The Chase National Bank

   1877 Established Chase National Bank of the City of New York
11/01/1921 Acquire By Merger Metropolitan National Bank of the City of NY
04/01/1926 Acquire By Merger Mechanics & Metals National Bnk of the City of NY
12/01/1927 Acquire By Merger Mutual National Bank of the City of New York
01/01/1929 Acquire By Merger Garfield National Bank of the City of New York
08/01/1929 Acquire By Merger National Park Bank of New York
05/01/1930 Acquire By Merger Equitable Trust Company of New York (1871-5/1930)
05/01/1930 Acquire By Merger Interstate Trust Company
12/01/1931 Purchase Bnking American Express Bank and Trust Company
03/01/1955 Merge To State President and Directors of the Manhattan Company
03/01/1955 Name Change To Chase Manhattan Bank, The (1799-9/1965)
09/01/1965 Convert Federal Chase Manhattan Bank, N.A., The
07/14/1996 Merge To State Chemical Bank
07/14/1996 Name Change To Chase Manhattan Bank, The
11/13/2004 Convert Federal JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association
New York Bank History C / Scripophily.com

There were five original directors, of whom John Thompson and his son, Samuel C. Thompson, were the prime movers. Lewis E. Ransom was a drug importer, Francis G. Adams had been a banker in Chicago, and Isaac W. White of White Bros. & Oliver was a dry goods dealer in Poughkeepsie. (The Chase National Bank of the City of New York, 1877-1922.)

The Chase National Bank of the City of New York, 1877-1922 / Internet Archive

"About ten years after it was founded Mr. Thompson and his associates sold the control to the late John G. Moore, Calvan S. Brice, James J. Hill, Gen. Samuel Thomas, and their associates." It opened for business at 117 Broadway; moved to the old Clearing House Building at 15 Nassau Street in 1887; and to the new Clearing House building at 83 Cedar Street in 1895. In 1915, it moved to the Adams Building at 57 Broadway. (The Chase National Enters New Home. New York Times, Jan. 10, 1915.)

The Chase National Bank, 1886

In January 1886, the number of directors was increased to seven. William H. Akin, John G. Moore, and Alfred C. Mintram were elected. Henry W. Cannon became president. In October, Akin and Mintram resigned, and were replaced by Cannon and Edward Tuck of Monroe & Co., bankers of New York and Paris. F.T. Adams replaced his father as a director, but resigned in November. Gen. Samuel Thomas, Calvin S. Brice, Oliver H. Payne were elected. William H. Porter became cashier. (The Chase National Bank of the City of New York, 1877-1922.)

John G. Moore

John Godfrey Moore was born in Steuben, Maine, where his father, Henry D. Moore, was a shipmaster. He came to New York in 1865 to be a clerk for his uncle, Wilson Godfrey, in the lumber business, and started his own firm in 1868. He became a partner of John O. Evans in the National Dredging Company of Wilmington, Del., and did work for the government in Buffalo, N.Y., Cleveland, Ohio, and the Delaware River. Evans and Moore organized the American Union Telegraph Co. in 1880, which was purchased by the Western Union, and the Mutual Union Telegraph Co., which Moore leased to the Western Union after Evans died. He established the stock exchange firm of Moore & Schley with Grant B. Schley, George F. Casilear, Elverton R. Chapman, and H.G. Timmermann in 1885. It was "largely identified with the operations of the Havemeyers and Rockefellers, J. Pierpont Morgan and William C. Whitney." (John Godfrey Moore Dead. New York Times, Jun. 24, 1899.) He was a director of more than twenty companies, in cluding the Western Union Telegraph and the Manhattan Trust Company, as well as the Chase National Bank. He had two daughters by his first wife, Jane Aldrich of Munson, Mass., who died in 1890. His second wife was Louise Hartshorne, daughter of James [M.] Hartshorne. (The Death of John G. Moore. Washington Times, Jun. 24, 1899; Died. New York Times, Feb. 18, 1890.) Henry D. Moore of the American Snuff Company was also born in Steuben, Maine.

The Death of John G. Moore / Library of Congress

His second wife's father, James Mott Hartshorne, founded the stock exchange firm of James M. Hartshorne & Brother in 1863, with his brother, Richard B. Hartshorne, and later his older brother, Sidney G. Hartshorne. (Obituary Notes. New York Sun, Mar. 7, 1895.) Hartshorne's grandson, Douglas Roy Hartshorne, Berzelius 1904, was a member of the War Production Board and was in the Office of Strategic Services in World War II. (Obituary Record of Graduates of the Undergraduate Schools Deceased during the Year 1949-1950, p. 162.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of the Undergraduate Schools, 1949-1950 Yale University Library (pdf, 221 pp)

John G. Moore left nearly his entire estate to his family, including cousins. (John G. Moore's Will Filed. New York Tribune, Jun. 29, 1899.) Dr. Vida Frank Moore, Professor of Philosophy and Pedagogy at Mount Holyoke and Elmira Colleges, was a half-sister. (Dr. Vida F. Moore Dead. New York Times, Jun. 12, 1915.) His sister, Ella Louise Moore, lived at 555 Park Avenue, New York. (Miss Ella Louise Moore. New York Times, May 20, 1926.) His widow married Warner Mifflin Leeds. (Leeds- Moore. New York Times, Dec. 18, 1901.)

John G. Moore's Will Filed / Library of Congress

His daughter Ruth married Lt. Col. Arthur H. Lee, then military attache of the British legation in Washington. (Wealthy Young Woman Married. Denver Evening Post, Dec. 24, 1899.) He had been Professor of Strategy and Tactics at the Royal Military College in Kingston, Ont. for five years before his appointment in 1898 as miliatary attaché with the U.S. Army in the war with Spain. The marriage "financially aided his subsequent parliamentary career." Col. Sir Arthur Hamilton Lee was knighted in 1916, and made the first Baron of Fareham. In 1920 they donated their estate, Chequers, as an official country residence for the Premier. He was on the board of governors of Sulgrave Manor, the ancestral home of George Washington's family. His title became extinct. (Viscount Lee, 78, Noted Statesman. New York Times, Jul. 22, 1947.) His other daughter also lived in England. (Miss Faith Moore Dead in Oxford, 65. New York Times, Mar. 17, 1944.)

John G. Moore's brother, Dr. Harry Boynton Moore, was chief surgeon to the Colorado Midland Railway Company. (News of the Railroads. New York Sun, Mar. 18, 1891.) His widow married Capt. William Randall Sayles, later Lieut. Commander and U.S. Naval Attaché at the Embassy in Paris. Their daughter, Katharine, married Ernest A. Bigelow Jr. (E.A. Bigelow, Jr. Weds Miss Moore. New York Times, Jan. 30, 1916.) His brother, Talman Bigelow, shot himself. They were cousins of Alanson B. Houghton, U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, and grandsons of John B. Bigelow, Ambassador to France during the Lincoln Administration. (Committed Suicide At Party in Home. New York Times, Dec. 15, 1927.) Ernest A. Bigelow Sr., Harvard 1890, a lawyer, was chairman of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company. (Ernest A. Bigelow, Ex-Chairman of IRT. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1945.) John Bigelow married Jane Poultney, who was a Royal descendant of Henry III, King of England, through the Plantagenets. (John Bigelow Dies in His 95th Year. New York Times, Dec. 20, 1911; Americans of Royal Descent: A Collection of Genealogies of American Families. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 116.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 116 / Google Books

After Ernest A. Bigelow Jr. died in 1919, Katharine Moore married Herman Livingston Rogers [Skull & Bones] 1914, son of Archibald Rogers [Yale 1873]. (New York Tribune, Sep. 14, 1920, p. 13, col. 1; Saturday Is Still Ruling as Favorite Day for Weddings. New York Tribune, Nov. 28, 1920.) Archibald Rogers was general manager of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad for a number of years, and he was in the military intelligence section of the War Dept. in the First World War. His sister married Herman Tong Livingston [Royal, p. 287]. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University 1928-1929, p. 345.) They met Mrs. Wallis Simpson while she was in China as the wife Lieut. Earl Winfield Spencer Jr. (Rogers Family Old Chums of Mrs. Simpson. Hammond Ind. Times, Dec. 5, 1936.) "They were in the little group invited to travel with the King aboard the yacht Nahlin during the King's Summer holiday cruise in the Mediterranean." (Rogerses Friends of King. New York Times, Dec. 8, 1936.) Herman Livingston Rogers gave the bride away when King Edward VIII married Wallis Warfield, and served as the couple's official spokesman. (Duke and Wallis Wed, With Mayor, Minister Administering Rites; and: Duke Pleads For Privacy On Honeymoon. Connellsville Weekly Courier, Jun. 3, 1937.)

New York Tribune, Sep. 14, 1920, p. 13 / Library of Congress
Saturday Is Still Ruling / Library of Congress
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1928-1929 / Yale University Library (pdf, 394 pp)
Americans of Royal Descent, p. 287 / Google Books

Herman L. Rogers's brother, Edmund Pendleton Rogers [Skull & Bones 1905], was a vice president of the Central Union Trust Company; president of the Fulton Trust Company since 1925, and then chairman. He was born in Hyde Park, N.Y., and was a boyhood friend of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. (Edmund Rogers of Fulton Trust, New York Times, Sep. 17, 1966.) His first wife was Edith January Elliott, daughter of Howard Elliott, president of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. Her aunt was Lady Leith of Aberdeenshire, Scotland. (Miss Edith J. Elliott and Edmund P. Rogers Wed in Emmanuel Church. Boston Evening Globe, Apr. 29, 1916.) She died in 1919, at age 23. Death of Daughter of Howard Elliott. Boston Daily Globe, Mar. 18, 1919.) His next wife was Mrs. Frank H. Goodyear, of Buffalo, N.Y. (Mrs. F.H. Goodyear Weds E.P. Rogers. New York Times, Oct. 1, 1931.) She was a member of the women's appeal committee of the Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases (Heads Women's Division In Cancer Center Drive. New York Times, Sep. 16, 1952), and a fund raiser for the Manhattan Women's Division of the New York Heart Association (Heart Association Opens Fund Drive. New York Times, Nov. 29, 1962; 8th Annual Ball For Heart Fund Is Planned Here. New York Times, Apr. 1, 1963; Lunch Will Open Campaign in Aid of Heart Patients. New York Times, Nov. 14, 1965.) Edmund P. Rogers Jr., Yale 1939, declined election to Book & Snake. (Senior Societies Hold Yale Tap Day. New York Times, May 13, 1938.) He was a partner of the New York law firm of Lord, Day & Lord, and a trustee of Berea College in Kentucky. (Edmund P. Rogers Jr., 49, Lord, Day & Lord Partner. New York Times, Dec. 4, 1966.)

Another brother, Rae Habersham Rogers, non-grad Yale 1910, married Marguerite E. Walker, daughter of Joseph Walker Jr. (Miss Walker Weds. New York Times, Oct. 13, 1908.) Their sister, Ellen Habersham Rogers, married Grant B. Schley's son, Kenneth Baker Schley, Yale 1902. Kenneth B. Schley was a partner of Moore & Schley from 1903 to 1944. His mother was a sister of George F. Baker Sr. His son, Kenneth Baker Schley Jr., graduated from Princeton in 1941. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University, 1943-1944, p. 247.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1943-1944 / Yale University Library (pdf, 393 pp)

Gen. Samuel Thomas

General Samuel Russell Thomas was a director, manager, or president of numerous railroads and foundries, and power, gas and electric companies, including the New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad (the Nickel Plate Line), the East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Railway, Lake Erie and Western Railway, The Canadian Pacific and the Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railway, and the Marquette, Houghton and Ontonagon systems. He was also a founder and director of the Bowling Green Trust Company, director of the Seventh National Bank, and a trustee of the Metropolitan Trust, Westchester Trust, and and Manhattan Trust Companies. He was born in Ohio, and began as a manufacturer of pig iron ans railroad supplies in Zanesville. He disposed of his holdings and retired from the Chase National Bank in 1899, and was succeeded by Oliver H. Payne. (Samuel Thomas Dead. New-York Daily Tribune, Jan. 12, 1903.) He was a member of the Jekyl Island Club. (Gen. Samuel Thomas Dead. New York Times, Jan. 12, 1903.) His estate was estimated at $10 million, but he cut off one of his sons, Harold Edgell Thomas of Chicago [who was an auto racer], with only the income from $100,000. (Gen. Samuel Thomas's Will. New York Times, Jan. 29, 1903.)

Samuel Thomas Dead, N.Y. Tribune / Library of Congress

His son, Edward Russell Thomas, Yale 1894, was publisher of the New York Morning Telegraph, and a director of the Mercantile Bank, Bowling Green Trust and Metropolitan Trust Companies, and the Provident Savings Life Assurance Society. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1926-1927, p. 150.) "Mr. Thomas was a man of some matrimonial experience, having been first married to Linda Lee, descendant of the Lees of Virginia. Linda seceded from this union to marry Cole Porter, song-writer. Then Mr. Thomas married his sister's best friend, Elizabeth Finley, but this union did not measure up to expectations and she cast him off in favor of Livingston Beeckman of Newport, R.I." His third wife and widow, actress Lucy Cotton, was married at least four more times (Col. Lyton Grey Ament, Lt. Comm. Charles A. Hann Jr., and William M. Magraw.). Her fifth fiance was Prince Vladimir Eristavi-Tchitcherine of Georgia. "Golden crowns will almost be placed on the couple, but withdrawn just in time, not to make them responsible for anything that happens in Soviet Georgia." In 1934, she bought Deauville, the $3 million "playground of the rich" in Miami Beach, and was acquitted of running a gambling casino. (If at First You Don't Succeed Try, Try Again. San Antonio Light, Jun. 8, 1941.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1926-1927 / Yale University Library (pdf, 346 pp)

His daughter, Eleanor, married Robert Livingston Beeckman. Edward H. Bulkley was best man, and the ushers were Stuyvesant Le Roy, Joseph Stevens, Edward L. Potter, Alphonso de Navarro, Theodore Havemeyer, and J. Borden Harriman. (Beeckman-Thomas. New York Times, Oct. 9, 1902.) Beeckman was a son of Gilbert Livingston Beeckman and Margaret Atherton Foster, and a descendant of Robert R. Livingston and Philip Livingston. He was employed by a stockbrokker at age 16, and became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1887. He was a state legislator, and was Governor of Rhode Island from 1915 to 1921. One of his sisters was Mrs. Louis Lorillard. Mrs. Eleanor Thomas Beeckman died in 1920. (Robert Beeckman, Ex-Governor, Dies. New York Times, Jan. 22, 1935.) Gilbert Livingston Beeckman was a Royal descendant of the Livingstons of Livingston Manor. (Distinguished Families in America, descended from Wilhelmus Beekman and Jan Thomasse Van Dyke. By William Benford Aitken, 1912, p. 25; and: Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 165.)

Distinguished Families in America, p. 25 / Google Books
Americans of Royal Descent, p. 165 / Google Books

Edward Tuck

Edward Tuck was born in Exeter, N.H., and graduated from Dartmouth in 1862. He entered the diplomatic service and was the U.S. Vice Consul in Paris in 1865-66. John Monroe recruited him to join John Monroe & Co., bankers, and he became a partner in 1871. He donated $300,000 in securities as a memorial to his father, Amos Tuck, who graduated in 1835 and was a trustee from 1857-1866. Amos Tuck was a member of Congress from 1847 to 1851. (Gives $300,000 to Dartmouth. New York Times, Sep. 20, 1899.) Edward Tuck retired from Monroe & Co. in 1892 and moved to Paris to acquire art. He married Julia Stell of Baltimore in 1872, and endowed the Stell Hospital in France with $100,000. (Edward Tuck Devotes His Wealth to France. New York Times, Sep. 1, 1929.)

The Chase National Bank, 1897-98

Directors: Henry W. Cannon, President; Samuel Thomas, Edward Tuck, James J. Hill of St. Paul, Minn.; Calvin S. Brice, John G. Moore, and William H. Porter, Vice President. J.T. Mills Jr., Cashier. (Annual Bank Elections. New York Times, Jan. 13, 1897 and Jan. 12, 1898.)

The Chase National Bank, 1900

Directors: H.W. Cannon, Grant B. Schley, A.B. Hepburn, James J. Hill, Oliver H. Payne, and Edward Tuck; John I. Waterbury, President of the Manhattan Trust Company, was elected to replace John G. Moore of Moore & Schley, deceased. (Elections of the Banks. New York Times, Jan. 10, 1900.)

The Chase National Bank, 1902-6

Directors: Oliver H. Payne, Grant B. Schley, James J. Hill, A.Barton Hepburn, John I. Waterbury, Henry W. Cannon, and George F. Baker. (Bank Board Elections. New York Times, Jan. 15, 1902; Annual Bank Elections. New York Times, Jan. 14, 1903; Boards of Directors Elected by City Banks. New York Times, Jan. 11, 1905.) A.H. Wiggin was re-elected, and George F. Baker Jr. was added to the board. (Many Bank Changes Result of Elections. New York Times, Jan. 10, 1906.)

Albert H. Wiggin

"Mr. Wiggin, immediately following his graduation from the English High School of Boston in 1885, entered the banking world as a clerk in the Commonwealth Bank of Boston. After serving his apprenticeship there, Mr. Wiggin became National Bank Examiner in the Boston District in 1891. Three years later he was appointed assistant cashier of the Third National Bank of that city. In 1897 he was appointed vice president of the Eliot National Bank. After serving in this position for two years, Mr. Wiggin left Boston to enter the Wall Street banking fraternity, and was elected Vice President of the National Park Bank. He held this position for five years and then joined other local banking institutions. When the Bankers Trust Company was organized in this city Mr. Wiggin was one of the group which brought into existence this strong institution..." (Billion Dollar Bank Formed By Merger With Chase National. New York Times, Feb. 12, 1926.) He was on the execuitve committee of the Hospital Saturday and Sunday Association in 1910 (Hospital Association Grows. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1910; New York's Own Needs. New York Times, Nov. 11, 1914.) He was elected a director of General Motors in 1915. (General Motors Changes. New York Times, Nov. 17, 1915.) Wiggin was a member of the committee of dissolution of the Tobacco Products Corporation for its merger with United Cigar Stores. (Tobacco Products Committee. New York Times, Feb. 15, 1928.) Wiggin was a member of the "rescue party" which met in J.P. Morgan's office after the stock market crashed. (Banking Bouys Up Stricken Stocks. New York Times, Oct. 27, 1929.) He was the son of Rev. James Henry and Laura W. Wiggin. (Long Records Back New Bank's Heads. New York Times, Mar. 19, 1930.) He was a director of Stone & Webster (Board of 22 Cut to 14 By Stone & Webster. New York Times, Mar. 24, 1933), and was among the Chase directors who left American Express due to the Banking Act of 1933 (Five New Directors in American Express. New York Times, May 5, 1934).

In 1911, the American Tobacco Company had cash accounts of between one and two million dollars at the Chase National Bank. (Fiscal Statements, The American Tobacco Co., Dec. 31, 1911.)

The Chase National Bank, 1909

Directors: Henry W. Cannon (Chairman), George F. Baker, Grant B. Schley, James J. Hill, A. Barton Hepburn (President), John I. Waterbury, Albert H. Wiggin, George F. Baker Jr., Francis L. Hine. Cashier: Samuel H. Miller. (Trow's Directory, 1909.)

The Chase National Bank, 1913

A large block of stock of the Chase National Bank, which was held by First National Bank interests, was sold to Albert H. Wiggin, President of the Chase. Control of the Chase National had been one of the targets of the Pujo Money Trust investigation. The First Security Company held stocks of banks and other companies which would have been illegal for the First National Bank to hold. Five of nine directors of the Chase National were also directors of the First National and the First Security Company. Directors of the Chase were: George F. Baker, George F. Baker Jr., A. Barton Hepburn, James J. Hill, Francis L. Hine, Grant B. Schley, Henry W. Cannon, John I. Waterbury, and Albert H. Wiggin. (First National Men Drop Chase Bank. New York Times, Jan. 6, 1913.) There were 83 shareholders, of whom the largest were George F. Baker, 28,682; H.W. Cannon, 1500; A.B. Hepburn, 1065; James J. Hill, 1500; Northern Finance Corp., 1500; Ferris S. Thompson, 6260; Edward Tuck, of Paris, 1500; United States Trust Company of New York, Trustee for Ferris S. Thompson, 1000; Albert H. Wiggin, 1000. (Stockholders in Big Banks. New York Times, Jan. 23, 1913.)

The Chase National Bank, 1915

Directors: Henry W. Cannon, James J. Hill, Grant B. Schley, A. Barton Hepburn, Chairman; John I. Waterbury, Albert H. Wiggin, President; George F. Baker Jr., Francis L. Hine, and John J. Mitchell. Vice Presidents: Samuel H. Miller and Edward R. Tinker Jr.; Henry M. Conkey, Cashier. (The Chase National Enters New Home. New York Times, Jan. 10, 1915.) According to Senate hearings, the Chase National Bank loaned $3 million for the Mexican Revolution. (Shows Germans Financed Villa. New York Times, Jan. 8, 1919.)

The Chase National Bank, 1916

In 1916, the Clayton Act forbade directors of banks with resources of more than $5 million from serving more than one banking institution. James J. Hill resigned, and was replaced by his son, James N. Hill. Charles M. Schwab, President of the Bethlehem Steel Company; D.C. Jackling, President of the Utah Copper Company; and Frank A. Sayles, President of the Slater Trust Company of Pawtucket, were added to the board, which was enlarged by three places. (Schwab Gets Place in Chase National. New York Times, Jan. 12, 1916.) Francis L. Hine and George F. Baker resigned, and were replaced by vice presidents Miller and Tinker. (More Bank Directors Quit. New York Times, Oct. 19, 1916.)

James N. Hill, Yale 1893

James Norman Hill was the son of James Jerome Hill, president of the Great Northern Railway, and Mary Theresa Mehegan. He was born in St. Paul, Minn., and joined the Great Northern on graduation. He was a director of it from 1898-1905, a director of the Northern Pacific Railway 1905-1913, and a director and officer of numerous other railroads. He was a trustee of the New York Trust Co. 1906-1912, a director of the Texas Company since 1913, and the Chase National Bank from 1916 until his death. His brother, three brothers-in-law, and four nephews also graduated from Yale. One of his sisters was Mrs. Pierre Lorillard. (Yale University Obituary Record of Graduates 1932-1933, p. 84.) J.N. Hill was one of four trustees, with Louis W. Hill, Walter J. Hill, and Edward T. Nichols, of the Lake Superior Company, which held Hill's iron ore properties. (J.J. Hill's "Empire" Kept in the Family. New York Times, Oct. 10, 1907.)

Yale University Obituary Record of Graduates 1932-1933 / Yale University Library (pdf, 271 pp)

The Chase National Bank, 1917-18

"In January, Edward T. Nichols, vice-president of the Great Northern Railway, became a director, and four new officers were added to the staff, bringing the number to seventeen. Those appointed at this time were: Gerhard M. Dahl, coming from the Electric Bond and Share Company, where he was Vice-President, to be Vice-President of the Chase Bank, and, as Assistant Cashiers, S. Frederick Telleen, Robert I. Barr, and Sewall S. Shaw. The following month Newcomb Carlton, President of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and Frederick H. Ecker, Vice-President of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, were elected Directors." (The Chase National Bank of the City of New York, 1877-1922.) A. Barton Hepburn resigned as Chairman of the Board of Directors to become Chairman of the Advisory Board. Albert H. Wiggin replaced hima as Chairman, and Eugene V.R. Thayer was elected President in place of Wiggin. (Thayer to Head Chase National. New York Times, Sep. 14, 1917.) The directorate was enlarged, and Andrew Fletcher, President of the American Locomotive Company; and Carl J. Schmidlapp and Gerhard M. Dahl, vice presidents, were elected. (Few Changes in Bank Directorates. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1918.) "Mr. Dahl was a member of the National War Finance Committee of the Red Cross, and Chairman of the Atlantic Division in the $100,000,000 drive. He was a member, too, of the Advisory Committee of the New York State Fuel Administration. Mr, Schmidlapp served with the Army in France, and Mr. Barr with the special Red Cross Mission to Russia." Robert I. Barr was an assistant cashier at Chase, and he and Barr were vice presidents of the Chase Securities Corporation in 1917. (The Chase National Bank of the City of New York, 1877-1922, p. 27.)

Edward T. Nichols

Edward Tattnall Nichols was the son of Rear Admiral Edward Tattnall Nichols, U.S.N., and Caroline Elizabeth Bowers. He was born in Pensacola, Fla., where his father was then stationed. He attended the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and St. Paul's School in Concord, N.H. He served in the Navy during the Korean expedition of 1871. In 1876, he became connected with the St. Paul and Pacific Railroad, and was closely associated with James J. Hill in that and its successors, the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway and the Great Northern Railway, as secretary, treasurer and a director. (Edward T. Nichols, Railroad Man, Dies. New York Times, Mar. 21, 1934.) Nichols was one of four trustees, with Louis W. Hill, J.N. Hill, and Walter J. Hill, of the Lake Superior Company, which held Hill's iron ore properties. (J.J. Hill's "Empire" Kept in the Family. New York Times, Oct. 10, 1907.)

Eugene Van Rensselaer Thayer Jr., Harvard 1904

In 1904, immediately after graduating from Harvard, he opened a brokerage business in Boston, which ended in 1912 when he became president of the Merchants National Bank of Boston. He moved to New York and took office as president of the Chase National Bank in 1918, which he resigned in 1921, but remained as a director. He was a director of Bethlehem Steel, Coca Cola, Otis Elevator, American Telephone and Telegraph, the Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, Chicago Pneumatic Tool Co., Kansas City Stockyards Co., and the Pere Marquette Railroad and numerous other firms, a director and chairman of the executive committee of the Central Trust Company of Illinois, and was once chairman of the Stutz Motor Car Company. (Eugene Thayer, 55, Ex-Banker, Dead. New York Times, Jan. 2, 1937.) His first wife, Gladys Baldwin Brooks, was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. Mortimer Brooks of New York. His ushers were Reginald Brooks, Philip Livermore, Delancey Jay, Hugh Minturn, Reginald Boardman, George P. Snow, Charles E. Perkins, and John L. Saltonstall, and James Jackson was best man. Adelaide Randolph, stepdaughter of William C. Whitney, was one of her bridesmaids. (Thayer-Brooks Wedding. New York Times, Sep. 4, 1903.) His mother-in-law created a $100,000 trust fund at the United States Trust Company for her grandson, Robert Thayer, administered by Frank L. Polk. (Grandchildren Get Estate. New York Times, Sep. 14, 1920.) His grandfather, Nathaniel Thayer, was a large benefactor of the Harvard Medical School.

He was best man at the wedding of Reginald Boardman to Carrie Louise Munn, daughter of Mrs. Charles A. Munn of Washington, formerly of Chicago. He and Boardman later went to a dance at the home of Secretary of the Treasury Franklin MacVeagh. (Washington Post, Feb. 18, 1911.) He was a member of the Executive Committee of the Harvard University Undergraduates Aero Training Corps, whose other members were William Thomas, George von L. Meyer, G. Richmond Fearing, N. Penrose Hallowell, Allan Forbes, Eliot Wadsworth, Philip A. Carroll, S. Huntington Wolcott, Charles E. Perkins, Benjamin Joy, A.J. Drexel Paul, Gordon H. Balch, and Roger Amory, chairman. (Harvard Aviators Ready for Licenses. New York Times, Aug. 25, 1916.) Thayer and his first wife were divorced in 1923, and he married Mary Elizabeth Harding, daughter of W.P.G. Harding, Governor of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, who was divorced from Frederick H. Prince Jr. the same day the Thayers got their decree. (Mrs. F.H. Prince Jr. Weds E.V.R. Thayer. New York Times, Jul. 1, 1923.) He left a $100,000 bequest to his secretary, $10,000 to his stepson, Frederick H. Prince 3d, and $5,000 to the Unitarian Church at Lancaster, Mass., with the residue to his wife. (Thayer's Will Is Filed. New York Times, Jan. 16, 1937.) His son, Robert Thayer, married Jean Forbes, daughter of John McHale Forbes, the Canadian Minister of Mines. (Thayer-Forbes. New York Times, Aug. 18, 1937.)

The Chase National Bank, 1920

In October 1919, the bank established a Medical Department which examined all applicants for employment. "A group insurance plan went into efi'ect in January, 1920, under which all employees of more than three months' standing are insured for from $1000 to $5000, according to length of service." (The Chase National Bank of the City of New York, 1877-1922, p. 27.) William Boyce Thompson, who headed the Red Cross Mission to Russia, was added to the board. (Samuel M'Roberts Quits National City. New York Times, Jan. 14, 1920.) Reeve Schley; Kenneth F. Wood of the Sayles Finishing Plants; H. Wendell Endicott of the Endicott Johnson Co.; and William M. Wood, president of the American Woolen Co.,were also added. (The Chase National Bank of the City of New York, 1877-1922.)

Franklin H. Gates, Elihu 1912

Franklin Herbert Gates was the son of Rev. Frederick Taylor Gates of the Rockefeller Foundation, and Emma Lucia Cahoon of Racine, Wis. He became associated with the Chase National Bank in 1920, as assistant cashier 1922-26 and second vice president until 1932. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1945-1946, pp. 81-82.) His son, Gordon Taylor Gates, Yale class of 1943, was killed in World War II. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1943-1944, p. 287.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1945-1946 / Yale University Library (pdf, 268 pp)
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1943-1944 / Yale University Library (pdf, 393 pp)

Reeve Schley, Wolf's Head 1903

Reeve Schley was the son of Grant Schley's brother, William T. Schley (1840-1912), an attorney for the New York Central Railroad. Reeve Schley graduated from Yale in 1903 and was a Fellow of the Yale Corporation in 1942. Reeve Schley practiced law with Simpson, Thacher & Bartlett for twelve years, until resigning to become a vice president of the Chase National Bank. He was vice president until 1946 and a director from 1920 to 1933. He was Eastern treasurer of the Republican National Committee from 1918 to 1920, and president of the American-Russian Chamber of Commerce. He was chairman of the Howe Sound Company, and a director of General Dynamics Corporation, the Atlas Corporation, the United States Guarantee Company, the Chihuahua Mining Company, and Potosi Mining Company. In 1956, he was elected chairman of the Underwood Corporation, and he was chairman and a director of the Somerville Trust Company until his death. (Reeve Schley, 79, Retired Banker. New York Times, Jun. 27, 1960.) He was a member of Wolf's Head. (Senior Tap Day At Yale. Chicago Daily Tribune, May 23, 1902.)

SCHLECHT - SCHUTT / Robert Ronald Hanley Sr.
Yale Daily News - Spring Vacation 1942 / Yale University

He married Kate De Forest Prentice, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William S.P. Prentice. Her brother, Bernon S. Prentice, was best man, and the ushers were his cousins, Kenneth Schley and Evander B. Schley Jr., Gifford Cochran [Wolf's Head 1903], Howard A. Plummer [Wolf's Head 1903], Harry Beekman, and C. Douglass Green of New York, and Harvey McClintock of Pittsburgh, Pa. Her bridesmaids included her cousin, Gertrude Sheldon, daughter of George R. Sheldon of New York. (Schley-Prentice Wedding at Galilee. New York Times, Sep. 8, 1907.) Mrs. Reeve Schley was a fund-raiser for the American Heart Association. (Aides Are Listed For Heart Ball At the Waldorf. New York Times, Feb. 4, 1962; 8th Annual Ball For Heart Fund Is Planned Here. New York Times, Apr. 1, 1963.)

Reeve Schley visited Russia and arranged the sale of $36.3 million worth of cotton to it. The deal was financed by the Chase National Bank and the Equitable Company of New York. (Russian Textile Unit in Bank Deal Here. New York Times, Aug. 7, 1925.) He was president of the American-Russian Chamber of Commerce, with Allen Wardwell as vice president. (Campaign to Revive Trade With Russia. New York Times, Jun. 24, 1926.) George C. Hanson, former U.S. Consul General at Moscow, accused New York bankers of meddling in State Department affairs to their own advantage. The Chamber complained about his complaints, and got him removed from his position. In a letter to the State Department, Hanson complained that "Mr. Browne [executive secretary of the chamber] inferred that the chamber was practically a branch of the ____ ____ Bank and that the chamber did what the bank wished it to do. It is a well-known fact that this bank has a monopoly of financing American Russian trade." Hanson committed suicide on an ocean liner while returning home from Greece. (Hanson Laid Fall to Bank Meddling. New York Times, Sep. 12, 1935.)

His uncle, Gen. Charles McCormick Reeve, Yale 1870, was a state legislator, and one of three commissioners appointed by the Governor of Minnesota in 1892 to accompany a shipload of flour to Russia. He was chairman of the Minnesota State Board of Managers for the Chicago World's Fair in 1893. He lived in Minneapolis since 1871. (Gen. Reeve, 99, Dies; Oldest Yale Man. New York Times, Jun. 25, 1947; Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University, 1946-1947, p. 5.) He was one of the original promoters of the town of Buxton, North Dakota, along with H.C. Ives of St. Paul, who was secretary to James J. Hill. His uncle, Budd Reeve, was general manager. The three carloads of lumber to build the town were the first shipment over the newly constructed St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railway line. (History of Buxton. Welcome to Buxton, North Dakota, accessed 7-27-10.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1946-1947 / Yale University Library (pdf, 241 pp)
History of Buxton / Welcome to Buxton, North Dakota

Reeve Schley Jr. [Wolf's Head 1931] was an usher at the wedding of John Holbrook [Scroll & Key 1931]. Reeve Schley's daughter, Eleanor Prentice Schley, married Webster B. Todd, and they were the parents of anti-smoker New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman. Nicholas Brady was a ribbon bearer at the wedding. (Miss Schley Bride of Webster B. Todd. New York Times, Oct. 11, 1933.)

Allen Wardwell 2d and Reeve Schley 3d were ushers for James Cox Brady (Scroll & Keys 1957), a descendant of tobacco financier Anthony N. Brady, who married Joan Babcock, a great-great-granddaughter of Samuel D. Babcock. Nicholas F. Brady was best man for his brother. (Wedding June 27 For Joan Babcock. New York Times, Jun. 2, 1957; L.I. Nuptials Held for Joan Babcock. New York Times, Jun. 28, 1957.)

The Chase National Bank, 1921-22, merger with The Metropolitan National Bank

Directors: Henry W. Cannon; A. Barton Hepburn, Chairman of the Advisory Board; Albert H. Wiggin, President; John J. Mitchell; Guy E. Tripp; James N. Hill; Daniel C. Jackling; Charles M. Schwab; Samuel H. Miller, Vice President; Edward R. Tinker; Edward T. Nichols; Newcomb Carlton; Frederick H. Ecker; Eugene V.R. Thayer; Carl J. Schmidlapp, Vice President; Gerhard M. Dahl, Vice President; Andrew Fletcher; William Boyce Thompson; Reeve Schley, Vice President; Kenneth F. Wood; H. Wendell Endicott; William M. Wood; Jeremiah Milbank; Henry Ollesheimer. Other vice presidents: Alfred C. Andrews, Robert I. Barr, Sherrill Smith. (Display Ad. New York Times, Nov. 24, 1921, and Jun. 30, 1922.)

Jeremiah Milbank, Yale 1909

Jeremiah Milbank (1887-1972) was head of the family investment firm, J. Milbank & Co. In 1917, he gave $50,000 to the Red Cross to found the Institute for the Disabled and Crippled. He was also a director of the Southern Railway, Corn Products, Allis-Chalmers, Western Union, American Surety, American Express and the Provident Loan Society. In 1928, he initiated the International Committee for the Study of Infantile Paralysis, forerunner of the National Committee. He was a friend and supporter of Herbert Hoover, and was the Eastern treasurer of the Republican National Committee in 1928 and 1932. Their children were Jeremiah Milbank Jr., Mrs. H. Lawrence Bogert Jr., and Mrs. Charles C. Spalding. (Jeremiah Milbank, a Financier Who Aided the Crippled, Dead. New York Times, Mar. 23, 1972.) He was a director of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company from 1927 to 1965. (Five Directors Are Named to the Board of Metropolitan Life Insurance. New York Times, Apr. 16, 1965.) His first wife was Katharine Schulze, daughter of Theodore A. Schulze of Minneapolis. (Married. New York Times, Dec. 13, 1910.) She died in 1917, and he married her sister, Katharine. (New York Times, May 25, 1919.) Jeremiah Milbank gave $5,000 to the American Society for the Control of Cancer. (Cancer Fund Gains $90,000 in Campaign. New York Times, Sep. 28, 1926.) Mr. and Mrs. Milbank were on the 50th Anniversary celebration committee for Memorial Hospital (Memorial Hospital to Mark 50th Year. New York Times, May 20, 1934), helped fund the American Heart Association (Heart Fund Ball Will Fete Envoys. New York Times, Apr. 26, 1956), and were patrons of the New York City Cancer Committee of the American Cancer Society. (Cancer Society To Gain June 15 At Fete on Liner. New York Times, May 25, 1959.)

A sister-in-law, Louise Rose Schulze, married his classmate, Theodore Pomeroy, who formed Case, Pomeroy & Co. with Jeremiah Milbank and Walter L. Case. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates, 1927-1928, p.175.) Ushers at the Schulze-Pomeroy wedding were to be William McCormick Blair, Albert Farwell, and Francis Butler of Chicago, Clark Mitchell of Denver, Jeremiah Milbank of New York, Maxwell Parry of Minneapolis, and her brother, Theodore Schulze. (Coming Weddings. Chicago Tribune, Apr. 17, 1910.) His brother-in-law, Theodore Schulze, was another 1909 Yale classmate. He married Margaret Hickman Thompson, daughter of William Boyce Thompson. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1936-1937, p. 114.) Mrs. Schulze Sr. was on the board of lady managers of the St. Paul Free Medical Dispensary, along with Mrs. Thomas Cochran. James J. Hill was a trustee. Two members of her family, the Lindekes, were involved as well. (Deal is Closed. St. Paul Daily Globe, Feb. 18, 1896, p. 5.) Theodore A. Schulze was a member of the committee to raise $1 million for a general hospital in St. Paul. (Will Begin Active Work for New Hospital. St. Paul Globe, Feb. 26, 1903.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates, 1927-1928 / Yale University Library (pdf, 366 pp)
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1936-1937 / Yale University Library (pdf, 269 pp)
St. Paul Daily Globe, Feb. 18, 1896, p. 5 / Library of Congress

His brother, Dunlevy Milbank, Yale 1900, was trustee of the Children's Aid Society for 35 years, and financed its million-dollar Children's Center in Harlem. He was a trustee since 1923 of Presbyterian Hospital in the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, and was a board member of the Bank of New York. (Dunlevy Milbank of Aid Society, 81. New York Times, Oct. 17, 1959.) He was a director of Borden's Condensed Milk (New York Milk Supply Controlled by Oil Trust [sic]. Racine Daily Journal, Nov. 10, 1909.) He gave $25,000 to the Red Cross War Fund. (New York City Near Its Red Cross Goal. New York Times, Jun. 23, 1917.) He was a director of Blair & Co. (Display Ad. Boston Globe, Apr. 5, 1920), and was a director of the Texas & Pacific Railway for 36 years. His son, Thomas F. Milbank, succeded him. (T&P President Tells of New E.P. Train to New York. El Paso Herald, Oct. 23, 1947.) Dunlevy Milbank gave $10,000 to the ASCC ($514,709 For Cancer Fight. New York Times, Dec. 31, 1926.) He left a legacy of $1 million to Presbyterian Hospital and $250,000 to Yale. His cousin, Eleanor Anderson Campbell, received $200,000 to be used for charity. (Milbank Will Gives Million to Hospital. New York Times, Oct. 23, 1959.) Mrs. Milbank was the daughter of Thomas Powell Fowler, a lawyer and president of the New York Ontario & Western Railroad. She was a vice president of the Ladies Christian Union and of the Y.W.C.A. which grew from its employment bureau. (Mrs. Dunlevy Milbank Dies at 82; Music Patron and Philanthropist. New York Times, Apr. 13, 1967.)

Their father was Joseph Milbank, the son of Jeremiah Milbank, a director of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad for 23 years. For 16 years, he was President of the Board of Trustees and Presiding Elder of the Madison Avenue Baptist Church. (Joseph Milbank Dies. New York Times, Sep. 8, 1914.) He replaced his late father, Jeremiah Milbank, as a director of the railroad. William Rockefeller was a fellow director. (Railway Annuals. Milwaukee Sentinel, Jun. 6, 1884.) He was a trustee of the New York Orthopedic Dispensary and Hospital. (Orthopedic Hospital Annex. New York Times, Nov. 23, 1892.) He reorganized the New York Condensed Milk Co. and reincorporated it as the Borden Condensed Milk Co., with his cousins Albert J. Milbank and Isaac Milbank, William J. Rogers, and H. Lee Borden. (A Great American Industry. Guthrie Daily Leader, May 25, 1899.) He married Ella Dunlevy, who was President of the Ladies Christian Union of the church. (Obituary Notes. New York Times, Mar. 19, 1912.) He was a brother of Elizabeth Milbank Anderson, founder of the Milbank Memorial Fund.

Their grandfather, Jeremiah Milbank, was born in New York City in 1818, and was educated in private schools there and in Redding, Conn. He joined the firm of I. and R. Milbank, wholesale grocers. In 1858, he supplied the capital with which the Borden Condensed Milk Company began business. He was a founder of the Madison Avenue Baptist Church. (Other Deaths. New York Times, Jun. 2, 1884.) He left $100,000 each to his son Joseph and daughter Elizabeth Milbank Anderson; $10,000 each to his nephews, Isaac M. Milbank and Albert G. Milbank, and niece, Annie McCollum; and to a friend, Rev. Charles D.W. Bridgman. His wife got their house in Greenwich, Conn. and $100,000 plus the remainder. (Jeremiah Milbank's Bequests. New York Times, Jun. 13, 1884.)

Jeremiah's brother, Isaac M. Milbank (?1810-1889), of Greenfield Hills, Conn., was the inventor of the Milbank-Amsler swinging breech used in Swiss military rifles. (Died. New York Times, Mar. 26, 1889; Carbon Canyon and Rancho Santa Ana del Chino: Isaac Milbank. Carbon Canyon Chronicle, Sep. 23, 2010. Accessed 6/6/11.)

Carbon Canyon and Rancho Santa Ana del Chino: Isaac Milbank / Carbon Canyon Chronicle

The Chase National Bank, 1923-25

Directors: Directors: Henry W. Cannon; Albert H. Wiggin, President; John J. Mitchell, Chairman, Illinois Trust & Savings Bank, Chicago; Guy E. Tripp, Chairman, Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co.; James N. Hill; Daniel C. Jackling, Vice President and Managing Director, Utah Copper Co.; Charles M. Schwab, Chairman, Bethlehem Steel Corp.; Samuel H. Miller, Vice President; Edward R. Tinker, President, Chase Securities Corp.; Edward T. Nichols, Vice President, Great Northern Railway Co.; Newcomb Carlton, President, Western Union Telegraph Co.; Frederick H. Ecker, Vice President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; Eugene V.R. Thayer, E. Atkins & Co.; Carl J. Schmidlapp, Vice President; Gerhard M. Dahl, Hayden Stone & Co.; Andrew Fletcher, President American Locomotive Co.; Reeve Schley, Vice President; H. Wendell Endicott, Vice President, Endicott Johnson Corp.; William M. Wood, President, American Woolen Co.; Jeremiah Milbank; Henry Ollesheimer, Vice President; and Arthur G. Hoffman, Vice President, The Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. Thomas Ritchie was Comptroller, and William P. Holly, Cashier. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1923.) In 1924, the board was expanded and F. Edson White, President of Armour & Company; Alfred P. Sloan Jr., President of General Motors Corporation; and Elisha Walker, President of Blair & Co. Inc., joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Oct. 15, 1924.) In 1925, Wood left, and Malcolm G. Chace, President, Chace & Harriman Inc., and Thomas N. McCarter, President, Public Service Corporation of New Jersey, were elected. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jul. 7, 1925.)

Malcolm G. Chace, Yale 1896

Malcolm Greene Chace attended Brown University, and transferred to Yale, where he graduated in 1896. He started at his grandfather's mill in Albion, then joined Henry I. Harriman to found the Chace & Harriman and The New England Electric System. He organized the Berkshire Hathaway Inc. textile concern. (Malcolm Chace, Financier, Dies. New York Times, Jul. 17, 1955.) His father was Arnold Buffum Chace, Chancellor of Brown University, and grandfather was Samuel B. Chace. (Dr. Arnold B. Chace of Providence Dead. New York Times, Feb. 29, 1932.) He married Elizabeth Edwards in 1903. (Weddings of a Day. New York Times, Apr. 16, 1903.) He was a director of the Old Colony Trust Company. (Display Ad. Boston Globe, Apr. 8, 1920.) He was a director of the International Paper Company until 1951, when he was succeeded by his son, Malcolm G. Chace Jr. (Son Succeeds Chace on Paper Co. Board. North Adams Transcript, Oct. 24, 1951.) Their daughter, Eliot Chace, married James Cox Brady Jr. (Eliot Chace Weds J. Cox Brady Jr. New York Times, Jul. 7, 1929.) James C. Brady joined Chace, his son and his nephew, Jonathan Chace, on the board of Berkshire Mills in 1952. (Fine Spinning Eyes South, But Hopes to Stay in N.E. North Adams Transcript, Nov. 20, 1952.) (Hathaway, Berkshire Mills in Merger. Fitchburg Sentinel, Mar. 15, 1955.) Buffett Partnership Ltd. of Omaha began buying in in 1965. President Seabury Stanton and his son resigned, but the Chaces remained. (Stanton Leaving Berk. Hathaway In Policy Dispute. North Adams Transcript, May 11, 1965.)

Malcolm G. Chace Jr. graduated from Yale in 1926 and married Beatrice Oenslager. (Charline Edwards to Wed F.K. Green. New York Times, Nov. 23, 1929.) He was formerly the chairman of Berkshire Hathaway Inc., a holding company in Omaha. A daughter married Wilson Nolen, a vice president of Becton Dickinson & Co, whose father, Herman C. Nolen, was chairman of McKesson & Robbins. His grandson, Christian Nolen, graduated from Yale as well. (Miss Wright Has Wedding. New York Times, Sep. 15, 1985.)

F. Edson White

F. Edson White succeeded J. Ogden Armour as president of Armour & Co. in 1923. He was a director of the Continental Illinois Bank, the Chase National Bank of New York, Montgomery Ward & Co. and other firms. (F. Edson White Dies in Fall at Chicago. New York Times, Jan. 16, 1931.) He was elected to the board of the Chase National Bank at the same time as Alfred P. Sloan, president of the General Motors Corporation. (Join Chase National Board. New York Times, May 10, 1923 p. 27.) White was on Morgan's List of favored stock buyers who got special discounts. (List of 'Favored' in Alleghany Issue. New York Times, May 25, 1933.) Edson W. Spencer of Honeywell was his grandson.

The Chase National Bank, 1926, merger with the Mechanics & Metals National Bank

Directors: Henry W. Cannon, Albert H. Wiggin, John J. Mitchell, Guy E. Tripp, James N. Hill, Daniel C. Jackling, Charles M. Schwab, Samuel H. Miller, Edward R. Tinker, Edward T. Nichols, Newcomb Carlton, Frederick H. Ecker, Eugene V.R. Thayer, Carl J. Schmidlapp, Gerhard M. Dahl, Reeve Schley, H. Wendell Endicott, Jeremiah Milbank, Henry Ollescheimer, Arthur G. Hoffman, F. Edson White, Alfred P. Sloan Jr., Elisha Walker, Malcolm G. Chace, Thomas N. McCarter, Robert L. Clarkson, Amos L. Beaty, William H. Woodin, William P. Holly, Gates W. McGarrah, John McHugh, William E.S. Griswold [S&B 1899], Henry O. Havemeyer, William A. Jamison, L.F. Loree, Theodore Pratt, Robert C. Pruyn, Samuel F. Pryor, and Ferdinand W. Roebling Jr. Albert Wiggin continued as Chairman of the Board; Edward R. Tinker, as Chairman of the Executive Committee; and Halstead Freeman, as President of Chase Securities Corporation. The Chase National Bank operated foreign branchges at Havana, Cuba; Cristobal, Canal Zone; and Panama City, Republic of Panama. (Billion Dollar Bank Formed By Merger With Chase National. New York Times, Feb. 12, 1926.) Wallace Delafield Simmons, S&B 1890, was a vice president of the Mechanics and Metals National Bank until 1927.

Halstead G. Freeman, Princeton 1903

Halstead Gurnee Freeman (1881-1970) was the son of Rev. John N. Freeman (1841-1921, Princeton 1863). (Obituary. John Newton Freeman '63. Princeton Alumni Weekly, 1921 Jun 22;21(36):900, 902.) He married Marion Forgan, sister of J. Russell Forgan, in Evanston, Ill., in 1916. (Personal and Social. Winnipeg Free Press, Jan. 25, 1916.) In 1921, he was Secretary of Chase Securities (Display Ad. New York Tribune, Oct. 23, 1921), and a vice president in 1922 (The Chase National Bank of the City of New York, 1877-1922, p. 25) of which he was President on 1926. The Freemans were social friends of Dr. and Mrs. J. Ramsey Hunt. (Eichem, Composer, Guest. New York Times, Mar. 19, 1926.) He was a vice chairman of the Investment Bankers Association of America. (Bankers' Group Election. New York Times, Nov. 25, 1926), and a director of the Tide Water Associated Oil Company (Financial Notes. New York Times, Feb. 18, 1927); American International Corporation (American International's Board. New York Times, Apr. 7, 1927), which held a "substantial" interest in the United Fruit Co. since 1916; Petroleum Corp. of America (Offers $110,500,000 in Oil Stocks Today. New York Times, Jan. 23, 1929); and the Utility Equities Corp. (Holding Company Formed. New York Times, Nov. 26, 1928). He was among the Chase directors who left American Express due to the Banking Act of 1933 (Five New Directors in American Express. New York Times, May 5, 1934). He joined Field, Glore & Co., of which his brother-in-law Forgan was a partner, when Marshall Field retired (H.G. Freeman Joins Field, Glore & Co. New York Times, Jul. 2, 1935), and its name was changed to Glore, Forgan. (Banking House to Change Name. Brooklyn Eagle, Dec. 22, 1936.) He died in 1970. (Deaths. New York Times, Dec. 6, 1970.)

Princeton Alumni Weekly, 1921 / Foogle Books

John McHugh

John McHugh, President of the consolidated bank, was president of the First National Bank of Sioux City, Iowa, until 1915, when he was elected Vice President of the Mechanics and Metals National Bank, and President in 1922. He was born in Canada, and gained his knowledge of banking in Nebraska. (Billion Dollar Bank Formed By Merger With Chase National. New York Times, Feb. 12, 1926.)

The Chase National Bank, 1927

Directors: Henry W. Cannon; Albert H. Wiggin, Chairman; John J. Mitchell, Chairman, Illinois Merchants Trust Co., Chicago; James N. Hill; Daniel C. Jackling, President, Utah Copper Co.; Charles N. Schwab, Chairman, Bethlehem Steel Corp.; Samuel H. Miller, Vice President; Edward R. Tinker; Edward T. Nichols, Vice President, Great Northern Railway; Newcomb Carlton, President, Western Union Telegraph Co.; Frederick H. Ecker, Vice President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; Eugene V.R. Thayer, Lowry & Co. Inc.; Carl J. Schmidlapp, Vice President; Gerhard M. Dahl, Chairman, Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corp.; Reeve Schley, Vice President; H. Wendell Endicott; Jeremiah Milbank; Henry Ollesheimer, Vice President; Arthur G. Hoffman, Vice President, The Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. of America; F. Edson White, President, Armour & Co.; Alfred P. Sloan Jr., President, General Motors Corp.; Elisha Walker, President, Blair & Co,. Inc.; Malcolm G. Chace; Thomas N. McCarter, President, Public Service Corporation of New Jersey; Robert L. Clarkson, Vice Chairman; Amos L. Beaty, Chairman, The Texas Company; John McHugh, President; William E.S. Griswold, Vice President, W. & J. Sloane; Henry O. Havemeyer, President, Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal; William A. Jamison, Arbuckle Bros.; L.F. Loree, President, The Delaware & Hudson Co.; Theodore Pratt; Robert C. Pruyn, President, National Commercial Bank & Trust Co., Albany, N.Y.; Samuel F. Pryor, Chairman, Executive Committee, Remington Arms Co. Inc.; Ferdinand W. Roebling Jr., President, J.A. Roebling's Sons Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Oct. 17, 1927.)

The Chase National Bank, 1929, merger with the National Park Bank

Board of Directors: Henry W. Cannon, Albert H. Wiggin, James N. Hill, Daniel C. Jackling, Charles M. Schwab, Newcomb Carlton, Frederick H. Ecker, Carl J. Schmidlapp, Gerhard M. Dahl, Reeve Schley, H. Wendell Endicott, Jeremiah Milbank, Henry Ollesheimer, Arthur G. Hoffman, F. Edson White, Alfred P. Sloan Jr., Malcolm G. Chace, Thomas N. McCarter, Robert L. Clarkson, Amos L. Beaty, John McHugh, William E.S. Griswold, Henry O. Havemeyer, L.F. Loree, Theodore Pratt, Robert C. Pruyn, Samuel F. Pryor, Ferdinand W. Roebling Jr., Earl D. Babst, Francis M. Brownell, James T. Lee, Andrew W. Robertson, Halstead G. Freeman, Charles Scribner, Richard Delafield, Cornelius Vanderbilt, Thomas F. Vietor, John G. Milburn, Vincent Astor, Joseph D. Oliver, Lewis Cass Ledyard Jr., David M. Goodrich, Eugenius H. Outerbridge, Kenneth P. Budd, Frank L. Polk, George N. Moffett, Charles S. McCain, Thomas I. Parkinson, Harvey C. Couch, and Clarence Dillon. (Display Ad. New York Times, Aug. 26, 1929.) James Cabell Bruce was a vice president of the National Park Bank and subsequently the Chase National Bank, 1927-31.

Charles S. McCain, Yale 1904

McCain had his early education in Little Rock, Ark., and soon after graduating from Yale, he helped to organize the Bank of Prescott, Ark., and the Bank of McGehee, Ark., and was cashier of both banks. In 1913, he organized the Bankers' Trust Company of Little Rock, of which he was successively vice president and president. He came to the National Park Bank as a vice president at the invitation of J.H. Fulton, and became president when Fulton died in 1927. He was also a director of the Western Electric Company, the American Express Company and other companies. (Long Records Back New Bank's Heads. New York Times, Mar. 19, 1930.) He was among the Chase directors who left American Express due to the Banking Act of 1933 (Five New Directors in American Express. New York Times, May 5, 1934).

The Chase National Bank, 1930, merges with The Equitable Trust Company and Interstate Trust Company; and acquires Harris, Forbes

Directors: Albert H. Wiggin, John McHugh, Charles S. McCain, Robert L. Clarkson, Winthrop W. Aldrich [who became President], Frank Altschul, Vincent Astor, Gordon Auchincloss, Earl D. Babst, Howard Bayne, Amos L. Beaty, Hugh Blair-Smith, Henry S. Bowers, Edward N. Brown, Francis H. Brownell, Kenneth P. Budd, H. Donald Campbell, Henry W. Cannon, Newcomb Carlton, Walter S. Carpenter Jr., Malcolm G. Chace, Harold Benjamin Clark, J.S. Coffin, Howard E. Cole, Edward J. Cornish, Harvey C. Couch, Frederic C. Coudert, Clarkson Cowl, Paul D. Cravath, Bertram Cutler, Gerhard M. Dahl, Thomas M. Debevoise, Richard Delafield, Clarence Dillon, Franklin D'Olier, Frederick H. Ecker, Halstead G. Freeman, Tom M. Girdler, David M. Goodrich, Edward H.R. Green, Augustus H. Griswold, William E.S. Griswold, Henry O. Havemeyer, Charles Hayden, James N. Hill, Arthur G. Hoffman, Ralph C. Holmes, George H. Howard, Daniel C. Jackling, Otto H. Kahn, Lewis Cass Ledyard Jr., James T. Lee, L.F. Loree, H. Edmund Machold, John C. Martin, Thomas N. McCarter, Charles G. Meyer, Albert G. Milbank, Jeremiah Milbank, John G. Milburn, George M. Moffett, George Wellwood Murray, Joseph D. Oliver, Henry Ollesheimer, Eugenius H. Outerbridge, Thomas I. Parkinson, Frank L. Polk, Robert C. Pruyn, Samuel F. Pryor, Lyman Rhoades, Andrew W. Robertson, Ferdinand W. Roebling Jr., Reeve Schley, Carl J. Schmidlapp, Charles M. Schwab, Alfred P. Sloan Jr., Robert C. Stanley, John C. Traphagen, Cornelius Vanderbilt, Thomas F. Vietor, George P. Whaley, F. Edson White, and Henry Rogers Winthrop. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jun. 4, 1930.)

"Looking at all the loans issued, it appears that only a handful of New York financial houses handled the German reparations financing. Three houses — Dillon, Read Co.; Harris, Forbes & Co.; and National City Company — issued almost three-quarters of the total face amount of the loans and reaped most of the profits... After the mid-1920s the two major German combines of I.G. Farben and Vereinigte Stahlwerke dominated the chemical and steel cartel system created by these loans. Although these firms. had a voting majority in the cartels for only two or three basic products, they were able — through control of these basics — to enforce their will throughout the cartel." (Wall Street and the Rise of Hitler. By Antony C. Sutton. Chapter 1, Wall Street Paves the Way for Hitler.)

Ch. 1, Wall Street and the Rise of Hitler / Reformed-Theology

The Chase Securities Corporation acquired the capital stock of the Harris, Forbes Corporations. Lloyd W. Smith was president of Harris, Forbes & Co., New York, and John R. Macomber was president of Harris, Forbes & Co. Inc. of Boston. It was founded in Chicago as N.W. Harris & Co. in 1882. In 1907, the Chicago house became the Harris Trust and Savings Bank. The eastern branches were acquired by Allen B. Forbes. (Chase Bank to Get Harris, Forbes Group as Securities Unit. New York Times, Aug. 1, 1930.) Coffin, Cowl, Delafield, Kahn, Milburn, Pruyn, Traphagen and White left the board. Harry M. Addinsell, E. Carleton Granberry, John R. Macomber, and Lloyd W. Smith [of Harris, Forbes], Frederic W. Allen and George E. Warren joined the board of the Chase National Bank. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1932.) Allan M. Pope was chairman of the First of Boston Corporation, which took over the securities division of Chase Harris Forbes (Chase Bank to Cut Ties With Two Units. New York Times, May 11, 1934.)

Gordon Auchincloss, Scroll & Key 1908

Gordon Auchincloss, Scroll and Key 1908, was the lawyer and secretary for his father-in-law, Col. Edward M. House. He was a director of the Chase National Bank, International Paper and Power Company, Crosse & Blackwell Company, Société Financière de Transports et d'Enterprises Industrielles of Belgium, Solvay American Corporation and Compania Hispano Americana de Electricidad of Spain. He was a trustee in the reorganization of the Porto Rican American Tobacco Company in 1940 and President of the reorganized company, the Rican Corporation, until 1943. He was the son of Edgar S. Auchincloss. (Auchincloss Dies; Aide to Col. House. New York Times, Apr. 17, 1943; Bulletin of Yale University, Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1942-1943, pp. 98-99.) In World War I, he was the assistant to Assistant Secretary of State Frank Polk [Scroll & Key 1894], who "laid the groundwork for the central intelligence organization U-1." (The CIA and American Democracy. By Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones. Yale University Press, 2003.)

Yale Obituary Record 1942-1943 / Yale University Library (pdf, 312 pp)

Howard Bayne, Columbia 1901

Howard Bayne was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland and came to the U.S. as a child. "He graduated from Columbia University in 1901 with an electrical engineering degree, and remained two years as an assistant to Michael I. Pupin while the inventor developed his electrical-wave mathematical theories and his loaded coil for long-distance telephone use." He then followed his father into banking and became a director of the Columbia Trust Company in 1905, and later a vice president, until it merged with the Irving Trust Company in 1924. He became a director of the Chase National Bank when it absorbed the Seaboard Bank, and continued after it became the Chase Manhattan. He was also a director of the Prudential Insurance Company of America for twenty-five years. He was also a director of the Federal Light and Traction Company, the El Paso Natural Gas Company, the McCall Corporation, the Borden Company, the Atlanta, Birmingham and Atlantic Railroad, the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad, the International Paper Company, the Bankers and Shippers Insurance company, the Jersey Insurance Company, and the American Re-insurance Company. He was also a former treasurer of the American Society for the Control of Cancer. (Howard Bayne, Banker Here, 79. New York Times, Aug. 25, 1958.) Fellow directors of the Seaboard National Bank included George W. Hill, Vice President of the American Tobacco Company. (Display Ad. New York Times, Oct. 15, 1924.) His father was Samuel G. Bayne. He was treasurer of the ASCC from 1913 to 1926. His brother-in-law, Dr. Frederick T. Van Beuren Jr., Yale 1898, was a director of the ASCC. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1942-1943, p. 66.) Van Beuren was a member of Wolf's Head. (Yale Society Elections. Boston Daily Advertiser, May 28, 1897.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1942-1943 / Yale University Library (pdf, 312 pp)

Charles G. Meyer, Columbia 1901

Charles Garrison Meyer was the son of Cord Meyer [1854-1910]. He was president of the Cord Meyer Company, real estate developers, since 1910. He was born in New York City and was in the Columbia University School of Arts class of 1901. He was also a director of the Franklin Fire and Home Insurance Companies and other corporations. (Charles G. Meyer, Civic Leader, Dies. New York Times, Apr. 10, 1950.)

Albert G. Milbank, Princeton 1896

Albert Goodsell Milbank was born in New Haven, Conn., but went to Princeton. His parents were Albert Jeremiah Milbank and Georgiana Goodsell. He joined Masten & Nichols, attorneys for the Borden Company, and became chairman of the board of Borden. Masten & Nichols merged with Murray, Aldrich & Webb, and became Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy. He was also an officer of the Milbank Memorial Fund, established in 1905 by his cousin, Elizabeth Milbank Anderson. "Although a Republican in politics, Mr. Milbank supported some of the social reforms of the early New Deal of Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1933 he advocated compulsory, comprehensive, social insurance against illness, accident, unemployment, old-age and death." He married Marjorie E. Robbins, daughter of Royal E. Robbins, and they had two sons, Robbins Milbank of Burlingame, Cal., and Samuel R. Milbank of New York. (Albert Milbank, Lawyer, 76, Dies. New York Times, Sep. 8, 1949.) [Mrs. Milbank was a first cousin of Harry Pelham Robbins of Memorial Hospital. Her sister was Mrs. John Caswell.] He was a director of the Barney Estate Company. (To Settle Barney Estate. New York Times, Mov. 22, 1907.) He was an executive of the Milbank Fund from 1905 to 1949. Executives of the Milbank Fund were responsible for FDR's Council on Economic Security. (Milbank Memorial Fund Centennial Report.) He was a correspondent of Dr. William H. Welch, S&B 1870, from 1929-34. He was a member of the General Committee of the American Society for the Control of Cancer when it received its big unconditional gift of $100,000 from John D. Rockefeller. (Rockefeller Aids Cancer Study Fund. New York Times, May 3, 1926.) At a meeting of the New York Academy of Medicine, Albert G. Milbank called for states to create compulsory health insurance plans, saying that the Wilbur Committee's voluntary plan wouldn't work. It was attended by Dr. George F. McCleary, former Deputy Senior Medical Officer of the British Ministry of Health, and also former Principal medical officer of the National Health Insurance Commission of the U.K. Pearl S. Buck and Edward C. Carter also spoke, and Dr. Livingston Farrand, president of Cornell, presided. (Health Insurance Urged By Milbank. New York Times, Mar. 17, 1933.) He was a member of the committee in charge of the Memorial Hospital anniversary celebration. (Memorial Hospital to Mark 50th Year. New York Times, May 20, 1934.) The old Charity Organization Society was merged with John D. Rockefeller's New York Association for Improving the Conditions of the Poor in 1939, and renamed the Community Service Society, headed by Walter S. Gifford, the president of A.T.&T. Bayard F. Pope, who became a director of Philip Morris in 1953, was elected vice chairman of the board. Mrs. Ruth V. Twombly, Mrs. August Belmont, Cornelius N. Bliss and Albert G. Milbank were elected vice presidents. The administrative committee included Morris Hadley (S&B 1916), Thomas S. Lamont, Robert A. Lovett (S&B 1918), and Frederick A.O. Schwarz, longtime trustee of Presbyterian Hospital. (Merger is Completed by Welfare Groups. New York Times, Apr. 13, 1939.) Milbank headed a new health committee of the Community Service Society that was formed "to study the society's program for preventable diseases in New York City," of which Bayard F. Pope was a member. (Fund's President Heads New Health Committee. New York Times, Feb. 4, 1943.)

Albert J. Milbank was a director of Borden's Condensed Milk Company. Edgar L. Marston was a fellow director. (Report of the Attorney general in the matter of the milk investigation, transmitted to the legislature April 25, 1910; The Manual of Statistics: Stock Exchange Hand-Book. Charles M. Goodsell and Henry E. Wallcom, eds, 1906, p. 404.) He died in 1912, in his 73d year. (Obituary Notes. New York Tribune, May 24, 1912.) His father-in-law, George W. Goodsell, was a wholesale grocer in New Haven. His mother was a Pierpont, and he began his business career as a clerk for Elias Pierpont. (Commemorative Biographical Record of New Haven County, Connecticut, Vol. 1, Pt 1, 1902.) Elias Pierpont (1803-1883) of New Haven was a Royal descendant of William the Conqueror, King of England. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 615.) James Gardner Clark, Yale 1861, who was "largely interested in the development of Redlands, Cal. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University, 1900 to 1910, p. 574.) Clark was born in Fayetteville, N.Y., and had been "the closest sort of chums" with Grover Cleveland, the future president, until they were 19. (Some Hit and Miss Chat. New York Times, May 17, 1885.)

The Manual of Statistics: Stock Exchange Hand-Book, p. 404 / Google Books
Commemorative Biographical Record of New Haven County / Ebooksread.com
Americans of Royal Descent, p. 615 / Google Books
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University, 1900 to 1910, p. 574 / Google Books

Samuel R. Milbank graduated from Princeton in 1927. "After three years with Brown Brothers & Company, he joined the investment banking firm of Wood, Struthers & Winthrop. He was a partner of the firm for more than 35 years, and chairman of its board of directors from 1969 to 1972." He was an officer in U.S. Naval Intelligence in World War II. He was a trustee of Barnard College from 1950 to 1979 and chairman of the board of trustees from 1956 to 1967. He was an officer of the Milbank Memorial Fund from 1934 until his death. (Samuel Milbank, 78, Banker Who Helped Many Charities. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1985.) He married Marian Livingston Wetmore, a daughter of Robert Carryl Wetmore of Santiago, Cuba. She was a great-granddaughter of Anthony Rutgers Livingston. (Marian Wetmore Becomes A Bride. New York Times, Jan. 10, 1934.) Her father was superintendent of the United Fruit Company's farms and railways in Costa Rica, including thirty or forty large banana farms. (Gossip Gathered in Hotel Lobbies. New Orleans Times Picayune, Oct. 11, 1899.) In 1986, the Milbank Quarterly published the study by Dorothy P. Rice et al. that was the basis of the Big Lie that smoking is an economic burden to society.

Robbins Milbank joined McCann-Erickson advertising agency in 1930. From 1941-1944 he managed the San Francisco office of Young & Rubicam, and returned to McCann-Erickson in 1944. He was appointed vice president in 1945. (Hillsboro Man Agency Executive. San Mateo Times, Dec. 29, 1945.) His first marriage was to Mary Lightfoot. His son, David Lightfoot Milbank, graduated from Princeton in 1951. He was a Foreign Service officer assigned to Zagreb, Yugoslavia. (Sally L. Thomas, David L. Milbank Marry in Jersey. New York Times, Sep. 27, 1959.) David L. Milbank was on active duty with the U.S. Army from 1951 to 1957 and was a Korean War veteran. In 1957, he transferred to the active reserve in military intelligence and retired as Lieutenant Colonel in 1982. From 1957 until his retirement in 1985, he worked for the C.I.A. in the Directorate of Plans, the Directorate of Operations, the Office of National Estimates, the Directorate of Intelligence, and the Intelligence Community Staff. While working for the C.I.A. and later for various private defense contractors, he published several articles on international terrorism." (The Thacher News, Fall 1999/Winter 2000, Volume XII, Number 1. Obituaries p 56.)

Robbins Milbank's second marriage was to Helen Paull Kirkpatrick. He was a retired executive of the McCann-Erickson Advertising Company. "During World War II, the bride was Geneva correspondent of The New York Herald Tribune and London correspondent for The Chicago Daily News. Later, she was correspondent for The New York Post in Paris and Washington before going into Government service." She was assistant to the president of Smith College. (Helen Kirkpatrick Married in Capital. New York Times, Jun. 30, 1954.) She was sent to Europe as a foreign correspondent of the Foreign Policy Association in 1931. She was public affairs advisor to the Bureau of European Affairs at the State Department, and head of the information departnment of the ECA in Paris. (Chairman Named by R.C. San Mateo Times, Feb. 4, 1957.) She was a daughter of Lyman B. Kirkpatrick of Rochester, N.Y. She was also on the Harvard University Board of Overseers. Robbins Milbank died in 1985. (Helen Paull Kirkpatrick Papers, Smith College). Lyman B. Kirkpatrick Jr. of the O.S.S., later inspector general of the C.I.A., was her brother. Robbins Milbank was a director of the Asia Foundation (Peninsulans See New Asia Chief. San Mateo Times, Jan. 28, 1957), which admitted to receiving funding from the C.I.A. (Asia Foundation Got CIA Funds. New York Times, March 22, 1967.) He was west coast director for the Institute of International Education until retiring to New Hampshire in 1962, where he joined the New Hampshire Charitable Fund as executive director. (N.H. Charitable Fund Engages Executive Head. Nashua Telegraph, Feb. 11, 1966.)

Helen Paull Kirkpatrick Papers / Smith College
Lyman B. Kirkpatrick Papers / Princeton University

Alfred Seton Post Jr., Yale 1898

Alfred Seton Post Jr. was a vice president of the Equitable Trust Company until the merger, and then a vice president of the Chase National Bank from 1930 until retiring in 1941. He was born in New York City. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1941-1942, p. 192.) He married Countess Mongelas, widow of Adolf Mongelas, former German Ambassador to Mexico. She was Fanny Dickinson Hazeltine of Grand Rapids, Mich. (Countess Mongelas Bride of A.S. Post. New York Times, Oct. 8, 1927.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1941-1942 / Yale University Library (pdf, 320 pp)

His father, Alfred Seton Post, was an aide-de-camp to Admirals Charles H. Davis and David H. Porter, in 1862. "He entered the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1863, but resigned a year later to go into business with Russell & Co. in China." He inherited a fortune when his grandfather and father died. (Alfred Seton Post Dead. New York Times, Apr. 7, 1914.) His grandfather was Waldron Blaau Post Jr. (1821-1858), who married a daughter of Alfred Seton. Post was in the family's wholesale drug importing business with his cousins and younger brother, Jotham W. Post, M.D. Their sister, Julia Elizabeth Post, married James Muncaster Brown, the head of Brown Brothers & Co. (The Post Family. By Marie Caroline Post, 1905, pp. 202, 222-230.)

The Post Family, p. 223 / Google Books

The Chase National Bank, 1933

The bank reduced its board of directors from 72 to 36. They were Winthrop W. Aldrich, Charles S. McCain, John McHugh, Vincent Astor, Gordon Auchincloss, Earl D. Babst, Howard Bayne, Francis H. Brownell, Henry W. Cannon, Newcomb Carlton, W.S. Carpenter Jr., Malcolm G. Chace, Edward J. Cornish, Bertram Cutler, Thomas M. Debevoise, Franklin D'Olier, Frederick H. Ecker, Edward H.R. Green, Henry O. Havemeyer, Arthur G. Hoffman, Ralph S. Holmes, L.F. Loree, Thomas N. McCarter, Albert G. Milbank, George M. Moffett, Joseph D. Oliver, Thomas I. Parkinson, Samuel F. Pryor, Andrew W. Robertson, F.W. Roebling Jr., Charles M. Schwab, Robert C. Stanley, Cornelius Vanderbilt, George P. Whaley, and Henry R. Winthrop. (Chase Bank Drops Half Its Board. New York Times, May 17, 1933.)

The American Tobacco Company had $3.9 million cash on deposit at the Chase National Bank. (ATC Fiscal Statement, Dec. 31, 1937.) The Matteoli Commission of the French Government accused the Guaranty Trust, J.P. Morgan & Co., the Bank of the City of New York, the Chase Bank, and American Express of handing over lists of Jewish account holders and turning their accounts over to the Nazi occupiers of France, "long before U.S. involvement in World War II deprived them of the right to refuse." (French panel implicates U.S. banks in looting. By Lee Yanowitch. Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Feb. 12, 1999.) Chase National Bank, Jewish Accounts, and Nazi Germany: "Using confidential sources with Chase National Bank, the FBI began to investigate the scheme in October 1940. This was more than four years after the scheme had begun, and the FBI’s aim was to compile lists for further surveillance of German-Americans who had purchased blocked Marks. The sale of blocked Marks thus continued for nine months after the FBI investigation began, and the business was at its heaviest during that time. Chase National executives avoided federal prosecution for violations of the Johnson Debt Act of 1939, the Espionage Act of 1917, and the Foreign Agents Act of 1938 when Chase’s lead lawyer, a former U.S. attorney from the same district office that had conducted the Grand Jury investigation, threatened to reveal FBI, Army, and Navy sources and methods in open court." "Chase National executives avoided federal prosecution for violations of the Johnson Debt Act of 1939, the Espionage Act of 1917, and the Foreign Agents Act of 1938 when Chase’s lead lawyer, a former U.S. attorney from the same district office that had conducted the Grand Jury investigation, threatened to reveal FBI, Army, and Navy sources and methods in open court." (Thousands of Intelligence Documents Opened under the Nazi War Crimes Disclosure Act. National Archives Media Alert, May 13, 2004.)

French panel implicates U.S. Banks / Jewish News of Greater Phoenix
Thousands of Intelligence Documents Opened / National Archives

The Chase National Bank, 1944-47

Board of Directors: Winthrop W. Aldrich, Chairman; M. Donald Campbell, President; Earl D. Babst, Chairman, American Sugar Refining Co.; Howard Bayne; John A. Brown, President, Socony-Vacuum Oil Co. Inc.; Francis H. Brownell, Chairman, American Smelting and Refining Co.; Newcomb Carlton; Malcolm G. Chace; Bertram Cutler; J. Frank Drake, President, Gulf Oil Corp.; Frederick H. Ecker, Chairman, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.; Henry O. Havemeyer, President, Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal; Arthur G. Hoffman, Vice President, The Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co.; Austin S. Igleheart, President, General Foods Corp.; James T. Lee, President, Central Savings Bank; Thomas N. McCarter, Chairman, Public Service Corporation of New Jersey; Arthur W. Page, Vice President, American Telephone and Telegraph Co.; Thomas I. Parkinson, President, The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States; Andrew W. Robertson, Chairman, Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co.; Carl J. Schmidlapp, Vice President; Lynde Selden, Vice Chairman, American Express Co.; Robert C. Stanley, Chairman and President, The International Nickel Co. of Canada, Ltd.; Barton P. Turnbull [President of Rockefeller Center]. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1944.) Brown left; A.N. Kemp, President of American Airlines Inc., and Jeremiah Milbank joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Apr. 4, 1945.) Chace and McCarter left; Francis W. Cole, Chairman, The Travelers Insurance Company, and Robert E. Wilson, Chairman, Standard Oil Co. (Indiana) joined. Cambell became Vice Chairman, and Arthur W. McCain became President. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jul. 3, 1946.)

The Chase National Bank, 1948-51

Board of Directors: Winthrop W. Aldrich, Chairman; Arthur W. McCain, President; Earl D. Babst, Chairman, American Sugar Refining Co.; Howard Bayne, retired banker; Francis H. Brownell, Chairman Finance Committee, American Smelting and Refining Co.; H. Donald Campbell, Chairman Trust Committee; Francis W. Cole, Chairman, The Travelers Insurance Co.; J. Frank Drake, Chairman, Gulf Oil Corp.; Joseph L. Egan, President, The Western Union Telegraph Co.; Henry O. Havemeyer, President, Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal; Austin S. Igleheart, President, General Foods Corp.; A.N. Kemp, Chairman, Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Co.; James T. Lee, President, Central Savings Bank; Leroy A. Lincoln, President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.; Jeremiah Milbank, Management of Investment Materials; Arthur W. Page, Director, Kennecott Copper Corp. and Westinghouse Electric Corp.; Thomas I. Parkinson, President, The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States; Andrew W. Robertson, Chairman, Westinghouse Electric Corp.; Laurance S. Rockefeller; Carl J. Schmidlapp, Senior Vice President; Lynde Selden, Vice Chairman, American Express Co.; Robert C. Stanley, Chairman and President, The International Nickel Co. of Canada, Ltd.; Leroy A. Wilson, President, American Telephone and Telegraph Co.; Robert E. Wilson, Chairman, Standard Oil Company (Indiana). (Display Ad. New York Times, Oct. 6, 1948.) Egan left; McCain, Vice Chairman of the Board; Percy J. Ebbott, President; Schmidlapp, Vice Chairman of the Executive Committee. (Display Ad. New York Times, Apr. 6, 1949 and Apr. 5, 1950.) Stanley left. (Display Ad. New York Times, Apr. 5, 1951.)

The Chase National Bank, 1952-54

Board of Directors: Winthrop W. Aldrich, Chairman of the Board; Percy J. Ebbott, President; Carl J. Schmidlapp, Vice Chairman Executive Committee; Earl D. Babst, Director and former Chairman, American Sugar Refining Co.; Howard Bayne; Kenneth C. Brownell, President, American Smelting and Refining Co.; H. Donald Campbell, Chairman Trust Committee; Francis W. Cole, Chairman, The Travelers Insurance Co.; Cleo F. Craig, President, American Telephone and Telegraph Co.; J. Frank Drake, Chairman, Gulf Oil Corp.; Henry O. Havemeyer, President, Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal; Austin S. Igleheart, President, General Foods Corp.; A.N. Kemp, Chairman, Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Co.; James T. Lee, President, Central Savings Bank; Leroy A. Lincoln, Chairman, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.; Richard H. Mansfield, Vice President, Rockefeller Center Inc.; Jeremiah Milbank; Arthur W. Page, Director, American Telephone and Telegraph Co. and Kennecott Copper Corp.; Thomas I. Parkinson, President, The Equitable Life Assurance Society; Andrew W. Robertson, Chairman Finance Committee, Westinghouse Electric Corp.; Laurance S. Rockefeller; Lynde Selden, Vice Chairman, American Express Co.; Robert E. Wilson, Chairman, Standard Oil Co. (Indiana). (Display Ad. New York Times, Oct. 6, 1952.) Aldrich was replaced by John J. McCloy; Joseph A. Martino, President, National Lead Co., joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Apr. 6, 1953.) Babst left; Harry A. deButts, President, Southern Railway System, and C.R. Smith, President, American Airlines Inc., joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Apr. 6, 1954.)

The Chase Manhattan Bank, 1955-57

John J. McCloy, Chairman of the Board; J. Stewart Baker, Chairman Executive Committee and President; Percy J. Ebbott, Vice Chairman; Graham B. Blaine, Vice Chairman; Elliott V. Bell, Chairman Executive Committee, McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. Inc.; Kenneth C. Brownell, President American Smelting and Refining Co.; James F. Brownlee, J.H. Whitney & Co.; George W. Burpee, Coverdale & Colpitts; Robert M. Catharine, President, Dollar Savings Bank of the City of New York; Francis W. Cole, former Chairman, The Travelers Insurance Co.; Cleo F. Craig, President, American Telephone and Telegraph Co.; Harry A. DeButts, President, Southern Railway System; J. Frank Drake, Chairman, Gulf Oil Corp.; Frederic W. Ecker, President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.; William V. Griffin, Chairman, Brady Security & Realty Corp.; Richard H. Mansfield, Vice President, Rockefeller Center Inc.; Joseph A. Martino, President, National Lead Co.; Henry D. Mercer, Chairman, States Marine Corp.; William J. Murray Jr., Chairman, McKesson & Robbins Inc.; Andrew W. Robertson, Chairman Finance Committee, Westinghouse Electric Corp.; Laurance S. Rockefeller; Frank F. Russell, Chairman, Cerro de Pasco Corp.; Lynde Selden, Vice Chairman, American Express Co.; C.R. Smith, President, American Airlines Inc.; Robert E. Wilson, Chairman, Standard Oil Co. (Indiana). Executive vice presidents were George Champion, Edward L. Love, Lawrence C. Marshall, and David Rockefeller. (Display Ad. New York Times, Apr. 5, 1955.) Blaine left; J. Doyle DeWitt, President, The Travelers Insurance Cos., and Ray D. Murphy, President, The Equitable Life Assurance Society, joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 6, 1956.) Craig left; Frederick R. Kappel, President, American Telephone and Telegraph Co. joined; George Champion became President; Laurance S. Rockefeller left, and David Rockefeller became Vice Chairman of the Board. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1957.)

Frederick R. Kappel

Frederick Russell Kappell graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1924, and joined Northwestern Bell Telephone Company, then part of AT&T. He became president of Western Electric in 1954, president and CEO of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company in 1956, and chairman in 1961. He retired in 1967. He was chairman of the International Paper Company from 1969 to 1971, and chairman of its executive committee from 1971-1972. (Frederick Kappel, 92, Ex-Chief Of AT&T and Former U.S. Aide. By Kenneth N. Gilpin. New York Times, Nov. 12, 1994.) He was chosen to replace Charles Proctor Cooper, also of AT&T, as a trustee of the Presbyterian Hospital (Hospital Picks Trustee. New York Times, Feb. 26, 1957), and was a director of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. (Kappel of A.T. & T. Joins Met Life Board. New York Times, Jul. 23, 1958.) Kappel was a member of the Ash Council to reorganize the government during the Nixon administration. (Roy Lawrence Ash. By Jack Rosenthal. New York Times, Jan. 23, 1971.) He was a director of the Chase Manhattan Bank until 1972. (Hesburgh Is Joining Board of Bank. By Leonard Sloane. New York Times, Mar. 22, 1972.) He was born in Albert Lea, Minn., where his father was a barber. His grandfather, John Kappel, immigrated from Germany in the 1850s, via Wisconsin. (Albert Lea Evening Tribune, Apr. 12, 1930; History of Goodhue County, Minnesota. By Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, 1909, p. 761.)

History of Goodhue County, Minnesota, p. 761 / Google Books

The Chase Manhattan Bank, 1959-60

John J. McCloy, Chairman of the Board; George Champion, President; David Rockefeller, Vice Chairman; J. Stewart Baker; Elliott V. Bell, Chairman Executive Committee, McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. Inc.; James F. Brownlee, Chairman, Minute Maid Corp.; Robert M. Catharine, Chairman, Dollar Savings Bank; Lucius D. Clay, Chairman, Continental Can Co.; Paul L. Davies, Chairman, Food Machinery and Chemical Corp.; Harry A. DeButts, President, Southern Railway System; J. Doyle DeWitt, President, The Travelers Insurance Cos.; J. Richardson Dilworth, President, Rockefeller Brothers Inc.; Frederick W. Ecker, President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.; Eugene Holman, Chairman, Standard Oil Co. (New Jersey); Frederick R. Kappel, President, American Telephone and Telegraph Co.; Joseph A. Martino, Chairman and President, National Lead Co.; Henry D. Mercer, Chairman, States Marine Corp.; William J. Murray Jr., Chairman Executive Committee, McKesson & Robbins Inc.; James F. Oates Jr., Chairman and President, The Equitable Life Assurance Society; Charles H. Percy, President, Bell & Howell Co.; Frank O. Prior, Chairman, Standard Oil Co. (Indiana); Frank F. Russell, Chairman, Cerro de Pasco Corp.; Lynde Selden, Director, American Express Co.; C.R. Smith, President, American Airlines Inc.; Whitney Stone, Chairman, Stone & Webster Inc.; Percy J. Ebbott, Chairman, Trust Advisory Board. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 7, 1959 and Jan. 6, 1960.)

Charles H. Percy

Charles H. Percy was the former Republican U.S. Senator from Illinois. His daughter, Sharon, is a director of PepsiCo and the wife of Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV of West Virginia. Percy was a correspondent of banker Lewis L. Strauss from 1958 to 1972.

The Chase Manhattan Bank, 1961-62

George Champion, Chairman; David Rockefeller, President and Chairman Executive Committee; Lawrence C. Marshall, Vice Chairman; J. Stewart Baker; Elliott V. Bell, Chairman Executive Committee, McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. Inc.; Lucius D. Clay, Chairman, Continental Can Co.; Paul L. Davies, Chairman, Food Machinery and Chemical Corp.; Harry A. DeButts, President, Southern Railway System; J. Doyle DeWitt, President, The Travelers Insurance Cos.; J. Richardson Dilworth, President, Rockefeller Brothers Inc.; Frederick W. Ecker, Chairman, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.; Eugene Holman, former Chairman, Standard Oil Co. (New Jersey); Frederick R. Kappel, President, American Telephone and Telegraph Co.; Joseph A. Martino, Chairman and President, National Lead Co.; John J. McCloy, Milbank, Tweed, Hope & Hadley; Henry D. Mercer, Chairman, States Marine Corp.; Jeremiah Milbank Jr., Chairman Executive Committee, Commercial Solvents Corp.; James F. Oates Jr., Chairman and President, The Equitable Life Assurance Society; Charles H. Percy, President, Bell & Howell Co.; Frank F. Russell, Chairman, Cerro de Pasco Corp.; Lynde Selden, Director, American Express Co.; C.R. Smith, President, American Airlines Inc.; Whitney Stone, Chairman, Stone & Webster Inc.; John E. Swearingen, President, Standard Oil Co. (Indiana). Percy J. Ebbott, Chairman, Trust Advisory Board. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 6, 1961, and Jan. 5, 1962.)

Jeremiah Milbank Jr., Yale 1942

Jeremiah Milbank Jr. was the son of Jeremiah Milbank. He married Andrea Hunter, daughter of Croil Hunter, the founder of Northwest Airlines in Minnesota. The ushers were John Croil Hunter, her brother; H. Lawrence Bogert Jr., Edwin Corning, Merrill Chapin Krech, Frank P. Shepard Jr. and Antonio Villa of New York; Dr. William E.S. James of Millbrook, N.Y.; Douglas J. Godkin of Boston, Meredith Boyce of Baltimore, Roger McCormick of Chicago, Stuyvesant Wainwright 2d of New Haven, and Theodore Pomeroy [Jr.] of Washington, Conn. He was in the Navy for three years. (Jeremiah Milbank Jr. Marries Miss Andrea Hunter in St. Paul. New York Times, Jul. 20, 1947.) Jeremiah Milbank Jr. was elected to the board of directors of Commercial Solvents in 1953. (Added to Directorate Of Commercial Solvents. New York Times, Apr. 29, 1953.) He was chairman of the executive committee and a controlling stockholder of Commercial Solvents Corporation. The House Government Operations Committee found that Commercial Solvents raised mony for Billy Sol Estes to go into the grain storage business, and provided $3,500,000 credit for his fertilizer deals. Milbank was assistant treasurer for Barry Goldwater's presidential campaign, and Estes got his first grain storage contract under Secretary Ezra Taft Benson, two of whose subordinates went to work for Commercial Solvents. (Sol Estes Charge Backlashes at GOP. By Drew Pearson. Lowell Sun, Oct. 6, 1964.) He was chairman of the Republican Finance Committee. (Milbank to Replace Stans in G.O.P. Finance Post. New York Times, Mar. 26, 1969.) He used various family foundations to fund the Heritage Foundation and other conservative organizations, and the Boys' Clubs of America. "Fortune magazine described the Milbank clan as 'one of the oldest, richest, most proper and least publicized families of the American business community.'" He was born in Manhattan in 1920, and graduated from Yale and Harvard Business School. He was married four times. His first wife, Andrea Hunter, died in 1982. A brief marriage to Carolyn Amory ended in divorce. The third, Rose Jackson Sheppard, died in 1998. His fourth wife, the former Mary Gillett Rockefeller, survived him. (Jeremiah Milbank Jr., Donor and G.O.P. Official, Dies at 87. New York Times, Aug. 19, 2007.) The JM Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded a three and one-half year anti-smoking demonstration project in 1977. (David F. Wynn, Director, National Health Project, Boys' Clubs of America to Donald P. Carmody, Director of Division of Health Protection, Office of Assistant Secretary for Health, Sep. 23, 1977.) Carolyn Pesnell Amory was a former chairwoman of the American Cancer Society's New York City division, then a national director at large. (Carolyn Pesnell Amory Wed. New York Times, Jul. 2, 1989.)

David F. Wynn to Donald P. Carmody, 1977 / UCSF (pdf, 3 pp)

Mrs. Jeremiah Milbank Jr. (Andrea Hunter) was vice chairman of a fundraising dinner for Project Hope. (A Dinner Party Planned in Aid Of Project Hope. New York Times, Nov. 10, 1968.) Jeremiah Milbank 3d married a daughter of former Ambassador Stanton Griffis, a partner of Hornblower & Weeks, Hemphill Noyes. (Miss Elizabeth Hethea Griffis Bride. New York Times, May 23, 1971.)

The Chase Manhattan Bank, 1964-65

George Champion, Chairman; David Rockefeller, President and Chairman Executive Committee; Lawrence C. Marshall, Vice Chairman; J. Stewart Baker; Elliott V. Bell, Chairman Executive Committee, McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. Inc.; Eugene R. Black; C.W. Cook, President, General Foods Corp.; Paul L. Davies, Chairman, FMC Corp.; J. Doyle DeWitt, President, The Travelers Insurance Cos.; J. Richardson Dilworth, President, Rockefeller Brothers Inc.; Gilbert W. Fitzhugh, President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.; Frederick R. Kappel, Chairman, American Telephone and Telegraph Co.; Joseph A. Martino, Chairman and President, National Lead Co.; John J. McCloy, Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy; Henry D. Mercer, Chairman, States Marine Lines Inc.; Jeremiah Milbank Jr., Chairman Executive Committee, Commercial Solvents Corp.; James F. Oates Jr., Chairman and President, The Equitable Life Assurance Society; C. Jay Parkinson, Executive Vice President, The Anaconda Co.; Charles H. Percy, Chairman, Bell & Howell Co.; Frank F. Russell, Chairman, Cerro Corp.; Stuart T. Saunders, Chairman, Pennsylvania Railroad Co.; C.R. Smith, President, American Airlines Inc.; Whitney Stone, Chairman, Stone & Webster Inc.; John E. Swearingen, President, Standard Oil Co. (Indiana). Percy J. Ebbott, Chairman, Trust Advisory Board. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 8, 1964.) Percy left; Roger M. Blough, Chairman, United States Steel Corp. joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 13, 1965.)

The Chase Manhattan Bank, 1966

George Champion, Chairman; David Rockefeller, President and Chairman Executive Committee; Lawrence C. Marshall, Vice Chairman; Elliott V. Bell, Chairman Executive Committee, McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. Inc.; Eugene R. Black; C.W. Cook, President, General Foods Corp.; Paul L. Davies, Chairman, FMC Corp.; Walter E. Dennis, Consultant, The Chase Manhattan Bank, N.A.; J. Doyle DeWitt, Chairman, The Travelers Insurance Cos.; J. Richardson Dilworth, Rockefeller Family & Associates; Gilbert W. Fitzhugh, President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.; J.K. Jamieson, President, Standard Oil Co. (New Jersey); Frederick R. Kappel, Chairman, American Telephone and Telegraph Co.; Joseph A. Martino, Chairman, National Lead Co.; John J. McCloy, Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy; Jeremiah Milbank Jr., Chairman Executive Committee, Commercial Solvents Corp.; Charles F. Myers Jr., President, Burlington Industries Inc.; James F. Oates Jr., Chairman, The Equitable Life Assurance Society; C. Jay Parkinson, President, The Anaconda Co.; Frank F. Russell, Chairman, Cerro Corp.; Stuart T. Saunders, Chairman, Pennsylvania Railroad Co.; C.R. Smith, Chairman, American Airlines Inc.; Whitney Stone, Chairman, Stone & Webster Inc.; John E. Swearingen, Chairman, Standard Oil Co. Percy J. Ebbott, Chairman, Trust Advisory Board. (Indiana). (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 19, 1966.)

Herbert P. Patterson, Yale 1948

Herbert Parsons Patterson graduated with a B.S. from Yale in 1948, and joined the Chase Manhattan Bank in 1949. In 1969, he was made its president when David Rockefeller became chairman. He lost his job in 1972 when the bank's earnings declined. He became a financial consultant to Marshalsea Associates, then president of the Stonover Company, which he founded in 1977. His father, Morehead Patterson, was chairman of A.M.F., which was founded by his grandfather, Rufus Patterson, as the American Machine and Foundry Company [which made the machinery to manufacture cigarettes for American Tobacco, while his mother was the granddaughter of a founder of the American Cancer Society]. (H.P. Patterson, Banker, Is Dead. New York Times, Jan. 31, 1985.) His first wife was Louise Oakey, widow of Charles S. McVeigh. His cousin, Casimir de Rham Jr., was best man. (Mrs. Louise Oakey McVeigh Is Married At River Club to Herbert P. Patterson. New York Times, Jul. 31, 1949.) She died in 1967, and he remarried to Patricia Shepard Norris. (Mrs. Norris, H.P. Patterson Married Here. New York Times, May 1, 1970.) Mr. and Mrs. Herbert P. Patterson were among 100 of the closest friends of Mrs. Albert D. Lasker, who were invited to a dinner dance at her townhouse in honor of Gerald Van Der Kemp, chief curator of Versailles. (Mrs. Lasker Is Hostess to 100 At Fete for Versailles Curator. New York Times, Dec. 5, 1970.) Their daughter married Thomas L. Kempner Jr. (Katheryn Clews Patterson Wed to Thomas Lenox Kempner Jr. New York Times, May 27, 1979.)

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cast 05-06-12