The Charles A. Dana Foundation

Charles A. Dana

Charles Anderson Dana (1881-1975) was head of the Spicer Manufacturing Company, which became the Dana Corporation in 1946. He was born in the Gramercy Park area of Manhattan. He graduated from Columbia University and Columbia Law School, and became an assistant prosecutor under William T. Jerome in the 1907 murder trial of architect Stanford White. He then served in the New York State Assembly for six years. He was a director of the Empire Trust Company, the Manufacturers Trust, the Fisk Rubber Corporation, and several companies in England. His burial service was the Pine Hill Cemetery in Brandon, Vt. (Charles A. Dana, Financier, Dies. New York Times, Nov. 29, 1975.)

He was elected to the board of directors of the German-owned pharmaceutical company, the Schering Corporation, when Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Beane paid the Office of Alien Property. The resigning directors were C. Gordon Lemude, Basil O'Connor, and Morrison G. Tucker. They were replaced by Edward H. York, partner of Drexel & Company; Harry C. Clifford of Kidder, Peabody & Co.; Leon Johnston, former Vice president of the Chase National Bank; and Dana. The checks were on the Bankers Trust Company. (A Check for $28,251,960 Changing Hands Yesterday. New York Times, Mar. 14, 1952.) He resigned in 1962, and was replaced by Douglas C. Findlay. (Directorship Is Filled By the Schering Corp. New York Times, Feb. 8, 1962.) Findlay was a partner in Merrill Lynch for more than 30 years, until around 1962. He was also a director of the Charles A. Dana Foundation. (Douglas C. Findlay, A Stockbroker, 73. New York Times, Aug. 31, 1969.)

Charles A. Dana was an usher at the wedding of George R.D. Schieffelin to Louise Scribner. Fellow ushers included Robert Olyphant Jr. and Edward R. Tinker. (A Day's Weddings. New York Times, Apr. 6, 1904.) His first wife was Agnes Ladson, daughter of Charles T. Ladson of Atlanta. Her sister, Mrs. Frank Adair, was matron of honor. Samuel Gilford was best man, and the ushers were Alden S. Blodget and George W. Carpenter, both of New York. He was a member of the law firm of Dana, Gilford and Gallatin. (Ladson-Dana Marriage Brilliant Social Event. Atlanta Constitution, Apr. 11, 1912.) They had two children, Charles A. Dana Jr. and Mrs. Morgan Cowperthwaite, but were later divorced. He married Eleanor Naylor, daughter of W.H. Naylor of Carthage, Texas. (C.A. Dana Marries Mrs. E.N. Stafford. New York Times, Aug. 2, 1940.)

His father was Charles Dana (1824-1906), from Branford, Vermont. "In 1848 Mr. Dana came to New York and entered the drygoods business. For some years he travelled for himself and the firm of Dana & Co., of Boston, in which cousins of his were interested, and in 1853 went to Aspinwall, crossed the Isthmus of Panama and went to San Francisco. During the trip he saw the possibilities of a Nicaraguan canal. He went to Honolulu in the same year and established the first bank in Hawaii. Returning to San Francisco, he became the third partner in the banking house of Dana Bros. & Co. and was elected vice-president of the North American Steamship Company, at that time the largest American steamship company. The president was Cornelius Vanderbilt, and until the death of the latter Mr. Dana was associated with him in business." He was also associated with Edwin D. Morgan and Solon D. Humphries. He was one of the incorporators and a director of the Erie Railroad, the New York and New England, and the Des Moines & Fort Dodge Railroad; president of the Orange Gas Company, vice president of the Citizens' Gas Company, and president of the Standard Gas Company. He was one of the founders and a governor of the Women's Hospital, and was chairman of the board of directors. He married Laura Parkin in 1879, and retired from business in 1882. (Obituary. New York Tribune, Jun. 6, 1906.) Charles Dana's brother was Anderson Carroll Dana. They were sons of Anderson G. Dana of Boston. (Died. New York Times, May 5, 1907.) The Dana family was listed in the Social Register in 1899.

Social Register, 1899, p. 106 / Google Books

Anderson Green Dana (1791-1861) was born in Cambridge, later Newton, Mass. His medical training was at Philadelphia Medical College, 1812, where Dr. Benjamin Rush was still a professor. He was an incorporator of the Vermont Medical Society in 1813. (Biographical Sketch of Dr. Anderson G. Dana. By Rev Bernice D Ames. In: In Memoriam, 1863.)

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Anderson G. Dana, p. 10 / Google Books

Laura (Parkin) Dana died in Brandon in 1932. (Died. New York Times, Oct. 17, 1932.) She was a half-sister of William Winthrop Parkin. (What is Doing in Society. New York Times, Oct. 28, 1902; Lareau Family Master File, accessed 8/14/11.) He was a partner in New York City of Olyphant & Company, China traders, which failed in 1878. "In addition to taking part in the firm's assignment, Mr. William W. Parkin made an assignment of his individual property to Mr. Henry Rogers," and "moved his family out of their handsome home at No. 49 Fifth-avenue, near East Twelfth-street." (A Wide-Reaching Failure. New York Times, Dec. 8, 1878.) William W. Parkin married Frances Moore Rogers. He was the son of Dr. John Still Winthrop Parkin (1792-1866), Yale 1809, and Mary Ann Hitchcock, sister of Gen. Ethan Allen Hitchcock, USMA 1817. His grandfather, Richard William Parkin, emigrated from Yorkshire, England, and married Mary Winthrop, daughter of John Still Winthrop, Yale 1737. (Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College, 1805-1815, p. 274.) William Parkin, Skull & Bones 1874, clerk of the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, was a son. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1943-1944, p. 5.) Mary Winhrop was a Royal descendant of Edward III, King of England. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 399.)

Lareau Family Master File / Ancestry.com
Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College, 1805-1815 / Internet Archive
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1943-1944 / Yale University Library (pdf, 393 pp)
Americans of Royal Descent, p. 399 / Google Books

Mrs. Charles A. Dana (Eleanor Naylor)

The Charles A. Dana Foundation made a gift of $258,200 for the MSKCC recovery pavillion, occupying almost an entire floor. (Memorial Center Receives $258,000. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1954.) Mrs. Charles A. Dana was a longtime benefactor of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and a leading organizer of numerous fundraising drives. (Cancer Center Unit Will Gain By Movie. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1955.; Fashion Display on Wednesday To Aid Memorial Cancer Center. New York Times, Jan. 31, 1957; The Belmont Ball Will Raise Funds For 2 Agencies. New York Times, May 24, 1964.) She was a Founding Trustee of the American Health Foundation, and was a Trustee until her death on March 19, 1984. AHF Trustees Lasalle D. Leffall and Hildegarde E. Mahoney were directors of the Dana Foundation, which supports former HHS Secretary Joseph Califano's CASA. (Directors, Dana Foundation. link died http://www.dana.org/about/foundation/directors.cfm.) Edward C. Andrews Jr., an emeritus trustee of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, was a director of the Charles A. Dana Foundation in 1997. (1997 Annual Report, Charles A. Dana Foundation.) David J. Mahoney was a trustee and CEO of the Charles A. Dana Foundation from 1977 until his death in 2000.

Opening remarks from CASA's conference by Joseph A. Califano, Jr. March 2000. Includes his smear about "the nicotine addiction of Pat Nixon who got down on the floor of the President's limosine to smoke during parades" - actually, this is spinelessness for not flaunting it in the faces of the anti-smoking vermin. Funded by American Airlines, California Healthcare Foundation, Charles A. Dana Foundation, Henry J. Kaiser Foundation, J.M. Foundation, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Primerica Financial Services, Psychemedics Corp., Ronald McDonald House Charities, and Schering Plough Corp.

Califano, CASA 2000 / tobacco document

The Charles A. Dana Foundation has also been a large donor to the Neurosciences Research Foundation.

Charles A. Dana Jr.

Charles A. Dana Jr. was president of the Cadan Corporation, a private investment company. He was born in New York City in 1915, and attended Princeton. He was a founding member of the Charles A. Dana Foundation. He heard about Dr. Sidney Farber's chemotherapy work, which led to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. "The Dana fortune had its origins in the early 20th century. The first Charles A. Dana, a New York lawyer, was representing a company that owned rights to the universal joint, the device that was replacing belts and chains to link the power of an automobile engine to the rear wheels of a car. He recognized the growth potential of the device and bought an 80 percent interest in the company." Ironically, Charles A. Dana Jr. died after being hit by a car. (Charles A. Dana Jr. Dies at 86; Aided Diverse Causes. By William H. Honan. New York Times, May 12, 2001.) The third Mrs. Charles A. Dana Jr., the former Norma (Taliaferro) Kendall, was on the Advisory Council of The Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 2002.

Mrs. Charles A. Dana Jr., Mrs. Thomas L. Kempner, Mrs. Milton Petrie, and Linda Gosden Robinson were on the 10-woman Advisory Council of The Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 2002. (Board and Society, 2002 Annual Report, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. link died http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/shared/graphics/AR2002/14_BoardAndSociety.pdf.)

Charles A. Dana 3d

Charles Anderson Dana 3d married Joan Whitney Meyer, daughter of Lady Weidenfeld of London and William Blair Meyer of New York. She was a granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Payson (sister of John Hay Whitney) and Mr. and Mrs. Cord Meyer. He is the son of his father's first wife, Marion Connett Turrell. He planned to join a real estate company in Denver. (Joan Whitney Meyer Married on L.I. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1971.)

Promotion of Anti-Smoking and Health Fascism by Various Dana Institutions

Representative Louise Day Hicks, D-MA, announced that the Department of Health, Education and Welfare approved a $6-million construction grant to the Children's Cancer Research Foundation in Boston, to be used for construction of the Charles A. Dana Cancer Center Clinical Investigation and Research Facilities. (Cancer Grant in Boston. New York Times, Jun. 25, 1972.)

The health effects of involuntary smoking. ST Weiss, IB Tager, M Schenker, FE Speizer. Am Rev Respir Dis 1983 Nov;128(5):933-942. From Brigham and Women's Hospital; The Charles A. Dana Research Institute, Beth Israel Hospital, and the Harvard Medical School. Funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Weiss - Am Rev Respir Dis 1983 full article / tobacco document

Investigations on the molecular dosimetry of tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. SS Hecht, SG Carmella, N Trushin, PG Foiles, D Lin, JM Rubin, FL Chung. IARC Sci Publ 1987;(84):423-429. From the Naylor Dana Institute for Disease Prevention, American Health Foundation, Valhalla, NY. Funded by the U.S. Public Health Service and the National Cancer Institute.

Hecht - IARC Sci Publ 1987 abstract / PubMed

Childhood Asthma and Passive Smoking. Urinary Cotinine as a Biomarker of Exposure. R Ehrlich, M Kattan, J Godbold, DS Saltzberg, KT Grimm, PJ Landrigan, DE Lilienfeld. Am Rev Respir Dis 1992 Mar;145(3):594-599. From Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York. Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Charles A. Dana Foundation. Landrigan was the pediatrician featured on ABC TV's Good Morning America.

Erlich - Am Rev Respir Dis 1992 full article / tobacco document

[John D. Twiname was the director of the Naylor Dana Institute between 1978 and 1982, and a vice president of the American Health Foundation. Between 1987 and 1997 the Naylor Dana Institute performed dozens of studies on laboratory animals attempting to find a way to blame tobacco-specific nitrosamines for cancer, in particular by Dietrich Hoffman and S.S. Hecht.]

Is Passive Smoking a Cause of Asthma in Childhood? R Ehrlich, M Kattan, DE Lilienfeld. J Smoking Related Dis 1993;4(2):91-99. Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Charles A. Dana Foundation:. "...it is concluded that there is sufficient evidence for public health purposes to target maternal smoking as a modifiable risk factor for wheezing illness in childhood." In fact, the death rates from asthma have steadily increased since the anti-smoking movement began. They keep repeating their lie over and over and are never held accountable for their lack of positive effects on the rates of asthma.

Ehrlich - J Smoking Related Disease 1993 full article / tobacco document

Inhibition of lung carcinogenesis by black tea in Fischer rats treated with a tobacco-specific carcinogen: caffeine as an important constituent. FL Chung, M Wang, A Rivenson, MJ Iatropoulos, JC Reinhardt, B Pittman, CT Ho, SG Amin. Cancer Res 1998 Sep 15;58(18):4096-101. "This work was supported by grants from The Tea Trade Health Research association
and by National Cancer Institute Grant CA46535."

Chung / Cancer Res 1998 full article

Smoking cessation and tobacco control: an overview. KM Emmons. Chest 1999 Dec;116(6 Suppl):490S-492S. From the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health. Funded by the U.S. Public Health Service, the National Cancer Institute and National Heart Lung & Blood Institute.

Emmons / Chest 1999 full article

A research agenda for tobacco control. KM Emmons. Cancer Causes Control 2000 Feb;11(2):193-194. No abstract. From the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Funded by the National Cancer Institute and National Heart Lung & Blood Institute.

Emmons - Cancer Causes Control 2000 / PubMed

Intervention and policy issues related to children's exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. KM Emmons, M Wong, SK Hammond, WF Velicer, JL Fava, AD Monroe, JL Evans. Prev Med 2001 Apr;32(4):321-331. From the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health. Funded by the U.S. Public Health Service and the National Cancer Institute. "This paper presents a review of the literature that evaluates interventions designed to reduce ETS exposure among young children. In addition, it presents the study design for Project KISS (Keeping Infants Safe from Smoke), an intervention designed to utilize exposure-related feedback to increase parents' motivation for ETS reduction and to reduce household ETS levels."

Emmons - Prev Med 2001 abstract / PubMed

A comprehensive worksite cancer prevention intervention: behavior change results from a randomized controlled trial (United States). G Sorensen, AM Stoddard, AD LaMontagne, K Emmons, MK Hunt, R Youngstrom, D McLellan, DC Christiani. Cancer Causes Control 2002 Aug;13(6):493-502. From the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Funded by the U.S. Public Health Service and the National Cancer Institute.

Sorensen - Cancer Causes Control 2002 abstract / PubMed

Comparison of the chemopreventive efficacies of 1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)selenocyanate and selenium-enriched yeast on 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induced lung tumorigenesis in A/J mouse. A Das, D Desai, B Pittman, S Amin, K El-Bayoumy. Nutr Cancer 2003;46(2):179-185. From the Institute for Cancer Prevention (formerly American Health Foundation), 1 Dana Road, Valhalla, NY. Funded by the U.S. Public Health Service and the National Cancer Institute.

Das - Nutr Cancer 2003 abstract / PubMed

A comprehensive worksite cancer prevention intervention: behavior change results from a randomized controlled trial (United States). G Sorensen, AM Stoddard, AD LaMontagne, K Emmons, MK Hunt, R Youngstrom, D McLellan, DC Christiani. J Public Health Policy 2003;24(1):5-25. From the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Funded by the U.S. Public Health Service and the National Cancer Institute.

Sorensen - J Public Health Policy 2003 abstract / PubMed

Chemopreventive efficacy of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) against 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)-induced lung tumorigenesis in female A/J mice. D Desai, A Das, L Cohen, K el-Bayoumy, S Amin. Anticancer Res 2003 Jan-Feb;23(1A):499-503. From the Institute for Cancer Prevention, American Health Foundation Cancer Center, 1 Dana Road, Valhalla, NY. Funded by the U.S. Public Health Service and the National Cancer Institute.

Desai - Anticancer Res 2003 abstract / PubMed

Reducing social disparities in tobacco use: a social-contextual model for reducing tobacco use among blue-collar workers. G Sorensen, E Barbeau, MK Hunt, K Emmons. Am J Public Health 2004 Feb;94(2):230-239. From the Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health. Funded by the U.S. Public Health Service and the National Cancer Institute.

Sorensen - Am J Public Health 2004 full article / PubMed Central
Sorensen / Am J Public Health 2004 full article

Reducing occupation-based disparities related to tobacco: roles for occupational health and organized labor. EM Barbeau, D McLellan, C Levenstein, GF DeLaurier, G Kelder, G Sorensen. Am J Ind Med 2004 Aug;46(2):170-179. From the Dana Farber Cancer Institute.

Barbeau - Am J Ind Med 2004 abstract - PubMed

Perceived racial/ethnic harassment and tobacco use among African American young adults. GG Bennett, KY Wolin, EL Robinson, S Fowler, CL Edwards. Am J Public Health 2005 Feb;95(2):238-240. From the Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health. "This project was funded in part by the North Carolina Governor’s Institute on Alcohol and Substance Abuse. G. G. Bennett was supported in part by the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center and the Liberty Mutual Foundation. K. Y. Wolin is supported by a National Cancer Institute training grant (5 T32 CA09001-28)."

Bennett - Am J Public Health 2005 full article / PubMed Central

From strange bedfellows to natural allies: the shifting allegiance of fire service organisations in the push for federal fire-safe cigarette legislation. EM Barbeau, G Kelder, S Ahmed, V Mantuefel, ED Balbach. Tob Control 2005 Oct;14(5):338-345. From the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Funded by the National Cancer Institute.

Barbeau - Tob Control 2005 abstract to full article / PubMed Central

Tools for health: the efficacy of a tailored intervention targeted for construction laborers. G Sorensen, EM Barbeau, AM Stoddard, MK Hunt, R Goldman, A Smith, AA Brennan, L Wallace. Cancer Causes Control 2007 Feb;18(1):51-59. From the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Funded by the National Institutes of Health and National Cancer Institute.

Sorensen - Cancer Causes Control 2007 abstract / PubMed

Tobacco use in women with lung cancer. ME Cooley, L Sarna, JK Brown, RD Williams, C Chernecky, G Padilla, LL Danao, D Elashoff. Ann Behav Med 2007 Jun;33(3):242-250. From the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Funded by the National Institutes of Health and National Cancer Institute.

Cooley - Ann Behav Med 2007 abstract / PubMed

Smoking cessation and lung cancer: oncology nurses can make a difference. ME Cooley, RL Sipples, M Murphy, L Sarna. Semin Oncol Nurs 2008 Feb;24(1):16-26. From the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute.

Cooley - Semin Oncol Nurs 2008 author manuscript / PubMed Central

Smoking cessation interventions in cancer care: opportunities for oncology nurses and nurse scientists. ME Cooley, R Lundin, L Murray. Annu Rev Nurs Res 2009;27:243-272. From the Dana Farber Cancer Institute and the College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts. Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute. Review.

Cooley - Annu Rev Nurs Res 2009 abstract / PubMed

Smoking cessation is challenging even for patients recovering from lung cancer surgery with curative intent. ME Cooley, L Sarna, J Kotlerman, JM Lukanich, M Jaklitsch, SB Green, R Bueno. Lung Cancer 2009 Nov;66(2):218-225. From the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute.

Cooley - Lung Cancer 2009 abstract / PubMed

Impact of smoking on patients with stage III colon cancer: results from Cancer and Leukemia Group B 89803. NJ McCleary, D Niedzwiecki, D Hollis, LB Saltz, P Schaefer, R Whittom, A Hantel, A Benson, R Goldberg, JA Meyerhardt. Cancer 2010 Feb 15;116(4):957-966. From the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Funded by the National Institutes of Health and many grants from the National Cancer Institute. Commits fraud by blaming smoking for colorectal cancer caused by JC polyomavirus.

McCleary - Cancer 2010 author manuscript / PubMed Central

The role of reported tobacco-specific media exposure on adult attitudes towards proposed policies to limit the portrayal of smoking in movies. KD Blake, K Viswanath, RJ Blendon, D Vallone. Tob Control 2010 Jun;19(3):191-196. From the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Harvard School of Public Health; the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston; and the American Legacy Foundation. Funded by the Harvard Education Program in Cancer Prevention and Control, the National Cancer Institute, and the National Institutes of Health.

Blake - Tob Control 2010 author manuscript / PubMed Central

From the Center for Community-Based Research, Dana-Faber Cancer Institute. Tobacco use cessation and weight management among motor freight workers: results of the gear up for health study. G Sorensen, A Stoddard, L Quintiliani, C Ebbeling, E Nagler, M Yang, L Pereira, L Wallace. Cancer Causes Control 2010 Dec;21(12):2113-2122. From the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Funded by the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Public Health Service, the National Cancer Institute, and the Centers for Disease Control. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters collaborated with this intrusion.

Sorensen - Cancer Causes Control 2010 abstract / PubMed

The Harvard School of Public Health's Center for Work, Health and Well-being is at the Center for Community-Based Research at the Dana-Farber Institute in Boston, Mass. Funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, this center concocted the 175-page policy document, SafeWell Practice Guidelines: An Integrated Approach to Worker Health Version 1.0 (by Deborah McLellan PhD, MHS; Elizabeth Harden, BA; Pia Markkanen, ScD, MSc; and Glorian Sorensen, PhD, MPH; February 2012.) Using the workplace wellness sections of the Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), it is the blueprint for the NIOSH Total Worker Health™ program to meddle "in every aspect of [workers] lives.... using the workplace as a platform for healthy [SIC] life choices." The primary attraction of the workplace for these creatures is, of course, the opportunity for COERCION.

Glorian Sorensen

Glorian Sorensen directs the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute’s Center for Community-Based Research, and is Professor in the Harvard School of Public Health’s Department of Society, Human Development and Health. Her field is strictly the manipulation of people, preferably powerless ones (low-income, multi-ethnic, blue-collar). "Dr. Sorensen is the Principal Investigator for the NIOSH-funded Center for Work, Health and Well-being, based at the Harvard School of Public Health in collaboration with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Partners Health Care. She is the Principal Investigator for the Massachusetts Cancer Prevention Community Research Network, which aims to strengthen and expand partnerships between academic researchers and community partners. She also leads the Harvard Cancer Prevention Education Program, which trains pre- and post-doctoral fellows in cancer prevention. Dr. Sorensen was awarded Fulbright Award in 2003-04 for study and research in Mumbai, India, with Dr. Prakash Gupta. This collaboration has expanded to include a study of tobacco control among school teachers in Bihar, India. Dr. Sorensen has served on multiple committees for the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Science, including the Committee on Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake (current), Committee to Assess Worksite Preventive Health Program Needs of NASA Employees (2004-2005) [a guinea pig for the NIOSH program], Committee on the Health and Safety Needs of Older Workers (2001-2005), Committee for Behavior Change in the 21st Century: Improving the Health of Diverse Populations (2000-2002), and Committee on Capitalizing on Social Science and Behavioral Research to Improve the Public's Health (1999-2000). She received her Ph.D. degree in Sociology and her MPH from the University of Minnesota." (Glorian Sorensen bio. Sorensen Lab, accessed 3-20-12.)

Glorian Sorensen bio / Sorensen Lab

Her publications go back to 1985 with the Minnesota Heart Survey, with Terry F. Pechacek [now Associate Director for Science for the Office on Smoking and Health (OSH), who was then an associate professor at Minnesota with the Minnesota Heart Health Program]; then with Judith K. Ockene and John Pinney [first director of the Office on Smoking and Health] in the 1990s. (Glorian C. Sorensen, PhD, MPH, Publications. Dana-Farber / Harvard Cancer Center.)

Glorian C. Sorensen, PhD, MPH, Publications / Dana-Farber / Harvard Cancer Center

Sorensen replaced Walter C. Willett as PI of the Harvard Education Program in Cancer Prevention Control in 2001, an ongoing program which has received $2,041,307 from NCI since then, in increments of about a half-million dollars a year. "This Program is designed to create a cadre of researchers in cancer prevention and control who will be knowledgeable about the current state of the science of cancer prevention; expert in a specialized research area in which they will be positioned to generate new knowledge to advance cancer prevention; skilled in formulating and writing research proposals; sufficiently well anchored in professional networks that they can monitor future developments in cancer prevention and translate their knowledge into research; and skilled in transdisciplinary approaches to research in cancer prevention and control. During our 14-year track record we have trained 77 trainees, including 39 pre-doctoral fellows, 20 postdoctoral fellows earning a further degree, and 18 post-doctoral fellows focused on mentored research. 38 of these fellows now work in academic settings, and an additional 21 are involved in cancer prevention research in other settings." This is about $26, 510 per trainee, administered by the National Cancer Institute. (Project Number: 5R25CA057711-18. RePORT Expenditures & Results, National Institutes of Health.)

Project Number: 5R25CA057711-18 / NIH

Reducing Social Disparities in Cancer Risk: The Role of Work and Worker Health - Sorensen has received $919,387 from NCI between 2004 and 2011 for working class worksite wellness lifestyle manipulation projects. The project end date is 2016. (Project Number: 2K05CA108663-06. RePORT Expenditures & Results, National Institutes of Health.)

Project Number: 2K05CA108663-06 / NIH

Promoting Tobacco Control Among Teachers in India. Sorensen has received $2,764,161 from NCI between 2008 and 2012. (Project Number: 5R01CA120958-04. RePORT Expenditures & Results, National Institutes of Health.)

Project Number: 5R01CA120958-04 / NIH

Mumbai Worksite Tobacco Control Study. Sorensen has received $1,078,918 from NCI from 2010-11. (Project Number: 5R01CA140304-02. RePORT Expenditures & Results, National Institutes of Health.)

Project Number: 5R01CA140304-02 / NIH

Karen M. Emmons

Karen M. Emmons has received $2,899,870 from NCI from 2007 to 2011 for "A Sustainable Approach to Increasing Cancer Screening in Community Health Centers." "The proposed study aims to evaluate sustainable strategies for maximizing cancer screening rates among populations facing significant cancer disparities. Using a community-based participatory approach, we will develop and implement the interventions in partnership with Whittier Street Health Center, which has implemented systems redesign according to the Chronic Care Model for cancer screening." (Project Number: 5R01CA126596-05. RePORT Expenditures & Results, National Institutes of Health.)

Project Number: 5R01CA126596-05 / NIH

Karen M. Emmons has received $3,341,607 from NCI from 2007 to 2011 for "Multiple Risk Behavior Intervention in Health Care Settings." "The proposed study is an efficacy study of Healthy Directions-2 (HD-2), which is designed to: (1) increase reach of the intervention into the target population; (2) extend the intervention to include smoking, and increase efficacy of the intervention across all target risk behaviors; and (3) promote and assess long-term maintenance of behavior change. HD-2, a randomized control trial conducted in 10 health centers, will assess whether the intervention effectiveness can be maximized while transferring some of the intervention components to less labor intensive and more disseminable formats. Health centers will be randomized into intervention or usual care." (Project Number: 5R01CA123228-05. RePORT Expenditures & Results, National Institutes of Health.)

Project Number: 5R01CA123228-05 / NIH

Karen M. Emmons has received $2,892,454 from NCI in 2010 and 2011 for "U-Mass Boston / DFHCC U54 Partnership." "This submission is in response to CAI 0-503 Comprehensive Partnerships to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities. This application, submitted by the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center and its partner UMASS Boston, describes plans to transition the successful U56 Partnership to a U54: From Its Inception, the Partnership has been based on strong Institutional support, significant personal commitment of the leadership, and a belief in the institutional benefit that would be derived from a successful partnership." (Project Number: 5U54CA156732-02. RePORT Expenditures & Results, National Institutes of Health.)

Project Number: 5U54CA156732-02 / NIH

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cast 03-22-12