The Bankers Trust Company of New York

The Bankers Trust, 1903

"A new trust company, all the Directors of which are officials of one or the other of the leading down-town banks, has just been organized for the purpose of carrying on a strictly trust company business on conservative lines. The announcement was received with much interest in Wall Street and was much commented on. It was pointed out that ten years ago such a combination of banking interests as is represented on the Board of Directors of the new trust company would have been impossible, and five years ago it would have been difficult. The men who are directors of the new trust company are mainly the younger bank officials, and besides their own banks they are closely connected with out-of-town interests. In fact, it was stated yesterday that there was hardly a banker in the United States who would not find a friend on the list." It was located at 143 Liberty Street, in the old quarters of the Liberty National Bank, and cleared through the Liberty; the President of the Liberty, Edmund Converse, was also its president. White & Case prepared the papers. (Bankers Trust Company. New York Times, Jan. 31, 1903.) George Bowen Case, Skull & Bones 1894, of the law firm of White & Case, was one of the organizers of the Bankers Trust, and the firm continued to be its general counsel. (George Case Dies; Lawyer Was 83. New York Times, Jul. 20, 1955.) His Bones classmate, Thomas Cochran, was later a director.

Directors: Stephen Baker, Pres. Bank of the Manhattan; Samuel G. Bayne, Pres. Seaboard National Bank; James G. Cannon, Vice Pres., Fourth National Bank; Edmund C. Converse, Pres. Liberty National Bank; Henry P. Davison, Vice Pres. First National Bank; James H. Eckels, Pres. Commercial National Bank, Chicago; Granville W. Garth, Pres. Mechanics' National Bank; A. Barton Hepburn, Vice Pres. Chase National Bank; William Logan, Cashier Hanover National Bank; Edgar L. Marston, Blair & Co. Bankers; Gates W. M'Garrah, Pres. Leather Manufacturers' National Bank; George W. Perkins, J.P. Morgan & Co. Bankers; William H. Porter, Vice Pres. Chemical National Bank; Daniel G. Reid, Vice Pres. Liberty National Bank; Francis H. Skelding, Cashier First National Bank, Pittsburg; Edward F. Swinney, Pres. First National Bank, Kansas City; John F. Thompson, Vice President; Albert H. Wiggin, Vice Pres. National Park Bank; Robert Winsor, Kidder Peabody & Co. Bankers, Boston; Samuel Woolverton, Pres. Gallatin National Bank; Edward F.C. Young, Pres. First National Bank, Jersey City. D.E. Pomeroy was Assistant Treasurer; T.W. Lamont was Secretary and Treasurer; and L.H. McCall Assistant Secretary. (Display Ad, New York Times, Apr. 5, 1903.)

Director Walter Frew later testified at the Pujo Committee hearings that, when the Bankers Trust was organized in 1903, all but ten shares apiece of the incorporators and stockholders were put in the hands of a voting trust composed of Davison, Reid, and Perkins. The other stockholders who signed the first voting trust were James A. Blair, James G. Cannon, E.C. Converse, G.W. Garth, A.B. Hepburn, William Logan, G.W. McGarrah, William H. Porter, J.F. Thompson (whose 6140 shares were more than the rest put together), Albert H. Wiggin, Sam Woolverton, and E.F.C. Young. When Perkins retired, George B. Case substituted for him. The first trust lasted until 1908, when it was renewed for another five years, then ended in 1913. The Guaranty Trust had a similar voting trust, with Davison, Porter, and George F. Baker. (Five Men Control $368,000,000 Here. New York Times, Dec. 11, 1912; Ends Voting Trust in Bankers Trust. New York Times, Oct. 26, 1913.)

Samuel G. Bayne

Samuel Gamble Bayne (1844-1924) was born in Ramelton, County Donegal, in Ireland. He attended the Belfast Academical Institution and Queen's College, Belfast. He went into the linen business with his cousin William Rea at Belfast, whose flax products were doing good business because of the cutoff of cotton during the US Civil War. He came to the US after the war with the intention of planting cotton, but invested in the Sugar House well near Titusville, Pa., the second oil well drilled in America. Later, he organized an oil well supply corporation which developed into the National Supply Company, and then the First National Bank of Bradford, Pa. In 1883, he helped organize the Seaboard National Bank in New York, and became its Chairman of the Board in 1922. He was also one of the original directors of the Bankers' Trust Company and the Columbia Trust Company. (Samuel G. Bayne, Banker, Dies At 79. New York Times, Apr. 21, 1924.) He was one of the defendants in antitrust suit by the State of Texas, which was based on the disclosures in the Waters-Pierce Oil Company hearings. He was the president of the Security Oil Company, and his son, Howard Bayne, was an officer. (After $100,000,000 From Standard Oil. New York Times, Apr. 15, 1913.)

George Bowen Case, Skull & Bones 1894

George Bowen Case was the son of Ermine Case Jr. and a native of Kansas City, Mo. After graduating from Yale, he got his law degree from Columbia in 1897. He founded White & Case wirh J. DuPratt White in 1901. He was a member of the War Council of the American Red Cross during World War II. (George Case Dies; Lawyer Was 83. New York Times, Jul. 20, 1955.) He was a member of Skull & Bones. (Yale University. New York Times, May 29, 1893.) He and Mary Clarke, daughter of Dumont Clarke of the American Exchange Bank, "were so quietly married on Friday afternoon that their many friends will be surprised to read the announcement made to-day." (Case-Clark. New York Times, Mar. 13, 1898.) He was an usher at the marriage of William Henry Sallman, the president of Northfield College in Northfield, Minn., formerly a professor at Yale, to Alice Bussey Trubee, the daughter of Frederick Trubee of Bridgeport, Conn. The other ushers were Rev. Anson Phelps Stokes, S&B 1896; Thomas Cochran Jr., S&B 1904; L.B. Jones of Wilkes-Barre, Penn., Yale 1894; Dr. Robert Nichols of Orange, N.J., Yale 1894; and Robert C. Seeley of New York. William Sloan of New York, Yale 1895, was best man. The bride's sister, Mrs. Henry P. Davison, was matron of honor, and the bridesmaids included Mary L. Davison of New York and Henrietta Pomeroy of Troy, Penn. Rev. Timothy Dwight, ex-president of Yale, was the officiating clergyman. (Sallman-Trubee. New York Times, Feb. 18, 1903.) His daughter, Mary Ermine Case, married Edward Cajetan Bench, Skull & Bones 1925, the son of Dr. Edward M. Bench of Galena, Ill. (Bench-Case. New York Times, Nov. 24, 1925.) [Bench was later treasurer of Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital.] His son, Robert Dumont Case, was a member of Scroll & Key 1936. (Miss Anne H. Ford to Become Bride. New York Times, Jun. 14, 1939; Case-Ford. New York Times, Jun. 16, 1940.) Robert D. Case was with White & Case until he died in 1944. (Robert Dumont Case. New York Times, May 31, 1944.)

George W. Perkins

George Walbridge Perkins was born in Chicago in 1862. His father had been in the shipping business in Buffalo, N.Y. before moving there and entering the life insurance field and founding religious missions. George W. Perkins went to work at the Chicago office of the New York Life Insurance Company. He was a trustee and chairman of the Finance Committee in 1900, when he was invited to become a partner of J.P. Morgan & Co. He remained with the firm after becoming a partner. He organized the International Harvester Company and was a director of U.S. Steel. He was a crony of Gov. Theodore Roosevelt and a major backer of his political campaigns. (George W. Perkins Dies in 58th Year. New York Times, Jun. 19, 1920.) In the 1906 campaign, he was acquitted of accepting a reimbursement for a Morgan campaign gift of $48,702.50 to the Republican National Committee, and later indicted on six counts of forgery and larceny and acquitted. (Perkins Is Arrested and Denies Wrongdoing. New York Times, Mar. 29, 1906; Drops Perkins Indictment. New York Times, Mar. 29, 1909.) Lewis L. Delafield was an executor of his will, and he and John B. Marsh and Louis J. de Milhau were witnesses. (G.W. Perkins Will Leaves to Family $10,000,000 Estate. New York Times, Jun. 23, 1920.) He was also a director of the National City Bank between 1902 and 1906. His son, George W. Perkins Jr., was a director of the City Bank Farmers Trust.

Daniel Pomeroy

Daniel E. Pomeroy was best man for Henry P. Davison when he married Kate Trubee. (Some April Weddings. Apr. 14, 1893.) His father was Newton Merrick Pomeroy of Troy, Pennsylvania, who was also an uncle of H.P. Davison. (Obituary Notes. New York Times, Feb. 19, 1914; Mr. N.M. Pomeroy Succombs to Pneumonia. Troy Gazette-Register, Feb. 20, 1914.) He was a director of Loew's Inc. (Schenck Succeeds to Loew's Posts. New York Times, Sep. 27, 1927.) He was a close friend of Jay Cooke, grandson of the Civil War financier, and accompanied Cooke's body home from England. (Jay Cooke is Dead; Friend of Hoover. New York Times, Nov. 23, 1932.) He resigned as a vice president of the Bankers Trust in 1922. He married Frances Morse of Troy in 1895. After she died, he married Mrs. Trevania Blair-Smith, the widow of Hugh Blair-Smith, treasurer of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company. (Mrs. Blair-Smith Engaged to Wed. New York Times, Jan. 2, 1937; Pomeroy-Blair-Smith. New York Times, Feb. 5, 1937.) He was born in 1868 in Troy, Penn., and after graduating from the Greylock Institute, went to work in the Pomeroy family bank. He came to the Bankers Trust as treasurer in 1903 at the request of "a cousin," and continued as a director of the Bankers Trust until his death. He was also a director of the American Brake Shoe Company and the Bucyrus Erie Company. He was the Eastern campaign manager for Herbert Hoover in 1928, and was a member of the Republican National Committee until 1942. (Daniel Pomeroy, Banker, 96, Dies. New York Times, Mar. 26, 1965.)

N.M. Pomeroy Succombs / Tri-County Genealogy & History

Daniel G. Reid

Daniel Gray Reid (1858-1925) was a vice president of the Liberty National Bank from at least 1903 to 1915, and was also a director of the Bankers Trust Company from 1903 to 1924. He was born in Richmond, Indiana, and in 1892 bought a nearby tin plate mill, with which he eventually combined every tin plate company in the country to form the American Tin Plate Company, with Reid as president. In 1901, it was absorbed by the United States Steel Corporation, and Reid became a director of that. He bought control of the American Can Company and the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad. In 1912, he organized the Tobacco Products Corporation with H.C. Frick, John D. Ryan and others. He was in poor health since 1918, and went to California in 1919. He and his doctor of five years, Charles F. Stokes, sued and countersued each other, and Reid described himself as suffering from "constant depression, mental lapses, persistent irritability, constant emotional instability and permanent disorganization." At his death, he was a director of the American Can Company, Bankers Trust Company, Chase Securities Corporation, Lehigh Valley Railroad Company, Metal and Thermit Corporation, and a trustee of the American Surety Company of New York. His daughter married Henry J. Topping, the son of Republic Iron and Steel president John A. Topping. (Daniel G. Reid Dies of Pneumonia at 66. New York Times, Jan. 18, 1925.) He was also a director of the Guaranty Trust from 1905 until at least 1917, when he was re-elected to a three year term. In 1916, he attended a dinner by Thomas F. Ryan which was a veritable summmit meeting of American Tobacco and the Guaranty Trust. He was the President of Tobacco Products until 1917, when George L. Storm, a former vice president and general manager of the General Cigar Company was elected, and Reid became Chairman. (G.L. Storm Heads Tobacco Products. New York Times, Jun. 7, 1917.) His great-granddaughter, Leigh Topping, married Nicholas Frederick Brady Jr., a grandson of [American Tobacco heir] James Cox Brady. She graduated from Emory University, and was until recently a financial analyst in the Atlanta office of the Bankers Trust Company. (Leigh Topping Is the Bride Of N. F. Brady Jr. in Atlanta. New York Times, May 31, 1987.)

Leigh Topping Is the Bride Of N. F. Brady Jr., 1987 / New York Times

His only daughter, Rhea Reid, married Henry Topping. (Miss Rhea Reid A Bride. New York Times, Jun. 2, 1910.) His grandson, Daniel Reid Topping, was an owner of the New York Yankees baseball team. He was a director of National Airlines, Madison Square Garden, the Automatic Canteen Co. and Louis Sherry Inc. He was married six times, the last to Charlotte Ann Lillard in 1957. (Dan Topping Dead at 61; Yankee Owner 22 Years. New York Times, May 20, 1974.) Mrs. Daniel R. Topping was co-chairman of the Flamingo Ball benefitting the American Cancer Society, according to "Suzy," "the best party of the year in Florida -- drawing all the top people in the horse world to a dramatic setting under a pink pavilion, pitched over the paddock at beautiful Hialeah race track." Mrs. Harper Sibley was one of the participants. (The top 400 had a ball! By Suzy [Knickerbocker]. Lowell Sun, Mar. 8, 1970.)

His grandson, John Reid Topping married Beverly Kraft Lewis. (Mrs. Lewis Bride of John R. Topping. New York Times, Aug. 23, 1945.) They were divorced, and she married Lowell P. Weicker Sr. His great-great-granddaughter, Samantha Stark Topping, married John M. Gellert, whose father, Michael E. Gellert, was a director of Humana Inc. (Samantha Topping and John Gellert. New York Times, Dec. 4, 2011.)

The Bankers Trust, 1905-08

In 1905, Garth and Logan left and were replaced by Walter E. Frew, Vice Pres. Corn Exchange Bank, and Gilbert G. Thorne, Vice Pres. National Park Bank; and Lamont was Vice President and a director. Pomeroy was Treasurer, H.W. Donovan Assistant Treasurer, and F.N.B. Close Asst. Tr. Off'r; B. Strong Jr. was Secretary. (Display Ads, New York Times, July 1, 1905, Jan. 4, 1906, and Feb. 5, 1907.)

In 1908, Eckels, Skelding and Winsor left, and were replaced by Edwin M. Bulkley, Spencer Trask & Co. Bankers; Frederick T. Haskell, Vice Pres. Illinois Trust & Savings Bank, Chicago; and Edward Townsend, Pres. Importers & Traders National Bank. (Display Ad, New York Times, Mar. 25, 1908.) Haskell was later the father-in-law of Henry R. Luce, the founder of Time Inc.

Edwin M. Bulkley

Edwin Muhlenberg Bulkley was a descendant of Rev. Peter Bulkley, the clergyman in Concord, Mass., and the Rev. Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, who founded the first Lutheran synod in America in 1748. He attended New York University before working at the American Exchange Bank of New York. In 1881, he joined Spencer Trask & Co. and became a general partner from 1887 to 1946. In 1924, he raised more than $2 million for the Union Theological Seminary, and he was a trustee of it at his death. He was also a director of the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co., the Detroit Edison Co., and the Milwaukee Electric Co. Edwin M. Bulkley Jr. was a partner in the Trask firm. (Edwin M. Bulkley, Broker, Dies At 86. New York Times, Jun. 21, 1949.) Mrs. Bulkley was the daughter of A.M. Kidder, founder of A.M. Kidder & Co. (Death List of a Day. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1903.) The firm of Spencer Trask & Co. financed Thomas Alva Edison in the electric lighting industry, and Trask was president of the New York Edison Company for nearly fifteen years. (Spencer Trask & Co. 50 Years Old Today. New York Times, May 1, 1931.) Bulkley gave $1,000 to the American Society for the Control of Cancer in 1926. He was a director of the Bankers Trust until 1934.

The Bankers Trust, 1909

Directors: Stephen Baker, Samuel G. Bayne, Edwin M. Bulkley, James G. Cannon, Edmund C. Converse (President), Henry P. Davison, Walter E. Frew, Frederick T. Haskell, A. Barton Hepburn, Thomas W. Lamont, Gates W. McGarrah, Edgar L. Marston, George W. Perkins, William H. Porter, Daniel G. Reid, Edward Townsend, Edward F. Swinney, John F. Thompson, Gilbert G. Thorne, Albert H. Wiggin, Samuel Woolverton. Secretary: Frank N.B. Close. Treasurer: Harry W. Donovan. (Trow's Directory, 1909, p. 59.)

The Bankers Trust, 1910

Directors: Stephen Baker, Pres. Bank of the Manhattan Co.; Samuel G. Bayne, Pres. Seaboard National Bank; Edwin M. Bulkley, Spencer Trask & Co. Bankers; James G. Cannon, Vice Pres., Fourth National Bank; Edmund C. Converse, President; Henry P. Davison, J.P. Morgan & Co. Bankers; Walter E. Frew, Vice Pres. Corn Exchange Bank; Frederick T. Haskell, Vice Pres. Illinois Trust & Savings Bank, Chicago; A. Barton Hepburn, Pres. Chase National Bank; Thomas W. Lamont, Vice Pres. First National Bank; Edgar L. Marston, Blair & Co. Bankers; George W. Perkins, J.P. Morgan & Co. Bankers; Gates W. McGarrah, Pres. Mechanics' & Metals National Bank; Daniel E. Pomeroy, Vice President; William H. Porter, Pres. Chemical National Bank; Daniel G. Reid, Vice Pres. Liberty National Bank; Benjamin Strong Jr., Vice President; Edward F. Swinney, Pres. First National Bank, Kansas City; Gilbert G. Thorne, Vice Pres. National Park Bank; Edward Townsend, Pres. Importers & Traders National Bank; Albert H. Wiggin, Vice Pres. Chase National Bank; and Samuel Woolverton, Pres. Gallatin National Bank. Close was Secretary, and H.F. Wilson the Jr. Asst. Secretary. (Display Ad, New York Times, July 5, 1910.) Perkins left before 1912.

The Bankers Trust, 1912 - Mergers with the Mercantile Trust and the Manhattan Trust

In 1911, the Bankers Trust absorbed the Mercantile Trust Company, whose home was burned out in the Equitable fire. The Bankers Trust and the Manhattan Trust were to have shared the first two floors of the new 31-story Bankers Trust Building at the corner of Wall and Nassau Streets. The two mergers made it only slightly smaller than the Guaranty Trust. (Bankers' Absorbs Manhattan Trust. New York Times, Feb. 21, 1912.) Additional directors and officers of the Bankers Trust: James S. Alexander, Pres. National Bank of Commerce; T. DeWitt Cuyler, Pres. Commercial Trust Co., Philadelphia; Rudolph Ellis, Pres. Fidelity Trust Co., Philadelphia; E. Hayward Ferry, Pres. Hanover National Bank; Francis L. Hine, Pres. First National Bank; Joseph B. Martindale, Pres. Chemical National Bank; Charles D. Norton, Vice Pres. First National Bank; and William C. Poillon, Vice President, were directors. F.I Kent and H.B. Thorne, Vice Pres.; G. Richards, Asst. Sec'y; G.W. Benton, Treas.; R.H. Giles and H.N. Dunham, Asst. Treasurers; I. Michaels, Trust Officer. (Display Ad, New York Times, Jan. 3, 1912.)

T. DeWitt Cuyler, Yale 1874

Thomas DeWitt Cuyler, Yale 1874, was born in Philadelphia in 1854. He was the son of Theodore Cuyler, counsel for the Pennsylvania Railroad. T. DeWitt Cuyler was counsel to the Equitable Life Assurance Society, and also to the Adams Express Company, The American Express Company, the American Railway Express Company, the Reorganization Committee of the Asphalt Company of America, the Commercial Trust Company, and the Franklin National Bank. He represented Scottish and English interests in Texas and New Mexico land. He became a director of the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1899, and was also a director of its subsidiaries, and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fé, the Long Island Railroad, and the New Haven and Hartford, and their subsidiaries. He organized the Franklin National Bank in 1900, and was also a director of the Girard Trust Company, the Philadelphia Saving Society, and the Philadelphia Company for Insurances on Lives and Granting Annuities, all of Philadelphia. His grandfather, Rev. Cornelius Cuyler, was pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia. Morris K. Jesup was his uncle. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1922-1923, pp. 85-89.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1922-1923 / Yale University Library (pdf, 385 pp)

Francis L. Hine

Francis Lyman Hine was president of the First National Bank from 1909 to 1922 and chairman of the executive committee until his death. He was a director or trustee of the American Can Co., American Radiator Co., American Surety Co. of New York, Astor Safe Deposit Co., Brooklyn Trust Co., Fifth Avenue Bank of New York, the First National Bank and First National Surety Co., Home Life Insurance Co., Lehigh Valley Coal Sales Co., National Biscuit Co., Phelps, Dodge & Co., and the U.S. Rubber Co. (Francis L. Hine, Banker, Dies At 76. New York Times, Oct. 10, 1927.) He was a director of the Phelps-Dodge Company, formed to take over the assets of Phelps, Dodge & Co., founded by William E. Dodge. (Phelps-Dodge Company Election. New York Times, Dec. 23, 1908.) He was one of the organizers of the Tobacco Products Corporation. (Strong Men Backing New Tobacco Rival. New York Times, Oct. 17, 1912.) He attended a 1916 dinner by tobacco financier Thomas F. Ryan which was a veritable summmit meeting of American Tobacco and the Guaranty Trust. (Thomas F. Ryan Is Host. New York Times, Feb. 18, 1916.)

He married Mary Ide Low, daughter of Henry Ide, in 1887. (Married. New York Times, Apr. 14, 1887.) She was the widow of Ethelbert Mills Low of A.A. Low & Brothers; his stepson was Ethelbert Ide Low, Wolf's Head 1902. They had two sons, Lyman Northrop Hine, Yale 1910, and Francis Worthington Hine, Yale class of 1915.

Her brother was George Edward Ide, Yale 1881. He was with the banking house of Dominick & Dickerman until 1889, then S.V. White & Co. In 1890, he became secretary of the Home Insurance Company, vice president in 1892, and president in 1894. He was president and a director of the Larchmont National Bank, a director of he Fidelity & Casualty Company and the Grand Central Branch of the Corn Eschange Bank, and other companies. He was on Hoover's Committee of Five to raise money for Belgian relief. (Obituary Record of the Graduates, Yale University 1915-20.) He was chairman of the building committee for the new 20-story building to house the Yale Club of New York City. (Yale Club to Have New 20-Story Home. New York Times, May 4, 1912.)

Obituary Record of the Graduates, Yale University 1915-20 / Internet Archive

The Bankers Trust, 1915

James S. Alexander, Pres. National Bank of Commerce; Stephen Baker, Pres. Bank of the Manhattan Co.; Samuel G. Bayne, Pres. Seaboard National Bank; Edwin M. Bulkley, Spencer Trask & Co. Bankers; Edmund C. Converse, Pres. Astor Trust Co.; T. DeWitt Cuyler, Pres. Commercial Trust Co., Philadelphia; Henry P. Davison, J.P. Morgan & Co. Bankers; W. North Duane, Vice President; Rudolph Ellis, Pres. Fidelity Trust Co., Philadelphia; E. Hayward Ferry, Vice Pres. Hanover National Bank; Walter E. Frew, Vice Pres. Corn Exchange Bank; Frederick T. Haskell, Vice Pres. Illinois Trust & Savings Bank, Chicago; A. Barton Hepburn, Chairman Chase National Bank; Francis L. Hine, Pres. First National Bank; Fred I. Kent, Vice President; Edgar L. Marston, Blair & Co. Bankers; Joseph B. Martindale, Pres. Chemical National Bank; Gates W. McGarrah, Pres. Mechanics' & Metals National Bank; Charles D. Norton, Vice Pres. First National Bank; William C. Poillon, Vice President; Daniel E. Pomeroy, Vice President; Seward Prosser, President; Daniel G. Reid, Vice Pres. Liberty National Bank; Edward F. Swinney, Pres. First National Bank, Kansas City; Gilbert G. Thorne, Vice Pres. National Park Bank; Edward Townsend, Pres. Importers & Traders National Bank; Albert H. Wiggin, Vice Pres. Chase National Bank; and Samuel Woolverton, Pres. Gallatin National Bank. (Display Ad, New York Times, Jan. 4, 1915.)

The Bankers Trust, 1917

Directors: Stephen Baker, Pres. Bank of the Manhattan Co.; Samuel G. Bayne, Pres. Seaboard National Bank; Nicholas Biddle, Astor Estate; Cornelius N. Bliss Jr., Bliss, Fabyan & Co.; Edwin M. Bulkley, Spencer Trask & Co. Bankers; F.N.B. Close, Vice President; Thomas Cochran, J.P. Morgan & Co.; Edmund C. Converse; T. DeWitt Cuyler, Pres. Commercial Trust Co., Philadelphia; Henry P. Davison, J.P. Morgan & Co.; John I. Downey, Building Construction; W. North Duane, Vice President; Walter E. Frew, Pres. Corn Exchange Bank; M. Friedsam, B. Altman & Co.; Robert W. Goelet; Frederick T. Haskell, Vice Pres. Illinois Trust & Savings Bank, Chicago; Fred I. Kent, Vice President; Ranald H. MacDonald, Real Estate; Edgar L. Marston, Blair & Co.; H.C. McEldowney, Pres. Union Trust Co., Pittsburg; Daniel E. Pomeroy, Vice President; William H. Porter, J.P. Morgan & Co.; Herbert L. Pratt, Vice Pres. Standard Oil Co.; Seward Prosser, President; Daniel G. Reid; Douglas Robinson, Real Estate; Archibald D. Russell; Charles L. Tiffany, Tiffany & Co.; Edward Townsend, Chairman Importers & Traders National Bank; and Herbert K. Twitchell, Vice Pres. Chemical National Bank. The company opened a new office in the Astor Trust building. (Display Ad, New York Times, May 7, 1917.) Thomas Cochran, Skull & Bones 1894, of J.P. Morgan & Co., was a Bones classmate of George Bowen Case, one of the organizers of Bankers Trust. Bliss was a former chairman of the Republican National Committee.

Thomas Cochran Jr., Skull & Bones 1894

Cochran was born in 1871 in St. Paul, Minn. He had several low-paying positions until entering the banking business in 1906 as a vice president of the Astor Trust Co. 1906-1914. Then he was president of the Liberty National Bank 1914-16, and a partner of J.P. Morgan & Co., Drexel & Co., Morgan, Grenfell & Co. of London and Morgan & Co. of Paris from 1917 until his death. He was a director of the Bankers Trust Company from 1916 until 1936. He was president of the board of directors of Doctors Hospital in New York City from 1928 to 1936, and a trustee of Phillips-Andover Academy from 1923. (Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1936-1937, pp. 63-64.) In 1912 he was one of the founders of the Tobacco Products Corporation, the predecessor of Philip Morris. (Strong Men Backing New Tobacco Rival. New York Times, Oct. 17, 1912.) He was a director of the Milbank Memorial Fund. (Anderson Riches Willed to Charity. New York Times, Mar. 9, 1921.)

Yale Obituary Record 1936-1937 / Yale University Library (pdf, 269 pp)

His uncle was the Rev. Israel Williams Cochran, a Presbyterian pastor in New Jersey. (Obituary Notes. New York Times, Feb. 17, 1887.) His father, St. Paul businessman Thomas Cochran Sr., was a religious activist who spoke at the Y.M.C.A. society of Racine, Wis. (Y.M.C.A. Anniversary. Racine Advocate, Sep. 20, 1883), and at the conferences at Lake Geneva, which sprang out of D.L. Moody's "World's Student Conference" at Northfield, along with Rev. R.A. Torrey of Chicago. (Cedar Rapids, Iowa, The Cosmos, May 1, 1892.) His mother was on the board of lady managers of the St. Paul Free Medical Dispensary, of which James J. Hill was a trustee. (Deal is Closed. St. Paul Daily Globe, Feb. 18, 1896, p. 5.)

Thomas Cochran and Family / Minnesota Historical Society
St. Paul Daily Globe, Feb. 18, 1896, p. 5 / Library of Congress

The Bankers Trust, 1920-24

Directors: Stephen Baker, Pres. Bank of the Manhattan Co.; Samuel G. Bayne, Pres. Seaboard National Bank; Nicholas Biddle, Astor Estate; Cornelius N. Bliss Jr., Bliss, Fabyan & Co.; Edwin M. Bulkley, Spencer Trask & Co.; F.N.B. Close, Vice President; Thomas Cochran, J.P. Morgan & Co.; Edmund C. Converse; T. DeWitt Cuyler, Chairman Commercial Trust Co., Philadelphia; Henry P. Davison, J.P. Morgan & Co.; John I. Downey, Building Construction; Pierre S. du Pont, Chairman E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. and Chairman, General Motors Corp.; Allen B. Forbes, Harris, Forbes & Co.; Walter E. Frew, Pres. Corn Exchange Bank; M. Friedsam, B. Altman & Co.; Frederick T. Haskell, Vice Pres. Illinois Trust & Savings Bank, Chicago; Horace Havemeyer, Pres. Havemeyers & Elder, Inc.; Fred I. Kent, Vice President; Ranald H. MacDonald, Real Estate; Edgar L. Marston, Blair & Co.; H.C. McEldowney, Pres. Union Trust Co., Pittsburg; Daniel E. Pomeroy, Vice President; William H. Porter, J.P. Morgan & Co.; Herbert L. Pratt, Vice Pres. Standard Oil Co.; Seward Prosser, President; Daniel G. Reid; Charles L. Tiffany, Tiffany & Co.; Edward Townsend, Chairman Importers & Traders National Bank; Herbert K. Twitchell, Vice Pres. Chemical National Bank; and Owen D. Young, Vice Pres. General Electric Co. (Display Ad, New York Times, Feb. 2, 1920.) In 1921, Townsend left and Paul Moore of Taylor, Bates & Co. joined. (Display Ad, New York Times, Feb. 21, 1921.) In 1922, Converse left and Winthrop W. Aldrich of Murray, Prentice & Aldrich joined. (Display Ad, New York Times, Jan. 5, 1922.) In 1923, Biddle, Cuyler, Davison, and Young left. Walter S. Gifford, Vice Pres. American Telephone & Telegraph Co.; Samuel Mather, Pickands, Mather & Co., Cleveland; Dwight W. Morrow, J.P. Morgan & Co.; and A.A. Tilney, Pres. Bankers Trust, joined; while Prosser became Chairman. (Display Ad, New York Times, Apr. 2, 1923.) In 1924, Forbes and Gifford left. Herbert P. Howell, Peierls, Buhler & Co.; and B.W. Jones, Vice Pres. Bankers Trust, joined. (Display Ad, New York Times, Jan. 7, 1924.) Bayne and Reid left during the year.

Winthrop W. Aldrich

Winthrop W. Aldrich was the president of the Equitable Trust Company and a partner of Murray, Prentice & Aldrich. He was John D. Rockefeller's brother-in-law, and a director of the Rockefeller Foundation. The Rockefellers sold their holdings and he resigned from Bankers' Trust to become president of the Chase National Bank upon its merger with the Equitable, because directors of national banks could not also be directors of trust companies. (Rockefellers Sell $30,000,000 Stock. New York Times, May 2, 1930.) He was elected a director of A.T.&T. in 1930. (A.T. & T.'s Banking Directorate. New York Times, Aug. 24, 1930.) He was Chairman of the Campaign Committee of the American Society for the Control of Cancer in 1926, when John D. Rockefeller Jr. made an unconditional gift of $100,000, plus an additional $10,000 toward expenses for a congress of cancer specialists at Lake Mohonk, and a director of the ASCC 1936-37.

Allen B. Forbes, Yale 1888

His father, Alexander Forbes, came to America from Scotland in 1854, and Allen Boyd Forbes was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1866. He was with the legal departnment of Swift & Co. in Chicago from 1888 to 1891, then joined N.W. Harris & Co. and became a partner in 1899. He was also a director of the United States Mortgage & Trust Co. and Mercantile Trust Co. of New York, and Harris Trust & Savings Bank and Harris Safe Deposit Co. of Chicago; and a trustee of the Teachers' Insurance and Annuity Association of America (Carnegie Foundation). (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1923-1924, p. 241.) Harris, Forbes & Co. was acquired by the Chase National Bank in 1930.

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1923-1924 / Yale University Library (pdf, 284 pp)

Horace Havemeyer

Horace Havemeyer was the son of Henry O. Havemeyer (H.O. Havemeyer Dies At L.I. Home. New York Times, Dec. 5, 1907). Horace succeeded him as a director of the American Sugar Refining Co. John E. Parsons was a director and counsel to the company (No More Secrecy in Sugar Trust. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1908), and his law firm of Parson, Closson & McIlvane represented Horace Havemeyer and other members of the family concerning the estate of Henry O. Havemeyer. (Close Havemeyer Estate. New York Times, Mar. 26, 1910.)

Horace Havemeyer's daughter Adaline married Richard Sturgis Perkins, the son of James H. Perkins of the Farmers Loan and Trust and National City Bank. (Miss Adaline Havemeyer Becomes Bride of R.S. Perkins in Heavenly Rest Church. New York Times, May 8, 1935.) His daughter, Doris, married Dr. Daniel Catlin, Yale 1932, the son of Daniel K. Catlin of St. Louis. Her great-great grandfather, Frederick C. Havemeyer established the W. & F.C. Havemeyer sugar refining firm in 1807, and her great-grandfather, Frederick Christian Havemeyer, founded Havemeyer & Townsend, later Havemeyer & Elder, of which her father was president. (Doris Havemeyer Fiancee of Daniel Catlin; Her Father Is President of Sugar Company. New York Times, Oct. 26, 1936; Doris Havemeyer and Dr. Daniel Catlin Are Married in Church of Heavenly Rest. New York Times, Feb 10, 1937.) The Catlin family were the owners of the Catlin Tobacco Company. (Catlin, Malcolm. In: Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Sangamon County, Vol. 2, Biographical. Chicago: Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers 1912.) The Catlin Tobacco Company was sold in 1899.

Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Sangamon County / Rootsweb

Herbert P. Howell

"Prior to coming to New York he was for many years with Carnegie Steel Company in Pittsburgh and in 1901 became head of its credit department. He was elected a vice president of the National Bank of Commerce in New York in November, 1912, and elected a director in 1915. He resigned in May 1922 to become President of Peierls, Buhler & Co." In 1928, he was a director and member of the Executive Committee of the Bankers Trust Company and the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States, and a trustee of the Franklin Savings Bank. (H.P. Howell to Head New Wall Street Bank. New York Times, Sep. 5, 1928.)

Samuel Mather, Royal

Samuel Mather (1851-1931) was the son of Samuel Livingston Mather and Georgiana Pomeroy Woolson. He was born in Cleveland, Ohio. He planned to enter Harvard College in 1869, but he was injured while working at his father's business, the Cleveland Iron Mining Company at Ishpeming, Mich. After two years recovering, he traveled in Europe, and rejoined the mining company in 1873. In 1881, he married Flora Amelia Stone, daughter of Amasa Stone and sister of Mrs John Hay. In 1883, he organized Pickands, Mather & Co., dealers in iron ore, coal, and pig iron. After Col. James C. Pickands died in 1896, he became senior partner. He owned stock in Lackawanna Steel, Youngstown Sheet and Tube, and United States Steel. He was a benefactor of Kenyon College and Western Reserve University, and a trustee and vice president of the latter for forty-five y ears. (Samuel Mather.Dictionary of American Biography Base Set. American Council of Learned Societies, 1928-1936.) Bridal attendants at his wedding were Miss Parsons, Miss Boardman, Miss Younglove, and Miss Mather of Cleveland, and Miss Faleyen of "the East." His groomsmen were James H. Hoyt, A.G. Stone, W.G. Mather, Henry C. Rouse and A.A. Adee, all of Washington. The newlyweds planned to spend the winter in Europe. (Mather-Stone. Cleveland Herald, Oct. 20, 1881.) He was an incorporator of the American National Red Cross in 1905, and was a correspondent of Mabel T. Boardman from 1913 to 1931. He gave $3000 to the American Society for the Control of Cancer. ($514,709 For Cancer Fight. New York Times, Dec. 31, 1926.)

His father, Samuel Livingston Mather (Wesleyan 1835), was the son of Samuel Mather, Yale 1792. His grandfather was Samuel Mather, a lawyer in Middletown, Conn. and a stockholder in the Connecticut Land Company which purchased the Western Reserve Tract. Samuel L. Mather "was subsequently sent to Cleveland to dispose of the family's Western Reserve holdings and to act as agent for other eastern interests with land in Ohio." He was one of the organizers of the Cleveland Iron Mining Co. around 1850, and became its president in 1869. (Samuel Livingston Mather. Dictionary of American Biography Base Set. American Council of Learned Societies, 1928-1936.) His mother, Catherine Livingston, was a Royal descendant of James I King of Scotland [James Charles Stuart 1566-1625]. (Samuel Mather. Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College with Annals of the College History Vol. V September, 1792 - September, 1805. By Franklin Bowditch Dexter, 1911, p. 31; and: Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 506.)

Graduates of Yale College 1792-1805 p. 31 / Google Books
Americans of Royal Descent, p. 506 / Google Books

Samuel Mather's son, Amasa Stone Mather, graduated from Yale in 1907. He was a partner of Pickands, Mather & Co., and manager of its iron ore mining department. He married Katherine Boardman Hoyt, the daughter of his father's old friend, James Humphrey Hoyt. (Obituary Record of the Graduates, Yale University 1915-20.) His widow married John W. Cross, Skull & Bones 1900. (Mrs. Amasa Mather Wed. New York Times, Jun. 4, 1932.)

Obituary Record of the Graduates, Yale University 1915-20 / Internet Archive

Her brother was Elton Hoyt 2d, Scroll & Key 1910. (Taft's Son Elected to Skull & Bones. New York Times, May 28, 1909.) He was a founding director of W.A. Harriman & Co. (Display Ad 106. New York Times, Dec. 29, 1920 p. 23.) He was best man at the marriage of Cleveland oil refinery president Fred G. Clark to Mrs. Sibyl Young Hine, the widow of Lyman Northrop Hine. (Other Weddings. New York Times, Jan. 17, 1932.) He was a senior partner of Pickands, Mather & Co., president of Mather Iron Co. and the Interlake Steamship Co., a director of Youngstown Steel Door Co. and the Interlake Iron Corp.; chairman of the Yale University Alumni Board 1931-1934, and a trustee of University Hospital, Cleveland. (Elton Hoyt 2d, 67, An Industrialist. New York Times, Mar. 17, 1955.)

Paul Moore, Wolf's Head 1908

Moore was a former member of O'Brien, Boardman & Platt, then of Taylor, Bates & Co. [of which David H. McAlpin 2d was a general partner]. He was a director of the Lehigh Valley Coal Sales Company, the American Can Company, and the National Biscuit Company. He was a son of "Judge" William H. Moore. (Paul Moore on Bankers Trust Board. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1921.) He was tapped for Wolf's Head (Yale's Society Elections. New York Times, May 24, 1907) and graduated from Yale in 1908, with a law degree from New York University in 1911. He began his career with the legal department of the Rock Island Railroad in Chicago. During World War I, he was a major with the Army Ordnance Corps in Washington. After moving to New York, he was a partner of the brokerage firm of Taylor, Bates & Co. He one of the founders of Republic Aviation, and was a director and member of the executive board. He was also a director of the National Biscuit Company, the American Can Company and the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. He was a director of the Bankers Trust Company until 1956. (Paul Moore, Lawyer, Dies at 74; A Founder of Republic Aviation. New York Times, Dec. 20, 1959.) He donated $100,000 to Yale University to use in "strengthening for the freshman year." ($100,000 Gift to Yale. New York Times, Mar. 9, 1958.) He was a patron of the New York City Cancer Committee "Florida Preview" fundraising dinner for the American Cancer Society. (Cancer Society Will Be assisted at Fete Dec. 12. New York Times, Nov. 9, 1958.) His son, William H. Moore (2d) joined the Bankers Trust, while Paul Moore Jr. became the Episcopal Bishop of New York.

Mrs. Paul Moore was a daughter of Leonard C. Hanna of Cleveland and his first wife, Fanny Mann. She received $100,000 in the second Mrs. Hanna's will. (Mrs. L.C. Hanna Left $3,075,000. New York Times, Dec. 13, 1936; Fanny Hanna Moore, Philanthropist, 95. By Alfred E. Clark. New York Times, Sep. 14, 1980.) She was a member of the Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood of the American Birth Control League. (123 Leaders Back Birth Control Aid. New York Times, Feb. 9, 1938.) Leonard Colton Hanna was the brother and business partner of Sen. Marcus Alonzo Hanna of Ohio. Her aunt, Seville Hanna, married Col. James Pickands [business partner of Samuel L. Mather]. H. Melville Hanna was a brother. (Howard Melville Hanna. History of the Great Lakes.) H.M. Hanna was one of the largest holders of common stock of the American Tobacco Company (Tobacco Plan Goes Now Before Court. New York Times, Aug. 25, 1911), and had been conveniently out of town when U.S. Marshalls attempted to serve papers on him in 1907. (Tobacco men subpoenaed. New York Times, July 19, 1907.) Lewis Cass Ledyard Sr. and Jr. were trustees since 1912 of the Melville Securities Company, a corporation created by H. Melville Hanna. (In re Hanna's Estate. Surrogate's Court, New York County, Jul. 15, 1922. In: New York supplement, Volume 195, p. 749.) H.M. Hanna and L.C. Hanna Jr. gave $1,000 each to the American Society for the Control of Cancer. (Cancer Fund Gains $90,000 in Campaign. New York Times, Sep. 28, 1926.)

Howard Melville Hanna / History of the Great Lakes

Mrs. Paul Moore was the first woman director of the Episcopal Church Foundation. (Appointed to the Board Of Episcopal Foundation. New York Times, Jan. 19, 1951.) Mr. and Mrs. Paul Moore were patrons of benefits for the New York City Cancer Committee of the American Cancer Society, Inc. (Benefit April 30 Aids Cancer Fund. New York Times, Mar. 11, 1953; Cancer Society Will Be Assisted At Fete Dec. 12. New York Times, Nov. 9, 1958; Fan Ball Aides Meet to Arrange Cancer Benefit. New York Times, Oct. 29, 1959.)

Paul Moore's father, William Henry Moore (1848-1923) "came from a family that for forty years had been well known in New England, tracing its lineage from colonial days." His father was Nathaniel Moore, a prominent banker and merchant of Utica, N.Y., and his mother was the daughter of banker George Beckwith. He graduated from Amherst in 1872 and began practicing law in Chicago. He married Ada Small, daughter of a former partner, in 1879. He was employed by the Adams Express Company and later the American Express Company. He and his brother, James Hobart Moore, organized and promoted the Diamond Match Company. He was chairman and a director of the National Biscuit Company, and a director of the First National Bank, the American Tin Plate Company (later merged into the United States Steel Corp.), the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, the American Can Company, the Lehigh Valley Railroad, the Continental Fire Insurance Company, the Western Union Telegraph Company, the American Cotton Oil Company and many others. (W.H. Moore, Lawyer and Horseman, Dies. New York Times, Jan. 12, 1923.) His stockholdings were valued at over $20 million. They included 2,800 Continental Insurance Company, $273,700; 881 First National Bank, $1,069,534; 1,604 New York Trust Company, $563,044; 4,445 Bankers Trust Company, $1,662,430; 17,574 D.L. & W. R.R., $2,253,865; 10,000 Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, $450,000; 6,100 Lehigh Valley R.R., $407,937; 824,810 American Can preferred, $2,753,910, 25,000 common $2,056,250; 140,500 National Biscuit Company, $5,514,625; 4,804 American Surety Company, $417,948; 10,850 Lehigh Valley Coal Sales Company, $889,700; 8,787 Glen Alden Coal Company, $527,200; 3,520 Tobacco Products Company, $287,980; 1,115 American Tank Car preferred, $113,033; 4,503 American Bank Note Company, $381,066; and 5,700 Atlantic Lobos Oil preferred, $105,450. (Judge Moore Left $24,492,656 Estate. New York Times, Jul. 9, 1924.) Mrs. Ada Small Moore bequeathed $250,000 and art objects valued at $356,423 to Yale University. The largest asset of the estate was a block of 372,000 shares of the American Can Company. There were also 200,000 shares of the National Biscuit Company. (Mrs. Moore's Estate Set at $29,129,046. New York Times, May 22, 1958.)

Paul Moore's uncle, James Hobart Moore, was his father's younger brother. They were business partners in the Diamond Match Company, the steel company mergers, the National Biscuit Company, the Rock Island Railroad, the American Company, and other ventures. He married Lora Josephine Small of Chicago and lived in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. (James H. Moore, Capitalist, Dead. New York Times, Jul. 19, 1916.) His son, Nathaniel Ford Moore, married Helen Fargo, the only daughter of William Congdon [Congdell] Fargo. (A Day's Weddings. New York Times, Nov. 9, 1905.) His largest stockholdings were 24,537 American Can Company preferred; 10,357 United States Steel preferred; 390 First National Bank; 100 Liberty National Bank; 7,155 Union Bag and Paper; 2,695 Northwestern Railroad common; 3,542 Lackawanna Railroad; 5,000 Union Pacific common; 238 American Tobacco; 2,000 American Writing Paper; 550 Lackawanna Coal Company; 2,500 Lehigh Valley; 872 Bankers Trust; 500 New York Air Brake; 442 Lackawanna Railroad of New Jersey; 313 Lehigh Valley Coal Company; 35,192 Rock Island Railway preferred; 429 National Bank of Commerce of St. Louis; 600 Baltimore & Ohio preferred; and 2,800 Continental Insurance Company. He had $1,806,122 deposited at the First National Bank, and $71,759 with J.P. Morgan & Co. His son died around 1909, and his former daughter-in-law received $100,000. Daniel G. Reid and Henry P. Davison received $500 bequests. (J.H. Moore Estate May Be $20,000,000. New York Times, Apr. 24, 1917.)

William Henry Moore bio / Biography.com

Paul Moore's brother, Hobart Moore, graduated from Yale in 1900 and attended Harvard Law School. He was briefly employed at the First National Bank of New York before developing tuberculosis. Shortly before his death, he married Ruth Winthrop Emmons, daughter of J. Frank Emmons of H.L. Horton & Co. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 378.) His brother, Edward Small Moore, attended Yale but didn't graduate. He was an official of the Rock Island and Pacific Railway and the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad; vice president of the American Brake Shoe Company, and a director of the National Biscuit and American Can Companies. In 1917-18 he was director of divisional administration of the American Red Cross in Washington. (Edward S. Moore, Race Horse Owner. New York Times, Sep. 28, 1948.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 378 / Google Books

A.A. Tilney

A.A. Tilney was the Boston representative of Harvey Fisk & Sons from 1894, and a partner from 1901 to 1915. Dwight W. Morrow urged him to accept the post of assistant to the president of Bankers Trust. He became president in 1928. He was a director of the American Gas & Electric Co., Babcock & Wilcox Co., Bankers Safe Deposit Co., Central Romana Inc., International Agricultural Corp., Newark Factory Sites Co. and the South Porto Rico Sugar Co. He graduated from Yale in 1890. (Arthur A. Tilney, Financier, 69, Dies. New York Times, Aug. 29, 1937). He was a member of Wolf's Head. Thomas J. Tilney, Skull & Bones 1870, was his brother, and Robert F. Tilney, Skull & Bones 1905, was a nephew. (Albert Arthur Tilney, B.A. 1890. Bulletin of Yale University, Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1937-1938, pp. 57-58.)

Yale Obituary Record 1937-1938 / Yale University Library (pdf, 305 pp)

The Bankers Trust, 1925-29

Directors: Winthrop W. Aldrich, Murray, Prentice & Aldrich; Cornelius N. Bliss Jr., Bliss, Fabyan & Co.; Edwin M. Bulkley, Spencer Trask & Co.; F.N.B. Close, Vice President; Thomas Cochran, J.P. Morgan & Co.; John I. Downey, Building Construction; Pierre S. du Pont, Chairman E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. and Chairman, General Motors Corp.; Walter E. Frew, Pres. Corn Exchange Bank; M. Friedsam, B. Altman & Co.; Frederick T. Haskell, Vice Pres. Illinois Trust & Savings Bank, Chicago; Horace Havemeyer, Pres. Havemeyers & Elder, Inc.; Herbert P. Howell, Peierls, Buhler & Co.; B.W. Jones, Vice Pres. Bankers Trust; Fred I. Kent, Vice President; Ranald H. MacDonald, Real Estate; Edgar L. Marston, Blair & Co.; Samuel Mather, Pickands, Mather & Co., Cleveland; H.C. McEldowney, Pres. Union Trust Co., Pittsburg; Paul Moore, Taylor, Bates & Co.; Dwight W. Morrow, J.P. Morgan & Co.; Daniel E. Pomeroy, Vice President; William H. Porter, J.P. Morgan & Co.; Herbert L. Pratt, Pres. Standard Oil Co.; Seward Prosser, Chairman; John W. Staley, Pres. Peoples State Bank of Detroit; Landon K. Thorne, Bonbright & Co.; Charles L. Tiffany, Tiffany & Co.; A.A. Tilney, President; and Herbert K. Twitchell, Pres. Seamens Bank for Savings. (Display Ad, New York Times, Mar. 31, 1925.) Jones left the board, while Henry J. Cochran and B.A. Tompkins joined. (Display Ad, New York Times, Jan. 5, 1926.) Marston and Porter left. They were replaced by Stephen Birch, James G. Harboard, J.A. Topping, and Arthur Woods. (Display Ad, New York Times, Jan. 4, 1927.) Morrow left, and was replaced by William Ewing and John J. Raskob. (Display Ad, New York Times, Jan. 3, 1928.) Haskell, Howell, Staley, and Twitchell left, and were replaced by B.W. Jones and George Murnane. (Display Ad, New York Times, Mar. 27, 1929.) William Payne Whitney, Skull & Bones 1898, and his brother had $7 million holdings in the Bankers Trust Co. in 1928.

Henry J. Cochran

Henry J. Cochran was a son of Israel Williams Cochran, and Thomas Cochran's cousin. He graduated from Princeton in 1900. He became chief statistician of the American Locomotive Company, then left in 1907 to be a certified public accountant. In 1912, he became a vice president of the Astor Trust Company, and in 1917, a vice president of the Bankers Trust. He was its president from 1929 to 1931, vice chairman of the board from 1931 to 1937, and a director from 1925 until his death. He became president of the Franklin Savings Bank in 1938 until 1950, then vice chairman until his death. He was also a director of the American Smelting and Refining Company, American Enka Corporation, and National Biscuit Company. (Henry J. Cochran, Long A Banker, 73. New York Times, Sep. 11, 1952.)

O. Parker McComas

O. Parker McComas joined the Bankers Trust Company in 1928 as a specialist in foreign securities, and the next year headed the company's business in Paris. He resigned in 1946 to join Philip Morris, and was its president from 1949 to 1957.

Landon K. Thorne

Landon K. Thorne was the son of Edwin Thorne of the Central Trust Company, and a grandfather of Sen. John Kerry's campaign advisor, David Hoadley Thorne (both were Skull & Bones 1966). He graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University in 1910. He married Julia A. Loomis, a cousin of Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson, S&B 1888. Ushers included Harry Van Sinderen (S&B 1911) and Howard Bonbright, and Carol Harriman was a bridesmaid. (Miss Loomis's Attendants. New York Times, Sep. 6, 1911.) He was the President of Bonbright & Co., Inc., in the 1920s and early 30s, when he also headed American Superpower Corporation. (Landon K. Thorne, 76, Banker, Developer of Bonbright, Dies. New York Times, Sep. 14, 1964.) He was on the board of directors of Bankers Trust when it became the administrator of the estate of Charles Manville, of the Johns Manville Company. Hiram E. Manville Sr., the son of the founder of the Johns-Manville Corporation, said that Charles Manville's will could not be found, and petitioned for the Bankers Trust Company to be made the administrator of the estate. (Charles Manville Dies At Age of 96. New York Times, Nov. 28, 1927; No Manville Will Found. New York Times, Dec. 25, 1927.) J.P. Morgan partner Thomas Cochran (Skull & Bones 1894) was on the board of directors of Bankers Trust at this time, and Hiram Edward Manville Jr. became a member of Skull & Bones in 1929. (Thomas Cochran, Financier, Is Dead. New York Times, Oct. 30, 1936.) Also on the board was Ranald H. Macdonald, who was the father of Ranald H. Macdonald II, Skull & Bones 1915, who joined the firm of Dominick & Dominick.

Landon K. Thorne, Jr. (~1913-1980), graduated from Yale in 1934. He was associated with the Bankers Trust Company from 1936 until his retirement in 1965, as a vice president and managing director of two of the bank's overseas investment companies. He was a lieutenant commander in the US Navy during World War II. After the war, he was a member of a special State Department task force that set up the military assistance plan in Europe. He was director of the Foreign Operations Administration in Italy from 1953-55, then in Belgium from 1955-56. He was publisher of the Rome [Italy] Daily American from 1956 to 1963. (Landon Thorne Jr., Ex-Diplomat. New York Times, May 14, 1980.) At the time of Julia Thorne's marriage to John Forbes Kerry, he managed the family's investments from a Wall Street office. {John Kerry Weds Miss Julia Thorne. New York Times, May 24, 1970.)

The Bankers Trust, 1930-31

Directors: Winthrop W. Aldrich; Stephen Birch; Cornelius N. Bliss; Edwin M. Bulkley; F.N.B. Close; Henry J. Cochran; Thomas Cochran; John I. Downey; Pierre S. du Pont; William Ewing; Walter E. Frew; M. Friedsam; C.E. Groesbeck; John W. Hanes; James G. Harboard; Horace Havemeyer; B.W. Jones; Fred I. Kent; Ranald H. MacDonald; Samuel Mather; H.C. McEldowney; Paul Moore; George Murnane; Daniel E. Pomeroy; Herbert L. Pratt; Seward Prosser; John J. Raskob; Landon K. Thorne; Charles L. Tiffany; A.A. Tilney; B.A. Tompkins; J.A. Topping; and Arthur Woods. Groesbeck and Hanes were new. (Display Ad, New York Times, Jan. 2, 1930.)

Later that year, the John D. Rockefeller interests sold their holdings to a syndicate composed of officers of the Bankers Trust and Bonbright & Co., particularly Landon K. Thorne, the president of Bonbright. Their shares amounted to about 7% of the trust's total capital shares. Winthrop W. Aldrich, the president of the Equitable Trust Company who was Rockefeller's brother-in-law, was to resign from Bankers' Trust to become president of the Chase National Bank upon its merger with the Equitable, because directors of national banks could not also be directors of trust companies. (Rockefellers Sell $30,000,000 Stock. New York Times, May 2, 1930.) Aldrich was replaced by S. Sloan Colt. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 2, 1931.) Friedsam, Havemeyer, Jones, and Mather left the board that year.

Samuel Sloan Colt

S. Sloan Colt was an usher at the wedding of Reginald La Grange Auchincloss in 1916. (R. La G. Auchincloss Weds Ruth Cutting. New York Times, May 3, 1916.) His brother-in-law, Charles D. Dickey Jr., and his cousins Joseph Walker 3d, Reginald L.G. Auchincloss, and Harris Dunscomb Colt were ushers at his marriage to Margaret Van Buren Mason. (Miss Mason, Bride of Lt. S.S. Colt. New York Times, Jan. 13, 1918.) His father was Richard Collins Colt, Yale 1885, who was a member of the firm of Collins & Co. from 1890 to 1922. (Richard C. Colt, 74, A Retired Exporter. New York Times, Nov. 12, 1938; Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1938-1939 p. 45.)

Yale Obituary Record 1938-1939 / Yale University Library (pdf, 329 pp)

His father-in-law, George Grant Mason, was a roundhouse foreman for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad in Green Bay, Wis., who inherited $12.5 million from his uncle James Henry Smith, aka "Silent Smith;" who in turn had inherited his fortune from his uncle, George Smith, "who had amassed a fortune of between $50,000,000 and $60,000,000 by speculations in Chicago and Milwaukee real estate and in promoting railroads in the western United States among them the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railway." (Inside Facts in Career of 'Silent Smith.' Waukegan Sun, May 6, 1910; Mrs. George G. Mason Dies At Tuxedo Park. New York Times, Aug. 4, 1929.) The Colts were divorced in 1945, and his ex married Gen. Everton Peabody, US Army, chief of the Intelligence Service and a former military attaché of the US Embassy in London. (Mrs. Colt Is Bride of Army Officer. New York Times, Jan. 26, 1947.)

Waukegan Sun, May 6, 1910 / Historic Millburn Community Association

He began as an assistant secretary at the Farmers Loan and Trust Company [where his uncles, the Auchinclosses and Samuel Sloan Jr., were directors]. (Financial Notes. New York Times, Oct. 23, 1919.) He was elected a vice president of the Farmers Loan and Trust in 1922. (Union National Dividend. New York Times, Dec. 22, 1922.) He was elected a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Company, along with Charles Proctor Cooper and John King Ottley, President of the First National Bank of Atlanta. (Mutual Life Elects 3 Trustees. New York Times, Jun. 6, 1931.) He was elected a director of the General Electric Company in 1940, replacing Seward Prosser. (General Electric to Have Another Banker on Board. New York Times, Jun. 29, 1940.) He was an usher at the funeral of fellow Tuxedo resident Pierre Lorillard, the former head of the P. Lorillard Tobacco Company. (Pierre Lorillard Buried. New York Times, Aug. 9, 1940.) Colt was co-chairman of the Memorial Cancer Center fund drive, with Lewis W. Douglas, the president of the Mutual Life. (First Poster Out for Cancer Drive. New York Times, Dec. 2, 1945.) S. Sloan Colt was president of the National Fund for Medical Education, which made $1,132,500 in grants to medical schools its first year (Education Grants of $2,229,370 Made. New York Times, Jul. 19, 1951), and continued as its president until 1960. (Medical Schools Aided. New York Times, Feb. 15, 1960.) He was Treasurer of the New York City Cancer Committee in 1950-52. (Named By Cancer Committee. New York Times, Apr. 26, 1950; Letter, Robert A. Loberfeld of N.Y.C. Cancer Committee to Dr. Willard F. Greenwald, Medical Director of Philip Morris Co., Feb. 18, 1952) and helped raise funds for them. (Cancer Society Will Be Assisted At Fete Dec. 12. New York Times, Nov. 9, 1958.)

New York City Cancer Committee, 1952 / tobacco document

The Bankers Trust, 1932-33

Directors: Stephen Birch, Pres., Kennecott Copper Co.; Cornelius N. Bliss, Director, Bliss, Fabyan & Co. Inc.; Edwin M. Bulkley, Spencer Trask & Co.; F.N.B. Close, New York; Henry J. Cochran, Vice Chairman, Bankers Trust; Thomas Cochran, J.P. Morgan & Co.; S. Sloan Colt, Pres. Bankers Trust; Henry G. Dalton, Pickands, Mather & Co.; John I. Downey, Vice President, Bankers Trust; Pierre S. du Pont, Chairman, E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co.; William Ewing, J.P. Morgan & Co.; Walter E. Frew, Chairman, Corn Exchange Bank Trust Co.; S. Parker Gilbert, J.P. Morgan & Co.; C.E. Groesbeck, Pres., Electric Bond and Share Co.; John W. Hanes, C.D. Barney & Co.; James G. Harboard, Chairman, Radio Corporation of America; Charles D. Hilles, Employers Liability Assurance Corp. of London, Ltd.; Fred I. Kent, New York; Alfred L. Loomis, Bonbright & Co.; Ranald H. MacDonald, Real Estate; H.C. McEldowney, Pres., Union Trust Co. of Pittsburg; Paul Moore, New York; George Murnane, Lee Higginson & Co.; Daniel E. Pomeroy, Chm. Finance Comm., American Brake Shoe & Foundry Co.; Herbert I. Pratt, Chairman, Standard Oil Co. of New York; Seward Prosser, Chm. Managing Committee, Bankers Trust; John J. Raskob, Vice Pres., E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co.; Landon K. Thorne, Bonbright & Co.; Charles L. Tiffany, Tiffany & Co.; A.A. Tilney, Chairman, Bankers Trust; B.A. Tompkins, Vice Pres., Bankers Trust; J.A. Topping, New York; Arthur Woods, New York. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 2, 1932.) Dalton, Gilbert, Hilles and Loomis were new. MacDonald left the board and was replaced by William L. De Bost, Pres. Union Dime Savings Bank. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1933.) Ten directors resigned because the Banking Act of 1933 prohibited investment bankers to be directors of Federal Reserve member banks: Bulkley, Dalton, Frew, Groesbeck, Hanes, Loomis, McEldowney, Murnane, Thorne, and Woods. (M'Cain to Leave Bank For Utility. New York Times, Jan. 6, 1934.)

Alfred Lee Loomis, Wolf's Head 1909

Alfred Lee Loomis (1887-1975) was the son of Dr. Henry Patterson Loomis. He graduated from Yale in 1909, then from Harvard Law School in 1912, and began as a clerk with Winthrop & Stimson, where he specialized in corporate law and became a partner in 1915. After serving in World War I, he became an investment banker with his brother-in-law, Landon Thorne, and became a vice president of Bonbright & Co., which financed public utilities. He published numerous scientific papers from the Loomis Laboratory, and founded the Loomis Institute, later the Radiation Laborator at MIT. He retired from Bonbright in 1933. In 1938, he help Ernest O. Lawrence get a $1.5 million grant from the Rockefeller Foundation to build the cyclotron at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratories in Berkeley, California. He was a member of the corporation of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a founder and trustee of the Rand Corporation. (Afred Lee Loomis Dead at 87; Physicist, Financier and Lawyer. New York Times, Aug. 12, 1975.) He was a member of Wolf's Head. (Chicago Boys Are Tapped. Chicago Tribune, May 22, 1908.)

Leland Stanford Stillman, Skull & Bones 1894

Leland S. Stillman (1870-1933) was in the law office of Butler, Stillman & Hubbard 1894-99; a partner of Patton, Stillman & Patton 1900-1905; a partner of Redington & Stillman 1907-1912; manager of the trust deparment of the Astor Trust Company of New York 1912-1915 and assistant secretary 1915-1917; assistant secretary of the Bankers Trust 1917-1926 and trust officer until retiring in 1929. He was the son of Jacob Davis Babcock Stillman, the personal physician of Stanford University founder Leland Stanford; and the father of Charles L. Stillman, a director and executive vice president of Time, Inc. from 1928 to 1971. He married Ada Latimer, daughter of Charles Latimer, in Hutchinson, Kansas. (Leland S. Stillman. New York Times, July 7, 1933; Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1933-1934, p 89.) His wife's sister was the wife of Judge Houston Whiteside of Hutchinson. (Weddings and Engagements. New York Times, Oct. 26, 1902.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale 1933-1934 / Yale University Library (pdf, 285 pp)
Children of Leland Stanford Stillman and Ada Lombard Latimer / Stillman Genealogy Homepage

The Bankers Trust, 1935-38

In 1935, the directorate was reduced to 16: Stephen Birch; Cornelius N. Bliss; Thomas Cochran; William L. De Bost; John I. Downey; William Ewing; S. Parker Gilbert; James G. Harboard; Fred I. Kent; Gates W. McGarrah; Paul Moore; Daniel E. Pomeroy; Herbert L. Pratt; John J. Raskob; Charles L. Tiffany; and B.A. Tompkins. Seward Prosser was Chm. Managing Committee; A.A. Tilney, Chairman; Henry J. Cochran, Vice Chairman; S. Sloan Colt, President. (Display Ad. New York Times, July 2, 1935.) In 1936, Ewing left and Hilles returned. (Display Ad. New York Times, Apr. 8, 1936.) In 1937, Thomas Cochran left. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1937.) In 1938, Henry J. Cochran returned, and William B. Given and George A. Sloan joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1938.) John S. Burke, Pres. of B. Altman & Co., was elected to the board. (Elected to Directorate Of Bankers Trust Co. New York Times, Apr. 16, 1941.)

John S. Burke

Burke was a member of Mayor Wagner's commission on hospital costs in 1959, with Mrs. Albert D. Lasker. (City Orders Survey of Hospital Costs. By Edith Evans Asbury. New York Times, Feb. 13, 1959.)

American Tobacco Company cash on deposit with banks, Dec. 31, 1937: $6.5 million at the Guaranty Trust Company of New York; $3.9 million at the Chase National Bank; $3.2 million at the National City Bank; $2.4 million at the Bankers Trust Company; $1.9 million at the Central Hanover Bank and Trust; $1.2 million at the Manufacturers Trust Company, and lesser amounts at other institutions. (ATC Fiscal Statement, Dec. 31, 1937.)

ATC 1937 Fiscal Statement / tobacco document

The Bankers Trust, 1946

Paul Moore, a special partner in the New York Stock Exchange firm of James B. Taylor & Co. owned 4.16 percent of the shares of the Bankers Trust Company. He was a director of the American Can Co., the National Biscuit Co., Republic Aviation, and the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. "Mr. Moore's holdings make him 'one of the two or three largest holders of the bank's stock,' an official said later." He owned 72,000 shares. Other large holders among the officers and directors included Cornelius N. Bliss; Henry J. Cochran, a director and member of the executive committee, and president and a trustee of the Franklin Savings Bank of N.Y.; S. Sloan Colt, president; Charles D. Hilles; Fred I. Kent, former vice president; and Daniel E. Pomeroy, a former vice president, each with between 700 and 6,000 shares. (Broker Big Holder in Bankers Trust. New York Times, Jan. 16, 1946.) Ellsworth Bunker, Pres. National Sugar Refining Co.; William H. Jackson, a partner of J.H. Whitney & Co.; Justin R. Whiting, Pres. Commonwealth and Southern Corporation; and Thomas J. Watson Jr., Vice Pres. International Business Machines, were elected to the board. (Sugar Man on Bank Board. New York Times, Jan. 8, 1947; Bank Notes. New York Times, Mar. 7, 1947; Head of Utility Is Added to Bankers Trust Board. New York Times, Jun. 14, 1947; Executive Elections. New York Times, Dec. 18, 1947.) Charles A. Wight, a vice president of the Bankers Trust Company, was elected to the board of Freeport Sulphur in 1947. (Banker Elected to Board Of Freeport Sulphur Co.New York Times, Sep. 26, 1947.)

William Harding Jackson, Princeton 1924

William Harding Jackson was born in Nashville, Tenn. in 1901. He graduated from Princeton in 1924 and Harvard Law School in 1928. He joined Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft in 1928, then Carter, Ledyard & Milburn in 1930. He joined the Army as a captain in 1942, and was assigned to the Army Air Force Intelligence School. In 1944, he joined the intelligence section of the U.S. Military Headquarters in London, and later was chief of inelligence for Gens. Jacob L. Devers and Omar Bradley. He was discharged as a colonel in 1945. He was a partner and managing director of J.H. Whitney and Co. until 1949, when he was named to the National Security Council committee with Allen W. Dulles and Mathias F. Correa. He was named deputy director of the C.I.A. the next year. In 1956, he became a special assistant to President Eisenhower. (William H. Jackson Dead at 70; Former C.I.A. Deputy Director. New York Times, Sep. 29, 1971.)

His family owned the Belle Meade Plantation, and bred Thoroughbred horses for auction across the South and in New York City. His father, William Harding Jackson, died in 1903. (People. Belle Meade Plantation, accessed 12-11-11.) His mother, Ann Davis Richardson Jackson, and her sister, Mrs. Horace H. Lurton Jr., were fixtures of Society, at Narragansett Pier in Rhode Island and in Washington, D.C. (Many Guests Play Bridge. Washington Post, Aug. 8, 1908; Europe and Newport Call More of Capital Society. Washington Post, Jul. 18, 1913; Outdoor Events at the Pier. Washington Post, Jul. 8, 1916.) Horace Harmon Lurton Sr. was a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. He was appointed by President William H. Taft, with whom he became close friends while both were serving on the Sixth U.S. Circuit Court. Lurton was Professor of Constitutional Law at Vanderbilt University from 1898 to 1910, and Dean of the University from 1905 to 1910. (Justice Lurton Dies at Seashore. New York Times, Jul. 13, 1914.) Mrs. Horace H. Lurton Jr. baked the wedding cake for Sen. William Gibbs McAdoo's marriage to Doris I. Cross, a 26-year-old Public Health Service nurse from Iowa. (Sen. McAdoo Wed Nurse Whose Father Disapproves. Galveston Daily News, Sep. 15, 1935.)

People / Belle Meade Plantation

The Bankers Trust, 1948

Directors: Cornelius N. Bliss, New York; Ellsworth Bunker, Chairman, The National Sugar Refining Company; Henry J. Cochran, Pres. Franklin Savings Bank; S. Sloan Colt, Pres. Bankers Trust; William L. De Bost, Chairman, Union Dime Savings Bank; William B. Given Jr., Pres. American Brake Shoe Co.; John W. Hanes, Chairman, Exec. Comm., United States Lines Co.; Charles D. Hilles, New York; William H. Jackson, Partner, J.H. Whitney & Co.; Fred I. Kent, President, Council of New York University; Ward Melville, Pres. Melville Shoe Corp.; Paul Moore, New Jersey; Thomas A. Morgan, Chairman, the Sperry Corp.; Daniel E. Pomeroy, New Jersey; Philip D. Reed, Chairman, General Electric Co.; George A. Sloan, Chairman, Southern Agriculturist, President, The Nutrition Foundation, Inc.; B.A. Tompkins, Vice Pres. Bankers Trust; Thomas J. Watson Jr., Vice Pres. International Business Machines Corp.; and Justin R. Whiting, Pres. The Commonwealth & Southern Corp. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jul. 6, 1948.) Francis S. Baer, left positions as Senior Vice Chairman of the Board and a director of the Bank of America N.T.S.A. for the same posts at Bankers Trust. High Posts for F. S. Baer With Bankers Trust Co. New York Times, Aug 11, 1949.)

The Bankers Trust, 1950-54

Directors: Alex H. Ardrey, Exec. Vice Pres.; Francis S. Baer, Senior Vice Pres.; Ellsworth Bunker, Chairman, The National Sugar Refining Company; Henry J. Cochran, Pres. The Franklin Savings Bank; S. Sloan Colt, President; William L. De Bost, Chairman, Union Dime Savings Bank; William B. Given Jr., Pres. American Brake Shoe Co.; John W. Hanes, Chairman Exec. Comm. United States Lines Co.; William H. Jackson, Partner J.H. Whitney & Co.; Fred I. Kent, Pres. Council of New York University; Ward Melville, Pres. Melville Shoe Corp.; Paul Moore, New Jersey; Pres. and Chairman, the Sperry Corp.; John M. Olin, Pres. Olin Industries Inc.; Daniel E. Pomeroy, New Jersey; Philip D. Reed, Chairman, General Electric Co.; George A. Sloan, Chairman, Southern Agriculturist, President, The Nutrition Foundation, Inc.; B.A. Tompkins, Vice Pres.; Thomas J. Watson Jr., Exec. Vice Pres. International Business Machines Corp.; and Justin R. Whiting, Pres. Consumers Power Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1950.) Coleman C. Walker, vice president of the Wachovia Bank and Trust Co. of Winston-Salem, N.C., was elected a vice president. (Bankers Trust Elects 2 Vice Presidents. New York Times, Apr. 21, 1950.) In 1951, James C. Brady, Pres. Brady Security & Realty Corp.; Howard S. Cullman of Cullman Bros. Inc.; Orie R. Kelly, Vice Pres. Bankers Trust; and Lewis A. Lapham, Pres. American-Hawaiian Steamship Co. joined the board. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1951.) In 1952, DeBost, Jackson, and Sloan left, and John M. Budinger and William T. Taylor, Vice Presidents of Bankers Trust; and B. Earl Puckett, Chairman, Allied Stores Corp., joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jul. 3, 1952.) In 1953, Cochran left and George G. Montgomery, Chm. Finance Comm. and Vice Pres. Castle & Cook Ltd., joined. (Display Ads. New York Times, Jul. 6, 1953 and Jul. 7, 1954.) Cullman and Kent left during 1954.

Lewis A. Lapham, Skull & Bones 1931

Lewis A. Lapham's family had been involved in shipping for four generations. His father, Roger D. Lapham, was once mayor of San Francisco. Lewis A. Lapham had been a reporter, editor and columnist for The San Francisco Examiner before the Second World War, when he was a civilian executive assistant to the commanding general for the San Francisco Port of Embarkation. He became president of the American-Hawaiian Steamship Co. in 1947. In 1953, he joined the Grace Line (a subsidiary of W.R. Grace) as executive vice president, and became president in 1955. "After serving as an outside director of the Bankers Trust Company for nine years, Mr. Lapham entered the bank's executive ranks as chairman of the executive committee in 1959. He was elected vice chairman of the bank in 1966 and president of the bank's holding company -- the Bankers Trust New York Corporation -- in 1968. Mr. Lapham retired as an active employee of the company in 1974 and retired from its board in 1981." He was a director of the H. J. Heinz Company, the Mobil Corporation and the Crane Company. (Lewis A. Lapham, 86, Executive In Shipping and Banking Concerns. By Leonard Sloane. New York Times, Dec. 22, 1995.) His Bones classmates included Henry John Heinz 2d of Pittsburgh and Bush relative John Mercer Walker of Memorial Sloan-Kettering, while James Ramsay Hunt Jr., later of the C.I.A., and James Gamble Rogers Jr. [who worked for Lord & Thomas on the American Tobacco account], and George Washington Hill Jr. of American Tobacco were slapped for Scroll and Key. (Yale Tap Day Held; 10 Refuse Election. New York Times, May 16, 1930.) James Stewart of Cleveland and Walter Swope of Pennsylvania, of S&B 1931, and Robert Heurtematte, Scroll & Key 1931, were ushers at his wedding. (Jane Foster Bride of Lewis Lapham. New York Times, Oct. 15, 1932.) He was elected a director of the Celanese Corporation of America in 1960. (Bankers Trust Officer Joins Celanese Board. New York Times, Jun. 29, 1961.) Mrs. Lewis A. Lapham was a member of the committee for a dinner benefit for Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, of which Mrs. William F. Buckley [S&B 1950] was a fellow member, and Mrs. Howard B. Dean was a co-chairmen. (Dance Wednesday to Assist Sloan-Kettering Society. New York Times, May 8, 1970.)

His son, Anthony Abbot Lapham, was the Central Intelligence Agency’s top lawyer in the 1970s when the agency was reeling from Congressional investigations into questionable and illegal activities, under George H.W. Bush in the Ford Administration and Adm. Stansfield Turner in the Carter administration. He was born in San Francisco in 1936. He graduated from Yale in 1958, and earned a law degree at Georgetown. He was an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia and then for the Treasury Department in its enforcement area. "While doing those two jobs, he served in Army intelligence [with the 226th Military Intelligence Detachment] and then in a legal unit in the Navy, sometimes on active duty but mostly in the Reserves.... In 1967, Mr. Lapham joined Shea & Gardner, and he became a partner three years later. He returned there after his C.I.A. tenure.... President Bill Clinton chose his C.I.A. director, R. James Woolsey, from the same firm. Stephen J. Hadley, the current President Bush’s national security adviser, was also a partner there." (Anthony A. Lapham, 70, Former C.I.A. Lawyer, Dies. By Douglas Martin. New York Times, Nov. 15, 2006; Former CIA General Counsel, Environmentalist Anthony Abbot Lapham, 70. By Joe Holley. Washington Post, Nov. 15, 2006.) He married Burks Bingham, the daughter of Harry Payne Bingham, Yale 1910 and a first cousin of Harry Payne Whitney, S&B 1894, and Payne Whitney, S&B 1898, and the granddaughter of Thomas Burks Yuille. (Anthony Lapham Becomes Fiance of Miss Bingham. New York Times, Jul. 16, 1964; Anthony Lapham Weds Miss Bingham. New York Times, Sep. 20, 1964; Melissa Yuille Married At Home to Harry Payne Bingham, Banker. New York Times, Apr. 25, 1937.) Thomas B. Yuille was the late president of the a predecessor of Philip Morris, the Tobacco Products Corporation.

Anthony A. Lapham, 70, Former C.I.A. Lawyer, Dies / New York Times

The Board of Directors of the New York Heart Association, Inc. in 1964-65 included Mrs. Harry Payne Bingham, Howard S. Cullman, Lewis A. Lapham, Ed Sullivan, and Lowell P. Weicker. (50th Anniversary New York Heart Association, Annual Report 1965.)

50th Anniversary New York Heart Association, Annual Report 1965 / tobacco document

George G. Montgomery

George G. Montgomery attended the University of California and was admitted to the bar in 1916. He was vice president and chairman of Castle & Cooke Inc. of Hawaii for more than 20 years. He joined the Kern County Land Company of San Francisco as president in 1954, then was board chairman from 1959 to 1969. It had large interests in oil, cattle, agriculture, land and manufacturing. He was also a director emeritus of the General Electric Company and an advisory director of the Wells Fargo Bank; and an emeritus member and former chairman of the advisory committee of Stanford University Graduate School of Business, a member of the board of overseers of the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace, a director of St. Luke's Hospital, San Francisco, and a regent of the University of San Francisco. His wife was the former Claudine Spreckels. (G.G. Montgomery, 79, Coast Industrialist. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1974.)

George Granville Montgomery Jr., Scroll & Key 1951, married Elinor Lanman White, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander M. White [brother of Ogden White]. He was a research assistant at the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. His grandfather was Rudolph Spreckels. Her attendants included Mrs. Allen Wardwell and Elinor B. Lamont. (Elinor Lanman White Is Bride on L.I. New York Times, Mar. 20, 1960.)

Coleman C. Walker

Walker was a friend of Bowman Gray of R.J. Reynolds, who informed him that "A good friend of mine has Just been treated by Dr. Russell Patterson in New York Oity, the well-known authority on cancer. My friend tells me that Dr. Patterson is quite definite in his conviction that there is no connection between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. I am just passing this on to you for whatever it may be worth, if anything. Lucie and I had hoped to get to Roaring Gap this summer, but somehow didn't work it in. I hope to get to Winston-Salem sometime before long. Lucie joins me in affectionate regards to all the family." (Walker to Gray, Sep. 11, 1963.)

Walker to Gray, Sep. 11, 1963 / tobacco document
Gray to Walker, Sep. 16, 1963 / tobacco document

The Bankers Trust, 1955-58

Directors: Alex H. Ardrey, Exec. Vice Pres.; Francis S. Baer, Exec. Vice Pres.; James C. Brady, Pres. Brady Security & Realty Corp.; John M. Budinger, Vice Pres.; Ellsworth Bunker, Pres. American National Red Cross; S. Sloan Colt, President; E. Chester Gersten, Exec. Vice Pres.; William B. Given Jr., Chairman,. American Brake Shoe Co.; John W. Hanes, Chairman Finance Comm. Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp.; Orie R. Kelly, Vice Pres.; Lewis A. Lapham, Pres. and Director, Grace Line Inc.; Ward Melville, Pres. Melville Shoe Corp.; George G. Montgomery, Pres. and Director, Kern County Land Co.; Paul Moore, New Jersey; Thomas A. Morgan, New York; Henry L. Moses, Partner Moses and Singer; John M. Olin, Chairman, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp.; Daniel E. Pomeroy, New Jersey; B. Earl Puckett, Chairman, Allied Stores Corp.; Philip D. Reed, Chairman, General Electric Co.; William T. Taylor, Vice Pres.; B.A. Tompkins, New York; Thomas J. Watson Jr., Pres. International Business Machines Corp.; and Justin R. Whiting, Chairman, Consumers Power Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jul. 6, 1955.) In 1956, Bunker, Kelly, and Paul Moore left, Howard S. Cullman returned, and J.P. Dreibelbis and Brian P. Leeb, Senior Vice Presidents, and William H. Moore joined. (Display Ads. New York Times, Jul. 5, 1956, Jan. 3, 1957, and Jan. 3, 1958.)

William H. Moore (2d)

William H. Moore was the son of Bankers Trust director Paul Moore. He married Edith McKnight, the daughter of Minneapolis lumber baron Sumner T. McKnight. (Edith McKnight Married to W.H. Moore 2d; Ceremony Takes Place in St. James Church. New York Times, Jun. 29, 1937.) His daughter, Pamela, married David Olyphant, Harvard 1958, who was with the First National City Bank. He was the son of John K. Olyphant Jr. (Father Escorts Pamela Moore At Her Wedding. New York Times, Apr. 28, 1962.) His son, William Henry Moore 3d, graduated from Yale in 1962 and married the daughter of Alastair Bradley Martin. (Father Escorts Dorothy Martin at Her Nuptials. New York Times, Jun. 23, 1962.) In 1984, William H. Moore III was admitted as a partner of Brown Brothers Harriman (Display Ad 45. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1984), and is still a partner as of 2007. (Weekly Bulletin, Feb. 2, 2007. State of New York Banking Department.)

Weekly Bulletin, Feb. 2, 2007 / State of New York Banking Department

His brother, Paul Moore Jr., was an usher at the wedding of Benjamin N. Duke's grandson, Anthony Drexel Duke. Duke was to be associated with the Farmers Loan and Trust Company later that fall. (Miss Alice Noel Rutgers Wed at Rumson In St. George's to Anthony Drexel Duke. New York Times, Sep. 10, 1939.) He graduated from Yale in 1941 and served in the First Marine Division in World War II. (Miss Jenny M'Kean Captain's Fiancee. New York Times, Nov. 11, 1944; Jenny M'Kean Wed to Paul Moore Jr. New York Times, Nov. 27, 1944.) He was an usher at the wedding of George deForest Lord Jr. (Wolf's Head 1942). Ruth du Pont Wed to George Lord Jr. New York Times, Mar. 23, 1947.) In 1969, he was elected the bishop-coadjutor, the successor to the Episcopal Diocese of New York. He was an activist in the Politically Correct causes of the 1960s. He was a trustee of the General Theological Seminary, from which he graduated, and the Yale Corporation. (An Activist Bishop. New York Times, Dec. 13, 1969.) In 1971, Yale appointed its first women members of the Yale Corporation. They were University of Chicago history professor Hanna Holborn Gray and civil rights lawyer Marian Wright Edelman, who received a law degree from Yale in 1963. William S. Beinecke, chairmain of Sperry & Hutchinson, and Lance M. Liebman, associate professor of law at Harvard, were also chosen. Among the continuing trustees were John Hay Whitney, William McC. Martin, Cyrus R. Vance, the Right Rev. Paul Moore Jr., and William W. Scranton. (Yale Names Two Women, One A Black Lawyer, to Board of Trustees. New York Times, Jun. 20, 1971.) Moore announced a "Venture Fund" for church programs in low-income areas. William F. May, chairman of the American Company, headed the fund drive. (Episcopalians Open Drive For $3-Million Venture Fund. New York Times, Apr. 24, 1972.)

The Bankers Trust, 1960-62

William H. Moore, Chairman of the Board; Alex H. Ardrey, President; Lewis A. Lapham, Chairman Exec. Comm; John M. Budinger, Senior Vice Pres. & Chairman, Advisory Comm.; J. Paschal Dreibelbis and Brian P. Leeb, Senior Vice Presidents; James C. Brady, Pres. Brady Security & Realty Corp.; S. Sloan Colt, New York; George H. Coppers, National Biscuit Co.; Howard S. Cullman, Pres. Cullman Bros. Inc.; Kempton Dunn, Pres. and Director, American Brake Shoe Co.; E. Chester Gersten, New York; John W. Hanes, Director, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp.; George G. Montgomery, Chairman, Kern County Land Co.; Henry L. Moses, Partner Moses and Singer; John M. Olin, Chairman, Financial and Operating Comm. and Exec. Comm., Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp.; Daniel E. Pomeroy, New Jersey; B. Earl Puckett, Chairman, Allied Stores Corp.; William T. Taylor, Chairman, ACF Industries Inc.; Walter N. Thayer, Pres. Whitney Communications Corp.; B.A. Tompkins, New York; Thomas J. Watson Jr., Pres. International Business Machines Corp.; Frazar B. Wilde, President and Director, Connecticut General Life Insurance Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1960.) In 1961, Coppers and Puckett left, and Wallis B. Dunckel joined as President. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1961.) In 1962, Ardrey, Leeb, and Moses left; Lee S. Bickmore, Pres. National Biscuit Co.; Wayne C. Marks, Pres. General Foods Corp.; and William A. Morgan, Senior Vice Pres., joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1962.)

The Bankers Trust, 1964

Directors: Lee S. Bickmore, Pres. National Biscuit Co.; James C. Brady, Pres. Brady Security & Realty Corp.; John M. Budinger, Senior Vice Pres. & Chairman, Advisory Comm.; S. Sloan Colt, New York; Howard S. Cullman, Pres. Cullman Bros. Inc.; Richard C. Doane, Chairman, International Paper Co.; J. Paschal Dreibelbis, Senior Vice President; Wallis B. Dunckel, President; Kempton Dunn, Chairman, American Brake Shoe Co.; E. Chester Gersten, New York; Paul A. Gorman, Pres. Western Electric Co.; Lewis A. Lapham, Chairman Exec. Comm; Wayne C. Marks, Armonk, N.Y.; George G. Montgomery, Chairman, Kern County Land Co.; William H. Moore, Chairman of the Board; William A. Morgan, Senior Vice Pres.; Herman C. Nolen, Chairman, McKesson & Robbins Inc.; John M. Olin, Hon. Chairman and member of principal comittees, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp.; Daniel E. Pomeroy, New Jersey; William T. Taylor, Chairman, ACF Industries Inc.; Walter N. Thayer, Pres. Whitney Communications Corp.; E. Clinton Towl, Pres. Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corp.; Thomas J. Watson Jr., Chairman, International Business Machines Corp.; Frazar B. Wilde, Chairman, Connecticut General Life Insurance Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 6, 1964.)

Paul A. Gorman

In 1975, when the U.S. Justice Department sued under the Clayton Act over interlocking directorships, Gorman was also a director of the Prudential Life Insurance Company, the International Paper Company, Campbell's Soup Company, and other Corporations. (Banks and Insurers Sued Over Dual Directorships. New York Times, Oct. 7, 1975.)

The Bankers Trust, 1966-71

Directors: William H. Moore, Chairman of the Board; Wallis B. Dunckel, President; Lewis A. Lapham, Chairman Exec. Comm; Lee S. Bickmore, Pres. National Biscuit Co.; John M. Budinger, Senior Vice Pres.; Joseph F. Cullman 3d, Pres. Philip Morris Inc.; Richard C. Doane, Chairman, International Paper Co.; Kempton Dunn, Chairman, American Brake Shoe Co.; Paul A. Gorman, Pres. Western Electric Co.; Plato Malozemoff, Pres. Newmont Mining Corp.; Wayne C. Marks, Armonk, N.Y.; Walter A. Marting, Pres. The Hanna Mining Co.; William F. May, Chairman, American Can Co.; George G. Montgomery, Chairman, Kern County Land Co.; William A. Morgan, Senior Vice Pres.; Herman C. Nolen, Chairman, McKesson & Robbins Inc.; William T. Taylor, Chairman, ACF Industries Inc.; Walter N. Thayer, Pres. Whitney Communications Corp.; E. Clinton Towl, Pres. Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corp.; Thomas J. Watson Jr., Chairman, International Business Machines Corp.; Frazar B. Wilde, Chairman, Connecticut General Life Insurance Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 7, 1966.) In 1967, Budinger left, and Alfred Brittain III joined as President and a director; also Philip D. Reed, Director of various corporations and former Chairman of General Electric; Kenneth Rush, Pres. Union Carbide Corp.; and Andrew W. Tarkington, Pres. Continental Oil Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 17, 1967.) In 1968, Montgomery left. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 16, 1968.) In 1969, Morgan and Wilde left, and Chester Baylis Jr., Exec. Vice Pres. Bankers Trust, and Francis C. Rooney Jr., Pres. Melville Shoe Corp., joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1969.) In 1970, Rush left, and John W. Brooks, Pres. and CEO, Celanese Corp.; C. Wadsworth Farnum, Senior Vice Pres., joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan.19, 1970.) Dunckel left before 1971. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 11, 1971.) Doane, Dunn, and Marks left during the year.

Alfred Brittain III

Alfred Brittain III's grandfather was Rev. Dr. Alfred Britain of Stamford, Conn., rector emeritus of St. John's Episcopal Church in Batavia, N.Y.: "Born in London, he was ordained in 1893, and his first rectorship was at Durham, in the tobacco district of Connecticut. For a time he was curate at St. Thomas Church in New York. Since retirement he had assisted in churches here and in New Canaan. He leaves a son, Alfred Brittain Jr., vice president of the Northern Trust Company of Chicago, and a daughter, Mrs. Thomas Greaves of New Canaan." (Rev. Dr. Brittain, 76, At Batavia 27 Years. New York Times, Jul. 2, 1943.) Alfred Brittain Jr. joined the New York Trust Company in 1944. He was a vice president and senior loan officer at his retirement in 1960. His other son, David C. Brittain, was a corporate vice president of Plough Inc. (Alfred Brittain, Veteran Banker In Chicago and New York, Was 81. New York Times, Aug. 13, 1977.) His son, Alfred Brittain 3d, graduated from Yale in 1945 and was with the Bankers Trust Company. (Miss B. Memhard Wed in Greenwich. New York Times, Dec. 19, 1948.) He joined the Bankers Trust as a credit investigator in 1947, became assistant treasurer in 1951, assistant vice president in 1954, first vice president in 1962 and later senior vice president. He was elected president of the Bankers Trust Company in 1966, and was elected a director of Philip Morris Inc. the same year. (Philip Morris Picks Director. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1966.) In 1970, he was elected treasurer of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. (Carnegie Peace Group Names New Chairman. New York Times, Jun. 16, 1970.) He retired from the bank in 1987, and from the board of Philip Morris when he reached thr mandatory retirement age in 1991.

The Bankers Trust, 1972-75

William H. Moore, Chairman of the Board; Lewis A. Lapham, Vice Chairman; Alfred Brittain III, President; Chester Baylis Jr., Chairman Exec. Comm; Lee S. Bickmore, Chairman and CEO, Nabisco Inc.; John W. Brooks, Chairman and CEO, Celanese Corp.; Joseph F. Cullman 3d, Chairman, Philip Morris Inc.; William M. Ellinghaus, Pres. New York Telephone Co.; C. Wadsworth Farnum, Exec. Vice Pres.; Richard L. Gelb, Pres. Bristol-Myers Co.; Paul A. Gorman, Chairman and Pres., International Paper Co.; Plato Malozemoff, Pres. Newmont Mining Corp.; Walter A. Marting, Pres. The Hanna Mining Co.; William F. May, Chairman, American Can Co.; Donald F. McCullough, Chairman and CEO, Collins & Aikman Corp.; Herman C. Nolen, director of various Corporations; Calvin H. Plimpton, M.D., Pres., Downstate Medical Center, State University of New York; Philip D. Reed, Director of various corporations and former Chairman of General Electric; Francis C. Rooney Jr., Pres. and CEO, Melville Shoe Corp.; Andrew W. Tarkington, Director and Consultant, Continental Oil Co.; William T. Taylor, Chairman Exec. Comm., ACF Industries Inc.; Walter N. Thayer, Pres. Whitney Communications Corp. and Partner, Whitcom Investment Co.; E. Clinton Towl, Chairman, Grumman Corp.; and Thomas J. Watson Jr., Chairman Exec. Comm., International Business Machines Corp. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 24, 1972.) Farnum, Reed, and Towl left, and were replaced by James E. Gibbons, Pres. Sackville-Gilliland Corp.; Vernon E. Jordan Jr., Exec. Director, National Urban League Inc.; and William P. Tavoulareas, Pres. Mobil Oil Corp. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 17, 1973.) Baylis and Taylor left, and were replaced by John W. Hannon Jr., Chairman Exec. Comm., Bankers Trust. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 23, 1974.) Lapham and Watson left, and were replaced by Richard A. Lenon, Pres. and CEO, International Minerals and Chemical Corp.; and Jacques G. Maisonrouge, Chairman I.B.M. World Trade Europe/Middle East/Africa Corp. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 22, 1975.) Lapham and Nolen left that year.

The Bankers Trust, 1976

Alfred Brittain III, Chairman of the Board; John W. Hannon Jr., President; Lee S. Bickmore, Chairman Exec. Comm., Nabisco Inc.; Howard W. Blauvelt, Chairman and CEO, Continental Oil Co.; John W. Brooks, Chairman and CEO, Celanese Corp.; Joseph F. Cullman 3d, Chairman, Philip Morris Inc.; William M. Ellinghaus, Vice Chairman, American Telephone and Telegraph Co.; Richard L. Gelb, Pres. and CEO, Bristol-Myers Co.; James E. Gibbons, Pres. Sackville-Gilliland Corp.; Paul A. Gorman, Director and former Chairman, International Paper Co.; Vernon E. Jordan Jr., Exec. Director, National Urban League Inc.; Richard A. Lenon, Pres. and CEO, International Minerals and Chemical Corp.; Jacques G. Maisonrouge, Chairman I.B.M. World Trade Europe/Middle East/Africa Corp.; Plato Malozemoff, Pres. Newmont Mining Corp.; Walter A. Marting, Chairman Exec. Comm., The Hanna Mining Co.; William F. May, Chairman and CEO, American Can Co.; Donald F. McCullough, Chairman and CEO, Collins & Aikman Corp.; William H. Moore, former Chairman of the Board, Bankers Trust Co. and Bankers Trust New York Corp.; Calvin H. Plimpton, M.D., Pres., Downstate Medical Center, State University of New York; Francis C. Rooney Jr., Pres. and CEO, Melville Corp.; William P. Tavoulareas, Pres. and Director, Mobil Oil Corp.; and Walter N. Thayer, Partner, Whitcom Investment Co. and Pres. Whitney Communications Corp. (Display Ad. New York Times, Oct. 19, 1976.)

The Bankers Trust, 1980s

Charles S. Sanford Jr. of Savannah, Ga. was promoted from president to deputy chairman. He graduated from the University of Georgia in 1958 and received an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1960. He joined Bankers Trust in 1962 and was named a senior vice president in 1973. Philip H. Hampton, 53, a managing director, was named vice chairman of the bank and holding company. (President Promoted At Bankers Trust. New York Times, Jun. 19, 1986.) David O. Beim, Ralph L. MacDonald, Eugene B. Shanks Jr. and George J. Vojta were named members of the Management Committee, which also included Alfred Brittain 3d, chairman; Charles S. Sanford Jr., deputy chairman; Philip M. Hampton, vice chairman, and Edward A. Lesser, executive vice president. (Bankers Trust Names 4 To Management Panel. New York Times, Dec. 18, 1986.)

Bankers Trust was a major source of funds for Kohlberg, Kravis Roberts (KKR), which took over R.J. Reynolds to make the company throw the fight against the state lawsuits and help the anti-smokers loot and plunder smokers.

George J. Vojta

"A native of Chicago, Mr. Vojta developed the plan that led to Citicorp's present organizational structure. After graduating from Yale University [1957], he joined Citibank (then First National City Bank) as a trainee in 1961. He was stationed in various posts throughout the Far East until 1972, when he took charge of the corporate planning department. A year later, he was promoted to senior vice president and general manager in charge of the international banking group. In 1977 he was put in charge of corporate strategy and development, where he remained until being named deputy to Mr. Costanzo earlier this year." After it became apparent that he would not succeed Walter B. Wriston, he resigned to become senior vice president and chief financial officer of the Phibro Corporation [later Phibro-Salomon Inc.] (A Top Citicorp Officer Resigns for New Post. By Leonard Sloane. New York Times, Jun. 5, 1981.) He joined the Bankers Trust Company as executive vice president in charge of strategic planning in 1984. He was president of Deak & Company, the parent of the foreign exchange and precious metals concern of Deak-Perera, and a director of Arthur D. Little & Company and Miles Laboratories, Inc. (A Strategic Planner For Bankers Trust. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1984.) George J. Vojta was the Bankers Trust designee under the Stockholders' Agreement in the anti-smoker takeover of Northwest Airlines, under Bush crony Fred V. Malek. "GEORGE J. VOJTA, age 61, has served as a director of the Corporation since October 1992. Mr. Vojta has served as vice chairman and director of Bankers Trust New York Corporation and Bankers Trust Company since 1992 and as a member of the management committee since 1984. He is also a director of Private Export Funding Corporation (financing of United States exports), a member of the New York State Banking Board and chairman of the Wharton Financial Services Center at the University of Pennsylvania (financial research and publication)." (Northwest Airlines 1997 DEF 14A.)

Northwest Airlines 1997 DEF 14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

The Bankers Trust, 1990s

Ralph L. MacDonald resigned from the management committee. Director Eugene B. Shanks was named to the new position of company president, while Edward A. Lesser and George J. Vojta were named vice chairmen, also new posts, and became directors. "Shanks joined Bankers Trust in 1973. He holds a bachelor's degree in math from Vanderbilt and a master's degree and doctorate in economics from Stanford." Chairman Charles Sanford was the fifth member of the management team. (Bankers Trust Names Three to Top Positions. By Michael Quint. New York Times, Jan. 22, 1992.) He left Bankers Trust in 1998 and became a director of Urstad Biddle Properties Inc. Urstadt Biddle Properties Inc. Appoints New Director. PR Newswire, Sep 17, 1999.)

The Bankers Trust, 1994

Directors include: George B. Beitzel, director since 1977, retired senior vice president and director, International Business Machines Corp., also a director of Rohm & Haas Co.; Vernon E. Jordan Jr., director since 1972, also a director of RJR Nabisco; Hamish Maxwell, director since 1984, Chairman of the Executive Committee, Philip Morris Companies Inc.; and Donald F. McCullough, director since 1971. The Capital Group, Inc. holds 8.19%, and Wellington Management Company 6.92%.

Bankers Trust New York Corp. 1994 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Bankers Trust New York Corp. 1995 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Bankers Trust New York Corp. 1996 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Bankers Trust New York Corp. 1997 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Bankers Trust New York Corp. 1998 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

In 1999, Bankers Trust Corporation merged into a subsidiary of Deutsche Bank AG, Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, with combined assets of about $850 billion.

Bankers Trust New York Corp. 1999 DEFM14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

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cast 02-10-12