The American Heart Association

AHA's Predecessor, the Association for the Prevention and Relief of Heart Disease

"In 1915, when heart disease for the first time surpassed tuberculosis as New York City's leading cause of death... Drs. Lewis A. Conner, Robert H. Halsey, John Wyckoff, Haven Emerson, and a few colleagues" established the Association for the Prevention and Relief of Heart Disease, which later became the New York Heart Association." (To the American Heart Association on its 40th Anniversary. New York Heart Association 1963-64 Annual Report.) Conner was president; Dr. T. Stuart Hart, Vice President; Dr. Nelson L. Deming, Secretary; and Ray Morris [S&B 1901], Treasurer. The Executive Committee was Robert H. Halsey, Chairman; Health Commissioner Haven Emerson, Dr. Hubert V. Guile, Mrs. Linzee Blagden, and Dr. Frederick Brush, Superintendent of the Burke Foundation. (Move to Combat Heart Disease. New York Times, Nov. 18, 1916.)

New York Heart Association 1963-64 Annual Report / UCSF (pdf, 12pp)

Lewis Atterbury Conner, Yale 1887

Dr. Lewis Atterbury Conner (1867-1950, Yale 1887) "was the founding president of the New York and American Heart Associations (AHA). Dr Conner was the founder of the American Heart Journal, America’s first medical subspecialty journal, and the official publication of the American Heart Association until 1950, when Circulation was created. Conner spent more than a half-century on the staff of the New York Hospital and Cornell University Medical College and was Chairman of Medicine from 1916 to 1932." Dr. Paul D. White was a member of the first editorial board of the Journal. Conner was Thompson's successor as Professor of Medicine at Cornell. He was editor-in-chief of the AHJ until 1937. (Lewis A. Conner: Cornell's Osler. By Jeffrey Fisher MD. Circulation 2000 Aug;102(9):1062-1067.) His father, Charles H. Conner, Yale class of 1864, was a brother-in-law of William W. Atterbury (1866-1935, Yale 1886), President of the Pennsylvania Railroad and a director of the Guaranty Trust. Dr. Lewis A. Stimson, Yale 1863, was Atterbury's cousin. (Lewis Atterbury Conner Ph.B. 1887. Bulletin of Yale University, Obituary Record of Graduates of the Undergraduate Schools Deceased during the Year 1950-1951, pp. 100-101; and: William Wallace Atterbury, Ph.B. 1886. Bulletin of Yale University, Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1935-1936, pp. 140-141; Dr. L. Conner Dies. New York Times, Dec. 4, 1950.) One of his patients was tobacco financier Henry C. Frick.

Lewis A. Conner / Circulation 2000 full article
Yale Obituary Record 1935-1936 / Yale University Library (pdf, 278 pp)
Obituary Record 1950-1951 / Yale University Library (pdf, 160 pp)

Nelson L. Deming, Berzelius 1890

Nelson Lloyd Deming got his MD at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. He was a physician in Fort Wayne, Ind. from 1897-1905, and in New York City and Litchfield, Conn. until he retired in 1935. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1947-1948, p. 128.) His daughter, Mary L. Deming, was an attendant at the marriage Ellen Greenough, the daughter of Dr. Robert B. Greenough [president of the American Society for the Control of Cancer], to Hardwick Stires, son of Rev. Dr. Ernest M. Stires of St. Thomas's Church in Boston. She was a great-niece of Dr. Charles W. Eliot, President Emeritus of Harvard. (Ellen Greenough Weds H. Stires. New York Times, Jan. 20, 1924.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1947-1948 / Yale University Library (pdf, 254 pp)

Dorothea Draper (Mrs. Linzee Blagden)

Dorothea Draper was the daughter of Dr. William H. Draper, a prominent physician in New York City and a trustee of Columbia University. Her grandfather, Charles A. Dana, was editor and publisher of The New York Sun. Her first husband, Linzee Blagden, a banker and stockbroker, died in 1936. "Mrs. James, a graduate of the Spence School in New York, was a former president of the board of managers of the Bellevue Hospital School of Nursing. She was one of the leaders in the drive to establish the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York." Her second husband was Henry James. (Mrs. James, 78, A Civic Leader. New York Times, Aug. 2, 1960.) She was a patroness of a fundraiser at the Colony Club for the American Society for the Control of Cancer in 1926. (To Aid Cancer Society. New York Times, Nov. 29, 1926.) She married Henry James, the president of TIAA and a trustee of the Rockefeller Institute, in 1938.

Linzee Blagden's brother, Dexter Blagden, was best man, and his brother George Blagden was an usher. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Blagden were among the guests. (Miss Draper, Bride of Linzee Blagden. New York Times, Dec. 16, 1913.) Linzee Blagden was the son of George Blagden and Frances Meredith Dexter. He graduated from Harvard in 1896 and received his law degree there in 1899, but practiced for only a few years. He was a member of several brokerage firms before becoming an officer of the Bank of New York and Trust Company about ten years before his death. He and his brother George both died suddenly of heart disease. (Linzee Blagden, 63, Bank Official, Dies. New York Times, Sep. 24, 1936.) George Blagden Sr. was the son of Rev. George Washington Blagden.

George Blagden graduated from Harvard in 1890. He was a general partner of Clark, Dodge & Co. at 61 Wall Street for more than 25 years, then a special partner. He was first vice president of the Greenwich Savings Bank and a director of the Atlantic Safe Deposit Company. (George Blagden, Banker, 67, Dies. New York Times, Mar. 23, 1934.) The bulk of his estate consisted of securities worth $1,151,524, mortgages, cash and insurance worth $593,202, and $765,962 as his interest in Clark, Dodge & Co. He left gifts to St. Luke's Hospital and Harvard University of $209,667 and $101,972 upon the death of his brothers and their wives. ($2,329,067 Willed By George Blagden. New York Times, Sep. 19, 1936.)

Dexter Blagden graduated from Harvard in 1893. He was a stockbroker and a former member of the governing committe of the New York Stock Exchange. He married Mabel Whitney after she divorced Charles H. Sabin, the President of the Guaranty Trust Company. She was the mother of Charles H. Sabin Jr. (Dexter Blagden. New York Times, Nov. 22, 1948; Mrs. Mabel Sabin Weds. New York Times, Apr. 2, 1918.) He was an usher at the wedding of William B. Dinsmore Jr. to Marion De Peyster Carey, whose stepfather was Richard Delafield. (Many Bright Weddings. New York World, Jun. 5, 1905.)

Robert H. Halsey M.D.

Robert Hurtin Halsey graduated from Columbia in 1896 and received his M.D. at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1900. He began as an instructor in medicine at the Postgraduate Medical School in 1903, and was an Adjunct Professor from 1906-1917, and a full professor from 1917 to 1939. He was president of the American Heart Association in 1932 and 1933. His grandfather, Stephen A. Halsey, founded one of the original settlements of Astoria, Queens. (R.H. Halsey Dead; Heart Specialist. New York Times, Sep. 16, 1955.) He was the first secretary of the National Heart Association, and its president in 1931-32. He was Professor of Medicine at New York Postgraduate Medical School and Hospital, and a consultant at New York Hospital-Bellevue. (R.H. Halsey, M.D. Circ Res 1955;3:646-648.) He married Edith Bates in 1909. (Married. New York Times, Apr. 18, 1909.) He was the heart specialist who attended Samuel L. Clemons aka Mark Twain. (Mark Twain Sinking. New York Times, Apr. 21, 1910.) He was named a member of the council at the Post-Graduate School and Hospital in 1930. (Col. A.J. MacNab Honored. New York Times, May 23, 1930.) Halsey certified that Otto H. Kahn was suffering from "high blood pressure and angina pectoris, with complicating pulmonitis," and that "his appearance in court would place his life in jeopardy." (Otto H. Kahn Improves. New York Times, Oct. 9, 1932.)

Mrs. Halsey was active in fundraising for the Cardiac Department of the Post-Graduate Hospital. Mrs. Cleveland H. Dodge and Mrs. Allen Wardwell were fellow fund-raisers. (Entertainments for Charity. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1924; Classical Dances to Aid Hospital. New York Times, Apr. 7, 1928; Parties to Aid the Sick. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1930; Lecture to Benefit the Cardiac Clinic. New York Times, Oct. 29, 1933.) Their daughter, Elizabeth Halsey, married Andrew Carnegie Whitfield, Princeton 1933, a nephew of Mrs. Carnegie. He was with International Business Machines Corp. (Elizabeth Halsey Married in Chapel. New York Times, Jun. 13, 1937.) They had a quarrel, and he took off in his plane and disappeared. (Family Abandons Whitfield Search. New York Times, Apr. 23, 1938.) He was declared legally dead in 1946.

T. Stuart Hart, Yale 1891

Theodore Stuart Hart was a vice president from 1916-22 and president of the Association for the Prevention and Relief of Heart Disease from 1922-24; founder and president of the New York Heart Association 1922-24; and founder, director, and chairman of the executive committee of the American Heart Association 1924-28. He was also a director of the New York Tuberculosis and Health Association. (Dr. Theodore Hart, A Heart Expert, 81. New York Times, Jan. 2, 1951; Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates of the Undergraduate Schools Deceased during the Year 1950-1951, pp. 16-17.)

Obituary Record 1950-1951 / Yale University Library

The New York Heart Association

The leadership of the New York Heart Association overlapped that of the American Heart Association, founded 1925. The NYHA was a major fundraiser for the AHA.

"Dr. Haven Emerson is President of the organization, Dr. Robert H. Halsey, Vice President and Edwin O. Holter is Treasurer. The Board of Governors includes Thomas W. Lamont, Mrs. Alfred F. Hess, Mrs. A.F. Tiffany, Dr. Alfred E. Cohn, Dr. Luther F. Warren, Dr. Nathan E. Brill and Clarence Dillon." (New York Heart Association Appeals for Aid in Its Work. New York Times, Dec. 21, 1924.) In 1926, it merged with the New York Tuberculosis and Health Association until 1945, when it became a separate group with offices at the New York Academy of Medicine. The offices of the finance committee were at 331 Madison Avenue. (Heart Association to Form Own Unit. New York Times, Jan. 27, 1945.)

Edwin O. Holter, Skull & Bones 1894

Edwin Olaf Holter (1871-1964), was the son of Anton M. Holter, founder of a Helena, Montana dynasty of lumber and other family enterprises, whom he assisted with stock market investments. (Yale University. New York Times, May 29, 1893; Edwin O. Holter, Lawyer, Led Prison Association. New York Times, Jun. 8, 1964.) He and Lewis A. Conner were ushers at the wedding of Amos R. Eno Pinchot (S&B 1897) to Gertrude Minturn, and the groom's brother Gifford Pinchot (S&B 1889) was best man. (The Weddings of a Day. New York Times, Nov. 15, 1900.) Holter was engaged to marry Sarah Sage, daughter of Mrs. Dean Sage [Sr.], in Albany. (What is Doing in Society. New York Times, June 4, 1903.) His daughter, Elizabeth Sage Holter, married Lawrence Kirktland Jennings, the son of Oliver G. Jennings, S&B 1887. It was his second marriage. (Nuptials of Miss Holter. New York Times, Mar. 5, 1944.) Mrs. Holter's brother, Dean Sage Jr., S&B 1897, was president of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. From 1900 to 1909, he was a law partner of Meredith Hare, S&B 1894, whose wife was another Sage sister, and whose brother, Montgomery Hare, was married to the daughter of John E. Parsons, the first president of the Memorial Cancer Hospital. Holter's brother, Percy William Holter, died the year after graduating from Yale in 1907. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 1105.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 1105 / Google Books

"The retirement of [Edwin's brother] Norman B. Holter brought his youngest son, Norman Jefferis (Jeff) Holter (1914-1983) into the family businesses. A chemist and physicist, Jeff Holter was a member of the Navy teams conducting atomic bomb tests at Bikini Atoll and hydrogen bomb tests at Eniwetok Atoll. After his return to Helena in 1946, he served as a corporate officer for Holter Hardware, Holter Company, Holter Realty, Montana Flour Mills, and Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Company. In addition, he founded and worked as research director for the Holter Research Foundation, Inc. This small, non-profit research laboratory was founded in 1947 and financed by private funds and Public Health Service grants. Being involved with the field of medical physics, the foundation is credited with the discovery of several important heart monitoring devices and for the creation of 'Dynamic Electrocardiography.'" (Guide to the Holter Family papers, 1861-1968. Montana Historical Society Research Center Archives, accessed 3-22-08.)

Guide to the Holter Family papers, 1861-1968 / Northwest Digital Archives, Washington State University

The American Heart Association

A few years before the formation of the New York Heart Association, Frederick L. Hoffman, a co-founder of the American Society for the Control of Cancer, trumpeted the menace of heart disease. He used data collected by the Department of Commerce through the Bureau of the Census. (Diseases of the Heart Now Lead Country's Mortality. New York Times, Dec. 30, 1923.)

The American Heart Association says that "The founding members were Drs. Lewis A. Conner and Robert H. Halsey of New York; Paul D. White of Boston; Joseph Sailer of Philadelphia; Robert B. Preble of Chicago; and Hugh D. McCulloch of St. Louis. Drs. James B. Herrick of Chicago and William S. Thayer of Baltimore were also instrumental in the early planning." (History of the American Heart Association. By the American Heart Association, accessed Apr. 15, 2009.) At its first annual meeting, the American Heart Association Inc. claimed 150 physician members in most states. Directors were Dr. Lewis A. Conner, President; Dr. Haven Emerson, Dr. T. Stuart Hart, and Dr. R.H. Halsey of New York; Dr. James B. Herrick, Dr. Robert P. Preble, and Dr. Sidney Strauss of Chicago; Dr. Henry Jackson, Dr. William H. Robey and Dr. Paul T. White of Boston; Dr. George W. Norris, Dr. Joseph Sailer and Dr. William D. Stroud of Philadelphia; Dr. Hugh McCulloch of St. Louis, and Dr. C.J. McIntyre of Indianapolis. (War on Heart Diseases. New York Times, Feb. 3, 1925.)

History of the American Heart Association / American Heart Association

A retired broker named Frederick Bruce left $10,000 to Johns Hopkins University, and $25,000 each to the American Society for the Control of Cancer, Memorial Hospital for the Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases, the New York Heart Association, and other New York institutions. (9 Institutions Share $210,000 By Bruce Will. New York Times, Jun. 21, 1928.)

Symposium on tobacco, NYAM, 1933

Drs. Lewis A. Conner, Robert H. Halsey and Harlow Brooks took part in a symposium on "recent studies on the effects of tobacco in man," held at the New York Academy of Medicine. Drs. Marion B. Sulzberger of the Post Graduate Hospital and Joseph Harkavy of Mount Sinai Hospital blamed hypersensitivity to tobacco for thromboangiitis obliterans. Removal of nicotine from the extract with which they injected the subjects did not change the effects. (Discover Cause of a Rare Disease. New York Times, Feb. 3, 1933.)

AHA / NYHA, 1946

Sponsors of the New York Heart Association fund raising campaign included Mrs. Albert D. Lasker; Mrs. William Randolph Hearst, Sr.; James S. Adams; Harold L. Bache, the nephew of Jules S. Bache; Leona Baumgartner; W. Averell Harriman; Devereux C. Josephs; Ralph T. Reed; Frank Stanton; and Thomas J. Watson Sr. Hugh Cullman and Emerson Foote were chairmen of Commerce and Industry committees. (Display Ad 46. New York Times, Jan. 31, 1946 p. 12.)

New York Governor formed the Council for Heart Diseases to raise money for the New York Heart Association. "The incoporators are Charles Proctor Cooper, vice president of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company; Dr. A. Wilbur Duryee, Governor Dewey's personal physician; Frank K. Houston, chairman of the board of the Chemical Bank and Trust Company; Alfred C. Howell, vice president of the Guaranty Trust Company; Dr. Edwin P. Maynard Jr., president of the New York Heart Association; Lowell P. Weicker, president of E.R. Squibb & Sons, and Carl Whitmore, president of the New York Telephone Company." (War on Heart Ills Backed By Dewey. New York Times, May 21, 1946.)

AHA / NYHA, 1947

Thomas I. Parkinson, president of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, headed the national advisory committee of the American Heart Association. "Dr. Howard F. West, president of the association, announced yesterday, that the committee of twenty-two laymen included Harold E. Stassen, former Governor of Minnesota, and Artemus L. Gates, former Assistant Secretary of the Navy. Non-physicians have been admitted to the executive bodies of the association, heretofore limited to medical specialists." (Heart Association Gets Advisory Unit. New York Times, Feb. 3, 1947.) Dr. Arlie R. Barnes, chairman of the board of governors of the Mayo Clinic, was elected president of the American Heart Association. Dr. Tinsley R. Harrison of the Southwestern Medical College, Dallas, Tex., was chosen president for 1948-49. Members of the advisory committee besides Gates, Stassen and Parkinson included Samuel Harrell of Indianapolis, who was also made treasurer; filmmaker Samuel Goldwyn; and former Rep. Clare Boothe Luce. (Mayo Clinic Official Named to Head Heart Association. New York Times, Jun. 7, 1947.) Rep. Jacob K. Javits of New York was to introduce legislation to create a national heart disease institute. (Doctors Advocate U.S. Heart Institute. New York Times, Jun. 9, 1947.) Dr. Charles A.R. Connor became medical director of the AHA, succeeding Dr. David D. Rutstein, who became Professor of Preventive Medicine at Harvard Medical School. (Gets Heart Association Post. New York Times, Sep. 16, 1947.) Carl Whitmore, president of the New York Telephone Company, headed a campaign by the New York Heart Association to raise $500,000. Mayor O'Dwyer was honorary chairman. Dr. Edwin P. Maynard Jr. was president of the NYHA. "The New York Heart Association is a division of the American Heart Association, which has divisions in nine other cities in other states." A national campaign was planned for 1949. (Group Plans Drive on Heart Diseases. New York Times, Dec. 20, 1947.)

AHA / NYHA, 1948

The Samuel H. Kress Foundation donated $25,000. ($25,000 for Heart Research. New York Times, Jan. 11, 1948.) Dr. H.M. Martin, executive secretary of the AHA, announced that Mrs. Frederick F. Brewster of New Haven, Conn., gave $50,000. (Gives $50,000 to Heart Drive. New York Times, Feb. 12, 1948.) E.J. Ade, formerly with the John Price Jones Corporation, was appointed fund-raising director of the American Heart Association. The AHA's first national campaign raised almost $3 million. (To Direct Fund-Raising For Heart Association. New York Times, Aug. 6, 1948.) Harold E. Stassen, chairman of the 1949 AHA campaign, announced that William E. Cotter, general counsel of Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation, was appointed executive vice chairman of the drive. Cotter had been general vice chairman of the New York University-Bellevue Medical Center Fund. (As Vice Chairman Will Aid Heart Association Drive. New York Times, Oct. 30, 1948.) Rome A. Betts, general secretary of the American Bible Society since 1942, was chosen executive director of the AHA. (New Executive Director of the Heart Association. New York Times, Dec. 15, 1948.)

AHA / NYHA, 1949

Maurice J. Tobin, U.S. Secretary of Labor, was chairman of the labor committee of the AHA fund drive. (Tobin to Aid Heart Drive. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1949.) Former Indiana Health Commissioner Dr. John W. Ferree was appointed director of he public health division of the AHA. (Heads Public Health Unit Of the Heart Association. New York Times, Jan. 20, 1949.)

AHA / NYHA, 1950

Dr. Howard B. Sprague succeeded Dr. H.M. Marvin as president of the AHA. Dr. Louis N. Katz was elected president for the next term, Dr. Maurice Visscher of Minneapolis was elected vice president, and Grant Keehn of New York, treasurer. Mrs. Louise Baer of New York, and Alva Bradley of Cleveland received awards. (New York Times, Jun. 25, 1950.)

AHA / NYHA, 1951

Elliott V. Bell was chairman of the New York Heart Association. Fifteen new members were elected to the board of directors: Howard S. Cullman [of Philip Morris], Col. J. Edward Johnston, Dr. Theodore G. Klumpp, Mrs. H. Nelson Slater, Dr. J. Murray Steele, Dr. Robert Watson and William Zeckendorf. Other board members included Arthur Baer, Dr. Adolph R. Berger, H. Donald Campbell, Mrs. Preston Davie, James A. Farley, Mrs. Vincent R. Impelliteri, John Sloan and Dr. May G. Wilson. (Heart Board Enlarged. New York Times, Feb. 6, 1951.)

May Davie (Mrs. Preston Davie)

May Davie was the daughter of Adolph Stevens Ladenburg, of the banking firm Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co. Her great-great-grandfather was Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury under Thomas Jefferson and a founder of New York University [and grandfather was Alexander Henry Stevens, Yale 1854]. She was finance chairman of the state Republican committee in 1933-34, and a delgate to the Republican National Convention. "She also was a supporter of Robert A. Taft in his bids for the Republican Presidential nomination, served as assistant treasurer for his campaign through 1952 and was chairman of the Robert A. Taft Institute of Government... In addition to her post as chairman of the Republican state finance committee, Mrs. Davie was chairman of the Eastern women's division of the Republican National Committee, a member of the Republican National Finance Committee and a delegate to the 1960 convention, which nominated Richard M. Nixon in his first attempt to become President." At her death, she was honorary board chairman of the New York Heart Association. (May Davie Dead; A Civic Leader. New York Times, Sep. 20, 1975.)

Her husband, Preston Davie, was a native of Louisville, Ky., and a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School. He was briefly a partner of his father, George M. Davie, in Louisville, then became a partner of the New York law firm that was later Conboy, Hewitt, O'Brien & Boardman. He was a descendant of Gen. William Richardson Davie of the Continental Army, founder of the University of North Carolina. His grandfather, Maj. Gen. William Preston of the Confederate Army, was a member of Congress and Minister to Spain. (Preston Davie, Lawyer, 86, Dead. New York Times, May 22, 1967.) His father, George Montgomery Davie, graduated from Princeton in 1868. He was a law partner of John Mason Brown and Alexander P. Humphrey. He died of sarcoma in New York City, where he had come to be treated by a cancer specialist. His father, Winston Jones Davie of Kentucky, son of Ambrose Davie, was a graduate of Yale in 1845. He was a cotton and tobacco planter in Christian County in his early years, and was the State Commissioner of Agriculture from 1876-1879. (George M. Davie Dead. New York Times, Feb. 23, 1900; Winston Jones Davie. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1870-1890, p. 379.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1870-1890, p. 379 / Google Books

New York Heart Association 1958 Annual Report / UCSF (pdf, 7 pp)
New York Heart Association 1963-64 Annual Report / UCSF (pdf, 12pp)

Dr. Louis N. Katz of Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago, succeeded Dr. Howard B. Sprague of Brookline, Mass. as President of the American Heart Association. Mrs. Alben Barkley, Bruce Barton, R. Duckett Jones, Robert L. King and Frederick K. Trask [Jr.] were named vice presidents. Dr. Irving S. Wright of Cornell Medical School was elected to succeed Katz. Andrew W. Robertson of Pittsburgh was re-elected chairman of the board of directors. (Elected as President of Heart Association. New York Times, Jun. 8, 1951.)

Frederick K. Trask Jr.

Frederick Kingsbury Trask graduated from Harvard in 1930. He founded the venture capital firm, Payson & Trask, with Joan Whitney Payson [John Hay Whitney's sister]. He was also a director of the U.S. Trust Co., General Reinsurance Corp., Great Northern Nekoosa Corp., and a trustee of New York Hospital-Cornell. (Trask, Frederick K., Jr. New York Times, Oct. 24, 1997.) He was an usher at James Roosevelt's wedding to Dr. Harvey Cushing's daughter, Betsey. (James Roosevelt Weds Miss Cushing. New York Times, Jun. 5, 1930.) He was the grandson of Charles Hooper Trask, Skull & Bones 1849, who was a partner of W. Ropes & Co. of Boston.

AHA / NYHA, 1955

Mrs. Lyon Slater headed the committee in charge of luncheon and fashion show, whose goal was $1,250,000. Other participants included Mrs. Jacob J. Rosenblum, vice chairman; Mrs. Byron C. Foy, Mrs. John Balfour Clark, Mrs. George U. Harris, Mrs. James A. Burden, Mrs. A. Wilbur Duryee, Mrs. Prentice Cromwell, Mrs. Preston Davie, Mrs. Robert L. Clarkson, Mrs. Edmund C. Lynch Jr., Mrs. Charles A. Blackwell, Mrs. Gilbert Kahn, Mrs. William Randolph Hearst Jr., Mrs. Robert McKim, and Mrs. Justus Lawrence; also, Mrs. A. Charles Schwartz, Mrs. Joseph M. May, Mrs. David Smart, Miss Constance Clarin, Mrs. Jackson A. Dykman, Mrs. Donald N. McDonnell, Miss Edith Conard, Mrs. William Goldring, Mrs. Barbara H. Drum, Mrs. Edward Pool and Mrs. Frederick Weisbrod. (Benefit Planned For Heart Group. New York Times, Mar. 13, 1955.)

AHA / NYHA, 1956

Mrs. Dwight D. Eisenhower was honorary chairman of the AHA Heart of America fund-raising ball in the Ambassador Hotel. Honorary vice chairmen were Mrs. Richard M. Nixon and Mrs. John Foster Dulles. Others involved were Mrs. Averell Harriman, Mrs. Robert F. Wagner, John C. Hughes, Mrs. Preston Davie, Mrs. Ann Rentschler, Mrs. Jacob J. Rosenblum, Mrs. Bruce A. Gimbel, Mrs. Basil P. Goulandris, Mrs. Donald Tansill, Lauder Greenway, Miss Elsa Maxwell, William Gaxton, Miss Elizabeth Guest, and Miss Mary Elizabeth Ballantine. Members of the dinner committee were Mrs. Hulbert Aldrich, Mrs. F. Truman Bidwell, Mrs. V. Beaumont Allen, Mrs. Charles M. Amory, Mrs. Albert Lasker, Mrs. John R. Drexel 3d, Mrs. David Gimbel, Mrs. Winston F.C. Guest, Mrs. Ira Haupt, and Mrs. Henry J. Heinz 2d. Also, Mrs. Lewis W. Douglas, Mrs. Richard G. Croft, Mrs. Alfred Corning Clark, Mrs. Howard Cullman, Mrs. Charles A. Blackwell, Mrs. Arde Bulova, Mrs. James Burden, Mrs. Walter Gubelman, Mrs. Charles V. Hickox, Mrs. Gilbert H. Miller, Mrs. Stephen Sanford, Mrs. George Ramsey and Mrs. Joseph A. Neff. (Ball on April 26 to Aid Heart Fund. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1956.) Harry Winston was the sponsor, who also arranged a fashion show of jewels. Others who took out tables included Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Milbank, Mr. and Mrs. Roderick Tower, Mrs. William Randolph Hearst, Mr. and Mrs. William M. Greve, Mr. and Mrs. William B. Jaffe, Mr. and Mrs. James Van Alen, Mrs. Gordon S. Rentschler, Mr. and Mrs. Harold E. Talbott, Mrs. Spyros P. Skouras, Mrs. Byron C. Foy, Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel P. Hill, Mr. and Mrs. Owen R. Cheatham. (Heart Fund Ball Will Fete Envoys. New York Times, Apr. 26, 1956.)

AHA / NYHA, 1958

Mrs. Nicholas Goulandris and Mrs. Alfred Corning Clark were members of the dinner committee of the Heart of America ball at the Waldorf-Astoria. Mrs. William F. Cassady, Mrs. Lewis B. Rosenstiel, and Mrs. Lowell P. Weicker headed the ball committee. Committee members included Mrs. Mario Pansa, Mrs. Draper Boncompagni, Mrs. Charles Willis Jr., Mrs. Harry Payne Bingham, Miss Elsa Maxwell, Mrs. John R. Drexel 3d, Mrs. Joseph Neff, Mrs. Tuckerman Draper, Mrs. Harvey D. Gibson, Mrs. Gilbert Miller, Miss Dorothy Field, Mrs. Jere W. Lord, Mrs. Nathaniel P. Hill and Mrs. William C. Langley; Mrs. Harry M. Anholt, Mrs. Justus Lawrence, Mrs. Clark Williams, Mrs. Owen Cheatham, Mrs. J. Malcolm Muir, Mrs. Charles W. Englehard, Mrs. Leon J. Livingston, Miss Elizabeth N. Graham, and Mrs. Henry M. Hunshman Jr. Mrs. Bruce A. Gimbel, chairman of the gifts committee, was assisted by Mrs. Anholt, Mrs. Donald N. McDonnell and Mrs. Clinton I. Smullyan. Lauder Greenway was chairman of the men's committee, whose members included Lowell Weicker, Hulbert S. Aldrich, Winston Thomas, Charles A. Blackwell, Denniston Slater, James A. Burden, Spyros P. Skouras, Charles G. Cushing, Ray D. Murphy, Henry J. Heinz 2d, Robert Montgomery, Drayton Cochran, George Leib and Walter Hoving, plus Charles F. Willis Jr., Robert L. Clarkson, Richard West, Preston Davie, Samuel H. Valiance, Milton Holden, Jay Rutherford, Harry O. King, Charles Payson, J.D. Wooster Lambert, Donald McDonnell and Edward McIlvain. (Heart Fund Ball to Be April 29. New York Times, Feb. 6, 1958.)

AHA / NYHA, 1960

Mrs. Lewis S. Rosenstiel was chairman of the dinner committee of the sixth annual Heart of America ball at the Waldorf-Astoria. Her co-chairman was Mrs. Russell Forgan. Schenley Industries Inc. was the sponsor. Mrs. William C. Langley was chairman of special projects; and Mrs. Thomas Hitchcock, Mrs. Lowell Weicker and Mrs. Edward L. Gerry were co-chairmen of the ball committee. Guests at the planning luncheon included Mrs. V. Beaumont Allen, Mrs. Joseph A. Neff, Mrs. Draper Boncompagni, Mrs. Alexander McLanahan, Mrs. Moss Hart, Mrs. John R. Drexel 3d, Mrs. Ernest T. Weir, Miss Jessica Daves, Mrs. Anthony Del Balso, Mrs. Donald Stralem, Miss Margaret Case, Mrs. William J. Barney, Mrs. Albert Cohn, Mrs. Henry J. Heinz 2d, and Mrs. Jacob J. Rosenblum; also Mrs. Robert F. Wagner, Mrs. J. Randall Creel, Mrs. Thomas Wyman, Mrs. Roswell L. Gilpatric, Mrs. Warren W. Johnson, Mrs. Seward W. Eric, Mrs. James Russell Lowell, Mrs. Clark Williams, Mrs. Edward H. Gerry, Mrs. Mario Pansa, and Mrs. Lyon Slater. (Plans Advanced By Heart Group For Fete May 2. New York Times, Dec. 4, 1960.)

AHA / NYHA, 1962

Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson and the Dutchess of Windsor were honorary co-chairmen of the Heart of America ball. Mrs. Robert F. Wagner was honorary vice chairman. Mrs. William C. Langley (Jane Pickens) was chairman of special projects for the New York Heart Association; Mrs. Thomas Hitchcock and Mrs. Mrs. Lowell Weicker were ball committee co-chairmen; and Mrs. J. Russell Forgan, Mrs. Edward H. Gerry, and Mrs. Richard West were dinner committee co-cahirmen. Mrs. Seymour Berkson was head of the gifts committee, and Mrs. Leon J. Livingston (Mollie Parnis) was vice chairman. Mrs. Preston Davie was chairman of the advisory committee. Members of the women's committee included Mrs. Donald N. McDonnell, Mrs. William Joshua Barney, Mrs. Edmund C. Lynch, Mrs. Vivian Beaumont Allen, Mrs. Clark Williams, Mrs. Alexander McLanahan, Mrs. Charles A. Berns, Mrs. James Russell Lowell, Mrs. Harold W. Brooks, Mrs. Jere W. Lord Jr., Mrs. David Muss, Miss Margaret Case, Mrs. Preston Long, Mrs. Joseph A. Neff, Mrs. O. Roy Chalk, Mrs. Ogden Reid, Mrs. F. Ambrose Clark, Mrs. Reeve Schley, Mrs. Anthony M. Del Balso, Mrs. Phillip Liebman, Mrs. Spyros S. Skouras, Mrs. John R. Drexel 3d, Mrs. Denniston Slater, Mrs. Charles Lachman, Mrs. Raymond Johnson, Mrs. Lyon Slater, Mrs. Charles W. Engelhard and Mrs. William B. Jaffe. (Aides Are Listed For Heart Ball At the Waldorf. New York Times, Feb. 4, 1962.)

Mrs. Preston Davie, honorary chairman of the Manhattan women's division of the New York Heart Association, opened the year's fund drive with a luncheon at her home. Dr. Charles E. Kossman, president of the New York Heart Association, was the speaker. Mrs. Charles A. Blackwell and Mrs. Lyin Slater were co-chairmen of the drive for the 12th year, with Mrs. Harry Payne Bingham and Mrs. Edmund P. Rogers as honorary vice chairmen. Mrs. William C. Langley was special projects chairman, and Mrs. George F. Baker Jr., Mrs. Joseph Verner Reed Jr., Mrs. Frederick A. Melhado, Mrs. Gerald H. Pratt, and Mrs. James Stewart as her vice chairmen. Ten-year veterans of the division were the guests of honor, including Mrs. Matthew Myer, Mrs. Wolcott Blair, Mrs. Robert McKim, Mrs. Francis B. Kann, Mrs. Frederick S. Whitlock, Mrs. Herbert Weston amd Mrs. George U. Harris. (Heart Association Opens Fund Drive. New York Times, Nov. 29, 1962.)

AHA / NYHA, 1963

Mrs. William C. Langley, chairman of Special projects, announced that Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson and Mrs. Robert F. Wagner were honorary co-chairmen of the Heart of America Ball. Mrs. Preston Davie was chairman of the advisory committee, and Mrs. J. Gordon Douglas and Mrs. Lowell Weicker were co-chairs of the ball committee. The dinner committee co-chairs were Mrs. Thomas Hitchcock and Mrs. Richard West. Mrs. Joseph A. Neff headed the decorations committee, and Mrs. Robert H. Craft was co-chairman of the floor committee. Assistants were Mrs. Wolcott Blair, Mrs. Reeve Schley, Mrs. Roswell L. Gilpatric, Mrs. Nathaniel P. Hill, Mrs. Edmund C. Lynch, Mrs. Gilbert Miller, Mrs. James Burden, Mrs. Ogden Reid, Mrs. Edwin F. Blair, Mrs. Tuckerman Draper, and Mrs. Winthrop Aldrich; also Mrs. Edmund P. Rogers, Miss Margaret Case, Mrs. William Woodward, Mrs. Harvey Dow Gibson, Mrs. Joseph Verner Reed, Mrs. Charles A. Blackwell, Mrs. Albert D. Lasker, Mrs. Lyon Slater, Mrs. Draper Boncampagni, Mrs. Harvey S. Firestone Jr., Mrs. Jere Lord Jr., Mrs. Samuel Pryor Reed, Mrs. William Blood, Mrs. Robert D.L. Gardiner, Mrs. Robert E. Kintner, Mrs. C. Ruxton Love Jr., and Mrs. Mary S. Robling. It was sponsored by Schenley Industries. (8th Annual Ball For Heart Fund Is Planned Here. New York Times, Apr. 1, 1963.)

AHA / NYHA, 1965

Mrs. William C. Langley, chairman of special projects for the New York Heart Association, was ball chairman, and the Dutchess of Windsor was honorary chairman. A preview of paintings from the collection of Harry Winston, Inc. at the Wally Findlay Galleries also benefited the fund. Mrs. Preston Davie was chairman of the advisory committee for ball, whose members included Mrs. Albert D. Lasker, Mrs. Charles A. Blackwell, Mrs. Lyon Slater, Mrs. Lowell Weicker, Mrs. Jacob J. Rosenblum, and Mrs. Richard West. Other committee heads were Mrs. Harold W. Brooks, Mrs. Alexander H. McLanahan, Mrs. John R. Drexel, Mrs. Thomas Hitchcock, Mrs. Denniston Slater, Mrs. Douglas Campbell, Mrs. Edward F. Hutton, Mrs. Joseph E. Levine, Mrs. Owen R. Cheatham, Mrs. Donald S. Stralem, Mrs. Seymour Berkson, Mrs. J. Gordon Douglas, Mrs. Victor W. Farris, Mrs. Henry J. Heinz 2d, Mrs. Elizabeth N. Graham (Elizabeth Arden), Mrs. O. Roy Chalk, Mrs. C. Ruxton Love, Mrs. C. Blaffer Hudson, and Mrs. F. Raymond Johnson. Other members of committes were Mrs. Harvey Firestone, Mrs. William Woodward, Mrs. Archbold Van Beuren, Mrs. Joseph Verner Reed Jr., Mrs. John Barry Ryan, Mrs. Harry Payne Bingham, Mrs. James A. Burden, Mrs. Joseph A.Neff, Mrs. Winthrop Aldrich, Mrs. T. Reed Vreeland, Mrs. Ogden Reid, Mrs. Clark Williams, Mrs. T. Suffern Tailer, Mrs. George Vanderbilt, Mrs. Jere W. Lord Jr., Mrs. S. Joseph Tankoos Jr., and Mrs. Draper Boncompagni. (10th Heart of America Ball Will Be Held on May 5. New York Times, Apr. 11, 1965.)

Mrs. Preston Davie was vice chairman of the Manhattan women's division of the New York Heart Association. Dr. Alfred P. Fishman was president. Mrs. Charles A. Blackwell and Mrs. Lyon Slater were co-chairmen of the fund drive. Mrs. Harry Payne Bingham and Mrs. Edmund P. Rogers were honorary vice chairmen. Mrs. William C. Langley was chairman of special projects, with Mrs. George F. Baker Jr., Mrs. Andre deCoppett, Mrs. Frederick A. Melhado, Mrs. Joseph Verner Reed Jr., and Mrs. Oscar Seagar as vice chairmen. The campaign committee members included Mrs. Wolcott Blair, Mrs. Milton M. Reid, Mrs. Earl Harkness, Mrs. A. Allston Flagg, Mrs. George U. Harris, Mrs. Roderick Tower, Miss Charlotte Ford, Mrs. A.C. Bostwick, Mrs. Arthur P. Felton 2d, Mrs. Herbert Weston, Mrs. Frederick Lee Liebolt, and Mrs. Harold E.B. Pardee. (Lunch Will Open Campaign in Aid Of Heart Patients. New York Times, Nov. 14, 1965.)

AHA / NYHA, 1966

The Dutchess of Windsor and Mrs. John V. Lindsay were honorary chairmen of the 11th annual Heart of America ball, sponsored by Schenley Industries, Inc. Mrs. Edwin F. Russell was ball chairman, and the advsiory committee was headed by Mrs. Preston Davie, with Mrs. Charles A. Blackwell, Mrs. Albert D. Lasker, Mrs. Lowell Weicker, Mrs. Lyon Slater, Mrs. Jacob J. Rosenblum, and Mrs. Richard West. Other special committee chairmen were Mrs. Alexander H. McLanahan, Mrs. J. Gordon Douglas, Mrs. Robert J. Gurney, Mrs. Joseph Levine, Mrs. Henry J. Heinz 2d, Mrs. John R. Drexel, Mrs. Thomas Hitchcock, Mrs. Seymour Berkson, Miss Jo Hughes, and Mrs. F. Raymond Johnson. Committee members included Mrs. Edward F. Hutton, Mrs. Elizabeth N. Graham (Elizabeth Arden), Mrs. Owen R. Cheatham, Mrs. Donald Stralem, Mrs. T. Reed Vreeland, Mrs. C. Ruxton Love, Mrs. William B. Jaffee and Mrs. Denniston Slater. (Heart Fund Ball Is Set for May 4 In the Set Room. New York Times, Mar. 6, 1966.)

AHA, 1978

Officers of the American Heart Association: W. Gerald Austen, President; Richard H.C. Taylor, Chairman; John W. Eckstein, President-Elect; Harriet P. Dustan, Immediate Past President; Gerald M. Turino, Councils; Malcolm R. Parker, Program; Howard E. Morgan, Research. Scientific Council Chairmen: Arichard J. Havel, Ateriosclerosis; Glenn A. Langer, Basic Science; Solbert Permutt, Cardiopulmonary Diseases; Robert H. Feldt, Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Grace E. Brown, Cardiovascular Nursing; M. Paul Capp, Cardiovascular Radiology; Russell M. Nelson, Cardiovascular Surgery; Francis M. Abboud, Circulation; Harold T. Dodge, Clinical Cardiology; Richard D. Remington, Epidemiology; Jacques Genest, High Blood Pressure; George A. Porter, Kidney; Abe B. Baker, Stroke Council; Edward Genton, Council on Thrombosis. (51st Scientific Sessions, Nov. 13-16, 1978, Dallas, Texas.)

51st Scientific Sessions, 1978 / UCSF (pdf, 47 pp)

See Also

The Lie That Secondhand Smoke Causes Heart Disease
How the Public Was Brainwashed About Heart Disease
CMV & other infections cause heart disease
Chlamydia pneumoniae causes heart disease

<= HOME

cast 02-06-15