The Equitable Life Assurance Society

Henry Baldwin Hyde

"Henry B. Hyde was born in Catskill, N.Y., Feb. 15, 1834. He was a descendant of an old Colonial family established in Newtown, Mass., in 1633, by William Hyde of England. He came to New York in the year 1850, and for the next two years was employed by Messrs. Merritt, Ely & Co., merchants of this city. In January, 1852, he obtained a clerkship in the office of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York, and was subsequently made cashier of that company." His father, Henry H. Hyde of Boston, was General Manger of the Mutual Life Insurance Company for New England. In 1859, Henry B. Hyde resigned from the Mutual and founded the Equitable. He married Annie Fitch, daughter of Simeon Fitch. His son, James H. Hyde, graduated from Harvard in 1898 and joined the company as a Second Vice President. William C. Alexander, the first president of the Equitable, died in 1874. (Death of Henry B. Hyde. New York Times, May 3, 1899.) Charles Ely of Merritt, Ely & Co. was a director of the Mutual.

William C. Alexander

Col. William C. Alexander was the last surviving son of Archibald Alexander, D.D., of Princeton. He graduated from the College of New-Jersey in 1824. He was in the New Jersey state legislature, and was a candidate for governor in 1859. He became president of the Equitable Life Assurance Society that year. (Obituary. New York Times, Aug. 25, 1874.)

Archibald Alexander, D.D., was elected a professor at the Princeton Theological Seminary when it was established in 1811, and held that office until his death. He left six sons - Rev. Dr. James W. Alexander, Rev. Joseph Addison Alexander, Rev. Samuel Alexander, lawyers Henry and William, and Archibald Alexander, M.D. (Death of Dr. Alexander. New York Times, Oct. 23, 1851.) Archibald Alexander, D.D., was about 80, and was born in Virginia. He had been President of Hampden Sidney College, and was at the Third Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia before coming to Princeton. (From the Trenton Gazette. Oct. 25, 1851.) Rev. Dr. Ashbel Green, Princeton 1783, a co-founder of the Princeton Theological Seminary, was the grandfather of Equitable Life trustee Ashbel Green.

Dr. Edward Wilberforce Lambert, Skull & Bones 1854

"Dr. Lambert became associated with Henry B. Hyde in 1850, who in that year founded the Equitable Life Assurance Society, and was made the society's first medical director. During the period of forty-five years since then he had remained chief of the Equitable's medical staff..." (Death of Dr. E.W. Lambert. New York Times, July 19, 1904.) He was born in Boston; his father, William Gage Lambert, moved to New York City during his senior year at Yale. He got his M.D. at the College of Physicians and Surgeons [1857]. He was the father of Dr. Alexander Lambert (S&B 1884) and Adrian VanSinderen Lambert (S&B 1893), and two other sons who also graduated from Yale, in 1880 and 1886. Three of his four daughters married Yale grads as well: Dickinson W. Richards (1880); William Ransom Barbour (1880), and Knight Dexter Cheney Jr. (S&B 1892). He married Martha, a daughter of Samuel W. Waldron. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 437.) He was a director of the Pacific Mutual Insurance Company in 1855. (Insurance. New York Times, Jan. 23, 1855.) Dr. Alexander Lambert S&B 1884, was chairman of the Executive Committee of the "Committee of Fifty" anti-smoking conspiracy, ca. 1920.

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 437 / Google Books

Dr. Edward W. Lambert's brother, Alfred Lambert, Skull & Bones 1843, was born in Boston and graduated from the Harvard Medical School in 1846, after interning at Massachusetts General Hospital. He was one of the incorporators of the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company in 1851, and was its medical examiner until 1868, when he went to that position at the Equitable. About eight years later he returned to Massachusetts, and in 1880 went back to the Massachusetts Mutual. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1880-1890, p. 250.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1880-1890, p. 250 / Google Books

There were other brothers in the family whom the rest of the family does not mention, including William Gage Lambert Jr. and James Henry Lambert., born in 1824 and 1826 in Boston. Arrest warrants were issued for William G. Lambert Jr. and William H. Perley for arson of a liquor store they owned, which was insured by the Standard and American Insurance Companies and the Home Insurance Company, along with inflated claims of loss. (Incendiary Fire in Broadway. New York Herald, Aug. 18, 1860.)

Descendants of Francis Lambert / justice101us

Their mother was Sally Perley, daughter of Phineas Perley. Her sister, Mary, was the first wife of Alexander Hamilton Twombly, and the mother of Rev. Alexander Stevenson Twombly (S&B 1854); grandmother of Edward Lambert Twombly M.D. (Yale 1881), Henry Bancroft Twombly (S&B 1884), Clifford Gray Twombly (Yale 1891), and Howland Twombly (Wolf's Head 1896); and great-grandmother of Edward Bancroft Twombly (S&B 1912), Alexander H. Twombly Jr. (Yale 1918), and great grandnephews Doane Twombly (Yale 1939) and Edward Twombly Jr. (Yale 1945). (The History and Genealogy of the Perley Family. By M. V. Perley-375. Salem, Mass., 1906; Alexander Stevenson Twombly. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 882.) Hamilton McK. Twombly, Harvard 1871, was a younger half-brother of Alexander S. Twombly.

The History and Genealogy of the Perley Family / Google Books
[AS Twombly] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 882 / Google Books
[E.L. Twombly, p. 44] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1934-1935 / Yale University Library (pdf, 260 pp)
[H. Twombly, p. 78] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1939-1940 / Yale University Library (pdf, 317 pp)
[C.G. Twombly, p. 33] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1942-1943 / Yale University Library (pdf, 312 pp)

Henry B. Twombly and Edward B. Twombly were directors of Sterling Securities Corp., along with Charles P. Taft 2d, S&B 1918. (Display Ad. Syracuse Herald, May 23, 1928.) Edward B. Twombly was Henry B. Twombly's son and law partner. (Who's who in Finance and Banking, 1920-1922. Edited by John William Leonard.)

Who's who in Finance, Banking, and Insurance / Google Books

Their father, William G. Lambert, was one of the original directors of the Equitable and was on its board until at least 1882. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 26, 1882 p. 10.) He was also a director of the New England Mutual Life Insurance Company (Affairs In and Around the City. Boston Atlas, Dec. 4, 1850; Insurance. New York Times, Oct. 20, 1851) and a director of the Home Insurance Company of New-York (Insurance. New York Times, Feb. 28, 1857.) In 1853, he was identified with the firm of A.A. Lawrence & Co. (Insurance. New York Times, Mar. 2, 1853.) He retired from A.A. Lawrence & Co. and joined Geo. C. Richardson & Co. in 1865. (Business Changes. Boston Daily Advertiser, Jul. 3, 1865.) He was a member of the executive committee of the American Home Missionary Society. "He was an active helper of D. Lyman Beecher in the Hanover Street Church, and one of the founders and deacons of the Bowdoin Street Church, Boston. Since 1861 he has been a member, and most of the time a deacon, of the Broadway Tabernacle Church" [of Rev. Joseph Parrish Thompson, S&B 1838]. (Letter from New York. By Huntington. The Congregationalist, Jan. 3, 1883.) Amos Adams Lawrence was the head of A.A. Lawrence & Co. (Obituary. New York Times, Aug. 24, 1886), and the grandfather of Bishop William Lawrence. A.A. Lawrence's father, Amos Lawrence, was a supporter of the notorious anti-smoker, Rev. George Trask.

Dr. Edward W. Lambert's daughter, Sally, married Dickinson Woodruff Richards, Scroll & Key 1880. He was a partner of Richards & Heald, Richards & Richards, and Richards & Affeld. He was the son of Rev. George Richards, Skull & Bones 1840. His Yale relatives go back to 1741. His daughter, Katherine Lambert Richards, married Albert W. Olsen [S&B 1917]. (Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1933-1934 pp. 39-40; D.W. Richards Dies; New York Lawyer. New York Times, Sep. 29, 1933.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1933-1934 / Yale University Library (pdf, 285 pp)

Dr. Edward W. Lambert's wife's sister, Sarah Katherine Waldron, married Elliot C. Cowdin. (Married. New York Times, Sep. 15, 1853.) Cowdin was born in 1819 in Vermont. He lived in Boston until 1852, when he moved to New York and founded Elliot C. Cowdin & Co., importing mainly Paris novelties. He was one of the founders of the Union League Club. "He was in Paris at the outbreak of the Franco-German war, went to Paris during the siege, but returned in time to witness the excesses of the Commune, and delivered an able paper on the subject at the Cooper Institute upon his return to this country. He had crossed the Atlantic some 50 times in all, and had, curiously enough, been a personal witness of every struggle from 1848 down to the last abortive struggle of the Communists." He was also a director of the Metropolitan Bank. He left an estate valued at about $500,000. (Elliot C. Cowdin Dead. New York Times, Apr. 13, 1880.) His widow, Edward W. Lambert, and Joseph S. Lowrey were the executors. Judge Charles A. Peabody and Fisher A. Baker were the witnesses. (Elliot C. Cowdin's Will. New York Times, May 9, 1880.) Elliot Cowdin Lambert, Yale 1886, of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. in New Hampshire, was named after him. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1910-1915, p. 632.) Their daughter, Martha Waldron Cowdin, married Robert Bacon, later a partner of J.P. Morgan. Ironically, Bacon died of blood poisoning after an operation for mastoiditis performed by Dr. Adrian Van S. Lambert; while his brother, anti-smoker Dr. Alexander Lambert, Skull & Bones 1884, was in charge of the case. (Col. Robert Bacon Dies in Hospital. New York Times, May 30, 1919.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1910-1915, p. 632 / Google Books

Dr. Samuel Waldron Lambert, Yale 1880, was professor of applied therapeutics at Columbia University from 1903 to 1914 and clinical medicine 1914-1919, dean of the faculty of medicine 1904 to 1919 [he was succeeded by Dr. William Darrach, Wolf's Head 1897], and dean emeritus 1919 to 1942. He was on the staff of at least 21 hospitals, and a trustee of Roosevelt Hospital from 1904 to 1919. He was President of the New York Academy of Medicine from 1927-28 and a trustee 1929-39. He was on the advisory council of the Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine, and the medical advisory committee of Yale-in-China. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1941-1942, pp 17-18.) Dr. Samuel Waldron Lambert and Dr. Walter F. Chappell, "as family physicians of William Rockefeller, filed an affidavit with Chairman Pujo of the Money Trust Committee "stating that Mr. Rockefeller's physical condition was such that his life would be endangered by any effort, strain, or excitement." (Doctors Tell of His Affliction. New York Times, Jan. 8, 1913.) As president of the New York Academy of Medicine, he sponsored a "graduate fortnight" on aging, whose partticipants included Dr. Louis I. Dublin, statistician of the Metropolitan Life; Dr. George E. Vincent, President of the Rockefeller Foundation; Dr. Alfred S. Warthin, Professor of Pathology at the University of Michigan; Dr. Harrison S. Martland, City Hospital, Newark; Dr. Linsly R. Williams, President of the New York Tuberculosis and Health Association; Dr. Charles F. Collins, New York City; Dr. George H. MacKee, Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology, Postgraduate Medical School; Dr. Howard Fox, Professor of Dermatology, New York University and Bellevue Hospital; Dr. Leo Buerger, attending surgeon, Bronx Hospital; Dr. Foster Kennedy, Professor of Clinical Neurology, Cornell University Medical School; Dr. Edwin G. Zabriskie, attending physician, Neurological Institute; Dr. Alfred E. Cohn and Dr. Alexis Carrel, of the Rockefeller Institute; and Dr. E.J.G. Beardsley, Associate Professor of Medicine, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia. (Doctors in a Congress to Study Ills of Age. New York Times, Aug. 26, 1928.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1941-1942 / Yale University Library (pdf, 320 pp)

Dr. Samuel W. Lambert was the physician of George Crocker, the youngest son of California railroad magnate Charles Crocker. George Crocker and his wife both died of stomach cancer. Crocker's sister was married to Charles B. Alexander of the Equitable. (Geo. Crocker Dying, A Victim of Cancer. New York Times, Nov. 17, 1909.) Crocker's gifts to Columbia University prior to the George Crocker Special Research Fund were put in the hands of Dr. Lambert, Dr. Joseph A. Blake, Dr. Frank Wood, C.N. Calkins, and Dr. William J. Cies. (Crocker Millions for Cancer Cure. New York Times, Dec. 8, 1909.)

Samuel W. Lambert Jr. was an internist and associate clinical professor of medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University, where he received his M.D. in 1923. He graduated from Yale in 1919. He was in charge of the Vanderbilt Clinic at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, and was also active in the New York Academy of Medicine, the Euthanasia Society, and the Judson Health Center, and was a trustee of the Taft School. (Samuel W. Lambert Jr. New York Times, May 17, 1977.) His daughter, Sarah Baldwin Lambert, married Charles F. Morgan, Harvard 1950, a partner of Morgan, Stanley & Co., and the son of Henry Sturgis Morgan, and grandson of J. Pierpont Morgan and Charles Francis Adams. (Sarah Baldwin Lambert Is Married. New York Times, Feb. 28, 1960.)

Dr. Adrian Van Sinderin Lambert, S&B 1893, joined the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1901, and was a Clinical Professor of Surgery from 1924 to 1946. He was president of the American Association for Throacic Surgery in 1939. He had two sons, Dr. Adrian Lambert [Yale 1930] and Dr. John T. Lambert [Yale 1935]. (Adrian Lambert, Surgeon, 80, Dead. New York Times, Oct. 17, 1952.) Francis Day Rogers [Scroll & Key 1935, brother of James Gamble Rogers, S&K 1931, who was at Lord & Thomas on the American Tobacco account] was an usher at Dr. John T. Lambert's wedding. (Nuptials Are Held for Miss Richmond. New York Times, Jan. 27, 1952.) His granddaughter, Mary Robinson Lambert, married Dr. George Alexander Carden Jr., Yale 1931. (Mary R. Lambert Bride in Garden. New York Times, Aug. 18, 1940.) She died two years later at the age of 34. (Mrs. G.A. Carden Jr., A Welfare Worker. New York Times, Apr. 29, 1942.)

Dr. Adrian V.S. Lambert's wife's brother was corporation attorney Lucius F. Robinson Sr., S&B 1885. He was a director of Colts Patent Fire Arms Manufacturing Company, Billings and Spencer Company, Veeder-Root, Inc., The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, the Phoenix Insurance Company and the First National Bank of Hartford. (L.F. Robinson Sr., Noted Lawyer, 78. The New York Times, Jun. 12, 1941.) Henry S. Robinson, S&B 1889, and John T. Robinson, S&B 1893, were his brothers. His brothers-in-law were J. Barclay Cooke, S&B 1893 and Walter E. Cooke, S&B 1895. Lucius F. Robinson, S&B 1843, was an uncle, and Arthur L. Shipman, S&B 1886, was a cousin. (Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1940-1941, pp. 26-27.) Henry Seymour Robinson was vice president of the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company from 1905-1918 and president since then. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926, pp. 139-141.) John Trumbull Robinson was a director of the Connecticut General Life Insurance Company. (Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1937-1938, pp. 69-70.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1940-1941 / Yale University Library (pdf, 290 pp)
Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926 / Yale University Library (pdf, 350 pp)
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale 1937-1938 / Yale University Library (pdf, 305 pp)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1872

William C. Alexander, President; George T. Adee, Vice-Pres., Nat. Bank of Commerce, New-York; Henry M. Alexander, Alexander & Green; John Auchincloss, John & Hugh Auchincloss; Benjamin E. Bates, President National Bank of Commerce, Boston; James M. Beebe, Boston; Thomas A. Biddle, Thomas A. Biddle & Co., Philadelphia; Robert Bliss, Bliss & Allen; William T. Blodgett, Wm. Tilden & Nephew; H.V. Butler, H.V. Butler & Co.;Wayman Crow, Crow, McCreery & Co., St. Louis; Thomas A. Cummins, Everett House, New-York; Theodore Cuyler, Philadelphia; Henry Day, Lord, Day & Lord; John J. Donaldson, Pres. Bank of North America; Dudley S. Gregory, Jersey City, N.J.; Ashbel Green, President Southern Railroad of New Jersey; Henry H. Hyde, Sears Building, Boston; James M. Halsted, President American Fire Insurance Company; S.J. Hawley, No. 140 Pearl-st.; Samuel Holmes, No. 4 Beekman-st.; Moses A. Hoppock, M.A. Hoppock & Co.; Henry A. Hurlbut, No. 11 West 20th-st.; Henry B. Hyde, Vice-President; Robert Lenox Kennedy, Pres. National Bank of Commerce, New-York; George G. Kellogg, Tefft, Griswold & Kellogg; William G. Lambert, Geo. C. Richardson & Co.; Edward W. Lambert, M.D., No. 2 East 37th-st.; Daniel D. Lord, Lord, Day & Lord; James Low, Low, Harriman & Co.; Peter McMartin, No. 168 5th-av.; Henry G. Marquand, No. 120 Broadway; Charles J. Martin, Pres. Home Insurance Co.; John T. Moore, Upper Aquebogue, Long Island; George D. Morgan, No. 56 Exchange-place; Jose F. Navarro, Vice-Pres. Commercial Warehouse Co., Wall-st.; Stephen H. Phillips, Attorney General, Honolulu, Sandwich Islands; Bennington F. Randolph, Jersey City, N.J.; John Slade, John Slade & Co.; John Sloane, W. & J. Sloane; Thomas U. Smith, Pres. Mercantile Loan & Warehouse Co., N.Y.; John A. Stewart, Pres. U.S. Trust Company; George H. Stuart, Stuart & Bro., Philadelphia; Henry S. Terbell, H.S. Terbell & Co.; S.W. Torrey, New-Jersey; Dwight Townsend, No. 65 Wall-st.; Alanson Trask, A. & A.G. Trask; William Walker, No. 117 East 21st-st.; William Whitewright Jr., No. 88 Wall-st.; Benjamin Williamson, Elizabeth, N.J.; Henry Young, No. 49 Nassau-st., New-York; Thomas S. Young, T.S. Young & Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 12, 1872, p. 8.)

George T. Adee

George Townsend Adee was born in Albany in 1804, but lived with his parents in Beekman Street, New York City. He was employed by his father's auction firm, Adee & Timpson, which was dissolved about 1850. He was a director of the National Bank of Commerce for 42 years, and its vice president from 1868 to 1878. At his death, he was also a director of the United States Trust Company, the Equitable Life Assurance Society, and the Republic Fire Insurance Company. (Obituary. New York Times, Nov. 21, 1884.)

His daughter, Clarissa Townsend Adee, married Maurice Dwight Collier, Yale 1866, of St. Louis. He was on the board of Counselors of the Sheffield Scientific School from 1869 to 1881, and was a director of Washington University, St. Louis. Henry Hitchcock [S&B] 1848 was his brother-in-law. (MD Collier. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 581.) Collier shared a law office at 45 Pine Street, New York City, with his brother-in-law George A. Adee. He left $1,000,000 to his widow, with instructions to carry out his known wishes regarding "the poor, the orphans, the Kingsley Trust Association of New Haven [aka Scroll & Key], and Yale College." She and his brothers-in-law, Ethan A. Hitchcock and Henry Hitchcock of St. Louis were the executors. (Collier's Will Is Found. New York Times, Jan. 16, 1906.) Ethan A. Hitchcock (1835-1909) was Secretary of the Interior from 1898 to 1907. (Hitchcock, Foe of Land Frauds, Dead. New York Times, Apr. 10, 1909.) Henry Hitchcock was "deeply interested in Washington University, St. Louis," for over 40 years, and became a director in 1859 and vice president in 1886. (H Hitchcock. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 135.) Ethan Allen Hitchcock, Scroll & Key 1931, was the son of George Collier Hitchcock, S&K 1890, nephew of Henry Hitchcock S&B 1879, and grandson of Henry Hitchcock S&B 1848. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1948-1949, p18.)

[MD Collier] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 581 / Google Books
[H Hitchcock] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 135 / Google Books
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1948-1949 / Yale University Library (pdf, 186 pp)

George Augustus Adee graduated from Yale in 1867 and Columbia Law School in 1870. His practioce was devoted "chiefly to the care of estates," and he was an official of the Yale Athletic Club, Yale Alumni Association and the University Fund, and the Building Committeee of the Yale Gymnasium. Augustus Alvey Adee, Yale 1821, Fleet Surgeon U.S. Navy, was an uncle. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 1061.)

[GA Adee] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 1061 / Google Books

His son, Philip Henry Adee, Yale 1873, was in business with Benjamin D. Silliman (Yale 1824) from 1877 until Silliman died in 1901. "He was also interested in the oil fields of Mexico." (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1911-1912, pp. 77-78.) Benjamin Douglas Silliman, whose Yale ancestors go back to 1722, was counsel to the National Bank of Commerce for over half a century. His younger brother, Frederick William Adee, also Yale 1873 and a graduate of Columbia Law School, died in 1900. (FW Adee. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 71.) Ernest Rufus Adee, Yale 1885, was a vice president of the Mercantile Trust Company. He married a daughter of Gen. Louis Fitzgerald. (ER Adee. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 370.) Edwin Morgan Adee, Yale 1881, was a lawyer who never practiced. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1913-1914, pp. 95-96.)

[PH Adee] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1910-1915, p. 238 / Google Books
[FW Adee] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 71 / Google Books
[ER Adee] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 370 / Google Books
[EM Adee] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1910-1915, p. 622 / Google Books

"The biographies of George Augustus Adee and Alvey Augustus Adee confirm that they both shared common ancestors William and Clara Adee. George A’s father was George T. and Alvey A’s father was Augustus A. Both men had the same parents…William and Clara." (Fsn133, AdeeTree2.) William Adee was one of the founders of the American Exchange Bank. (American Exchange Bank. New York Spectator, Jul. 26, 1838.) Alvey Augustus Adey Jr. was in an office of the Secretary of State for 54 years. "He was the man in the State Department to whom were referred all complex problems relating to foreign intercourse. It was he who prepared the formal messages that are sent to the heads of other Government on State occasions, and to him were submitted many questions having to do with problems of precedence on big official social occasions in Washington. Mr. Adee was the connecting link between Administrations and it was through his office that continuity of policy in the handling of perplexing matters of diplomacy were carried from one Administration to another." (Alvey A. Adee Dies, Veteran Diplomat. New York Times, Jul. 6, 1924.) He began his career as an assistant to Daniel Sickles, who was a prominent client of his criminal-lawyer uncle, when Sickles was appointed Minister to Spain. Adee was the chargé d'affaires who arranged for Boss Tweed's capture and return from Spain. (Alvey Augustus Adee 1842-1924. By Harrison Griswold Dwight. Dictionary of American Biography Base Set. American Council of Learned Societies, 1928-1936.) (Augustus Alvey Adee MD, Yale 1821. Biographical notices of graduates of Yale College : including those graduated in classes later than 1815, who are not commemorated in the annual obituary records, 1913, p. 66.) A.A. Adee of Washington was a groomsman at the wedding of Samuel Mather to Mrs. John Hay's sister, Flora. (Mather-Stone. Cleveland Herald, Oct. 20, 1881.) A.A. Adee gave away his niece, Constance Cleveland Adee, daughter of the late David Graham Adee, at her marriage to Dr. Walter Tyler of Georgetown. Paymaster G.M. Adee of the U.S. Navy was his best man. Rev. Dr. Roland Cotton Smith of St. John's Church performed the ceremony. (A Day's Weddings. New York Times, Dec. 2, 1906.)

Graduates of Yale College in Classes Later Than 1815 / Archive.org

James W. Alexander

James Waddell Alexander was born in Princeton, N.J. in 1839. "Both of his parents were Virginians by birth, his mother being of the well-known Virginia family of Cabell. His father was the Rev. Dr. James W. Alexander, for many years pastor of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, in this city, prior to the advent of Dr. John Hall." The Rev. Dr. Archibald Alexander was his grandfather. His uncle, Dr. Joseph Addison Alexander, was a professor at Princeton University; his uncle, Rev. Dr. Samuel Davis Alexander, was pastor of Phillips Memorial Church in New York; his uncle, Dr. Archibald Alexander, was a physician; and his uncle, Henry Martyn Alexander, was the head of Alexander & Green. He graduated from Princeton in 1860 and joined the law firm of Cummins, Alexander & Green. He left Alexander & Green to join the Equitable, of which his uncle, William C. Alexander, was president, as Secretary 1866, and became Second Vice President in 1871, First Vice President in 1874, and President in 1899. He married Elizabeth Beasley Williamson, daughter of Chancellor Williamson, in 1864. His son, Henry Martyn Alexander Jr, graduated from Princeton in 1890, and was a member of the law firm of Alexander & Colby. His other son, Frederick Beasley Alexander, was a freshman at Princeton. (James W. Alexander. New York Times, May 21, 1899.) Henry Martyn Alexander died in 1899. (Died. New York Times, Sep. 11, 1899.) Henry Martyn Alexander's daughter, Helen G. Alexander, married Philip Kip Rhineland, a grandson of Dr. Isaac L. Kip. (Miss Rhinelander to Wed a Banker. New York Times, Sep. 14, 1921.)

John Auchincloss

John Auchincloss died in Quebec in 1876. Pallbearers were John Steward, Samuel Sloan, Jacob D. Vermilye, Benjamin B. Sherman, Thomas A. Cummins, William C. Kent, William B. Bleecker, and Monriff (?) Mitchell. (Funeral of Mr. John Auchincloss. Jul. 1, 1876.) His wife, Elizabeth [Buck], died in 1902 at age 86. (New York Times, Oct. 28, 1902.) His father, Hugh Auchincloss, was born in Paisley, Scotland, in 1780, came to America in 1803, and settled in New York in 1805. "[H]e was known for his sturdy adherence to the more rigid opinions of those who are designated the Old School of Presbyterians," and was a treasurer of the Presbytery of New York, and Director of the Princeton Theological Seminary. (New-York City. New York Times, Jul. 13, 1855.) His daughter, Sarah Ann Auchincloss, was Mrs. James Coats (Died. New York Times, Jun. 14, 1887), and their daughter, Annie Mackenzie Coats, married George Gordon King (Married. New York Times, Jun. 18, 1891.) John Auchincloss was the father of Edgar S. Auchincloss (who was Samuel Sloan's son-in-law) and grandfather of Dr. Hugh Auchincloss, Scroll & Key 1901, and Alfred Mamwaring Coats, Scroll & Key 1891, of the thread company, J&P Coats. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1942-1943, p. 30.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1942-1943 / Yale University Library (pdf, 312 pp)

Robert Bliss. Skull & Bones 1850

Robert Bliss was a partner in several dry goods commission firms, the last of which was Bliss & Allen. After retiring from it, he became a vice president of the Bank of New York. He married Parker Handy's daughter, Susan Maria, in 1861. His father, Rev. Seth Bliss, was Secretary of the New England branch of the American Tract Society in Boston. He was a brother of William Root Bliss, also Skull & Bones 1850. William R. Bliss was connected with the Equitable for thirty years. He died a few months after his brother. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 546.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 546 / Google Books

Ashbel Green, Royal

Ashbel Green was the son of James S. Green, a lawyer of Princeton, N.J., and the grandson of Ashbel Green, D.D. He graduated from Princeton in 1846, and founded Alexander & Green with Henry M. Alexander in 1849 or 1850. He was vice president and general counsel of the West Shore Railroad, and later general counsel of the New York Central. His brother, Robert S. Green, was the governor of New Jersey; and his brother, Dr. James S. Green, was the mayor of Elizabeth, N.J. (Death List of a Day. New York Times, Sep. 5, 1898.) He was a trustee of the Palatine Insurance Company of Manchester, England. (Notes of Insurance Interests. New York Times, Sep. 9, 1898.) He was married to Louisa Buloid Walker, daughter of William Walker. Esq., by Rev. J.W. Alexander. (Married. New York Times, Nov. 10, 1854.) Ashbel Green was secretary, Henry M. Alexander was second vice-president, and William Walker was treasurer of the Demilt Dispensary. (The Demilt Dispensary. New York Times, Mar. 27, 1855.)

His son, William Walker Green, graduated from Yale in 1878 and joined Alexander & Green in 1886. Another son, Ashbel Green Jr., was a member of Wolf's Head 1891. His daughters married Thomas Thacher [S&B] 1870 and William C. Gulliver [S&B] 1871. (William Walker Green, B.A. 1878. Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1923-1924, pp. 73-74.) His grandson was Thomas Day Thacher, Skull & Bones 1904.

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1923-1924 / Yale University Library (pdf, 284 pp)

Rev. Dr. Ashbel Green, Princeton 1783, a co-founder of the Princeton Theological Seminary, was a trustee of Princeton 1790-1812; Chaplain U.S. House of Representatives 1792-1800; President of the Board of Trustees from 1812-1822, and a trustee of the Seminary from 1822-1848; and President of the Board of Trustees of Jefferson Medical College 1826-1848. (Princeton University General Catalogue 1746-1906, pp. 12, 18, 101.) Divie Bethune and Robert Lenox were among the ruling elders. (Historical Sketch of the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church of the United States. Western Monitor, Feb. 16, 1816.) Ashbel Green, 1762-1848, was a Royal descendant of Thomas Dudley (1576-1653), governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. (#63 Royal Descents, Notable Kin, and Printed Sources: Notable Descendants of Governor Thomas Dudley (RD). By Gary Boyd Roberts.)

Princeton University General Catalogue 1746-1906 / Internet Archive (pdf, 556 pp)
Notable Descendants of Governor Thomas Dudley (RD) / New England Ancestors

James M. Halsted

James M. Halsted of Halsted, Haines & Co. married Catharine Crane, the daughter of O. Halsted. Rev. J.R. Crane of Middletown, Conn. performed the ceremony. (New-York Spectator, Dec. 23, 1833.) Halsted, Haines & Co. was established in 1804 by William M. Halsted, the father of partner William M. Halsted., and Richard Townley Haines, the grandfather of partner William A. Haines. John K. Myers and J. Edward Bentley were also partners when it suspended in 1884. It was at Nos. 376 and 378 Broadway. (An Old Firm's Suspension. New York Times, Jul. 13, 1884.) James M. Halsted was the father of Charles Stockton Halsted. He left a trust fund in the New York Trust Company for his grandchildren, Catherine Crane Halsted and James Maver Halsted. (Called It Extravagant. New York Times, Dec. 19, 1894.) Catherine Crane Halsted married James Ewing, of the American Society for the Control of Cancer.

William Mills Halsted Jr. was the father of Dr. William Stewart Halsted, Yale 1874. In 1878, he was appointed house physician to the newly constructed New York Hospital, where he inaugurated the medical departnment. "He organized with the aid of Dr. [George Edmund] Munroe [S&B 1874], Dr. George M. Tuttle [S&B 1877], and others, a new kind of instruction for medical students by practical methods in the laboratory, in the dispensary, and at the bedside, to take the place of the 'cram quizzes' then in vogue." From 1887 to 1889 he worked with Dr. William H. Welch [S&B 1870] in the pathological laboratory of Johns Hopkins University, where he was made director of the surgical department, and in 1890, surgeon-in-chief of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and professor of surgery at JHU. He died in Baltimore in 1922. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1922-1923, pp. 90-92.) William S. Halsted's sisters were Bertha, wife of John Taylor Terry [Wolf's Head 1879] and Mrs. Samuel Oakley Vanderpoel, and Richard H. Halsted of the New York Stock Exchange was his brother. Their grandfathers, William H. Halsted and Richard Townley Haines, were founders of Union Theological Seminary. (Mrs. John T. Terry. New York Times, Sep. 25, 1930; John Taylor Terry, B.A. 1879. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1941-1942, pp. 15-16.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1922-1923 / Yale University Library (pdf, 385 pp)
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1941-1942 / Yale University Library (pdf, 320 pp)

John T. Terry 1879's brother, Rev. Roderick Terry (Scroll & Key 1870) was a member of the council of New York University and Bellevue Hospital from 1883-1898, and a trustee of Rutgers College from 1886-1908. He married a daughter of Henry G. Marquand. His daughter was married to Eugene Hale Jr. (S&B 1898). (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1933-1934, p13-14.) Hale was bequeathed $500,000 by his Bones classmate, William Payne Whitney, in 1931.

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1933-1934 / Yale University Library (pdf, 285 pp)

William Mills Halsted's daughter Louise married John Kirtland Myers, who was later president of the Pacific Mutual Insurance Company. Their son, Thaddeus Halsted Myers M.D., Scroll & Key 1881, was an orthopedic surgeon in New York City. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926, pp. 102-104.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926 / Yale University Library (pdf, 350 pp)

James Low

James Low founded the dry goods house of Low, Harriman with Oliver Harriman, who married his oldest daughter. After retiring in 1876, he was said to have lost $4 million in the stock market. His oldest son took over the business, which became Joseph T. Low & Co. His other son was James T. Low, Jr. (Death List of a Day. New York Times, May 19, 1898.) Joseph T. Low was also a director of the Equitable.

Henry G. Marquand

Henry Gurdon Marquand was born in New York in 1810, and educated in Pittsfield, Mass. His ancestors came from the Island of Guernsey. He was a brother of Frederick Marquand, whose estate he was put in charge of. He funded construction of the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad and was its president. He was a major benefactor of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. His children were Allan Marquand, Professor of Art at Princeton University; Henry Marquand, Mrs. Roderick Terry [S&K 1870], Mrs. Henry Galbraith Ward, and Mrs. Harold Godwin. (Henry G. Marquand Dead. New York Times, Feb. 27, 1902.) He gave $1000 during the founding of Memorial Hospital. (The New-York Cancer Hospital. New York Times, May 18, 1884.)

George D. Morgan

George Denison Morgan was born in Hartford, Conn. He came to New York in 1847 and formed a banking firm with his cousin, former Gov. Edwin D. Morgan, John T. Terry, and Solon Humphries, under the name E.D. Morgan & Co. (Obituary. New York Times, Jun. 14, 1891.)

John Sloane

John Sloane was the head of W. & J. Sloane. He was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1834, and came to New York with his father in 1853. He was a director of the American Surety Company, the Equitable Life, Bigelow Carpet Company, East River Gas Company, Fifth Avenue Safe Deposit Company, the Hudson Trust, Indianapolis Gas Company, the Manhattan Company, the Morton Trust, the New Amsterdam Gas Company, the Ohio and Indiana Comsolidated Natural and Illuminating Gas Co., the Provident Loan Society, and the Second National Bank. He was the brother of William D. Sloane and Henry T. Sloane. (John Sloane Dead. New York Times, Dec. 10, 1905.) He left an estate of more than $1,000,000. He was a brother of William D. Sloane, who married Emily Vanderbilt. His wife was the former Adela Berry, and they had two sons, John and William Sloane. (Mrs. Adela Sloane Dead. New York Times, May 15, 1911.) She left her estate, Wyndhurst, to Evelyn Sloane, Mrs. William E.S. Griswold; her house on Fifth Avenue to John Jr.; and $400,000 to William Sloane. (Will of Adela B. Sloane. New York Times, Jun. 8, 1911.)

His father, William Sloane, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1810, and came to New York in 1834. He was employed by Thompson & Co. in the carpet business for 19 years, then started his own business. His brother joined him, and it became W. & J. Sloane. After John Sloane retired, William and his four sons - John, William D., Henry T., Thomas C. and Walter W. Law - continued it. His daughter was Mrs. [Edmund] Coffin. He was also a director of the Bigelow Carpet Company, and Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Company. (Death of Mr. William Sloane. New York Times, May 24, 1879.) He left bequests to various religious organizations, mainly connected with the Presbyterian Church, including $30,000 each to the Board of Foreign Missions and Board of Domestic Missions. (A Generous Merchant. New York Times, Jun. 5, 1879.) He had two other brothers, James and Andrew, besides John; a sister, Jane H. Wray; and a sister-in-law in Scotland, Margaret Bardeur. A son, David Sloane, was deceased. Eliza T. Sloane was a niece. (Miscellaneous City News. New York Times, Jun. 28, 1879.)

John Sloane, the other founder of W. & J. Sloane, was born in Kilmarnie, Scotland, in 1818, and came to New York in 1841. He retired after 28 years at the company, but after a few years of retirement in Stamford, Conn., he returned to New York and founded the Dolphin Carpet Manufacturing Company and was president for fifteen years. He retired about two years before his death. He had a son and a daughter. (Obituary. New York Times, Mar. 4, 1891.) John Sloane, formerly of Kilmamock, Scotland, died Thompsonville, Conn., in his 83rd year. (Died. New York Times, May 8, 1864.) Eliza T. Sloane, wife of John Sloane, died in 1887. (Died. New York Times, Jun. 14, 1887.)

Samuel W. Torrey

Samuel Whittemore Torrey was one of the sons of William Torrey. The father and sons built, owned and operated a part of the New Jersey Southern Railroad, later part of the New Jersey Central. He was a director of the Equitable for twenty years. Mrs. Samuel W. Torrey, was the daughter of George Coggill, an Englishman who operated a fleet of ships in foreign trade. One of his daughters was Mrs. Hart Lyman. (Death List of a Day. New York Times, Feb. 8, 1903.) Samuel W. Torrey and his brother, William A. Torrey, sold locomotives to Russia on commission. (Furnishing Locomotives to Russia. New York Times, Oct. 23, 1877.) William A. Torrey was the junior partner of E.D. Hammond & Company. (Obituary Notes. New York Times, Oct. 30, 1910.) William Torrey was a brother of Prof. John Torrey, the chemist and botanist of Columbia College. He died at age 98. (Obituary. New York Times, Jun. 17, 1891.)

His son-in-law, Hart Lyman, Scroll & Key 1873, joined the New York Tribune in 1876, and was editor-in-chief from 1905 to 1913. His brothers, Frederick W. Lyman and George R. Lyman, ex-1867, lived in Minneapolis, Minn. They were cousins of Dickinson W. Richards, et al. One of his daughters was Mrs. Rowland Stebbins, and Rowland Stebbins Jr., Scroll & Key 1931, was a grandson. His son, Huntington Lyman, was a member of Wolf's Head 1916. He became a member of the New York Stock Exchange the same year he graduated, and was a member of its governing committee at the time of his death. Mrs. Huntington Lyman was a daughter of Henry Barstow Platt [S&B] 1882. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1927-1928, pp. 53 and 187.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1927-1928 / Yale University Library (pdf, 366 pp)

Alanson Trask

Alanson Trask was born in Salem, Mass., in 1808. He was one of the founders of the Equitable Life Assurance Society. He retired from business around 1867 and purchased Ooweening, a farm near Saratoga Springs, but continued to ride the train into New York for the director meetings in his nineties. He married Sarah Elizabeth Marquand, daughter of Isaac Marquand (Married. New York Spectator, Oct. 7, 1833), the only sister of Henry G. and Frederick Marquand. Their children were Spencer Trask, the banker; Mrs. [Dr. De Witt Clinton] Enos; and Mrs. Rev. William A. Holliday. (Death of Alanson Trask. New York Times, Aug. 3, 1902.) He and a brother were shoe manufacturers, with factories in New England which sent their product to New York City. The Trasks are descended from Capt. William Trask, a Puritan, who sailed on the ship Abigail in 1628, and founded the Massachusetts Bay Colony at Salem, Mass. (Death of Alanson Trask. Brooklyn Eagle, Aug. 2, 1902.) He was a longtime director of the Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Eagle, Jun. 1, 1859 and May 21, 1867.)

His brother, Asa G. Trask, was Alanson Trask's partner in A. & A.G. Trask & Co., the largest wholesale shoe dealers in New York before the Civil War. He was born in Salem, Mass. in 1811. He was survived by two sons in Chicago and one in New York Cuty. (Death List of a Day. New York Times, Jan. 31, 1897.) He married Hetty C. Marquand, a daughter of Isaac Marquand. (Died. New York Times, Mar. 12, 1891.) He was a director of the Shoe and Leather Bank. (Bank Notices. New York Times, Apr. 7, 1855, and Apr. 10, 1858.)

Spencer Trask (1844-1910) was born in Brooklyn, and graduated from Princeton in 1866. He founded the banking house of Spencer Trask around 1869, which was also called Trask & Stone and Trask & Francis, until becoming Spencer Trask & Co. in 1881. "Mr. Trask was a warm admirer of Thomas A. Edison and, in the early days of Mr. Edison's inventions, was one of his strongest backers. He was President of the Edison Light and Power System from the time of its inception and was a large stockholder in many of the Edison companies throughout the country." In 1896, he reorganized the New York Times Company and was its first president. He married Katrina Nichols, daughter of George L. Nichols, in 1874. (Mr. Trask Notable in Varied Fields. New York Times, Jan. 1, 1910.) Spencer Trask was one of the incorporators of the American National Red Cross. (Jan. 5, 1905, ch. 23, Sec. 1, 33 Stat. 599. Title 36 Patriotic Societies and Observances, Chapter 1, American National Red Cross.) He left his estate in trust, at the request of his wife. The executors were Mrs. Trask; his former partner, George Foster Peabody; and his brother-in-law, George L. Nichols [Jr.]. (Spencer Trask Left His Estate in Trust. New York Times, Jan. 21, 1910.)

George Livingston Nichols Sr. was a member of T.B. Coddington & Co., metal importers, since 1854, and was its senior partner. He was a vice president and a director of the Phoenix Bank. (George Livingstone Nichols. Brooklyn Eagle, Mar. 28, 1892.) George L. Nichols Jr. was born in Brooklyn and graduated from Williams College in 1881. "Within a few years he was a partner of Masten & Nichols, which at the time of his death had become Milbank, Tweed, Hope & Webb. (George L. Nichols, Lawyer, Dies At 71. New York Times, Mar. 5, 1932.) He was a director of the Barney Estate Company (To Settle Barney Estate. New York Times, Nov. 22, 1907), and of the Milbank Memorial Fund (Anderson Riches Willed to Charity. New York Times, Mar. 9, 1921.) He married Mary Chickering, daughter of piano manufacturer George H. Chickering. Her first husband, Capt. Fitz Herbert Ruxton, was an Irish Army officer. Children of her first marriage were William V.C. Ruxton and Mrs. Adolph Boissevain, and of her second, Mrs. Kerr Rainsford. (Mrs. G.L. Nichols Dead in Katonah. New York Times, Apr. 14, 1933.) Her granddaughter, Dorothy Vernon Ruxton, married Charles A. Wight Jr., Scroll & Key 1953. (Dorothy Ruxton Ensign's Fiancee. New York Times, Mar. 13, 1954.)

Another son, Acosta Nichols, graduated from Williams College in 1893. He was a member of Spencer Trask & Co. since 1894, and a director of the Mercantile Properties Co., the Mexican Coal and Coke Co., the Broadway Realty Co., the West Boylston Manufacturing Co., the Towne Securities Co. and Town Mines Inc., and Wickwire Spencer Steel. Co. He was a trustee of the American University in Beirut, the Society for Improving the Condition of the Poor, the Long Island Biological Institute, and the Nassau Hospital Association. (Acosta Nichols, Stockbroker, 72. New York Times, Feb. 9, 1945.) He was president of the Spencer Trask Fund, an investment trust, with common stock holdings in Colgate-Palmolive-Peet and General Elecric, among others. (Trust in First Year Has $652,191. New York Times, Apr. 17, 1930.) He was an usher at the wedding of Robert G. Mead Jr. to Elsie Cleveland (The Weddings of a Day. New York Times, Nov. 10, 1898), and of Charles Dexter Cleveland to Frances E. Homans (A Day's Weddings. New York Times, Nov. 30, 1899.)

Mrs. Trask married George Foster Peabody in 1921. He was born in Columbus, Ga. in 1852. He came to New York [with his parents, George Henry and Elvira Canfield Peabody]. He was a clerk in a wholesale goods company until 1880, when he became associated with Spencer Trask. He was an officer and director of the General Electric Company, the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, the Morton Trust and several railroads. In 1904, he was treasurer of the Democratic Narional Committee, and in 1906 he was treasurer of the General Education Board. He was a supporter of Woodrow Wilson, who made him a director and vice chairman of the Federal Reserve Board; Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt, who rehabilitated himself at Peabody's property at Warm Springs, Ga., after his bout with polio. He adopted Mrs. Waite, a widow, who was executive secretary of the Katrina Trask Alliance, as his daughter. (G.F. Peabody Dead; Philanthropist, 82. New York Times, Mar. 5, 1938.) He was a director of the State Trust Company, and made loans to his brother, R.C. Peabody. The State Trust was controlled by a syndicate including R.A.C. Smith and William C. Whitney, which was merged into the Morton Trust. (Easy for State Trust Directors to Get Millions in Loans. New York World, Jan. 19, 1900.)

His brother, Charles Jones Peabody, was also with Spencer Trask & Co. until 1923. He lived in Albany, N.Y. from 1880 to 1895. He was a trustee of the Brooklyn Savings Bank, a director of the Franklin Trust and the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences; vice president of International Combustion Engineering Corp., member of the executive committee of the American Beet Sugar Co., and a director of several Mexican corporations. (Charles J. Peabody Dies in Brooklyn. New York Times, Feb. 25, 1924.)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1880-81

Board of Directors: Henry B. Hyde, George D. Morgan, George T. Adee, Henry A. Hurlbut, Henry F. Spaulding, William H. Fogg, William A. Wheelock, Parker Handy, William G. Lambert, Henry G. Marquand, James W. Alexander, Henry S. Terbell, Thomas S. Young, John D. Jones, Thomas A. Cummins, Robert Bliss, Daniel D. Lord, Horace Porter, Edward W. Lambert, Bennington F. Randolph, Alanson Trask, John Sloane, Ashbel Green, Henry V. Butler, George H. Stuart, William Whitewright Jr., John A. Stewart, James M. Halsted, Chauncey M. Depew, Benjamin Williamson, Henry M. Alexander, William Walker, Henry Day, Joseph Seligman, E. Boudinot Colt, Thomas A. Biddle, George W. Carleton, George G. Kellogg, Samuel Borrowe, Robert Lenox Kennedy, José F. Navarro, John J. McCook, Stephen H. Phillips, Samuel W. Torrey, Samuel Holmes, Theodore Weston, Alexander P. Irvin, T. DeWitt Cuyler, Louis Fitzgerald, William M. Bliss, Charles G. Landon, and William Alexander. (Display Ad. The Congregationalist, Feb. 11, 1880.) Seligman left, Samuel G. Goodrich joined. (Display Ad. New York Tribune, Jan. 27, 1881.)

Henry M. Alexander Jr.

Henry Martyn Alexander Jr. was the son of President James Waddell Alexander. He married Helen Manice, daughter of William De Forest Manice, Yale 1851. (Marriages. New York Times, Dec. 6, 1895; Death List of a Day. New York Times, Sep. 8, 1903.) He was a director of the Equitable Life Assurance Society from 1935 to 1951. He graduated from Princeton in 1890, graduated from Columbia Law School, and was a law partner with Bainbridge Colby in Alexander & Colby, then with Joseph A. Keenan from 1908. He had a son, De Forest M. Alexander and a daughter, Mrs. Helen G. Rhinelander; and a brother Frederick B. Alexander of Los Angeles. (Henry M. Alexander. New York Times, Apr. 17, 1952.)

William DeF. Manice, Yale 1851, studied law in Germany and practiced in New York City. He was the older brother of Edward Augustus Manice, Yale 1858. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 318.) Her sisters married Charles Henry Mellon and E. Hayward Ferry.

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 318 / Google Books

William Alexander

William Alexander, Secretary of the Equitable, married Frances Gordon Paddock, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Franklin A. Paddock. His cousin, Dr. Samuel Alexander, was best man, and the ushers were Percival Lowell of Boston, E. Austin Oothout, Franklin Paddock, Ernest J. Wendell, Samuel Sherwood, and cousin Henry M. Alexander. (Three Happy Couples. New York Times, Nov. 11, 1887.) She was on the Board of Governors of the Woman's Hospital as well. (Woman's Hospital to Move. New York Times, Dec. 19, 1897.)

Gen. Louis Fitzgerald

Louis Fitzgerald rose from the rank of sargeant to lieutenant colonel during the Civil War, then made a career in the New York National Guard, where he became a brigadier general in 1882. He resigned as head of the Mercantile Trust during the Armstrong insurance investigations, where he was wanted as a witness. "He avoided subpoena servers even to the extent of absenting himself from the funeral of his son, who was killed by a Long Island Railroad train in November, 1906." (Gen. L. Fitzgerald Dead. New York Times, Oct. 7, 1908.) Mrs. Fitzgerald was a daughter of William S. Verplanck of Fishkill. (Obituary. New York Times, Dec. 24, 1885.)

Their daughter, Geraldine Fitzgerald, married Ernest R. Adee. Ushers included Edward de Peyster Livingston, W.B. Coster, Ambrose Henry, Marion Story, Wyllys Terry, and Lous Fitzgerald, her brother. (A Day's Weddings. New York Times, Nov. 25, 1896.) He was a vice president of the Mercantile Trust. She was chairman of the New York Committe for the National Cathedral and of the Republican Committee of Orange County. (Mrs. Ernest Adee, Civic Leader, Dies. New York Times, May 6, 1956.)

Their daughter, Adelaide Fitzgerald, married Eugene Sugny Reynal. They were both in the hospital with scarlet fever, and the nurses and doctors were their witnesses. (Married Beside the Bridegroom's Sick Bed. New York Times, Mar. 17, 1901.) His mother [a daughter of Elias S. Higgins] was an heiress to a carpet manufacturing fortune. (Mrs. Jules Reynal's Death. New York Times, May 3, 1901.) Mrs. Eugene S. Reynal and Mrs. Nathaniel C. Reynal were benefactors of the New York City Cancer Committee benefit for the American Society for the Control of Cancer. (Two Fetes in the Offing. New York Times, Oct. 20, 1929.) Their son was Eugene S.R. Reynal, the New York publisher [Reynal and Hitchcock, e.g. The Little Prince]. (Eugene S. Reynal, Former Polo Player. New York Times, Jan. 1, 1940.)

Their daughter, Eleanor Fitzgerald, married Harold FitzGerald. (Married. New York Times, Oct. 6, 1903.) He was born in Brookline, Mass. His parents were Desmond FitzGerald, a civil engineer, and Elizabeth Salisbury. He graduated from Harvard in 1900, and was a note broker at W.O. Gay & Co., then a partner of the importing firm, C.A. Van Rensselaer & Co. During World War I he was on the President's Coal Commission and a lieutenant in the Army Motor Transport Corps. After the war, he was partner in the New York Stock Exchange firm of Potter Bros. & Co. and its successors, Potter & Co. and Munds, Winslow & Potter until 1938. Their son was Desmond FitzGerald. Harold FitzGerald's sister was Mrs. Charles A. Van Rensselaer. (Harold FitzGerald, Long a Stockbroker. New York Times, Dec. 9, 1948.) The first Mrs. FitzGerald died in 1913. (Died. New York Times, Jul. 27, 1913.) He remarried to Helen Johnson Bolton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Otis Johnson of Washington, D.C., and widow of Harlan K. Bolton of Lake Forest, Ill. (Mrs. Bolton Is Engaged. New York Times, Jun. 17, 1924.) She had been the private secretary of Mrs. Philander C. Knox while Mr. Knox was U.S. Attorney General. (Social and Personal. Washington Post, Mar. 26, 1905.) Mrs. Knox continued to visit her in Chicago. (Social Gossip of the Day. Washington Times, Jun. 10, 1905.)

Desmond FitzGerald [2d] married Mary E. Peabody, daughter of Bishop Malcolm Endicott Peabody of Utica, N.Y. Charles Francis Adams Jr. of Boston was best man. Ushers were Albert Francke, George Lee Peabody, Potter Palmer 3d of Chicago, A. Holmes Crimmins and Alfred C. Harrison of New York, Charles Stockton, Ephron Catlin and Thomas Whiteside of Boston, William Patten of Lenox, and Amos Eno of Princeton, N.J. He graduated from Harvard in 1932, and was with the law firm of Spence, Windels, Walser, Hotchkiss & Angell of 40 Wall Street. (Mary E. Peabody Bride in Maine. New York Times,Sep. 3, 1939.) They were divorced, and she was later known as Marietta Tree. He was a liaison officer with Chinese forces during World War II, and in 1951 became an officer of the C.I.A., of which he became deputy director. (Desmond FitzGerald Dies at 57; Was a Deputy Director of C.I.A. New York Times, Jul. 24, 1967.) An article in Esquire identified him as the man in charge of espionage activities abroad. (Saltonstall Denies 'Clandestine' Links of C.I.A. and School. New York Times, Apr. 19, 1966.)

Desmond FitzGerald 2d's sister, Eleanor, and her cousin, Charles A. Van Rensselaer Jr. and his wife, did fundraising for the American Society for the Control of Cancer. (Ball to Help Medical Work. New York Times, Feb. 27, 1927.) Eleanor married Albert Francke Jr., Yale 1924. His best man was Archibald Douglas Jr. Her cousin, Adele Reynal, was one of the bridesmaids. (Miss Fitz Gerald Is Wed in Church. New York Times, Jun. 17, 1931.) Albert Franke Jr. was a vice president of Chemical Bank and a consultant to Ernst & Ernst. (Obituary: Albert Francke Jr. Alumni Horae. St. Paul School, 1985 Autumn;65(3):144.) His father, Albert Francke, was a member of the New York Stock Exchange from 1902 to 1927, and a member of its board of governors from 1910 to 1913. He was a member of Carlisle & Jacquelin, at 120 Broadway. He was born in London, England in 1870. His father was Jonas Robert Francke, a Swedish consul in Havana, Cuba and founder of Francke Hijos, sugar merchants. (Albert Francke, On Stock Exchange. New York Times, Mar. 16, 1945.) The senior Francke graduated from Yale in 1891, and had four brothers who also graduated from Yale. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University, 1944-1945, p. 248.)

Albert Francke, Jr. / St. Paul School
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1944-1945 / Yale University Library (pdf, 442 pp)

Albert Francke 3d, a partner in the law firm of Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle of New York, put together the Fidelity Dollar Savings Trust of Bermuda, managed by a Bermuda subsidiary of the Fidelity Management and Research Company of Boston. The fund was "scouting for well-heeled foreign interest in the Middle East and Asia." (Offshore Money Fund for Foreigners. New York Times, Sep. 14, 1975.) He "retired as a partner in the law firm of Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle; he worked in its New York and London offices and was the firm's chairman from 1987 to 1991. He graduated from Yale and received his law degree from Stanford." (Wedding Celebrations. New York Times, Feb. 18, 2007.) He was an usher at his sister's marriage to Frederic G. Cammann, Harvard 1951. (Nora Fitzgerald Francke Is Wed to Frederic Gallatin Cammann. New York Times, Jul. 8, 1956.) Mrs. Cammann headed the Junior Dance Committee for the Memorial Cancer Center benefit and other events. (Fete May 23 to Aid Cancer Center. New York Times, May 5, 1957; Kettering Cancer Unit Will Benefit Monday. New York Times, May 12, 1961.)

The elder Desmond FitzGerald was born in Nassau, the Bahamas and came to Providence, R.I., when he was a child. He was educated at Phillips Academy, Andover. He was the first superintendent of the Boston water-works, and designed its reservoirs. He was a consultant on the water systems of Washington, D.C., New York City, and Manila as well. At one time he was Deputy Secretary of State of Rhode Island under Gov. Bartlett. (Desmond FitzGerald, Engineer, Dies at 81. New York Times, Sep. 23, 1926.) He was a nephew of Sophia Augusta Brown, widow of John Carter Brown, who left him half the land in her mother's estate in Providence, and $25,000. Mrs. William Watts Sherman was a cousin. (Willed Heirlooms to Wealthiest Boy. New York Times, Mar. 13, 1909.) His mother, Sarah Caroline Brown, was a daughter of Patrick Brown, President of Her Majesty's Honorable Council of the Bahama Islands. (Married. New York Spectator, Mar. 7, 1839.) His grandmother, Harriet Thayer, was a descendant of Roger Williams, founder of the Rhode Island Colony. (Americans of Royal Descent, p. 513.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 513 / Google Books

Desmond FitzGerald married Elizabeth P., daughter of Stephen Salisbury, M.D. (Marriages. The Congregationalist and Boston Recorder, Jun. 30, 1870.) Dr. Salisbury was born in Boston in 1812, and graduated from Harvard in 1832. (In Memoriam. Boston Daily Advertiser, Sep. 23, 1875.) Mrs. FitzGerald's sister, Annie G. Salisbury, married Theodore S. Woolsey [Skull & Bones 1872], son of ex-President Woolsey. (Marriages. The Congregationalist, Jan. 2, 1878.) Woolsey was professor of international law at Yale from 1878-1911, and professor emeritus since then. Edward E. Salisbury, Yale 1832, was an uncle. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University, 1928-1929, p. 47 / 48.) Mrs. Desmond FitzGerald was a fixture of Palm Beach Society, dining with the likes of Mr. and Mrs. Winston Guest, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Sanford, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Pulitzer, Melissa Yuille, and the Duke of Marlborough. (Lord Carnarvon Host in Florida. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1936.) While attending school in Paris in 1857-58, Desmond FitzGerald visited his Thayer relatives, who were friends of Napoleon III. (Family Notes. By Desmond FitzGerald, 1911, p. 25/72.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1928-1929 / Yale University Library (pdf, 394 pp)
Family Notes / Internet Archive

Their other son, Stephen Salisbury FitzGerald, married Agnes Blake, only daughter of Francis Blake of Brookline, Mass., co-inventor of the telephone transmitter, at Ampersand, N.Y. Charlotte H. Young and Janet Fish were in their party. They made a camp on the shore of Lake Saranac for their honeymoon. A few miles away at the Saranac Inn was a group that included included Mr. and Mrs. A.M. Young, Mrs. J.H. Goss, George Milton Smith and Herbert Gallaudet. (The Ampersand. New York Tribune, Sep. 16, 1906.) Stephen S. FitzGerald was elected a director of the Brookline Trust Company. (Heard on the Street. Boston Evening Globe, Nov. 3, 1915.)

New York Tribune, Sep. 16, 1906, p. 2 / Library of Congress

John D. Jones

John D. Jones was president of the Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company for over forty years. He was born in Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. in 1814. He began his career as a clerk in the Merchants' Marine Insurance Company, and then at the Atlantic Insurance Company. He left to be an independent adjuster for a few years, but returned as Secretary after the Arlantic was mutualized. He was elected president in 1855. His wife was a daughter of Gen. Henry Floyd-Jones. (Obituary Record. New York Times, Sep. 24, 1895.) He was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Metropolitan Throat Hospital. (Metropolitan Throat Hospital. New York Times, Jan. 23, 1881.) His nephew, Edward H. Floyd-Jones, Scroll & Key 1892, continued as president of the Throat Hospital. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1930-1931, pp. 112-113.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1930-1931 / Yale University Library (pdf, 345 pp)

John J. McCook

John J. McCook was born in Carrollton, Ohio, in 1845, and enlisted in the Union Army at 16. He graduated from Kenyon College in 1866, then entered Harvard Law School. He was a representative of the New York Loan and Improvement Company and José de Navarro, and a director and counsel for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. He joined Alexander & Green in 1893, and was senior partner at his death. He was also a director of the American Surety Company, the International Banking Corporation, and Wells Fargo Company. He married Charles B. Alexander's sister, Jeanette. (Col. John J. McCook, the Lawyer, Dead. New York Times, Sep. 18, 1911.) He was also a trustee of Princeton University. At the commencement of the Princeton Theological Seminary in 1900, on behalf of the Board of Directors, he warned graduates not to criticize the Presbyterian creed, following which his his brother-in-law, Rev. Maitland Alexander of Pittsburgh, announced the award of fellowships and prizes. (Princeton Seminary. New York Times, May 9, 1900.) His daughter, Caroline Alexander McCook, married John Junius Morgan, a graduate of Eton and Cambridge who lived in England. Morgan's father, Dr. John B. Morgan, was rector of the American Church of the Trinity in Paris, and his mother was Juliet B. Morgan, a sister of J. Pierpont Morgan. (Miss Caroline McCook to Wed. New York Times, Sep. 12, 1908; Autumn Weddings and Engagements. New York Times, Sep. 24, 1908; Morgan-McCook Wedding. New York Times, Oct. 7, 1908.) Another daughter, Susan Alexander McCook, married Peter A. Jay, Harvard 1900, First Secretary of the American Legation in Tokyo, Japan. "He has also traveled extensively in Arabia and Persia, and is deeply interested in the Pan-Islamic movement." The ushers were Nicholas Biddle, John Saltonstall, Charles D. Draper, Duncan Harris, Cyril Hatch, Robert Livermore, William Phillips, Bayard Cutting, Moncure Robinson, Malcolm D. Whitman, and Andrew R. Sargeant. (Peter A. Jay Weds Miss Susan M'Cook. New York Times, Mar. 17, 1909.)

William A. Wheelock, NYU 1843

William Almy Wheelock graduated from New York University in 1843. He was president of the Equitable and the Central National Bank, and treasurer and president of the council of New York University. His ancestor, Rev. Ralph Wheelock (B.A. and M.A. Cambridge) came from England in 1638 and founded the town of Medfield, Mass. His son, William Efner Wheelock, was born in Manchester, England, and graduated from Yale in 1873. He received his MD at Columbia in 1876. He was an assistant medical examiner at the Equitable and attending physician at the Demilt Dispensary until 1883, when he switched to law, and then botany. William E. Wheelock's sister married George A. Strong, [S&B] 1871. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926, p. 67.) William A. Wheelock was a member of the governing body of N.Y.U. when New York University Medical College was formed from the merger of New York Medical College and Bellevue Hospital Medical College. (Medical Colleges Unite. New York Times, May 15, 1897.) William A. Wheelock was a member of "a combination of capitalists and promoters of new industrial enterprises and trusts," associated with William C. Whitney and R.A.C. Smith. (Loans of State Trust Company. New York Times, Jan. 14, 1900.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926 / Yale University Library (pdf, 350 pp)

Theodore Weston, Yale 1853

Theodore Weston was the civil engineer in charge of the Croton Aqueduct and other water and sewer projects in New York City and Brooklyn. "[I]n 1870 he ended this connection to become architect, engineer, superintendent and trustee of the Equitable Life Assurance Society," and constructed and managed its two buildings in Boston and New York City. He was the architect of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. His first wife was the daughter of Francis Bayard Winthrop, Yale 1804, and Elizabeth Woolsey, the sister of Theodore D. Woolsey, the President of Yale. Theodore Weston's second wife was Catherine Boudinot Stimson, a sister of Dr. Lewis Atterbury Stimson, Yale 1863. (Obituary Record of the Graduates, Yale University 1915-20, p. 838.) His minor son, Theodore W. Weston, owned land in John M. Woolsey's subdivision in the original allotment in the village of Cleveland, Ohio, which he sold. (Guardian's Sale. Daily Cleveland Herald, Sep. 15, 1866.) He went broke speculating in real estate, and assigned his property to a business partner, Henry J. Davison. (Failures. Boston Daily Advertiser, Dec. 6, 1882.)

Obituary Record of the Graduates, Yale University 1915-20 / Internet Archive
Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale, 1792-1805, p. 730 / Google Books

His son, Theodore Winthrop Weston, Yale 1885, was involved in real estate in St. Petersburg, Fla. (Obituary Record of the Graduates, Yale University 1915-20, p. 1435.) His son, Frederick Willoughby Weston, Yale 1899, was associated with the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia until 1927. His sister married William F. Dominick, Yale 1898. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1926-1927, p. 178.)

Obituary Record of the Graduates, Yale University 1915-20 / Internet Archive
Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1926-1927 / Yale University Library (pdf, 346 pp)

The Winthrops are Royal descendants of Edward III, King of England. (Francis Bayard Winthrop, 1804. Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College, Vol. V, September 1792 - September, 1805, p. 730; Americans of Royal Descent, p. 400.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 400 / Google Books

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1886-87

Board of Directors: Henry B. Hyde, President; J.W. Alexander, John A. Stewart, Louis Fitzgerald, John D. Jones, Henry A. Hurlbut, R.L. Kennedy, H.G. Marquand, Eugene Kelly, W.A. Wheelock, Cornelius N. Bliss, Henry Day, George C. Magoun, Marcellus Hartley, William B. Kendall, John Sloane, Samuel Borrowe, H.M. Alexander, B. Williamson, Chauncey M. Depew, William Walker, Charles G. Landon, G.W. Carleton, Henry S. Terbell, E.W. Lambert, Thomas S. Young, B.F. Randolph, Robert Bliss, J.F. de Navarro, Daniel D. Lord, J.J. McCook, James M. Halsted, W. Whitewright, Horace Porter, Alanson Trask, Geo. de F. L. Day, E.B. Colt, W. Alexander, William M. Bliss, Parker Handy, C.B. Alexander, Edward W. Scott, of New York; Oliver Ames, Eustace C. Fitz, S.H. Phillips, of Boston; H.R. Wolcott, of Denver; Thomas A. Biddle, George H. Stuart, T. de Witt Cuyler, of Philadelphia; A Van Bergen, of Paris; H.J. Fairchild, of Manchester, England; Gustav G. Pohl, of Hamburg. (Display Ad 9. New York Times, Feb. 13, 1886, p. 8.) Whitewright and Walker left; Levi P. Morton and Charles S. Smith joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 24, 1887.)

Charles B. Alexander

Charles B. Alexander was the attorney for Julien T. Davies, the assignee and receiver in the Marine Bank failure that was caused by the failure of Grant & Ward, the firm of former President Ulysses S. Grant. (More of Ward's Rascality. New York Times, May 11, 1884.) He was the attorney for the Equitable during the Tontine investigation. (The Tontine System Investigation. New York Times, Apr. 2, 1885.) He married Hattie Crocker, the daughter of railroad magnate Charles Crocker, of San Francisco. Henry A. Alexander, his brother, was best man. The ushers were Harry Tevis, E.H. Sheldon, Frank Carolan, Charles W. Crocker, Henry J. Crocker, H.B. McDowell, E.W. Greenaway, and Osgood Hooker. "Senator [Leland] Stanford was one of the first to extend his congratulations." (Hattie Crocker Married. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1887.) Mrs. Alexander was on the Board of Supervisors of the New-York Orthopaedic Dispensary and Hospital, where Dr. T. Halsted Myers was one of the physicians. (Orthopaedic Hospital's Work. New York Times, Dec. 7, 1894.) Charles B. Alexander, class of 1870, replaced his deceased father, Henry M. Alexander, as a Trustee of Princeton University. His wife gave Alexander Hall to the university. (Elected A Trustee of Princeton. New York Times, Oct. 21, 1899.) George Crocker, the youngest son of Charles Crocker, left a fund of about $1.5 million called the "'George Crocker Special Research Fund,' the income from which is to be applied in the prosecution of researches as to the cause, prevention, and cure of cancer,'" to the Trustees of Columbia University. His previous gifts to Columbia were put in the hands of Dr. [Samuel W.] Lambert, Dr. Joseph A. Blake, Dr. Frank Wood, C.N. Calkins, and Dr. William J. Cies. John Hays Hammond was the executor of Crocker's will. (Crocker Millions for Cancer Cure. New York Times, Dec. 8, 1909.) Charles B. Alexander was a guest at Thomas F. Ryan's tobacco summit dinner in 1916. (Thomas F. Ryan Is Host. New York Times, Feb. 18, 1916.) In 1917, he was Chairman of the Finance Committee of the Democratic State Committee and Vice Chairman of the National Democratic Club. (Democrats At Luncheon. New York Times, Mar. 4, 1917.) His oldest daughter, Harriet, married Winthrop W. Aldrich, a brother-in-law of John D. Rockefeller Jr. (Miss Alexander to Wed W.W. Aldrich. New York Times, Sep. 2, 1916.) Mary Crocker Alexander married Sheldon Whitehouse, Yale 1905, who was a private secretary to Whitelaw Reid when he was Ambassador to England. He also held diplomatic posts at Caracas, Paris, Constantinople, Greece, Petrograd and Stockholm. (Mary C. Alexander Weds S. Whitehouse. New York Times, Oct. 15, 1920.) In 1896, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander attended the coronation of Czar Nicholas II in Moscow with his sister and her husband, Gen. John J. McCook, who represented the U.S. Government at the ceremonies. Charles Beatty Alexander was the grandson of Rev. Dr. Archibald Alexander, founder and member of the first theological faculty of the Princeton Theological Seminary. They were lifelong members of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church. (Mrs. Alexander Dies in Paris Home. New York Times, Jul. 17, 1935.)

Rev. Maitland Alexander was another brother. He married Madeleine Laughlin of Pittsburgh, "a sharer of the hugh fortune of the Joneses and Laughlins, pioneer steel manufacturers of western Pennsylvania. Her father, Alexander Laughlin, Jr., left her nearly $10,000,000 several years ago. The late B.F. Jones, who amassed over $20,000,000 was her grandfather." Rev. Alexander himself inherited nearly a million. (Pittsburg Pastor to Wed Girl With Millions. San Antionio Gazette, Jan. 19, 1900.) Her brother, Alexander Laughlin Jr., graduated from the Yale Sheffield Scientific School in 1910. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926, p. 263-264.) Benjamin F. Jones Jr. graduated fom Princeton in 1891. His father had been chairman of the Republican National Committee in 1884, and he was a staunch Republican. (B.F. Jones Jr., Steel Master, Dies. New York Times, Jan. 2, 1928.) Her cousin, Thomas McK. Laughlin was a very close friend of President Taft, who attended his funeral in Pittsburgh when he committed suicide. Rev. Maitland Alexander conducted the ceremonies. John W. Herron of Cincinnati was the father of both Mrs. Laughlin and Mrs. Taft. (President Attends Laughlin Funeral. New York Times, Mar. 14, 1910; Thomas McKennan Laughlin Ph.B. 1897. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 1320.) Her other cousin, Irwin [Boyle] Laughlin, Scroll & Key 1893, was in the U.S. diplomatic service from 1904-1933, including second secretary of legation in St. Petersburg, Russia from 1907-1908, and counsellor at London 1916-1919. He married a daughter of Adrian Iselin. (Irwin [Boyle] Laughlin, B.A. 1893. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1940-1941, pp. 51-52.) His cousin, Grant Smith, was Secretary of the American Legation in Brussels. (Laughlin Eccentric While in Berlin. New York Times, Mar. 15, 1910.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926 / Yale University Library (pdf, 350 pp)
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 1320 / Google Books [scan is defective so download pdf]
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1940-1941 / Yale University Library (pdf,

Another brother, Henry Addison Alexander, Princeton 1883, was counsel to the U.S. Embassy in Paris from 1886 to 1899. (General catalogue of Princeton University, 1908, p. 267.) He married Grace Green in 1888. Oliver Harriman Jr. and Herbert Satterlee were among the ushers. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Roosevelt were among the guests. (Marriage of Henry A. Alexander and Miss Grace Green. New York Times, Feb. 1, 1888.) Her father, Albert W. Green, died on a hunting trip in South Dakota. He was born in Ohio but came to New York while young. He was a special partner of Green, Joyce & Co. of Columbus and a special partner in Gilmore & Ruhl, of St. Louis. (Albert W. Green. New York Tribune, Oct. 3, 1900.) They were divorced in 1893, remarried in 1895, and divorced again in 1906. He was living at Hyeres, France. (Wife of Henry A. Alexander Again Seeks Her Freedom. New York Sun, Apr. 28, 1906.) When his second wife left, he lived in London, "where he has formed legal and financial connections with the house of Rothschilds." (Silver Bathtub Ends Their Honeymoon. Oakland Tribune, Oct. 17, 1909.) Their only daughter, Eleanor Butler Alexander, married Theodore Roosevelt Jr., son of the former President. (Miss Alexander Roosevelt's Bride. New York Times, Jun. 21, 1910.) Mrs. Alexander and her two sisters received the income from a fortune left by their grandfather, Theron R. Butler, which was to go to his great-great-grands, of whom the Roosevelt children were the only ones. (Roosevelt Babies Heirs to $4,000,000. New York Times, Mar. 14, 1915.) Butler was President of the Sixth-Avenue Railroad Company. (Obituary Notes. New York Times, Jan. 21, 1884.)

General catalogue of Princeton University, 1908, p. 267 / Google Books

The Roosevelts had a daughter, Grace Green, and three sons, Theodore III, Cornelius Van Schaak, and Quentin II. In 1924, after losing the gubernatorial election, Theodore Jr. went to Central Asia with his younger brother, Kermit [1889-1943], on behalf of the Field Museum. In 1929, while on another trip to Indochina with Kermit, President Herbert Hoover appointed him Governor of Puerto Rico.

Maj. Quentin Roosevelt and his cousin, 2d Lt. Kermit Roosevelt Jr. [1916-2000], were both members of the O.S.S. in World War II. (Textual Records from the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Office of Strategic Services.) Quentin was a vice president of the China National Aviation Corporation when he died in 1948. His daughter, Susan Roosevelt, graduated from Radcliffe in 1970 and studied Chinese for a year before entering law school. She married William F. Weld, Harvard 1966 [later Governor of Massachusetts]. (Susan Roosevelt Is Wed on L.I. New York Times, June 8, 1975.)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1888

Board of Directors: Henry B. Hyde, President; James W. Alexander, Vice-President; Louis Fitzgerald, Henry A. Hurlbut, Henry G. Marquand, William A. Wheelock, Henry Day, M. Hartley, H.M. Alexander, Chauncey M. Depew, Charles G. Landon, Cornelius N. Bliss, Alanson Trask, E. Boudinot Colt, John A. Stewart, John D. Jones, John Sloane, S. Borrowes, B. Williamson, G.W. Carleton, E.W. Lambert, H.S. Terbell, Thomas S. Young, Robert Bliss, John J. McCook, B.F. Randolph, Eugene Kelly, George C. Magoun, William B. Kendall, Daniel D. Lord, H.J. Fairchild, James M. Halsted, William Alexander, Horace Porter, C.B. Alexander, Geo. DeF. L. Day, J.F. De Navarro, Parker Handy, Edward W. Scott, Charles S. Smith, Levi P. Morton, George H. Stuart, William M. Bliss, Joseph T. Low, T. DeWitt Cuyler, Oliver Ames, Eustace C. Fitz, S.H. Phillips, Henry R. Wolcott, A. Van Bergen, Gustav G. Pohl. (Display Ad. New York Sun, Feb. 16, 1888.)

Joseph T. Low

Joseph T. Low was the son of Equitable director James Low. He joined Low, Harriman & Co. with his brother-in-law, Oliver Harriman, in 1867. (Copartnership Notices. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1867 p. 6.) He was a founding director of the International Banking and Trust Company in 1900. (Trust Companies to Unite. New York Times, Jan. 31, 1900.) He married a daughter of Henry A. Mott, who was the son of Dr. Valentine Mott and a brother of Dr. Alexander B. Mott. (The Obituary Record. New York Times, Feb. 7, 1894.) The total value of real estate was placed at $2 million and the personal property at $70 million. (Jay Gould's Will Filed. New York Times, Dec. 13, 1892.)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1891-92

Directors: Henry B. Hyde, President; James W. Alexander, Vice-President; Louis Fitzgerald, Henry A. Hurlbut, Henry G. Marquand, William A. Wheelock, Henry Day, M. Hartley, H.M. Alexander, Chauncey M. Depew, Charles G. Landon, Cornelius N. Bliss, Alanson Trask, E. Boudinot Colt, John Sloane, S. Borrowe, B. Williamson, Eugene Kelly, John A. Stewart, George C. Magoun, William M. Bliss, William B. Kendall, G.W. Carleton, E.W. Lambert, H.S. Terbell, Thomas S. Young, John J. McCook, Daniel D. Lord, H.J. Fairchild, William Alexander, Horace Porter, Edward W. Scott, C.B. Alexander, Geo. DeF. L. Day, John D. Jones, Levi P. Morton, John A. McCall (Comptroller), Charles S. Smith, Joseph T. Low, A. Van Bergen, T. DeWitt Cuyler, Oliver Ames, Eustace C. Fitz, S.H. Phillips, Henry R. Wolcott, Gustav G. Pohl, J.F. DeNavarro, James H. Dunham, Daniel R. Noyes, Waldo Adams. George W. Phillips and J.G. Van Cise were Actuaries. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1891.) McCall and Pohl left; M.E. Ingalls and T.D. Jordan joined. Thomas D. Jordan was the new Comptroller. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 19, 1892.)

Daniel R. Noyes

Daniel Rogers Noyes was senior partner of the wholesale drug firm of Noyes Bros. & Cutler, of St. Paul, Minn. He was born in 1836 in Lyme, Conn. From 1854 to 1861, he was associated with the wholesale drug house of Schieffelin Bros. & Co., of New York City; then the banking house of Gilman, Son & Co. In 1868, he moved to St. Paul and founded Noyes, Pett & Co., which "developed into one of the largest and most successful drug houses of the Northwest, doing a business annually of about $2,000,000, its trade covering not only Minnesota, Dakota, Montana, Iowa, Wisconsin, but extending to the Pacific Coast,draws upon the intervening territories and even so far south as New Mexico, and, in addition, having a very considerable export trade in certain lines of goods for Europe and Asia." He was vice-president of the St. Paul Trust Co. and the Real Estate Title Insurance Co., and a director in the Merchants' National Bank, and the Union Land Co. His wife was Helen Gilman, daughter of Winthrop Sargent Gilman of New York. (Noyes & Cutler. The Pharmaceutical Era July 1, 1891.)

Noyes & Cutler / Digger Odell Publications

Daniel R. Noyes, Charles P. Noyes, and Edward H. Cutler were the partners of Noyes Bros. & Cutler of St. Paul. (It Hurt Them. St. Paul Daily News, May 18, 1892.) Mrs. Charles Phelps Noyes was Emily Hoffman Gilman. "She had long been a leader in charitable, religious, civic and educational activities in St. Paul." (Mrs. Charles P. Noyes. New York Times, Sep. 10, 1930.) Their daughter marrried Henry W. de Forest, Scroll & Key 1876, a trustee of the majority stock of the Equitable.

Daniel R. Noyes was also a regent of the University of Minnesota and a trustee of Carleton College. His son, Winthrop [Sargent] Gilman Noyes, Scroll & Key 1891, was a partner of Noyes Brothers & Cutler since 1900, and vice president from 1915 until retiring in 1920. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1930-1931, p. 106.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1930-1931 / Yale University Library (pdf, 345 pp)

His son, Daniel Raymond Noyes, Scroll & Key 1905, was a partner of G. M.-P. Murphy & Co., private bankers, 1923-25, and an investment counselor in New York City from 1925-1940. Their sister was married to Thatcher M. Brown, [Wolf's Head] 1897. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1940-1941, p. 108.) He was connected with Brown Brothers, Harriman & Co. (D. Raymond Noyes. New York Times, Nov. 22, 1940.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1940-1941 / Yale University Library (pdf, 290 pp)

His daughter, Helen Gilman Noyes, married William Adams Brown, Scroll & Key 1897, son of John Crosby Brown of the Brown Brothers family. He was a director of the Yale Alumni University Fund Association 1895-1921; a trustee of the Presbyterian Board of Home Missions 1910-1923, and Constantinople Women's College 1915-1943; a director of the Union Settlement Association 1893-1930; and various positions with the Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America between 1917 and 1943. His sister was Mrs. Henry L. de Forest 1897. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1943-1944, p. 31.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1943-1944 / Yale University Library (pdf, 393 pp)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1895

Directors: H.B. Hyde, President; James W. Alexander, Vice President; Louis Fitzgerald, Henry A. Hurlbut, Henry G. Marquand, William A. Wheelock, M. Hartley, H.M. Alexander, Chauncey M. Depew, Cornelius N. Bliss, August Belmont, Charles S. Smith, John Sloane, Horace J. Fairchild, Sir W.C. Van Horne, S. Borrowe, E. Boudinot Colt, Gage E. Tarbell, Marvin Hughitt, William B. Kendall, Frank Thomson, G.W. Carleton, E.W. Lambert, H.S. Terbell, Thomas S. Young, John J. McCook, George J. Gould, William Alexander, Horace Porter, Edward W. Scott, C.B. Alexander, Daniel R. Noyes, G.W. Phillips, Alanson Trask, John A. Stewart, John D. Jones, Levi P. Morton, Joseph T. Low, A. Van Bergen, T de Witt Cuyler, Oliver Ames, Eustace C. Fitz, Daniel Lord, Henry R. Wolcott, Jacob H. Schiff, James H. Dunham, M.E. Ingalls, Brayton Ives, Thomas D. Jordan, S.D. Ripley, J.F. de Navarro. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 27, 1895.)

George J. Gould

George J. Gould was the son of Jay Gould. He was president of the Missouri Pacific and a director of numerous other railroads. (The International Who's Who, 1912. H.L. Motter, ed., p. 527.)

The International Who's Who, 1912, p. 527 / Google Books

Sidney Dillon Ripley

"Mr. Ripley was a grandson of Sidney Dillon, financier, builder of the Union Pacific Railroad, and its first President. From the estate of $6,000,000 left by Dillon Mr. Ripley received bequests giving an annual income of $50,000. Although his name was connected with several important undertakings, Mr. Ripley held largely aloof from business as well as from public affairs. Among concerns that counted him as Director were the First National Bank of Hempstead, L.I., the Manganese Steel Safe Company, the Mercantile Trust Company, the Mount Morris Bank, and the Taylor Iron and Steel Company." He died after an operation for appendicitis. (Sidney Dillon Ripley Dead. New York Times, Feb. 25, 1905.) He married Mary Baldwin Hyde, the only daughter of Henry B. Hyde. (Wedded in the Country. New York Times, Oct. 15, 1885.) She remarried to Charles R. Scott, a representative of the International Banking Corporation in the Orient. (Mrs. M.H. Ripley Bar Harbor Bride. New York Times, Sep. 10, 1912.)

His son, James Hazen Ripley, was treasurer of the American Society for the Control of Cancer and an activist for Memorial Hospital, N.Y.C., as well as a trustee of C.C. Little's Jackson Laboratory. His first wife was Marguerite Doubleday, a daughter of George Doubleday. (Miss M. Doubleday Weds J.H. Ripley. New York Times, May 5, 1925.) She died in 1932, and he was engaged to a daughter of John W. Livermore. He graduated from Harvard in 1914. (Gladys Livermore Engaged to Marry. New York Times, Mar. 29, 1934.) George Doubleday was the chairman of Ingersoll-Rand. His first wife, Alice Moffitt, died in 1919, and he married Mary May White in 1937. (G. Doubleday Dies; Industrialist, 89. New York Times, Dec. 8, 1955.)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1896

Directors: H.B. Hyde, President; James W. Alexander, Vice President; Louis Fitzgerald, Henry A. Hurlbut, Henry G. Marquand, William A. Wheelock, Marcellus Hartley, H.M. Alexander, Chauncey M. Depew, Cornelius N. Bliss, Thomas D. Joran, Charles S. Smith, John Sloane, Horace J. Fairchild, Levi P. Morton, Gage E. Tarbell, Marvin Hughitt, Frank Thomson, George J. Gould, Samuel M. Inman, Sir W.C. Van Horne, Charles B. Alexander, Edward W. Lambert, John J. McCook, William Alexander, James H. Hyde, Horace Porter, John A. Stewart, Jacob H. Schiff, A. Van Santvoord, Melville E. Ingalls, Thomas S. Young, A. Van Bergen, John E. Searles, David H. Moffat, James H. Dunham, T. De Witt Cuyler, Joseph T. Low, Daniel Lord, Henry R. Wolcott, August Belmont, William B. Kendall, Henry S. Terbell, George W. Phillips, George W. Carleton, Samuel Borrowe, E. Boudinot Colt, Daniel R. Noyes, Alanson Trask, Brayton Ives, Sidney D. Ripley, J.F. De Navarro. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 5, 1896.)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1898-1900

Directors: Henry B. Hyde, Louis Fitzgerald, Chauncey M. Depew, William A. Wheelock, Marcellus Hartley, H.M. Alexander, Cornelius N. Bliss, Henry G. Marquand, Charles S. Smith, John Sloane, Thomas D. Jordan, David H. Moffat, Horace J. Fairchild, John Jacob Astor, T. Jefferson Coolidge, Frank Thomson, Marvin Hughitt, George J. Gould, Samuel M. Inman, Sir W.C. Van Horne, Gage E. Tarbell, Charles B. Alexander, Edward W. Lambert, John J. McCook, William Alexander, Joseph T. Low, John A. Stewart, Jacob H. Schiff, Robert T. Lincoln, Levi P. Morton, A. Van Santvoord, Daniel Lord, James H. Hyde, William A. Tower, Melville E. Ingalls, John E. Searles, A. Van Bergen, T. De Witt Cuyler, Thomas S. Young, James W. Alexander, August Belmont, Thomas T. Eckert, James H. Dunham, Sidney D. Ripley, George W. Carleton, George W. Phillips, Henry S. Terbell, Brayton Ives, E. Boudinot Colt, Alanson Trask, J.F. De Navarro. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 4, 1898.) Phillips and Terbell left; D.O. Mills, and George H. Squire joined. (Display Ad. Lowell Sun, Mar. 4, 1899.) H.B. Hyde, Lord, and Thomson left; James W. Alexander became president, and C. Ledyard Blair, A.J. Cassatt and H.C. Haarstick joined. (Display Ad. Atlanta Constitution, Feb. 11, 1900.) George W. Phillips, the first Actuary, died in 1896, and Mr. J.G. Van Cise, who had been Assistant Actuary since 1873, was appointed to his place, R.G. Hann receiving the appointment of Assistant Actuary. (The Officers of the Society. New York Times, May 3, 1899.)

John Jacob Astor IV, Royal

John Jacob Astor IV (1864-1912) was the son of William B. Astor Jr., brother of John Jacob Astor 2d; and the great-grandson of John Jacob Astor, the fur trader. He died in the sinking of the ocean liner Titanic. During the Spanish-American War, he financed a battalion of American volunteers in Cuba. (Wikipedia, accessed 8/13/10.) He was also a director of the Morton Trust Company. (Display Ad. New York Times, Oct. 2, 1899.) His mother, Caroline Webster Schermerhorn, was a Royal descendant of James I, King of Scotland. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 553.) [However, Rev. Thomas Barclay of Albany's relation to John Barclay of East Jersey is disputed.] His wife, Ava Lowle Willing, was a Royal descendant of Alfred the Great, King of England, ibid. pp. 86 and 100. Her sister, Susan R. Willing, was the second wife of Francis Cooper Lawrance Jr., Yale 1877.

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 553 / Google Books

Most of his real estate holdings were left in the trusteeship of James Roosevelt Roosevelt, Nicholas Biddle, and Douglas Robinson, who were also the executors. His second wife, Mrs. Madeline T. Force Astor, received the income of a $5 million trust fund, and his house and stable, and their expected posthumous child received $3 million in trust. His first wife, Mrs. Ava Willing Astor, wasn't mentioned, but their daughter, Ava Alice Muriel Astor, also received $5 million in trust until her majority. "The will reveals the system under which the Astor estate is kept intact and increased from generation to generation. Each generation has a family head. This family head holds property of two classes, property held in trust and property which is held outright, because the law forbids entailments. The family head makes a will leaving the property held in trust outright to his son and the property held outright in trust. Each alternate block of property is held in trust, the rest held outright, as the property changes hands." His son, William Vincent Astor, a minor, was the principal beneficiary of his will. (Astor Fortune Goes to Vincent. New York Times, May 7, 1912.) Roosevelt, Biddle, and Robinson had also been trustees of William B. Astor Jr.'s will. Lewis Cass Ledyard of Carter, Ledyard & Milburn, the attorney in John Jacob Astor's divorce, also drew the will. (Vincent Astor in Full Control. New York Times, May 8, 1912.)

James Roosevelt Roosevelt was the husband of John Jacob Astor IV's sister, Helen Astor. (The descendants of John Jacob Astor. New York Times, Mar. 6, 1898.) Robert Maitland was best man at their wedding. The ushers were Mr. Hoyt, Langdon Wilkes, Charles de Rham Jr., Mr. Gracie, Frederick Newbold, and Mr. Oelrichs. The bridesmaids were Augusta Astor, Sybil Kane, Miss Newbold and Miss Livingston; also Mrs. William Astor and her cousin, Mrs. Edward Schermerhorn. (A High Toned Wedding. Milwaukee Daily Sentinel, Nov. 23, 1878.)

T. Jefferson Coolidge, Harvard 1850, Royal

Thomas Jefferson Coolidge was born in Boston in 1831. His father was Joseph Coolidge, and his mother was Ellen Wayles Randolph, a granddaughter of President Thomas Jefferson. He was educated abroad, then graduated from Harvard in 1850. He started in the store of William Perkins. In 1853, he formed a partnership with Joseph P. Gardner in the East India trade. In 1857, he took charge of the Boott mills in Lowell, and rebuilt them. From 1861, he lived in France for three or four years. In 1865, he resigned from the Boott mills and joined the Lawrence Manufacturing Company. In 1875, he became treasurer of the Amoskeag corporation of Manchester, N.H. In 1880, he dropped manufacturing and took up railroading, and was president of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, and of the Oregon Railway Navigation company. He was president or a director of Dwight Manufacturing companies, the Boston & Lowell, Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, Kansas City, and the Fort Scott & Memphis railroads; the Merchants National Bank of Boston, the West End railway, the Old Colony and New England Trust Companies, and 30 other corporations. In 1892, he was appointed minister to France by President Harrison. He was recommended by the former minister, Whitelaw Reid. He resigned from the Equitable in 1905, and declined to serve on the committee to select a chairman. He was an overseer of Harvard from 1886 to 1897, and gave $5000 to it in 1899. He married Hetty S. Appleton, daughter of William Appleton, in 1852. (T. Jefferson Coolidge. Lowell Sun, Nov. 18, 1920.) He was a principal owner of the Carthagena Railroad Company in Colombia (The Uprising in Colombia. New York Times, Jan. 28, 1895), and of the Wisconsin Central Railway. (News of the Railroads. New York Times, Sep. 6, 1898.) Coolidge and James H. Hyde were directors of Charles T. Yerkes's railroads in London, England. (Mr. Yerkes's London Company. New York Times, May 1, 1903.)

T. Jefferson Coolidge's sister, Anna Storer Coolidge, married Col. William Edgar Prince. (Married. Boston Daily Advertiser, Jun. 22, 1866.) Their daughter, Gertrude Prince, married Lewis Cass Ledyard.

The Appletons and Randolphs were both royal descandants of William I, King of England. His father-in-law, William Appleton, was President of the Massachusetts branch of the Bank of the United States and a U.S. Congressman. Mrs. Amos A. Lawrence was a sister-in-law. Mrs. Appleton was a royal descendant of Louis VII, King of France. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, pp.253 and 39.) Joseph Coolidge Jr. and Ellen Randolph were married at Monticello on May 27, 1825. (Married. Daily National Intelligencer, Jun. 14, 1825.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 39 / Google Books

"Mr. Joseph Coolidge, jr., a citizen of the United States of North America, have put in a claim for household furniture, stores, and other valuable property and papers, of Ł33,610 41 cents; and this claim has been admitted and is about to be paid by Her Majesty's joint plenipotentiary, Capt. Charles Elliot, R.N. We must first ask how far, either in law or equity, a citizen of the United States or any other foreigner, can be admitted to claim under an indemnification wrung from the Chinese by the British arms, while they have a consul or vice consul in China? Senor V.N.P. Guttierris, who was Mr. Coolidge's clerk, has had his claim of $732.75 cents for wearing apparel, admitted... it is reported Mr. Coolidge, besides his well-known confidential intercourse with Captain Elliot, was particularly warned by that officer in person not to remain in Canton that night, the 21st of May." (Thirty-Two Days Later from the Celestial Empire. New York Herald, Dec. 8, 1841.)

Thomas Jefferson Coolidge Jr. graduated from Harvard in 1884. He was a founder and president of the Old Colony Trust Company, and also president of the Bay State Trust Company, a vice president of the National Bank of Commerce, and a director of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company and other corporations. (Thomas Jefferson Coolidge. New York Times, Apr. 16, 1912.) He was secretary and treasurer of the United Fruit Company. "From a glance at the above list of officers so far chosen, it can be read between the lines that the Boston Fruit Company, of Boston, that old, staid and solid institution of the New England states, is in the new concern up to its eyes." (Macheca and Oteri Lines Bought Out. New Orleans Daily Picayune, Apr. 20, 1899.)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1902

Directors: J.W. Alexander, James H. Hyde, Louis Fitsgerald, Chauncey M. Depew, William A. Wheelock, Henry G. Marquand, Cornelius N. Bliss, George H. Squire, Thomas D. Jordan, C.B. Alexander, V.P. Snyder, Samuel M. Inman, John A. Stewart, A.J. Cassatt, Robert T. Lincoln, J.J. Astor, Gage E. Tarbell, Marvin Hughitt, William H. McIntyre, M. Hartley Dodge, Brayton Ives, Alanson Trask, Levi P. Morton, William A. Tower, D.O. Mills, George J. Gould, George T. Wilson, T. DeWitt Cuyler, E.W. Lambert, H.M. Alexander, F.F. De Navarro, M.E. Ingalls, Jacob H. Schiff, James J. Hill, Carles S. Smith, Henry C. Frick, William Alexander, John J. McCook, H.C. Harrstick, David H. Moffat, Sidney D. Ripley, John Sloane, E.H. Harriman, Alfred G. Vanderbilt, T. Jefferson Coolidge, August Belmont, Sir William C. Van Horne, Thomas T. Eckert, C. Ledyard Blair, William H. Baldwin Jr., Thomas S. Young, Joseph T. Low. (Display Ad. Atlanta Constitution, Feb. 18, 1902.)

William H. Baldwin Jr.

William Henry Baldwin Jr. was born in Boston in 1826, and graduated from Harvard in 1885. Before he completed the Law School course, Charles Francis Adams had made him a clerk in the auditors' office of the Union Pacific Railroad in Omaha. When Jay Gould took over the Union Pacific, he went to the Flint and Pere Marquette, then the Southern Railway system and the Richmond and Danville lines. In 1896, he was chosen to be the president of the Long Island Railroad. He married Ruth Standish Bowles [an aunt of Chester Bowles]. (W.H. Baldwin At Last Succombs to Malady. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1905.) He was chairman of the General Education Board funded by John D. Rockefeller. (J.D. Rockefeller Gives $1,000,000 for Schools. New York Times, Apr. 23, 1902.) Mrs. Baldwin graduated from Smith College in 1887, and was secretary to its president until their marriage in 1889. She was on its board of trustees for 25 years. She was the first chairman of the National League on Urban Conditions Among Negroes, which was organized in their home in 1912. (Mrs. Ruth Baldwin Dies in 70th Year. New York Times, Dec. 15, 1934.) William H. Baldwin 3d graduated from Harvard in 1913. He was president of the Urban League from 1942-1947, and a trustee of the New School for Social Research. (W.H. Baldwin Dead; Public Relations Aide, Urban League Leader. New York Times, May 20, 1980.)

Alfred G. Vanderbilt, Royal, Skull & Bones 1899

Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt was the son of Cornelius Vanderbilt [II, son of William H. Vanderbilt and grandson of the Commodore], of the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad and numerous other corporations, and Alice Claypoole Gwynne, daughter of Abram Evans Gwynne (Yale 1839), and granddaughter of Henry Collins Flagg (Yale 1811). He had large interests in the New York Central Realty and Terminal Company, and interests in the Raquette Lake Railway and Transportation companies, the Fulton Navigation Company, the Equitable Life Assurance Company, and the Plaza Bank. His first marriage was to Ellen French, the daughter of Francis Ormond French (Harvard 1857), who was the mother of William Henry Vanderbilt. His second marriage was to Mrs. Margaret Emerson McKim, mother of Alfred G. Vanderbilt Jr. and George Vanderbilt. His brothers were William Henry Vanderbilt 1893, who died during college; Cornelius Vanderbilt S&K 1895, and Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt 1902. His sister Gertrude married Harry Payne Whitney [S&B 1894, and Gladys married Hungarian Count László Széchenyi]. He died when the Lusitania sank. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1910-1915, p. 851.) Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt was the heir of his father's estimated $70 million fortune. His brother Cornelius was cut out, and he gave money from his own share to his brother. The executors were Alice G. Vanderbilt, the widow; and Alfred G. Vanderbilt, William K. Vanderbilt, Chauncey M. Depew, and Edward V.W. Rossiter, with Reginald C. Vanderbilt to qualify when he came of age. The United States Trust Company was trustee. It was witnessed by the late Henry H. Anderson, who was Cornelius Vanderbilt's legal advisor, J. Carstensen and G.S. Prince. The first codicil was witnessed by Anderson's son, Henry B. Anderson, G.S. Prince, and Warren S. Crane; the second codicil by Edward L. Rossiter, Chandler P. Anderson and Henry B. Anderson. (Vanderbilt Will Changed By Heir. New York Times, Oct. 27, 1899.) He was a director of the International Banking Corporation. (Market Movement. New York Times, Apr. 22, 1902.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1910-1915, p. 851 / Google Books

His brother, Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt, Wolf's Head 1902, was an investor. He was a director of the Raquette Lake Railway and Raquette Lake Transportation Co., and the Fulton Chain Railway and Fulton Navigation Company. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926, p. 194.) Their mother was a Royal descendant of Edmund Ironsides, King of England, and his grandfather Flagg was mayor of New Haven. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 162.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926 / Yale University Library (pdf, 350 pp)
Americans of Royal Descent, p. 162 / Google Books

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt were members of the New York Committee for Project HOPE in 1964. (Project Hope Health Opportunities for People Everywhere. New York - 1964, p. 64.)

New York Committee for Project HOPE / UCSF (pdf, 69 pp)

The International Banking Corporation

Several officers and/or directors of the Equitable - James W. Alexander, James H. Hyde, W.H. McIntyre, and John J. McCook - were prominently involved in the formation of the International Banking Corporation in 1901-02. Hyde became a director of the First National Bank of Chicago in 1903. (Chicago Bank Directors. New York Times, Jan. 14, 1903.)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1904

Directors: J.W. Alexander, J.H. Hyde, Louis Fitzgerald, Chauncey M. Depew, William A. Wheelock, H.C. Deming, Cornelius N. Bliss, George H. Squire, Thomas D. Jordan, C.B. Alexander, V.P. Snyder, Samuel M. Inman, John A. Stewart, A.J. Cassatt, Robert T. Lincoln, J.J. Astor, Gage E. Tarbell, Marvin Hughitt, William H. McIntyre, M. Hartley Dodge, Brayton Ives, Bradish Johnson, Levi P. Morton, William A. Tower, D.O. Mills, George J. Gould, George T. Wilson, T. de Witt Cuyler, E.W. Lambert, H.M. Alexander, J.F. de Navarro, M.E. Ingalls, Jacob H. Schiff, James J. Hill, Charles S. Smith, Henry C. Frick, William Alexander, John J. McCook, H.C. Haarstick, David H. Moffatt, Sidney D. Ripley, John Sloane, E.H. Harriman, Alfred G. Vanderbilt, T. Jefferson Coolidge, August Belmont, Sir William C. Van Horne, Thomas T. Eckert, C. Ledyard Blair, William H. Baldwin Jr., James B. Forgan, Joseph T. Low. James W. Alexander, President; James H. Hyde, Vice President; Gage E. Tarbell, Second Vice President; George T. Wilson, Third Vice President; William H. McIntyre, Fourth Vice President; William Alexander, Secretary; Thomas D. Jordan, Comptroller; Sidney D. Ripley, Treasurer; H.R. Winthrop, Asst. Secretary; M. Murray, Cashier; W.B. Bremner, Asst. Treasurer; S.C. Bolling, Superintendent of Agencies; Edward W. Lambert, M.D., Consulting Medical Director; W.R. Bross, M.D. and Arthur Pell, M.D., Medical Directors. (Display Ad 8. New York Times, Feb. 5, 1904, p. 9.)

Henry Champion Deming, Skull & Bones 1872

Deming was Secretary and Treasurer of the New Jersey and New York Railroad between 1874 and 1880, and Secretary, Treasurer, Vice President, and President of the Mercantile Trust between 1880 and 1907. He was a director of the Equitable Trust Company and the Union Pacific Railroad. He was the son of Henry Champion Deming S&B 1836, and Charles Clerc Deming S&B 1872 and Laurent Clerc Deming S&B 1883 were his brothers. They were also cousins of the Shipman family, including Arthur L. Shipman, S&B 1886. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1930-1931, pp. 30-31.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1930-1931 / Yale University Library (pdf, 345 pp)

Bradish Johnson

Bradish Johnson was born in New York City, circa 1851. He was President of the Estate of Bradish Johnson, a director of the American Cotton Oil Co., the Commonwealth Insurance Company, the Equitable Life Assurance Co. and Equitable Trust Company, and the Greenwhich Savings Bank, and was President of the State Investing Company. His wife was Aimee Gaillard, daughter of Joseph Gaillard. His daughter, Marie, married William Hamilton Russell, and his sons were Bradish G. Johnson and Aymar Johnson. (Bradish Johnson, Financier, Dies. New York Times, Aug. 1, 1918.)

Bradish Gaillard Johnson served in the Army in the First World War. He settled in France in 1923 and returned to New York in 1940. He married Emma M. Grima Johnson, an official of the Coordinating Council for French Relief Societies. His son, Bradish G. Johnson Jr., a war correspondent, was killed in Spain in 1937. His daughter, Adelaide, was a food transport driver for the French Army during the early part of the war. (Bradish G. Johnson, An Estate Manager. New York Times, Jun. 10, 1944.) Mrs. Bradish G. Johnson was the daughter of Judge Alfred Grima of New Orleans. Adelaide Johnson married Count Alain d'Eudeville of Paris. He was a captain in the French Army, and was liaison officer with the U.S. Counter-Intelligence Corps. (d'Eudeville - Johnson. New York Times, Jul. 7, 1949.) Alfred Grima Johnson graduated from Harvard and served with the American Field Service in France in 1939 and 1940, and in Africa in 1941. He was a first lieutenant in the Office of Strategic Services. He was to marry Francine Buffet of Versailles. (Alfred Johnson to Wed. New York Times, Jun. 2, 1946.)

Bradish G. Johnson's brother, Aymar Johnson, graduated from Harvard in 1905. He was a member of Johnson and Wood, stock brokers. He was a Lieutenant Commander in the U.S. Naval Intelligence Office, and was on his way to Bermuda when he was stricken. He married Marion Hoffman in 1924. (Aymar Johnson, 58, Stock Broker Here. New York Times, Apr. 7, 1942.)

Bradish Johnson's father, Bradish Johnson (1811-1892), was from Louisiana, where his grandfather was a partner of pirate Jean Lafitte. Two sisters, Margaret and Louisa, married Stephen Whitney in succession. (Necrology. New Orleans Daily Picayune, Nov. 5, 1892.)

Henry Rogers Winthrop, Yale 1898, Royal

Henry Rogers Winthrop was the only son of Buchanan Winthrop, Yale 1862, who was the only son of Henry Rogers Winthrop [Yale 1830], from whom he inherited a fortune. His mother was Sarah Helen Townsend, daughter of Isaac Townsend. (Buchanan Winthrop Dead. New York Times, Dec. 26, 1900.) Buchanan Winthrop's law practice was almost entirely management of estates. He was a Fellow of Yale University since 1891. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 62.) Mrs. Henry R. Winthrop left her residual estate of about $2,130,391 to the Theological Seminary at Princeton. It included $222,996 in U.S. Government bonds, $875,000 in United States Trust Company stocks, $153,000 in Bank of New York, $134,800 in Bank of Commerce, $90,750 in Manhattan Company, $85,000 in Gallatin National; Bank, and $67,500 in Bank of America. (Gift Increased to Theological Seminary. New York Times, May 31, 1903.) Henry Rogers Winthrop 1898's great grandfather was John Still Winthrop 1804, a brother of Francis Bayard Winthrop 1804. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1890-1900, p. 430.) The Winthrops owned Fisher's Island. They were Royal descendants of Edward III, King of England. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 400.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 62 / Google Books
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1890-1900, p. 430 / Google Books
Americans of Royal Descent, p. 400 / Google Books

Henry R. Winthrop was an usher at the wedding of Henry John Innes-Ker, eighth Duke of Roxburghe, to his cousin, May Goelet. The late British Ambassador, Sir Michael Herbert, had married her aunt. (Duke of Roxburghe Marries Miss Goelet. New York Times, Nov. 11, 1903.) Henry R. Winthrop married Anna Woodward Babcock, daughter of Henry D. Babcock. (Henry R. Winthrop To Wed. New York Times, Aug. 8, 1905.) Frederic Kernochan was his best man. The ushers were Samuel D. Babcock, her brother; Ashbel H. Barney, Julian A. Ripley, Monson Morris, and Le Roy McKim. "James Hazen Hyde was to have been an usher, but at a late hour his regrets were received." (Miss Babcock Wed To Henry R. Winthrop. New York Times, Oct. 4, 1905.) He was later a senior partner in Harris, Winthrop & Co. with John F. Harris until 1929; Winthrop, Mitchell & Co. and Winthrop, Whitehouse & Co., and was a member of the board of governors of the New York Stock Exchange from 1935 to 1938. (Henry Winthrop, Banker Here, 82. New York Times, Nov. 15, 1958.) He was a director of Loew's Inc. until resigning in 1953, when G. Rowland Collins was elected to succeed him. (Dean of N.Y.U. School Named Loew's Director. New York Times, Nov. 25, 1953.)

General partners of Winthrop, Mitchell & Co., incorporated in the District of Columbia, were Henry Rogers Winthrop, New York; Leeds Mitchell, Chicago; Theodore E. Cunningham, Evanston, Ill.; John J Fagan, New York; Harry C. Schaack, Chicago; George R. Thornton, Oak Park, Ill.; Alfred I. Preston Jr., New York; Richard P. Loasby, Montclair, N.J.; Richard F. Babcock, Woodbury, Long Island; Richard B.W. Hall, New York; Henry P. Godfrey, New York; Thomas Miller, Chicago; Arthur J.O. Illian, New York; James J. Masterson, Bergenfield, N.J.; George N. Buffington, Barrington, Ill.; William P.S. Earle Jr., Great Neck, N.Y.; Henry W. Bull, New York; Perry K. Heath, Washington, D.C.; William J. Cunningham, Brooklyn; George F. Brennan, Jersey City; and Malcolm S. McConihe Jr., New York. Special partners were Walter Schuttler, Chicago ($260,000); Milton W. Holden, Palm Beach ($300,000); Estate of Woodward Babcock by Grace C. Babcock and Henry D. Babcock, New York ($150,000); and Henry Rogers Winthrop ($300,000). (Legal Notices. Washington Post, Jan. 18, 1938.)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1906

Hold-over directors following reorganization: A.W. Krech, President of the Equitable Trust Co.; Henry M. Alexander; William H. McIntyre, former Fourth Vice President; James H. Hyde; George T. Wilson, Third Vice President; Thomas D Jordan, former Controller; Gage E. Tarbell, Second Vice President; Sir William C. Van Horne; Henry R. Winthrop, Treasurer; C.B. Alexander of Alexander & Green; John J. McCook of Alexander & Green; Valentine P. Snyder; T. De Witt Cuyler; Levi P. Morton; James B. Forgan; H.C. Haarstick; F.F. de Navarro; and Paul Morton. Grover Cleveland, Morgan J. O'Brien, and George Westinghouse were trustees of the Thomas F. Ryan stock. They nominated (for one-year terms) E.W. Bloomingdale, New York; Joseph Bryan of Richmond, Va.; John D Kernan of Utica; James McMahon of Brooklyn; William E. Paine of New York; Tom Randolph of St. Louis; and William Whitman of Boston. For two-year terms: Abraham Brittin of New Orleans; Charles E. Littlefield of Rockland, Me.; E.W. Robertson of Columbia, S.C.; J.G. Schmidlapp of Cincinnati; Daniel A. Tompkins of Charlotte, N.C.; Frank S. Witherbee of Port Henry, N.Y.; and Charles H. Zehnder of Philadelphia. For three-year terms: John N. Beach of New York; James B. Forgan of Chicago; A.L. Humphreys of New York; John T. Manson of New Haven; William C. Redfield of Brooklyn; F.W. Roebling of Trenton, N.J.; and G.F. Vietor of New York. For four years: Thomas A. Gillespie of New York; Willis F. McCook of Pittsburgh; Eugenius H. Outerbridge of New York; Wallace L. Pierce of Boston; Thomas Spratt of Ogdensburg, N.Y.; J. Edward Swanstrom of Brooklyn; and Eben E. Thomas of Easton, Pa. In the "administration ticket" to fill vacancies: John T. Manson of New Haven, president of the Yale National Bank of that city; William E. Paine, a lumber merchant; Thomas A. Gillespie, a contractor of New York and Pittsburgh; Eugenius H. Outerbridge, President of the Davies Textile Co.; and Abraham Brittin, Vice President of the Canal Bank of New Orleans and a director of the Hibernia Bank in which the Equitable was a large stockholder. (Ryan Trustees Control Equitable Hold-Overs. New York Times, Jun. 22, 1906.)

Willis F. McCook, Scroll & Key 1873

Willis Fisher McCook was the son of George Latimer McCook, M.D., who was an advisor to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton during the Civil War. Willis F. McCook was born in New Lisbon, Ohio in 1851, and practiced law in Pittsburgh since 1876. He was personal counsel of Henry C. Frick and T.M. Carnegie; one of the organizers of the H.C. Frick Coke Company in 1882; and a founder and director of the Pittsburgh Steel Company in 1901, and its president since 1920. He was counsel to the Equitable Life as well as a director, and a director of numerous steel related companies. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1923-1924, page 59.) His grandson, Allison Maxwell, was president of the company in 1963. (Pittsburgh Steel Enters New Phase. Monessen Valley Independent, Jun. 1, 1963.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1923-1924 / Yale University Library (pdf, 284 pp)

Jacob G. Schmidlapp

Jacob Godfrey Schmidlapp (1849-) was the founder and president of the Union Savings Bank and Trust Company of Cincinnati. (The Historical Register, Edwin C. Hill, ed., 1920, p. 69.) "Another of the President's great Cincinnati friends is J.G. Schmidlapp, the head of the financial interests of that city. Like Judge Hollister, Mr. Schmidlapp is not a political power, but socially he is the leader of his city's upper "40" or "400," whichever way one wishes to put it." (The Most Intimate Friends of President Taft. By E.J. Edwards. New York Times, May 29, 1910.)

The Historical Register, 1920 / Google Books

Frank S. Witherbee, Skull & Bones 1874

Frank S. Witherbee, Skull & Bones 1874, was the president of Witherbee, Sherman & Co., mining iron ore and manufacturing pig iron. He was also a director of the Cubitas Iron Ore Co. of Cuba, the Equitable Life Assurance Society, the Fulton Trust Co. and Chatham & Phenix National Bank of New York City. (Frank Spencer Witherbee, B.A. 1874. Obituary Record of the Graduates, Yale University 1915-20, p. 348.) Witherbee was a guest at Thomas F. Ryan's tobacco summit dinner in 1916. (Thomas F. Ryan Is Host. New York Times, Feb. 18, 1916.) He was a member of the campaign committee to raise money for the United Hospital Fund in 1919. (Hospitals Seek $1,000,000. New York Times, Oct. 25, 1919.) He married Mary Rhinelander Stewart, a Royal descendant of King James I of Scotland. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 404.)

Obituary Record of the Graduates, Yale University 1915-20 / Internet Archive
Americans of Royal Descent, p. 404 / Google Books

Edwin W. Robertson, Yale 1885

Edwin Wales Robertson was the son of U.S. Senator Thomas James Robertson of South Carolina, and a grandson of Joseph Robertson who moved to South Carolina from Virginia. He was President of the National Loan & Exchange Bank of Columbia from 1898-1927, and was a director of the Equitable from 1905 until his death. His daughter Frances married Basil Hwoschinsky, who graduated from the Imperial Naval Academy in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1908. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University 1928-1929, pp. 104-106.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University 1928-1929 / Yale University Library (pdf, 394 pp)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1909

Directors: Charles B. Alexander, John N. Beach, E.W. Bloomingdale, Abraham Brittin, T. DeWitt Cuyler, James B. Forgan, Thomas A. Gillespie, William A. Day, Alexander C. Humphreys, Edward de V. Morrell, Bradish Johnson, John D. Kernan, Alvin W. Krech, Charles E. Littlefield, John T. Manson, John J. McCook, Willis F. McCook, James McMahon, David H. Moffatt, Levi P. Morton, Paul Morton (President), Alfonso de Navarro, Ludwig Nissen, Eugenius H. Outerbridge, William E. Paine, Wallace L. Pierce, Tom Randolph, William C. Redfield, E.W. Robertson, Jay Morton, Robert Mather, J.G. Schmidlapp, V.P. Snyder, Thomas Spratt, J. Edward Swanstrom, Gage E. Tarbell, Eben B. Thomas, Daniel A. Tompkins, Sir William C. Van Horne, George F. Vietor, William Whitman, George T. Wilson, Frank S. Witherbee, Charles H. Zehnder. Secretary: William Alexander.Treasurer: Charles E. Phelps. (Trow's Directory, 1909.)

Thomas A. Gillespie

Thomas Andrew Gillespie was born in Pittsburgh and graduated from high school there in 1866. He began as a clerk for the Pittsburgh Gas Company, then went to an iron manufacturing firm for eight years, then manufactured iron bolts on his own. He joined George Westinghouse in 1884, then founded T.A. and R.G. Gillespie with his brother in 1890. In 1897 it was incorporated as the T.A. Gillespie Company. It constructed locks and dams for the U.S. government on the upper Ohio River; the East Jersey Water Company plant in Paterson and the Pittsburgh Water Filtration Works, and the third-tracking of the elevated railroad lines in Manhattan. (T.A. Gillespie, Contractor, Dies. New York Times, Jan. 28, 1926.)

T.A. Gillespie & Co. had been a general contracting company until 1915, when it bought over 300 acres in Sayreville Township, New Jersey. It was said to have a contract with the British War Office to furnish powder, and the Union Powder Corporation was affiliated with it. (Gillespie to Make Powder. New York Times, Jun. 3, 1915.) Gillespie, vice president F.W. Williams, and two officers in the Ordnance Department of the Russian Army, Gen. Seposhnikov and Col. Joukowski, were involved in a car crash. (5 Flung From Auto Dodging Children. New York Times, Sep. 18, 1915.) The T.A. Gillespie shell-loading plant at Morgan, N.J., was said to be the largest in the world. It had been hastily constructed in three months, using wood frame and corrugated iron, and buildings were too closely spaced, although this was according to government specifications. On the night of Oct. 4, at 7:40 pm, with over 2000 night shift worlers present, a series of explosions began which lasted for three days. The week before, three women and a man had been killed when a partly-loaded shell rolled off a table and blew up. (Great Munition Plant Blown Up, 100 May Be Dead. New York Times, Oct. 5, 1918; Day of Explosions and Fire Finishes Shell Plant Ruin. New York Times, Oct. 6, 1918.) The vice-president, E.A. Yates, told the Senate investigating committee that on the day of the explosion there was between 25 and 30 million pounds of TNT, nitrate, ammonia, loaded shells, and smokeless powder at the plant, of which slightly less than 350,000 pounds of TNT had exploded. E.C. Hawley of the Fire Prevention Bureau of the War Industries Board said that the company had been advised to install a sprinkler system in June. (Thinks Enemy Alien Blew Up War Plant. New York Times, Nov. 15, 1918.) The Senate Military Affairs sub-committee estimated that 12,155,000 pounds of explosives were destroyed, and blamed Army policy for storing too much ammunition at the site. (Blame For Morgan Blast. New York Times, Feb. 23, 1919.)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1910

Directors re-elected "as representatives of the policy holders:" Thomas Spratt, Eben B. Thomas, J. Edward Swanstrom, Wallace L. Pierce, Thomas A. Gillespie, Eugenius H. Outerbridge, and Willis McCook. Directors re-elected by the stockholders were Gage E. Tarbell, A. De Navarro, Paul Morton, T. De Witt Cuyler, L.P. Morton, W.S. Redfield, W.C. Van Horne, and W.A. Day. J.P. Morgan held 502 of the 735 shares represented; these were in the names of George Westinghouse and ex-Justice Morgan J. O'Brien, who voted their stock in person. (Equitable Unmuturalized. New York Times, Dec. 8, 1910.)

In 1916, John L. Swayze, general counsel of the New York Telephone Company, told the Thompson Legislative Committee that the company had tapped 350 telephones, on the order of N.Y.C. Police Commissioner Arthur Woods. One of the taps was on the phone of law firm Seymour & Seymour, whose office was at 120 Broadway in the Equitable Building. John S. Seymour said he had read about it in the newspapers and hired a detective agency, which told him that another detective agency had had it done, but could find no evidence. He said that there had been no criminal investigation going on at their office, "but there was a large business transaction - a munitions transaction for the Allies with large interests on both sides," in which the J.P. Morgan firm "had a financial interest in the parties who were not our clients, but who were dealing with our clients." (Seymour Wires Tapped on Order Given By Woods. New York Times, May 18, 1916.) John Sammis Seymour was a member of Skull & Bones, 1875 (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale Univeraity Deceased during the Year 1930-1931, p. 47.) His brother and law partner, Frederick Seymour, Yale 1881, was a director of the Western Cartridge Company and the Equitable Powder Manufacturing Co. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1923-1924, p. 89.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale 1930-1931 / Yale University Library (pdf, 345 pp)
Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1923-1924 / Yale University Library (pdf, 284 pp)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1911

New directors: Charles D. Norton and William B. Skinner, four-year class; Charles D. Barney, George C. Boldt, three-year class; John D. Crimmins, Alton B. Parker, Samuel Rea, Douglas Robinson, Norman B. Ream, and Samuel M. Felton, two-year class. They filled vacancies and brought the total to the full quota of fifty-two members. (New Equitable Directors. New York Times, Dec. 7, 1911.)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1915

Directors: Charles B. Alexander, Charles D. Barney, John N. Beach, E.W. Bloomingdale, George C. Boldt, Abraham Brittin, John D. Crimmins, Thomas DeWitt Cuyler, William A. Day (President), Henry W. deForest, Samuel M. Felton, James B. Forgan, Thomas A. Gillespie, Robert Goelet, Alexander C. Humphreys, Bradish Johnson, John D. Kernan, Charles E. Littlefield, Arthur H. Lowe, John B. Lunger (Vice President), John T. Manson, Willis F. McCook, Edward DeV. Morrell, Joy Morton, Levi P. Morton, Alfonso De Navarro, Ludwig Nissen, Charles D. Norton, Eugenius H. Outerbridge, William E. Paine, Alton B. Parker, Wallace L. Pierce, Tom Randolph, Samuel Rea, E.W. Robertson, J.G. Schmidlapp, William Skinner, Thomas W. Slocum, V.P. Snyder, Thomas Spratt, Gage E. Tarbell, Eben B. Thomas, Sir William C. Van Horne, Richard H. Williams, George T. Wilson (2d Vice President), Frank S. Witherbee. William Alexander, Secretary. Medical directors: T.H. Rockwell, F.C. Wells. (Directory of Directors in the City of New York, 1915 Vol. 1939.)

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1917

"The stock of the Equitable has had a variety of ownerships since the insurance investigation. Prior to that time it was held by the Hyde family, under whose ownership the late E.H. Harriman obtained the use of large parts of the Society's funds. Harriman and Hyde quarreled, which did much to bring on the investigation. At a time when Harriman was thought to be after the stock, Thomas F. Ryan stepped in and bought the 502 shares which the Hyde family held. This led to a feud between Harriman and Ryan, already in embryo, and the railroad builder, when asked at the investigation if he had been trying to get the stock and whether he had succeeded, made his famous reply, 'Not yet, but soon.'

"In 1909 the late J.P. Morgan bought the controlling interest. He got part of the stock from Ryan and a part from the Harriman estate, thus showing that Mr. Harriman did get part of it from Ryan. Charles A Peabody, who acted as counsel for the Harriman estate, said last night that half of what Morgan got came from the Harriman estate. Mr. Morgan formed mutualization plans because, he said to a friend, he wished to remove the Equitable as a menace to the financial situation. A committee on mutualization was formed, and when General [T. Coleman] du Pont got the control in 1915 he pledged himself to lend aid to the mutualization plans. He bought the stock shortly after he had sold his interest in the E.I. de Nemours-du Pont Powder Company, of which he had been the head, for a sum said to have been $26,000,000."

There were 436 shares of minority stock. The minority shareholders included Franklin B. Lord, personal counsel to New York Governor Whitman, representing the Lord estate; the estate of former President Grover Cleveland; Charles B. Alexander; Thomas DeWitt Cuyler of Philadelphia; Chauncey M. Depew; Marcellus Hartley Dodge; Hornblower & Weeks; James H. Hyde; Samuel W. Lambert; the MacLaren estate; Levi P. Morton; Valentine P. Snyder; Thomas Spratt; Gage E. Tarbell; Spencer Trask estate; George T. Wilson; and the Hurlbut estate. Members of the Mutualization Committee of the board of directors were Thomas Spratt, chairman; T. de Witt Cuyler, Joy Morton, Eugenius H. Outerbridge, Charles D. Norton, and John D. Kernan. Judge William A. Day was president of the Equitable. (Sells Equitable to Policy Holders. New York Times, Jul. 22, 1917.)

120 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY

The Equitable Building at 120 Broadway was Antony C. Sutton's "New York Headquarters for Revolution," including the 1917 mission to aid the Bolsheviks in Russia. "The original building at 120 Broadway was destroyed by fire before World War I. Subsequently the site was sold to the Equitable Office Building Corporation, organized by General T. Coleman du Pont, president of du Pont de Nemours Powder Company. A new building was completed in 1915 and the Equitable Life Assurance Company moved back to its old site. In passing we should note an interesting interlock in Equitable history. In 1916 the cashier of the Berlin Equitable Life office was William Schacht, the father of Hjalmar Horace Greeley Schacht — later to become Hitler's banker, and financial genie. William Schacht was an American citizen, worked thirty years for Equitable in Germany, and owned a Berlin house known as "Equitable Villa." Before joining Hitler, young Hjalmar Schacht served as a member of the Workers and Soldiers Council (a soviet) of Zehlendoff; this he left in 1918 to join the board of the Nationalbank fur Deutschland. His codirector at DONAT was Emil Wittenberg, who, with Max May of Guaranty Trust Company of New York, was a director of the first Soviet international bank, Ruskombank."

"In any event, the building at 120 Broadway was in 1917 known as the Equitable Life Building. A large building, although by no means the largest office building in New York City, it occupies a one-block area at Broadway and Pine, and has thirty-four floors. The Bankers Club was located on the thirty-fourth floor. The tenant list in 1917 in effect reflected American involvement in the Bolshevik Revolution and its aftermath. For example, the headquarters of the No. 2 District of the Federal Reserve System — the New York area — by far the most important of the Federal Reserve districts, was located at 120 Broadway. The offices of several individual directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and, most important, the American International Corporation were also at 120 Broadway. By way of contrast, Ludwig Martens, appointed by the Soviets as the first Bolshevik "ambassador" to the United States and head of the Soviet Bureau, was in 1917 the vice president of Weinberg & Posner — and also had offices at 120 Broadway." (Chapter 8, 120 Broadway, New York City. In: Wall Street and the Bolshevik Revolution, by Antony C. Sutton.)

Ch. 8, Wall Street and the Bolshevik Revolution / Reformed Theology
New York, NY Equitable Building Fire, Jan. 1912 / GenDisasters.com
The Equitable Building / New York Architecture Images

Elgood C. Lufkin

Elgood C. Lufkin was the son of Chauncey S. Lufkin, "manager for half a century of all of the producing branches of the Standard Oil Company, and discoverer and developer of the Rumanian oil fields... Mr. Lufkin, from 1889 until the dissolution of the Standard Oil Trust, was the world expert of the Rockefeller corporation." He died in Lima, Ohio. His son, Elgood C. Lufkin, was president of the Texas Oil Company (Chauncey S. Lufkin, Well Finder of Standard, Dead. Boston Daily Globe, Feb. 23, 1918). Elgood C. Lufkin graduated from MIT as a mechanical engineer in 1888. He became a vice president of the Texas Company in 1909, and was a director of the Peoples Bank of Buffalo, N.Y. (Ad. 38. Bankers' Magazine, Dec. 1910;81(6):XIX), and later of the newly-formed Mercantile Trust & Deposit Company, of 115 Broadway, New York, whose directorate was "exceptionally strong and represents some of the strongest business and financial interests in the United States" (Display Ad 3. New York Times, Sep. 25, 1917 p. 2; The Mercantile Trust Company. Bankers' Magazine, Nov. 1919;99(5):693.). He became chairman of the board of the Texas Company in 1920, until resigning in 1926. He was later a director of the Equitable Trust Company of New York (Display Ad 127. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1930 p. 38; Elgood C. Lufkin, Oil Leader, Dead. New York Times, Oct. 10, 1935; Mrs. Elgood C. Lufkin. New York Times, Jan. 2, 1942.)

One son, Elgood Moulton Lufkin, S&B 1925, married Marie Murray McDonnell, the widow of John Vincent McDonnell, S&B 1911, a Tulsa, Oklahoma oilman who died of leukemia in 1926 after they had been married just two years. (Mrs. McDonnell to Wed. New York Times, Oct. 31, 1929; McDonnell-Murray. New York Times, Oct. 9, 1924; John V. M'Donnell, Oil Producer, Dies. New York Times, May 25, 1926.) Marie Murray was the daughter of Thomas E. Murray, a vice president of the New York Edison Company. Her brothers were Joseph Bradley Murray, Yale 1910, and Thomas E. Murray Jr., Yale 1911. (Wed by Bishop McDonnell. New York Times, May 25, 1916; John Vincent McDonnell, B.A. 1911, Obituary Record of Yale Graduates, 1925-1926, p. 204.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates, 1925-1926 / Yale University Library (pdf, 350 pp)

Elgood C. Lufkin was the grandfather of Dan W. Lufkin, Skull & Bones 1953, of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette. The Equitable acquired Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette and its money management arm, Alliance Capital Management, L.P., in 1985. In 1991, the Equitable was demutualized again, and French insurer AXA Group invested $1 billion in Equitable. Richard H. Jenrette was Chairman and CEO of The Equitable Companies, Inc. In 2004, AXA Equitable acquired Mutual of New York (MONY).

The Equitable Life Assurance Society, 1941

Directors: Henry M. Alexander, William Seaman Bainbridge, Charles D. Barney, Edward C. Blum, Ralph Budd, Joseph P. Chamberlain, J. Reuben Clark Jr., Bertram Cutler, Francis B. Davis Jr., Robert E. Dodds, John C.B. Ehringhaus, William J. Graham, John F. Harris, Robert C. Hill, Frederick P. Keppel, Francis K. Kernan, Richard W. Lawrence, Sam A. Lewisohn, Russell B. Lowe, John T. Manson, Edwin P. Maynard, George V. McLaughlin, John Bassett Moore, George Welwood Murray, John Lord O'Brian, Thomas L. Parkinson, Leonard Peckett, John J. Pelley, Horace D. Pillsbury, Seward Prosser, William Roberts, William Skinner, Jessie Slingluff, C. Carroll Todd. (Insurance Bosses Used Jobs to Further Their Own Interests, SEC Says. By Charles W. Holmburg. The Capital Times, Mar. 13, 1941.)

John F. Harris

John Francis Harris was born in Boston and moved west with his father, George Samuel Harris, a land agent for the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad and then the Burlington & Missouri River Railroad. The family moved to Burlington, Iowa, in 1870 and Lincoln, Neb. in 1872. His older brother, George B. Harris, started as an office boy at the Hannibal & St. Joseph, and eventually became president of the president of the Chicago, Burlington & Northern in 1889. When it merged with the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, he became its president until 1901 but remained on its board of directors until his death in 1918. (Harris House still stands but was never home to George S. Harris. By Jim McKee. Lincoln Journal Star, Apr. 28, 2013.) John F. Harris attended the University of Nebraska, then went into the grain business and moved to Chicago. He was a partner of John W. Gates in Harris & Gates, then in Harris, Winthrop & Co. from 1910 to 1929. He founded Harris, Upham & Co. in 1930. He was a director of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, Southern Pacific Railroad, Lima Locomotive Co. and American Steel Foundries. (J.F. Harris, park donor, is dead. Lincoln Evening Journal, Apr. 15, 1941.) He was chairman of the New York County chapter of the American Red Cross. (Made Red Cross Chairman. New York Times, Aug. 3, 1917.) He married Gertrude Upham of St. Paul, Minn. (Lincoln Courier, May 25, 1895.) His sons were George U., Henry U., John U. and Lement U. Harris. (John Francis Harris. New York Times, Apr. 15, 1941.)

120 Broadway, 1946: Cresap, McCormick and Paget

Mark Winfield Cresap [Jr.], Willard Francis McCormick, and Richard M. Paget organized this management consulting firm in 1946. It began in a snall office with a secretary and one staff member. They met several years before, when Cresap was a colonel in Gen. Brehon Somvereli's Service of Supply, McCormick was an executive of United States Steel, and Paget was a member of the staff of Frank Knox, Secretary of the Navy. Its first big customer was the Ford Motor Company, and the firm moved to a suite at 20 Pine Street by 1948. Mark W. Cresap reorganized sales management at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, then joined it as vice president and assistant to President Gwilym Price in 1951, becoming president in 1958. He graduated from Williams College and the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. His first position was at Booz, Allen & Hamilton. (Personality. A Triumvir at Westinghouse. New York Times, Jan. 19, 1958.) Mark W. Cresap Jr. was from Winnetka, Ill. He married a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Reed, granddaughter of Frederic Foster Carey. (Madeleine C. Reed Ex-Colonel's Bride. New York Times, Sep. 9, 1948.) He was a director of the Mellon National Bank and Trust Company and a trustee of the Rand Corporation. (Mark W. Cresap Jr. Dies at 53; Ex-President of Westinghouse. New York Times, Jul. 29, 1963.) Mark W. Cresap Sr. graduated from Northwestern University in 1898. He was a founder of its School of Commerce in 1908, and was a member of its board of trustees. He was chairman of Hart, Schaffner & Marx, a director of the First National Bank and United Air Lines. (M.W. Cresap Dead; Noted Clothier, 69. New York Times, May 31, 1942.) "Mr. McCormick was senior partner until the firm was incorporated in 1969, when he was named chairman. He remained chairman while the company was owned by Citicorp from 1970 to 1977, after it went private again and when it merged with Towers, Perrin, Forster & Crosby. He retained the title of chairman until retiring in 1987. Mr. McCormick was a former governor of the Foreign Policy Association, a trustee of the Thomas Alva Edison Foundation and a member of the Cardinal's Committee for the Laity. He had also been on the boards of the Carborundum Company, the Chicago Pneumatic Tool Company, Farrell Steamship Lines, the Midland Capital Corporation and the Schering-Plough Corporation." He was born in Tonawanda, N.Y. He joined the Remington Rand Company in 1920, and United States Steel in 1938. (Willard F. McCormick, 85, Dies; Led Management Consulting Firm. New York Times, Apr. 11, 1989.)

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