The Farmers Loan and Trust Company of New York

Bank History, Farmers Loan and Trust Company

(From: New York Bank History. By Bob Kerstein, President of Scripophily.com)

1822 Established Farmers Fire Insurance & Loan Company
1836 Name Change To Farmers Loan and Trust Company
06/01/1929 Purchased Trust National City Bank of New York
06/01/1929 Name Change To City Bank Farmers Trust Company
12/19/1931 Acquire By Merger Bank of America Trust Company
01/30/1959 Convert Federal First National City Trust Company
01/01/1963 Merge To Federal First National City Bank
1976 Name Change To Citibank, N.A.
Bank History F / Scripophily.com

Rufus King Delafield, Royal

Rufus King Delafield was the youngest son of John Delafield and Ann [Hallett]. He was an officer of the Phenix Bank 1823-1835, and actuary and secretary of the Farmer's Loan and Trust Company 1835-1852. He was also president of the Delafield & Baxter hydraulic cement company. He married Eliza Bard, daughter of William Bard [who was the predecessor of Henry Parish the younger as President of the New York Life Insurance and Trust Company]. (Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Family History of New York, Vol. 1, 1907. By William Smith Pelletreau, p. 279.)

Historic Homes and Institutions, p. 279 / Google Books

Rufus K. Delafield's sister, Susan Maria, married Henry Parish, an uncle of Henry Parish. Henry Parish died in 1856, several years after a stroke which paralyzed him. His will left $200,000 to her and the residue of his million-dollar estate to the children of his brothers and sisters, but three codicils left everything to his wife. The other heirs contested it on grounds of undue influence. When Mrs. Parish died in 1861, the will was still being contested, and she directed that both her estate and that of her husband be left to her brothers, Joseph, Henry, Edward, Richard and Rufus K. Delafield. (Law Reports. New York Times, Aug. 7, 1861.)

The Delafield family married into the royal desendants of Edward III, King of England, in 1563, and their ancestor, John Delafield, was made a Count of the Holy Roman Empire in 1697, "with remainder of the title to his descendants, male and female, of his name." (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p.65.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 65 / Google Books

Their father, John Delafield, who arrived in America in 1783, "brought to America the first copy of the treaty of peace which formally closed the Revolution. His sister had married William Arnold, the grandfather of the celebrated Matthew Arnold, and a close friend at the time of William Pitt, the Prime Minister." The ship carrying the official copy arrived several days later. "A member of the de Peyster family met Delafield on his arrival, and sent the copy of the treaty by special messenger to Philadelphia, where the Continental Congress was in session." Rufus K. Delafield's son, Richard Delafield, was president of the National Park Bank, and an incorporator and president of the Delafield family association. (Famous Delafield Family Is Now Incorporated. New York Times, May 12, 1912.) Among other things, John Delafield sold Bohea tea, imported in the ships Asia and Canton. (Display Ad. New York Daily Advertiser, Oct. 30, 1789.) The ship Mary, Daniel S. Moore, master, just arrived from Canton, unloaded teas, nankeens, silks and sugars on Delafields wharf, apply to Lawrence & Van Zandt, Brothers Coster and Co., or John McVickar. (Display Ad. New York Daily Advertiser, Sep. 12, 1800.)

Famous Delafield Family Is Now Incorporated, 1912 / New York Times

John Delafield Jr. (1786-1853) graduated from Columbia College in 1802. (The Annual Commencement of Columbia. Connecticut Journal, Aug. 12, 1802.) Shortly before the War of 1812, he was sent "under a commission from the United States Government, to command a fleet of merchant vessels." He was taken prisoner after being wrecked on the British coast. "After peace was established, he was induced to remain in England, and, for eight or nine years, was well known in the London Exchange as the American Banker. By the influence which he thus acquired among capitalists, he was enabled to spread foreign money over the country, especially the Southern and Western States." In 1839, the State of Illinois failed to pay a loan he procured for it. He retired to a farm in Geneva, N.Y. in 1842, and in 1851 was elected president of the Agricultural College. (Recent Deaths. New York Times, Oct. 25, 1853.) In 1820, he was appointed cashier of the Phenix Bank. (Mercantile Advertiser, Aug. 24, 1820.) In 1836, he was accused of having been "the great confederate of the Commercial Bank of Albany "in forming combinations in the Long Island Rail Road and other stocks." He refused to show the stock ledger on the request of several directors of the Phenix Bank. (Commercial Bank Investigation. New York Herald, May 13, 1836.) He resigned as President and a director in 1838. (Phenix Bank. New York Spectator, Apr. 26, 1838.)

The Farmers Loan and Trust Company, 1879-1880

R.G. Rolston, President; G.F. Talman, Vice-President; R.C. Boyd, Second Vice-President; G.P. Fitch, Secretary. Executive Committee: Moses Taylor, J.J. Astor, Isaac Bell, G.F. Talman, Samuel Sloan, Edward Minturn, R.G. Rolston. (Display Ad. New York Times, Apr. 11, 1879 p. 6.) In 1880, W.D. Searls was Assistant Secretary, and Robert Lennox Kennedy replaced Minturn. (New York Times, Jan. 6, 1880 p. 7.)

John Jacob Astor

John Jacob Astor (1822-1890) was the son of William Backhouse Astor, and grandson of the original John Jacob Astor. His father left two-thirds of a life interest in the Astor fortune to him, valued between $100 and $150 million.. His brother, William B. Astor Jr., got the other third. It was largely in real estate, which provided an income of over $5 million per year, and reverted to their children after their deaths. The Trinity Church Corporation was the only larger holding of real estate in the New York City. (John Jacob Astor Dead. New York Times, Feb. 23, 1890.) He left $100,000 each to St. Luke's Hospital and the New-York Cancer Hospital, and a $400,000 investment fund for the Astor Library. (Millions Handed Down. New York Times, Feb. 27, 1890.) Mrs. Astor was Charlotte Augusta Gibbes, and she inherited a large personal fortune from her parents, Thomas S. Gibbes, a southerner, and the former Miss Van den Heuval. The Astors were married in 1846, and William Waldorf Astor was their only child. Mrs. Astor was a manager of the Woman's Hospital from 1872 until her death. "The Cancer Hospital, whose foundation has just been celebrated, owes its origin to Mrs. Astor's sister, Mrs. Cullom, and its construction to the generosity of Mrs. Astor." Her sister, Miss Zela Gibbes, also lived with the Astors. Dr. Fordyce Barker said that she died of enteritis, or chronic inflammation of the bowels, not of cancer. (The Death of Mrs. Astor. New York Times, Dec. 13, 1887.) The Cancer Hospital opened in 1887, and John Jacob Astor had given over $300,000 to it by 1888, including the addition of a pavilion for men. Mrs. Cullom also left $50,000 to the Cancer Hospital. (Another Noble Gift. New York Times, Dec. 13, 1888.) John Jacob Astor IV (1864-1912) was the son of William B. Astor Jr.

Isaac Bell

Isaac Bell was born in New York City in 1814. He was the twelfth Isaac Bell in his family since the first one left Edinburgh, Scotland, and landed with the New Haven colony in 1640. He began in the French banking house of the Lentilhon Company, and later went to Charleston, S.C. and Mobile, Ala. in the cotton trade. He met Dr. Valentine Mott and his fourteen year old daughter [Adelaide] on a business trip to Europe in 1842, and he married her two years later. They lived in Mobile, where he was vice president and chairman of the Southern Bank of Alabama, and was a member of the Alabama legislature and on the staff of the Governor. In 1856, he returned to New York, and was elected a member of the Board of Supervisors. He was the first Commissioner of Charities and Correction in 1859. He financed troop transport ships in the civil war, and later organized the New York and Havre Packet Company and the Old Dominion Steamship Company. His son, Isaac Bell Jr., was U.S. Minister to Holland. He married the sister of James Gordon Bennett [Jr.]. His daughter [Olivia] was Mrs. James L. Barclay. (Isaac Bell Passes Away. New York Times, Oct. 1, 1897.) Isaac Bell was a vice president of the Tweed Ring's Tenth National Bank (The City Banks. New York Herald, Jan. 12, 1870), and a Sachem of the Tammany Society, whose Grand Sachem was William M. Tweed. (Annual Meeting of the Tammany Society. New York Times, May 13, 1871.) Mrs. Bell was one of the founders of Memorial Hospital. (Gotham Gossip. New Orleans Daily Picayune, Sep. 8, 1890.)

James L. Barclay was a Royal descendant of Edward I, King of England. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 107.) [However, the relation between Rev. Thomas Barclay of Albany and John Barclay of East Jersey is disputed.] James Lent Barclay's granddaughter, Allardyce Barclay, married Philippe Hottinguer, a son of Henri Hottinguer, head of the Hottinguer banking firm of Paris. (Allardyce Barclay Engaged to Marry. New York Times, Jul. 3, 1931.) Suzanne Hottinguer and Constance de Pourtales were to be flower girls. (Other Wedding Plans. New York Times, Jul. 18, 1931.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 107 / Google Books

James Gordon Bennett, founder of the New York Herald, married Henrietta Agnes Crean, a Royal descendant of several kings and a multitude of Magna Charta Sureties. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 716.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 716 / Google Books

His father, Isaac Bell, was from Stamford, Connecticut. He made several voyages to China. "He had seen Washington, and was on familiar terms with most of the leading federalists. Among these was Hamilton, with whom he walked daily in the morning on the Battery." "To an inquiry propounded by a friend to Mr. Bell a short time before his death, relative to his advanced years, he ascribed his longevoty to regularity and plainness in living, and total abstinence from tobacco, segars and all kinds of spiritous and malt liquors." (Obituary. Death of Isaac Bell, Senior. New York Herald, Sep. 8, 1860.)

Roswell G. Rolston

Roswell Graves Rolston was an officer of the Farmers Loan and Trust Company for thirty-three years, until suffering a stroke in 1897. He resigned as president, but continued as chairman and a director until shortly before his death. He had been involved in "several minor ventures" until becoming involved in organizing the Fourth National Bank. He left it to become a vice president of Farmers. He was also a director of the Western Union Telegraph Company, the Queens Insurance Company of America, the New Jersey Steamboat Company, the National City Bank, and the Commonwealth Insurance Company of New York; a member of the Board of Managers of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, and a trustee of the Consolidated Gas Company. (Rosewell G. Rolston Dead. New York Times, Aug. 26, 1896.) He was a director of the Northern Pacific Railroad during the 1883 visit of Eduard Lasker among a group of German investors. (The Northern Pacific Road. New York Times, Sep. 22, 1882; Accepting His Resignation. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1884.)

His son, Louis B. Rolston, was a partner of the law firm of Geller, Rolston & Horan, counsel to the Farmers Loan and Trust. (Louis Bertrand Rolston. New York Times, Jan. 29, 1933.) He was Secretary and Treasurer of the Bellevue Hospital Medical Board when it was merged with the New York University Medical College. D.O. Mills was President and Samuel Sloan, Vice President. (Two Colleges Are United. New York Times, Apr. 9, 1897.)

Samuel Sloan (1817-1907)

He was born in Lisburn, Ireland, the hometown of the Brown Brothers, before his parents immigrated to New York. He left school at age 15 when his father died, and worked at McBride & Co., Irish linen importers, and was a partner by 1845. In 1855, "At the instance of Gov. [Edwin Dare] Morgan," he became a director and then the President of the Hudson River Railroad, later the New York Central. He left after Commodore Vanderbilt took control, and two years later was elected President of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western. He was its president until 1899, and then chairman until his death. He was president of a half dozen other railroads at various times, and was a director or officer of 33 corporations at his death, including vice president and director of the National City Bank, a director of the Farmers Loan and Trust Company, and the United States Trust Company. (Samuel Sloan Dies In Nintieth Year. New York Times, Sep. 23, 1907.) He also contributed $5,000 to the building fund for Columbia University, along with Abram S. Hewitt, Seth Low, Samuel D. Babcock, Jacob H. Schiff, and R. Fulton Cutting (who gave $10,000). (Columbia's New Site. New York Times, May 11, 1892.) Bellevue Hospital Medical College was consolidated with New York University Medical College in 1897. The officers of the Bellevue Hospital College Board were D.O. Mills, President; Samuel Sloan, Vice President; and Louis B. Rolston, Secretary and Treasurer. (Two Colleges Are United. New York Times, Apr. 9, 1897.) "He was a warm friend of James Boorman, the projector" of the Hudson River road. "Its Directors were mostly men of strength in the business world, including Gov. Morgan, John D. Wolfe, Drake Mills, C.H. Russell, James Bauman, C.W. Chapin, Moses H. Grinnell, William Kelly, Charles F. Pond, and Edward Jones." (Samuel Sloan. By Earl D. Berry. New York Times, Mar. 6, 1898.) Peter Lorillard was a director in 1858, when Samuel Sloan was unanimously re-elected president. (Commercial Affairs. New York Times, Jun. 15, 1858.)

George F. Talman

He was born in New York City in 1795 and graduated from Columbia [1814]. He was a law partner of his brother-in-law, Henry G. Wisner, until 1825. He was a law partner of Ogden Hoffman, then became the New York agent of the American Trust Company of Baltimore until it wound up its affairs, when he became a vice president of the Farmers' Loan and Trust. He was not married. (Obituary. New York Times, Jun. 12, 1883.) He was chairman of the National Republican Young Men Club (Meeting of the National Republican Young Men. New-York Spectator, Oct. 11, 1831), and the next year a candidate for Congress (Great Anti-Jackson Meeting! New York Spectator, Nov. 1, 1832). He was one of the assignees of The American Life and Trust Company of Baltimore (Money Market. New York Herald, Aug. 19, 1842.); and a director of the Michigan Central Railroad (Railroad Election. Milwaukee Sentinel, Jun. 23, 1874; Financial Record Boston Stock Market. Boston Daily Advertiser, Jun. 29, 1875; Railroad Election. Chicago Inter Ocean, May 11, 1876), and the Erie Railway (Erie Railroad Directors. New York Times, Oct. 11, 1854; Election of Erie Railroad Directors. The North American, Nov. 28, 1877; Reorganization of the Erie Railroad. The Galveston Daily News, Apr. 30, 1878). He was one of the replacement directors of the Bank of the State of New York (The Mismanagement of the Bank of the State of New York. St. Louis Globe-Democrat, Mar. 18, 1876). He left an estate of $2,206,455 net. (Two Millions Distributed. New York Times, Aug. 22, 1884.)

He was the son of Samuel Talman and Phebe Townsend. His sister, Ann, was Mrs. Henry Coit; and sister Sarah Townsend married Gabriel Wisner. (Died. New York Times, Feb. 19, 1874; Townsend--Townshend, 1066-1909: the history, genealogy and alliances of the English and American house of Townsend. Compiled by Margaret Townsend, 1909, p. 74). The partnership of Henry Coit & Son was dissolved in 1864 (Changes in New York Firms. Boston Daily Advertiser, Jan. 11, 1864). Henry Coit was a trustee of the Atlantic Mutual Insurance Co. (Financial. New York Times, Feb. 29, 1868), and the Union National Bank. He was born in New London, Conn. He was supercargo on a ship trading with Lisbon during the War of 1812, and went into business as a shipping merchant in 1815. He married Miss Talman in 1822. (Obituary. New York Times, May 19, 1876.)

Townsend--Townshend, 1066-1909 / Internet Archive

His brother, James T. Talman, was Cashier of the Morris Canal Bank. The District Attorney entered a nolli prosique, stating that 'however important Mr. T. might have been in signing his name to the certificates of the Morris Canal stock, yet he was satisfied that he had no knowledge that a fraud was intended, nor did he afterwards participate in it in any shape.' (Oyez & Terminer. New York Spectator, Dec. 22, 1826). He was a director of the Union National Bank and the Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company. He was born in New London, Conn. about 1780 (Obituary. New York Times, May 19, 1876). Mrs. James Townsend Talman was Mary Watson Lawrence. Their daughter, Georgiana, married Henry C. Townsend, a Philadelphia lawyer who attended Yale in 1839. He was counsel to Penn. Mutual Life Insurance Company. (Townsend--Townshend, 1066-1909: the history, genealogy and alliances of the English and American house of Townsend. Compiled by Margaret Townsend, 1909, p. 44.)

The Farmers Loan and Trust Company, 1882-1884

No. 26 Exchange Place, New York. Directors: * George F. Talman, Vice Pres.; * Moses Taylor; * Isaac Bell; William Walter Phelps; A.H. Baylis; W.W. Astor; Jno. H. Mortimer; W.H. Wisner; Charles E. Dill; A.S. Murray; Thomas Rutter; J.H. Banker; S. Clark Jervoise; * John J. Astor; * Robert Lenox Kennedy; * Samuel Sloan; Percy R. Pyne; William Remsen; James Roosevelt; Edgar S. Auchincloss; A.R. Van Nest; R.L. Cutting; Edward R. Dell; N.L. McCready; C.H. Thompson; * R.G. Rolston (President); and Denning Duer. (* Executive Committee). W.D. Searls, 2nd Vice Pres.; William H. Leupp, Secretary; Frank Munn, Asst. Sec'y. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 7, 1882 p. 7.) In 1883, it moved to Nos. 20 and 22 William St. Baylis, Mortimer, Talman and Taylor left, and Frederick Billings, Robert C. Boyd, and Moses Taylor Pyne joined the board. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 19, 1883 p. 7; Display Ad. New York Times, May 28, 1884 p. 7.)

Edgar S. Auchincloss

Edgar Stirling Auchincloss, a commission merchant, was the son of John Auchincloss. He graduated from New York University in 1864, and married Maria La Grange Sloan, daughter of Samuel Sloan, the president of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. Three of his brothers graduated from Yale (in 1871 [Frederick Lawton Auchincloss], 1873, and 1879 [Hugh D. Auchincloss, who succeeded him as a director of the Farmers Loan and Trust]) and five of his sons (in 1896, 1901, 1903 and two in 1908). (Frederick Lawton Auchincloss 1871. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1870-1880, p. 371; Edgar Stirling Auchincloss 1896. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 1272.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1870-1880, p. 371 / Google Books
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 1272 / Google Books [scan is defective so download pdf]

His son, Samuel Sloan Auchincloss, entered the Yale class of 1894, but left to join Auchincloss Brothers before graduating. He was a member of the Stock Exchange firm of Auchincloss, Joust & Patrick until about 1924, and lived his last six years in England. (Samuel Auchincloss Dies in England at 61. New York Times, Apr. 28, 1934.)

His son, Dr. Hugh Auchincloss, Scroll & Key 1901, attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia and was a member of its faculty from 1908 to 1947. Hugh's grandparents were John and Elizabeth (Buck) Auchincloss. His daughter, Maria Sloan Auchincloss, married Allen M. Look, Skull & Bones 1927. (Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1947-1948, pp. 60-61.) Dr. Hugh Auchincloss was to be an usher at the wedding of Dr. Raynham Townsend. Fellow ushers included Dr. George Smith [Yale 1901], Dr. Albert Lamb [S&B 1903]. (Society Home and Abroad. New York Times, May 17, 1908.) He was at the fundraiser of the American Society for the Control of Cancer in 1926. (Cancer Fund Gains $90,000 in Campaign. New York Times, Sep. 28, 1926.) Mrs. Hugh Auchincloss was a benefactor of the New York City Cancer Committee's benefit for the ASCC. (Two Fetes in the Offing. New York Times, Oct. 20, 1929.) His grandson, Dr. Hugh Auchincloss, Yale 1938, was an associate clinical professor of surgery at Columbia's College of Physicians and Surgeons. (Hugh Auchincloss, Surgeon, Dies at 83. New York Times, Oct. 31, 1998.) His great-grandson, Dr. Hugh Auchincloss, Jr., has been named the new principal deputy director of National Intitute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "Auchincloss joins NIAID from Massachusetts General Hospital, where, as professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School, he earned an international reputation in the field of organ transplantation. An immunologist, Auchincloss is the founder and director of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Center for Islet Transplantation at Harvard Medical School. He has spent much of his time in recent years as chief operating officer of NIAID’s Immune Tolerance Network. He also serves as chairman of the FDA’s subcommittee on xenotransplantation. He was elected president of the American Society of Transplantation in 2005." (NIH Record, Mar. 10, 2006.)

Yale Obituary Record 1947-48 / Yale University Library (pdf, 254 pp)
Dr. Hugh Auchincloss, 1998 / New York Times
NIH Record, Mar. 10, 2006 / National Institutes of Health

Dr. Hugh Auchincloss (Yale 1938)'s daughter, Elizabeth L. Auchincloss M.D., is vice chairwoman for graduate medical education in the department of psychiatry at Weill Cornell. Her husband, Dr. Richard W. Weiss, is also a psychiatrist. Their daughter, Margaret Weiss, is a special assistant to Jeffrey D. Zients, the acting director of President Obama's Office of Management and Budget. She married Joseph E. Maloney, a co-founder of the Locust Street Group. (Margaret Weiss and Joseph Maloney. New York Times, Apr.1, 2012.) The Locust Street group received $15.4 million in 2009 from America's Health Insurance Plans, the lead trade group for the health insurance industry. (Top Lobbyists Prep for Supreme Court Healthcare Decision. First Street Research Group, Mar. 23, 2012.)

His son, James Coats Auchincloss (1885-1976), Yale 1908, briefly worked as a $4 per week clerk at the Farmers Loan and Trust before purchasing a seat on the New York Stock Exchange for $92,000, "the highest price paid up to that time." He gave up his seat in 1935 to run for office in Rumson, N.J. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1942, after redistricting made his district Republican, and served eleven terms before retiring in 1965. He had two sons, Douglas and Gordon Auchincloss [2d]. (James C. Auchincloss Dies At 91; 11-Term Jersey Representative. By Thomas W. Ennis. New York Times, Oct. 3, 1976.) Before World War II, Gordon Auchincloss II worked for the Lord & Thomas advertising agency on the American Tobacco Company account. During World War II, he worked for the O.S.S. in propaganda.

His son, Gordon Auchincloss, Scroll and Key 1908, was the lawyer and secretary for his father-in-law, Col. Edward M. House. He was a director of the Chase National Bank. In World War I, he was the assistant to Assistant Secretary of State Frank Polk [Scroll & Key 1894], who "laid the groundwork for the central intelligence organization U-1." (The CIA and American Democracy. By Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones. Yale University Press, 2003.)

Yale Obituary Record 1942-1943 / Yale University Library (pdf, 312 pp)

His son, Reginald L. Auchincloss, was a member of Scroll & Key 1913. (Yale 'Taps' in Rain Amid Great Tension. New York Times, May 17, 1912.) He married Ruth Hunter Cutting, the daughter of Robert Fulton Cutting. Ushers at his wedding were T. Lawrason Riggs, F. Bayard Rives, S. Sloan Colt [his cousin, at whose wedding Auchincloss was an usher], Charles H. Marshall, H. Humphrey Parsons, C. Suydam Cutting, Edwin D. Morgan Jr., and Joseph Walker 3d. His brother, Samuel Sloan Auchincloss, was best man. (Washington Post, Apr. 3, 1916; R. La G. Auchincloss Weds Ruth Cutting. New York Times, May 3, 1916.) "This work has been made possible through the generosity of the Royal Baking Powder Company, Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Auchincloss, and the Cancer Rescarch Fund of the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania. The writers are indebted, also, to Mr. R. G. Crosen for his aid in the development of the method." (The Tar in Cigarette Smoke and Its Possible Effects. William D. McNally, M.D. of Rush Medical College. Am J Cancer 1932 Nov;16(6):1502-1514.) R. Fulton Cutting, a grandson of director Robert L. Cutting, was a major benefactor of the American Society for the Control of Cancer. In 1948, McNally testified on behalf of the Federal Trade Commission against the P. Lorillard Tobacco Company, along with Albert D. Lasker's crony Anton J. Carlson.

McNally, 1932 / tobacco document

Edgar S. Auchincloss's brother, John Winthrop Auchincloss, Ph.B. 1873, was an agent of J&P Coats, Ltd., from 1873 to 1890; a partner of Auchincloss Brothers 1877-1923; a director of several corporations including the Illinois Central Railway and the All America Cable Company, and a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Company from 1885-1907 and a director of it from 1903 to 1914, as well as a member of its "investigating committee" in 1905. His daughter, Elizabeth, married Percy H. Jennings, S&B 1904. (J.W. Auchincloss, 84, Former Executive. New York Times, Jan. 25, 1938; Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1937-1938, pp. 153-154.) His wife was a daughter of Charles Handy Russell. (Mrs. J.W. Auchincloss. New York Times, Mar. 21, 1933.) Lansing Reed was Percy Hall Jennings' best man. (Weddings of a Day. New York Times, Jan. 13, 1907.) His son, Joseph Howland Auchincloss, Scroll & Key 1908, received his law degree from Harvard in 1911, then joined Stetson, Jennings and Russell, where his uncle, Charles Howland Russell, was a partner. He continued with the firm when it became Davis, Polk & Wardwell in 1921. (J. Howland Auchincloss Dies; Specialist in Corporate Law, 82. New York Times, Sep. 1, 1968.) Dr. J. Howland Auchincloss Jr. graduated from Groton School, Yale, and the College of Physicians and Surgeons. He married Sarah Sedgwick Knapp. His brother, Louis S. Auchincloss, was best man. (Sarah Knapp Bride of Army Physician. New York Times, Aug. 18, 1946.) Dr. J. Howland Auchincloss was a co-author of "The acute effects of smoking on the mechanics of respiration in chronic obstructive pulmonary emphysema" (Am Rev Tuberc. 1957;Jul;76(1):22-32. No abstract available), which was cited in the 1964 Surgeon General Report. At a luncheon meeting sponsored by the American Lung Association and the World Health Organization, he claimed that "Lung-related diseases can be traced back to man-made air pollution, which is largely tobacco smoke." (Lung Association Talks Detail Anti-Smoking Fight. By Richard Palmer. Syracuse, N.Y., Herald-Journal, Apr. 8, 1980.)

Yale Obituary Record 1937-1938 / Yale University Library (pdf, 305 pp)
Syracuse Herald-Journal, 1980 / tobacco document

Frederick Billings

Frederick Billings (1823-1890) was Henry Villard's predecessor as president of the Northern Pacific Railroad. He was an executor of the will of surgeon dentist Dr. Eleazar Parmly, his father-in-law. Parmly left an estate of about $1.5 million, of which his wife, Julia, would get a quarter. (The Will of Dr. Parmly. New York Times, Jan. 20, 1875.) His son, Parmley Billings, died of "congestion of the kidneys" at age 25. (Parmley Billings Dead. New York Times, May 9, 1888.) He attended the annual meeting of the Presbyterian Hospital that year. (Presbyterian Hospital Meeting. New York Times, Dec. 23, 1888.) He was born in Royalton, Vt. in 1823, graduated from the University of Vermont in 1844 and read law with O.P. Chandler in Woodstock. In 1849, he moved to San Francisco, where his brother-in-law, Capt. Simmons, had purchased an estate, and became the first lawyer in that city. In 1865, he disposed of most of his property and returned to Woodstock. Billings purchased an original twelfth interest in the Northern Pacific Railroad, and was elected president in 1879. He resigned in 1881 out of disagreement with Villard's blind-pool financiering. He continued as a director and large stockholder until the year of his death. He was also a director of the Farmers' Loan and Trust Company, the American Exchange Bank, the Manhattan Life Insurance Company and other companies, and a trustee of the Presbyterian Hospital and the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled. (Frederick Billings Dead. New York Times, Oct. 1, 1890.) His father was Oel Billings of Woodstock, Vt. [who was the grandfather of Charles M. Billings of the Guaranty Trust]. (Mortuary. Chicago Inter Ocean, Oct. 2, 1890.) The Farmers' Loan and Trust Company put the Northern Pacific Railroad into the hands of receives. (Northern Pacific Again. New York Times, Aug. 16, 1893.) Mary Montagu Billings married John French, the son of Warren C. French. Her brother, Frederick Billings, escorted her. Mr. and Mrs. K.D. Cheney Jr. [S&B 1892] were among the guests. (Many June Brides Wed Yesterday. New York Times, June 2, 1907.) Laura Billings married Dr. Frederic S. Lee, a physiologist at Columbia University. She was a member of the council of the Charity Organization Society from 1902 until her death, and trustee of the Russell Sage Foundation. (Mrs. Frederic S. Lee. New York Times, Nov. 8, 1938; Dr. Frederic S. Lee, Physiologist, Dies. New York Times, Dec. 16, 1939.) His grandson, John French Jr., married Rhoda Walker, daughter of the late Roberts Walker of the law firm White & Case. Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller was best man, and ushers included John D. Rockefeller 3d and Edwin Olaf Holter Jr. (Other Weddings. New York Times, June 25, 1931.) His granddaughter, Mary Billings French, married Laurance S. Rockefeller. (Miss French's Bridal to Take Place Aug. 15. New York Times, Jul. 19, 1934.) His great-granddaughter, Lucy Aldrich Rockefeller, married Charles Hamlin, Skull & Bones 1961. They were both students at Dartmouth Medical School. (Lucy Aldrich Rockefeller Is Married. New York Times, Jun. 14, 1964.)

Beginning in 1916, the Billings family as well as the Rockefellers supported the establishment of a medical school at the University of Chicago. "Albert Billings' son, C.K.G. Billings, was the family's principal donor, but his cousin, Dr. Frank Billings (the Dean of Rush Medical College), brother-in-law Charles H. Ruddock, and nephew Albert M.B. Ruddock also participated in the plan. In all, members of the Billings family gave more than $1 million to found the University of Chicago Medical School and erect the Albert M. Billings Hospital." C.K.G. Billings was the retired president of Peoples Gas, Light, and Coke Co. of Chicago, and the founder of Union Carbide.

Developing the Medical Center / University of Chicago

Dr. Frank Billings (1854-1932) was Albert Merritt Billings's nephew. In addition to being Dean of Rush Medical College for 20 years, he was variously treasurer, president, trustee, secretary of the board of the American Medical Association between 1902 and 1924; president of the John McCormick Institute for Infectious Diseases from 1902 to 1932; president of the board of trustees of the Otho S.A. Sprague Memorial Institute from 1909 to 1932; president of the Association of American Physicians in 1906; and president of the National Tuberculosis Association in 1907. He was also Chairman of the American Red Cross Commission to Russia in World War I. He and Arthur D. Bevan were the physicians of Marshall Field Jr., who shot himself in 1905. (In Death's Shadow. Stevens Point Daily Journal, Nov. 24, 1905; Marshall Field Jr. Better. New York Times, Nov. 26, 1905.)

Guide to the Frank Billings Papers / University of Chicago Library

Robert Livingston Cutting

Robert Livingston Cutting (1812-1887) "was conspicuous in local affairs when a young man and was one of the most active and aggressive members of the Committee of Seventy, appointed to overthrow the Tweed Ring." He was a member of the stock brokerage firm Lee, Livingston & Co., 17 William Street, at his death. He was supposedly bankrupt, owing $150,000 to the estate of his father, $17,000 to his brother, William Cutting, and $5,000 to his wife. He was survived by his brother and two sons, Robert L. Cutting Jr. (whom he disinherited in 1892 for marrying Minnie Seligman), and James De Wolf Cutting, a partner of Taylor, Cutting & Co., 7 Wall Street. (R.L. Cutting In Debt $170,000 At His Death. New York Times, Mar. 9, 1904; Ahnentafel, Generation No. 1. In: Frederick Philipse Family Tree. An Aristocratic Family from Bohemia, Czech Republic.)

Frederick Philipse Family Tree / Ancestry.com

Robert Livingston Cutting Jr. was an incorporator of The Electric Light Company in 1878, capital $300,000. Fellow incorporators included Tracy R. Edson, James H. Barker, Norvin Green, Grosvenor P. Lowery, Robert M. Galloway, Egesto B. Fabbray, George R. Kent, George W. Soren, Charles F. Stone, William G. Miller, Thomas A. Edison and George S. Hamlin. (Latest News. Chester, Pa., Daily Times, Oct. 18, 1878; White Dental Manufacturing Company Records. The Edison Papers.) "Tracy R. Edson Co-founder of the American Banknote Company and previous to that a co-founder of Rawdon, Wright, Hatch & Edson, printers of the first United states postage stamps. During the Civil War, Edson was president of the American Bank Note Company and was famously involved in printing Confederate banknotes and bonds for Gazaway Bugg Lamar, the chief Confederate agent in New York, while still executing his prewar contract to print U.S. treasury notes for the Federal government. In later years he was Vice President of Western Union and was the man who introduced Thomas Edison to that company." (New York Submarine Company - Subscription to Capital Document with signatures - New York 1864. Scripophily.net)

New York Submarine Company / Scripophily
Edison Papers / Rutgers University

He was also a partner of tobacco financier Thomas Fortune Ryan: "This is to certify that the undersigned have formed a limited partnership, pursuant to the provisions of the Revised Statutes of the State of New-York; that the name or firm under which such partnership is to be conducted is LEE & RYAN; that the general nature of the business to be transacted is the buying and selling, on commission, of bonds, stocks and securities, and such other business as my be properly incident thereto; that the names of all the general and special partners interested therein, with their respective places of residence, are as follows: John Bowers Lee, who resides in the City, County, and State of New-York, and Thomas Fortune Ryan, who resides in the City, County, and State of New-York, who are the general partners, and Robert L. Cutting Jr., such a special partner, has contributed the sum of one hundred thousand dollars as capital to the common stock; that the said partnership is to commence on the 6th day of March, A.D. 1882, and is to terminate on the 6th day of March, A.D. 1884; that the principal place of business of the said partnership is in the City and County of New-York. - Dated March 3, 1882." Lee swore to A.W. Andrews, notary public, that the said sum had been paid in cash. (Copartnership Notices. New-York Times, Apr. 4, 1882 p. 7.) A brother of Robert L. Cutting Jr., Fulton Cutting (1816-1875), was the father of Robert Fulton Cutting (1852-1934), a major benefactor of the American Society for the Control of Cancer; his daughter married Reginald L. Auchincloss.

Denning Duer, Royal

[William] Denning Duer (1812-1891) was a member of the firm of Prime, Ward & King, bankers. He married Caroline King, the daughter of J.G. King, and formed J.G. King and Sons in 1847, and J.G. King's Sons in 1853. He retired from the firm in 1875. He was the son of William Alexander Duer, the President of Columbia College from 1829-1842. (Denning Duer. New York Times, Mar. 11, 1891.) He was a director of the Republic Fire Insurance Company (Insurance. New York Times, Apr. 24, 1852), and the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad. (Local News in Brief. New York Times, Feb. 23, 1870.) He was a Royal descendant of Robert II, King of Scotland. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p.120.) A son, Lieutenant Commander Rufus K. Duer, died of yellow fever on the U.S. steamer Narragansett, aged 26. (Died. New York Times, Jul. 13, 1869.)

Americans of royal descent, p. 120 / Google Books

His brother, William A. Duer, was a trustee of the Union Trust Company, of which his uncle, Edward King, was President. "The family was descended from Col. William Duer, who was born in Devonshire, England, and came to this country in 1747. He was a son of John Duer, a planter of Antigua, and his wife, Frances Frye, was a daughter of Gen. Frederick Frye, a President of the West India colonies. He came to New York as Secretary to Lord Clive and married Lady Katherine Alexander, the daughter of William Alexander, Lord Sterling." He was the father-in-law of Clarence H. Mackay. (William A. Duer Dies at the Mackay Home. New York Times, Oct. 28, 1905.) The Mackays were divorced in 1913, and she re-married in 1914 to Dr. Joseph A. Blake. (Mrs. K. Duer Blake Dies of Pneumonia. New York Times, Apr. 20, 1930.)

William A. Duer's father-in-law, William R. Travers, was born in Baltimore in 1819, where his grandfather had come to from London about the time of the Revolution. He entered West Point, but was not successful and finished his education at Columbia College. He was a childhood friend of Leonard Jerome, who drew him back from Baltimore to go into business with his brother, A.G. Jerome, and who accompanied his body on its return from Bermuda. [Leonard Jerome's daughter was Lady Randolph Churchill, the mother of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.] "Mr. Travers was one of the greatest club men in the city, being a member of every prominent club except the Union League," 27 in all. His sister was the mother of John D. Prince, of Prince & Whitely. (William R. Travers Dead. New York Times, Mar. 28, 1887.) His mother-in-law, née Maria Louisa Johnson, was the daughter of Reverdy Johnson, a U.S. Senator from Maryland and Minister to England under President Grant. President Arthur spent his summers at their cottage in Newport, R.I. They rented it to William C. Whitney after Mr. Travers died. Their surviving children were Mrs. George R. Fearing, Mrs. John G. Heckscher, Mrs. William A. Duer, Mrs. Walter Gay of Paris, Mrs. James Wadsworth of Geneseo, N.Y., and Susan Travers. (Death of Mrs. Wm. R. Travers. New York Times, Jul. 17, 1893.) William Riggin Travers Jr. graduated from Columbia in 1882. He married Lillie Harriman, daughter of Oliver Harriman, in 1889. About three months after they were divorced, he shot himself. (W.R. Travers Ends Life After Divorce. New York Times, Sep. 30, 1905.)

Denning Duer Jr. was Vice Consul in Lisbon, Portugal during the Arthur administration, and U.S. Consul in Antwerp, Holland, during the Cleveland administration. He retired to New Haven, Conn., about 1890, and died there in 1915. (Denning Duer. The Weehawken Time Machine.)

Denning Duer / The Weehawken Time Machine

His daughter, Caroline Suydam Duer, married George X. McLanahan, Wolf's Head 1896. (Election Day on Yale Campus. New York Times, May 24, 1895.) From 1899 to 1901, he was managing clerk of Curtis, Mallet-Prevost & Colt in New York City, then attended the School of Law and Diplomacy at George Washington University. He was a director of the Union Trust Company of Washington, D.C., for 14 years. In 1906, he helped organize the Washington Herald, and was its owner from 1908-1912. He was a trustee of Berea College in Kentucky. (Obituary Record of the Graduates, Yale University 1915-20, p. 976.)

Obituary Record of the Graduates, Yale University 1915-20 / Internet Archive

Samuel Clark Jervoise

Samuel Clarke Jervoise (1808-1890) was the son of Rev. Sir Samuel Clarke Jervoise, baronet, of Hampshire, England, who graduated from Corpus Christi college, Oxford, in 1792. His older brother, Jervoise Clarke Jervoise (1801-1889), inherited the title. They were descended from Sir Samuel Clarke, Sheriff of London and Middlesex, who was knighted in 1712, and Thomas Jervoise, Member of Parliament from Hampshire in the reign of Queen Anne. (Gentleman's Magazine, Vol. 193, 1852, p. 527.)

Gentleman's Magazine, 1852, p. 527 / Google Books

S. Clarke Jervoise lived at Endsleigh House, Tormoham [parish of Tor Mohan, named for the Mohan family], Devon, in 1881.

Samuel Clarke Jervoise / Genealogy.Links.org
A Country Cottage Writ Large / Hotel Endsleigh.com

Ambrose Spencer Murray

Ambrose Spencer Murray was a member of Congress from 1855 to 1859. He married Frances Wisner, daughter of Henry Gabriel Wisner, Princeton 1799, and Sarah Talman. His son, Francis Wisner Murray, Yale 1877, received his M.D. at Columbia in 1887, and was a surgeon at New York Hospital since 1893, and St. Luke's Hospital between 1887 and 1902. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University 1928-1929, p. 69.) Ambrose Spencer Murray was a director of the Erie Railroad from 1853 to 1867, and President of the National Bank of Orange County. (Obituary. New York Times, Nov. 10, 1885.) Dr. Francis W. Murray was appointed to the faculty of Cornell Medical College when it was founded in 1898. (Cornell's Annual Report. New York Times, Oct. 30, 1898.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1928-1929 / Yale University Library (pdf, 394 pp)

William Walter Phelps, Skull & Bones 1860

William Walter Phelps (1839-1894) was a New Jersey Congressman 1872-1874, and minister to Germany in 1889-93. In addition to the Farmers Loan and Trust, he was a director of the National City Bank, the Second National Bank of New York, the United States Trust Co., and nine railroads. He married Ellen Sheffield, the daughter of Joseph E. Sheffield, the founder of Yale's Sheffield Scientific School, and fathered Sheffield Phelps, S&B 1886, who died of typhoid fever in 1902; and John Jay Phelps, Scroll & Key 1883, d. 1948, who was with the Farmers Loan and Trust from 1883-85, and was a trustee of the U.S. Trust Company of New York from 1895-1948. (William Walter Phelps bio, Phelps Family History in America; Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1890-1900, p. 238; Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 262.) The sons were cousins of Mabel T. Boardman of the American Red Cross. (Bulletin of Yale University, Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University deceased during the Year 1948-1949, pp. 6-7.) He was a brother-in-law of Rev. David Stuart Dodge, Yale 1857. His nephew, Samuel Rossiter Betts, S&K 1875, was his secretary while he was in Congress.

William Walter Phelps bio / Phelps Family History in America
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1890-1900, p. 238 / Google Books
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 262 / Google Books
Yale Obituary Record 1948-49 / Yale University Library (pdf, 186 pp)

Moses Taylor Pyne, Princeton 1877

Moses Taylor Pyne was the son of Percy Rivington Pyne and Albertina Shelton Taylor Pyne. His mother was the daughter of Moses Taylor. He was general Solicitor for the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad for twelve years, and continued as a member of the Board of Managers. He was also a director of the National City Bank. He was a trustee of Princeton for thirty-six years. He had two sons, Percy R. Pyne 2d and Moses Taylor Pyne Jr. (M. Taylor Pyne Dies, Princeton Mourns. New York Times, Apr. 23, 1921.) He was a member of the Board of Managers of St. Luke's Hospital from at least 1889 to 1893 (St. Luke's Hospital. New York Times, Oct. 19, 1889; St. Luke's New Hospital. New York Times, Mar. 28, 1893.) He was elected a director of the Prudential Insurance Company in 1917. (Pyne a Prudential Director. New York Times, Mar. 14, 1917.) Mrs. Pyne was a daughter of Gen. Robert F. Stockton, President of the United Railroads of New Jersey, and the Mercer and Somerset Railway. Her sister was Mrs. Mercer Beasley. (Death List of a Day. New York Times, May 6, 1898.)

According to Cullman family lore, Moses Taylor Pyne financed a key deal for Joseph Cullman Sr. when the McKinley Tariff Act of 1890 took effect. Cullman had made a deposit on a stockpile of hundreds of thousands of pounds of Sumatra leaf in Amsterdam, and needed an additional $3 million to finish paying for it. The National City Bank could legally loan only $500,000, and the additional $2.5 million was a personal loan from its president. (Can't Take It With You: The Art of Making and Giving Money. By Lewis Cullman. John Wiley & Sons, 2004, p. 32.)

James Roosevelt

James Roosevelt was the son of James Roosevelt Roosevelt and Helen Astor. His father was an executor of the wills of his uncle, John Jacob Astor IV, and great uncle, William B. Astor Jr.

Samuel Sloan Jr.

Samuel Sloan Jr. was the son of Samuel Sloan. Samuel Sloan Jr. was first employed by the Farmers Loan and Trust in 1887. He became assistant secretary in 1889, secretary in 1897, and vice president in 1897. He continued his fathers' seat on the board of the National City Bank as well. He retired as a senior vice president in 1930, but continued as a director. "His desk at the offices of the City Bank Farmers Trust Company is to be kept intact for him at the direction of James H. Perkins, president of the bank, it is announced, and his old associates at the bank expect to continue to see him at it frequently." (Samuel Sloan Out of Active Banking. New York Times, Apr. 30, 1930.) He graduated from Columbia University in 1887. In 1888, he married Katherine S. Colt, who survived him, along with his brother, Benson B. Sloan, and sisters, Mrs. Richard C. Colt [the mother of S. Sloan Colt] and Mrs. Joseph Walker. (Samuel Sloan, 75, A Retired Banker. New York Times, Nov. 27, 1939.) He was Treasurer of the International Medical Missionary Society. (Missionaries Made Doctors. New York Times, Jun. 18, 1894.) He was an usher at Joseph Walker Jr.'s marriage to his sister, Elizabeth L. Sloan. (Last Evening's Weddings. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1887.) His nephew, Samuel Sloan Walker, was a member of Scroll & Key 1917. His grandnephew, Samuel Sloan Walker Jr., Skull & Bones 1948, was a publisher who was subsidized by the C.I.A.

Samuel Sloan 3d was the son of Samuel Sloan Jr.'s brother Benson Bennett Sloan. He married Maralen Winnifred Reed of Little Rock, Ark., while he was a flying instructor at Perrin Field in Texas. (Sloan-Reed. New York Times, Dec. 25, 1943.) He later married Marion Baker Titus. (Mrs. Titus Married To Samuel Sloan 3d. New York Times, Apr. 21, 1956.) In 1966, he was a vice president of Hayden, Stone, Inc. (Frank and Levy Are Nominated To Head Big Board's Governors. By Vartanig G. Vartan. New York Times, Apr. 12, 1966.) His brother, Benson B. Sloan Jr., graduated from Princeton in 1937. He served as a navigator in the Army Air Forces in the South Pacific in World War II, then joined Harris, Upham & Company as a stockbroker and retired as a partner in 1965. Two brothers, William and Samuel, survived him, as well as his son and daughter. (Benson B. Sloan Jr.; Stockbroker, 75. New York Times, Oct. 31, 1990.) "Ben started as an investment analyst with City Bank Farmers before almost five years in the Army, starting as a private and ending up a captain." He was with the 435th Bomb Squadron in New Guinea, Papua, and the Solomon Islands. (Benson B. Sloan Jr., '37. Princeton Alumni Weekly, Jan. 23, 1991.)

Benson B. Sloan Jr., 1990 / New York Times
Benson B. Sloan Jr., '37 Princeton Alumni Weekly

Abraham R. Van Nest

He was a director of the New York & New Haven Railroad (N.Y. & New Haven Railroad - The Schuyler Frauds. Savannah Daily Morning News, May 22, 1857; New York and New Haven. New York Times, Jan. 10, 1884) and other railroads (Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad. New York Times, Jun. 9, 1878; Railroads. Milwaukee Sentinel, Jun. 5, 1883; The Illinois Central. Daily Inter Ocean, Jun. 1, 1882), the Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. (Railroad Record. North American, May 11, 1881; Delaware and Hudson Canal Company. St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 9, 1883), and the American Loan and Trust Company, the loan and financial agent for the city of Galveston, Texas (City Council. Galvestion News, Dec. 12, 1882.) He was also the head A.R. Van Ness & Co., dealers in harness and leather goods. He died in 1888. His wife was Mary Thompson, daughter of Capt. William Thompson of the Collins steamship line. (Mary Thompson Van Nest. New York Times, Nov. 21, 1897.) His son, Abraham Rynier Van Nest Jr., Rutgers 1841 and Rutgers Theological Seminary 1847, was a clergyman of the Dutch Reformed Church who spent many years at the American chapels in Paris, Rome, and Florence, Italy, the last from 1866 to 1875. His grandfather was Abram Van Nest, and Rev. Rynier Van Nest was a great uncle. (Obituary. New York Times, Jun. 2, 1892.)

William H. Wisner

William H. Wisner was born in New York City in 1806. "When very young he was sent to Goshen, N.Y., where the family resided, and there he received his education. He subsequently engaged in the grocery business in this city, and was for many years one of the most prominent and best-known men in the tea-importing trade." He retired from business about 1886. "Mr. Wisner was the great-grandson of Henry Wisner, who was a member of the Continental Congress and took an active part in the Revolution. He was also the grandson of Gabriel Wisner, who was killed at the battle of Minisink." He was to be buried in the family plot at Goshen. Seven children survived him. (Obituary Record. New York Times, Jan. 28, 1895.) William H. Wisner held a number of notes on Olyphant & Company, China traders, which failed in 1878. (A Wide-Reaching Failure. New York Times, Dec. 8, 1878.) He was one of the Eastern stockholders and directors of the St. Louis Ore and Steel Company, who included several directors connected with the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company. (A Solid Syndicate. St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 26, 1882.)

Wisner / Van Der Veer Genealogy

Alexander Masterson

Alexander Masterson, a seventy-two year old director of the Farmers Loan and Trust, was shot to death by a retired merchant who accused him, in a sixty-three page statement, of alienating his family from him and wasting their money. David McClure and Rosewell G. Rolston were named as Masterson's accomplices. (Alex. Masterson Shot. New York Times, May 4, 1899.)

The Farmers Loan and Trust Company, 1900-1901

Nos. 16, 18, 20 & 22 William Street, New York: Edwin S. Marston, President; Thomas J. Barnett, 2d Vice President; Samuel Sloan Jr., Secretary; Augustus V. Heely, Asst. Secy. Directors: Samuel Sloan; William Waldorf Astor; James Roosevelt; D.O. Mills; Robert E. Ballantine; Franklin D. Locke; George F. Baker; Charles A. Peabody Jr.; Hugh D. Auchincloss; James Stillman; Edward R. Bell; Henry A.C. Taylor; D.H. King Jr.; Henry Hentz; Robert C. Boyd; E.R. Holden; William Rowland; Edwin S. Marston; Moses Taylor Pyne; S.S. Palmer; Edward R. Bacon; H. Van Rensselaer Kennedy; Cleveland H. Dodge; John L. Riker; Daniel S. Lamont; A.G. Agnew; Archibald D. Russell. (Display Ad 13. New York Times, Jan. 8, 1900 p. WF8.) William B. Cardozo and Cornelius R. Agnew became Assistant Secretaries. (Display Ad 16. New York Times, Mar. 5, 1900 p. WF8.) In 1901, Roosevelt and Bell left the directorate, and P.A. Valentine joined. (Display Ad 15. New York Times, Jan. 21, 1901 p. WF8.) W.S. Bogert was elected in June. (Farmers Loan and Trust. New York Times, Jun. 12, 1901.)

Hugh D. Auchincloss

Hugh Dudley Auchincloss (1858-1913) was a brother of Farmers Loan and Trust director Edgar S. Auchincloss. He graduated from Yale in 1879. He was a partner with his brother, John Winthrop Auchincloss, Yale 1873, in Auchincloss Brothers, founded by his grandfather, Hugh Auchincloss of Paisley, Scotland. He retired from this business in 1891 to manage private companies and go into banking. He was a director of the Bank of Manhattan Co., a trustee of the Bowery Savings Bank, the Consolidated Gas Co., and the Farmers Loan and Trust. He married Emma Brewster, the daughter of Oliver Burr Jennings, in 1891. Walter Jennings, S&B 1880, was his brother-in-law. His classmate, Dr. Walter B. James, S&B 1879, married his wife's sister. (Hugh D. Auchincloss Dies. New York Times, Apr. 22, 1913; Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1910-1915, p. 449.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1910-1915, p. 449 / Google Books

As of Dec. 31, 1911, the American Tobacco Company had $4,349,521.51 at the Farmers Loan & Trust Co. (Fiscal Statements, The American Tobacco Co., Dec. 31, 1911.)

ATC Fiscal Statements, Dec. 31, 1911 / tobacco document

Edward R. Bacon

Edward Rathbone Bacon was First Vice President and a director of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, and longtime president of the Baltimore and Ohio Southwestern Railroad. He died in Baltimore after an operation for appendicitis at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy, and admitted to the bar in Buffalo in 1869. (Edw. R. Bacon Dies After An Operation. New York Times, Dec. 3, 1915.) Edward R. Bacon was an attorney for the Reorganization Committee of the Marietta and Cincinnati Railroad. (The Marietta and Cincinnati Sale. New York Times, Dec. 21, 1882), and an attorney for Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. (The Telegraph Companies' War. New York Times, May 28, 1884.) His "mysterious syndicate" purchased the 32,000 shares held by the city of Baltimore. (News About Railroads. New York Times, Jun. 11, 1890), and then the state of Maryland's preferred stock, which was exchanged for common stock held by Johns Hopkins University. (News About Railroads. New York Times, Jun. 14, 1890.) He was on the committee to purchase the Mobile & Alabama Grand Trunk Railroad wirh George Arents, P.D. Barker of New York, and D.I. Parker of Mobile. (Work of the Railways. New York Times, May 8, 1883.) He was sole executor and trustee of the will of Samuel Pratt King of Buffalo, who was "one of two prodigal sons" who "made themselves widely known in New-York, London, Paris, Monte Carlo, and burned money like waste paper in pursuit of pleasure. (Samuel Pratt King's Will. New York Times, Nov. 19, 1892.) "Mr. Bacon achieved his success as a lawyer in Buffalo, and came to this city about fifteen years ago, and soon afterward became a member of the firm of Field, Dorsheimer, Deyo & Bacon, of which David Dudley Field was the senior member. Mr. Bacon gave his attention particularly to railroad matters, and for many years he has been the representative in this country of large foreign interests." He was president of the Baltimore and Ohio Southwestern since about 1892. (Baltimore and Ohio Changes. New York Times, Feb. 2, 1896.) "The chief holdings of Baltimore and Ohio common stock are still in the hands of the Garrett family. Miss Mary Garrett, Mrs. T. Harrison Garret, and Robert Garrett own, in the aggregate, about 60,000 shares. The Greigg interests hold about 8,000 shares, and William F. Burns owns in the neighborhood of 4,000 shares. The Johns Hopkins University is not so large a stockholder as has been supposed. That institution now owns 1,000 shares of first preferred stock and 350 shares of the common stock." Its reorganization committee consisted of Gen. Louis Fitzgerald, Eugene Delano, Edward R. Bacon, Howland Davis, and William A. Read, to which they added August Belmont and Henry Budge. Fitzgerald was Chairman, and H.C. Deming was Secretary. (News of the Railroads. New York Times, Mar. 6, 1896.) Directors of the B&O were William F. Frick, James L. McLane (who represented the Johns Hopkins interests), George C. Jenkins, Alexander Shaw, George A. Von Lingen, Maurice Gregg, and William H. Blackford of Boston; Louis Fitzgerald, Eugene Delano, Edward R. Bacon, William A. Read, and Howland Davis of New York. John K. Cowen was President. (The Baltimore and Ohio. New York Times, Nov. 17, 1896.) William Salomon, Edward R. Bacon, and Norman B. Ream, "who with Messrs. Marshall Field, James J. Hill, Philip D. Armour, and other Western capitalists, compose the syndicate which recently acquired an important interest in the property." (Baltimore and Ohio Plans. New York Times, Jan. 14, 1899.) He made specific bequests of more than $1 million. The Farmers' Loan and Trust Company was an executor. (Big Legacies to Relatives. New York Times, Dec. 12, 1915.) His wife was the granddaughter of Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt. She left $25,000 to Columbia University, and Harvard University and the Smithsonian Institute received $50,000 each. (Mrs. Bacon's Will Filed. New York Times, Apr. 15, 1919; $1,840,454 Left By Vanderbilt Heiress. New York Times, May 17, 1921.) His brother, Walter Rathbone Bacon, was a barrister in London. (Jones & Co.'s Failure. Bangor Daily Whig & Courier, Jan. 6, 1882; The Sugar Problem. New Orleans Daily Picayune, Feb. 14, 1894.)

William B. Cardozo

William Benjamin Cardozo was a senior vice president and a director of the City Bank Farmers Trust Company. He was born in New York in 1865, the son of Abraham Hart Cardozo of Petersburg, Virginia, and Sarah Peixotto Cardozo of New York. Roswell G. Rolston, the president of the Farmers Loan and Trust Company, was a friend of his father, who gave Cardozo his first job as an office boy in 1881. He was elected a director of the firm in 1931. He was a first cousin of Judge Benjamin N. Cardozo. He was married to Jennie Housman. (William Cardozo, Veteran Banker. New York Times, June 4, 1940.) Judge Cardozo, his cousin, was the son of Judge Albert J. Cardozo of the Tweed Ring. Michael Hart Cardozo Sr. (1851-1906), the great grandfather of New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's Corporation Counsel Michael A. Cardozo, was a brother of William B. Cardozo. (Cardozo, Stern Genealogy. American Jewish Archives.) William B. Cardozo was best man for Edward Lester Bamberger at his marriage to Lillian Grace Housman, the sister of Arthur A. Housman. Mr. and Mrs. B.M. Baruch were among the guests. (Bamberger-Housman. New York Times, Apr. 30, 1902.) "The firm of A.A. Housman & Co., which succeeded Burrell & Housman in 1890, consisted of Mr. Housman, the senior partner; his two brothers, Clarence J. and Fred Housman, and Saling W. Baruch. Mr. Baruch, who is the second board member, is a younger brother of Bernard Baruch, a former partner in the firm." (A.A. Housman Dead; Ill Only Three Days. New York Times, Aug. 22, 1907.) In 1899, A.A. Housman & Co. attached the trustees of the will of John E. Liggett for commissions on procuring a purchaser for 550½ shares of stock of the Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company. The purchaser was George P. Butler. (The Liggitt [sic] and Myers Sale. New York Times, Apr.22, 1899.)

Cardozo, Stern Genealogy / American Jewish Archives (pdf, 1 p)

His daughter, Mildred Rosalie Cardozo, was married to Arnold Furst, a lawyer with Kaye, MacDavitt & Scholer. Judge Benjamin N. Cardozo performed the ceremony. Arnold's uncle, Michael Furst, Yale 1876, was best man. (Furst-Cardozo. New York Times, June 26, 1930.) Arnold Furst graduated from Yale in 1903, and was his uncle's partner in Furst & Furst from 1907 to 1918. Michael Furst was a founder of the Montauk Bank of Brooklyn, and chairman of the board of directors of the National Title Guarantee Company since 1930; a trustee of the Greater New York Savings Bank, and a director of the Mechanics Bank of Brooklyn and National Exchange Bank and Trust. He was a founder of the Young Men's Hebrew Association and its president from 1906 to 1910, and a trustee of the Denver Home for Consumptives. (Michael Furst, B.A. 1876. Bulletin of Yale University, Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1933-1934, p. 30.)

Yale Obituary Record 1933-1934 / Yale University Library (pdf, 285 pp)

Henry Hentz

Henry Hentz founded the cotton firm of H. Hentz & Co. in 1856. He was vice president or president of the New York Cotton Exchange from 1873 to 1876, and Chairman of the Executive Committee of the New York State Chamber of Commerce from 1889 to 1896. He retired from business in 1918, but remained as a special partner for several years. (Henry Hentz Dies in His 91st Year. New York Times, Sep. 30, 1924.)

Darius O. Mills

Darius Ogden Mills (1825-1910) founded the bank of D.O. Mills & Co. in Sacramento, Calif., and was President and/or Treasurer of the Bank of California from 1864 to 1880. He was appointed a Regent of the University of California from 1875 to 1883. (Regents of the University of California. Biographies.) However, in 1880, he moved to New York, and Isaias W. Hellman was appointed to serve out his term. (Biographies. Regents of the University of California. Univ. of Calif. - Berkeley.) In 1862, he was a Commissioner of the Union Pacific Railroad when it got its big subsidy from the US Congress, along with Thomas W. Olcott [the father of Central Trust trustee Frederick P. Olcott], John S. Kennedy of the Central Trust, Noah L. Wilson, C.P. Huntington and William Butler Ogden. (Public Notices. New York Times, July 14, 1862.) In 1884, he was one of the invited guests at the funeral of Prussian legislator Eduard Lasker. (The Funeral of Dr. Lasker. President White, Mr. Schurz, and Others Pay Tribute to His Memory. New York Times, Jan. 11, 1884.) In 1899, he was a trustee of the Morton Trust Company. (Display Ad 15. New York Times, Oct. 2, 1899 p. 8.) In 1903, he was a trustee of the Metropolitan Trust Company, along with Morris K. Jesup, John E. Parsons, and Norman B. Ream. (Display Ad 19. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1903 p. 11.) Mrs. D.O. Mills gave $5,000 to the Woman's Hospital, predecessor of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. (New Woman's Hospital Is Ready For Patients. New York Times, Dec. 6, 1906.) Their daughter, Elizabeth Mills, married Whitelaw Reid. His ushers were his brother, Ogden Mills; Clarence King, Augustus C. Gurnee, and Charles S. Hurd. (Reid-Mills. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1881.) He was also a trustee of the United States Trust Company.

Biographies, Regents of the University of California / Univ. of Calif. - Berkeley

Charles A. Peabody Jr., Royal

Charles A. Peabody Jr. (1849-1931) was a director of the Farmers Loan and Trust from at least 1900 to at least 1929. He was President of the Mutual Life Insurance Company from 1906 until retiring in 1927. After graduating from Columbia University and Columbia Law School, he joined his father's law firm, Peabody, Baker and Peabody. Partner Fisher Ames Baker was counsel to the First National Bank and the uncle of its President, George Fisher Baker. "It was said at the time Mr. Peabody left law for insurance, that the change was, at least in part, due to the influence of the elder Baker in the councils of the Mutual." Peabody was trustee of the estate of the first John Jacob Astor since 1893, and was associated with William Waldorf Astor and represented him in this country. At his death, he was on the boards of directors of City Bank Farmers Trust Company, Mutual Life Insurance Company, Oregon Short Line Railroad, Central of Georgia Railway, Illinois Central Railroad and Union Pacific Railroad, and was a trustee of the Church Pension Fund and member of the board of managers of Delaware & Hudson Company. (C.A. Peabody Dies; Insurance Figure. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1931.) His mother, Julia Livingston, was a daughter of James Duane Livingston, Royal descendant of John, King of England. (Americans of royal descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 287.) His stepmother, Mary E. Hamilton, was a granddaughter of Alexander Hamilton and a cousin of Mrs. William Astor. (Ex-Judge Peabody Married. New York Times, Feb. 4, 1881.) He was also a director of the Guaranty Trust Company from 1911-26, and his granddaughter, Anita Peabody Hadden, married Arthur W. Page Jr, whose brother Walter H. Page became chairman of the Morgan Guaranty Trust.

Americans of royal descent, p. 287 / Google Books

Archibald Douglas Russell, Royal

Archibald Douglas Russell was the son of Archibald Russell, who immigrated from Scotland in 1836. "Archibald Russell (born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1811, died in New York City, 1871) was graduated from Edinburgh University, studied law with Sir Fraser Tytler, and completed his education at Bonn, Germany. He was the son of James Russell, president of the Royal Society, Edinburgh, and cousin of the metaphysician, Sir William Hamilton. He was of the Kingseat and Slipperfield family of Russell (see Burke's Peerage), and cousin to Lord Sinclair and Sir Archibald Little. Through his mother he was descended from the Rutherfords of Edgerston, and his maternal great-grandmother was Eleanor Elliot, of the family of the Earl of Minto, who trace in unbroken succession from James II. of Scotland, and is connected with the Dukes of Buccleugh and the Earls of Angus. Coming to reside in New York in 1836, he married Helen Rutherford Watts, daughter of Dr. John and Anna Rutherford Watts, and granddaughter of Robert Watts and Lady Mary, daughter of Lord Stirling.... He thus became connected with families who had played an important part in the history of the city." He was a founder and trustee of the Five Points' House of Industry, and a founder and president of the Ulster County Savings Institution. (History of the City of New York: its Origin, Rise and Progress, Volume 3, 1896. By Martha Joanna Lamb and Mrs. Burton Harrison, p. 767; (Americans of royal descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 581.)

Americans of royal descent, p. 581 / Google Books
History of the City of New York, p. 767 / Google Books

Archibald Douglas Russell was born in New York City in 1853, and educated in private schools. He first joined Brown Brothers & Company, then formed the banking and real estate firm of Russell, Robinson & Roosevelt, with Elliott Roosevelt (brother of Theodore) and Douglas Robinson, their brother-in-law. (American Biography: A New Cyclopedia, Volume 7, 1920. By American Historical Company, p.469.)

American Biography: A New Cyclopedia, p. 469 / Google Books

He married Albertina Taylor Pyne, a daughter of Percy R. Pyne and granddaughter of Moses Taylor. His ushers were Percy R. Pyne Jr., S.V. Stratton, Clarence H. Wilds, Isaac Iselin, H. Conkling, G. Gordon King, and T.B. Gautier. (A Wedding at Riverdale. New York Times, Oct. 3, 1884.) Mrs. Russell gave $500,000 to build the sanctuary of the National Cathedral of the Episcopal Church, in Washington, D.C. Her husband was a trustee of Princeton University, the Fulton Trust Company, the Greenwich Savings Bank, and the Title Guarantee and Trust Co.; a director of the Farmers Loan and Trust, the Astor Trust, the Commercial Trust, and the Atlanta, Birmingham & Atlantic Railroad, and a member of the board of managers of the Delaware & Hudson Co. (Mrs. A.D. Russell's Gift. New York Times, May 9, 1914.) He was elected a life trustee of Princeton in 1904. (Prof. Young to Retire. New York Times, Dec. 9, 1904.) Their daughter, Ethelberta, married Francis Marion Eppley, Princeton 1906, who was an editor of Scientific American. (Miss Russell to Wed. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1909; Miss Russell a Bride. New York Times, May 9, 1909.) He died on Nov. 29, 1919. John D. Peabody, Lewis Spencer Morris, and the City Bank Farmers Trust Company of New York were executors of his estate. (A.D. Russell Left $8,513,707 Estate. New York Times, Dec. 27, 1933.)

His brother, William Hamilton Russell, married Florence Sands. He was a member of Renwick, Aspinwall & Russell, architects. (Weddings. New York Times, Nov. 29, 1893.) William Hamilton Russell [Jr.] left Harvard to join the army. He married Marie Gaillard Johnson, daughter of Bradish Johnson. (Miss Johnson Wed to Lieut. Russell. New York Times, Mar. 7, 1918.) Their daughter, Aimée Gaillard Russell, was with the Office of Strategic Services (O.S.S.) in Rome, Italy. She married Don Cino Tommaso Corsini of Florence. (Miss Aimee Russell Wed. New York Times, Nov. 28, 1945.)

His sister, Eleanor Elliot Russell, married Arthur J. Peabody. (Married. New York Times, May 12, 1871.) He was with Charles Scribner & Co. He and his brother, George H. Peabody, were nephews of philanthropist George Peabody. They came to New York from Zanesville, OH, where their father, Jeremiah Dodge Peabody, was a farmer. (Mr. Peabody's Pedigree. London Illustrated Times, Dec. 4, 1869; The News. Brooklyn Eagle, Feb. 11, 1870.) He was a founder of the Continental Trust Company. (A New Trust Company. Brooklyn Eagle, Apr. 20, 1890.)

The Farmers Loan and Trust Company, 1906-1907

Edwin S. Marston, President; Thomas J. Barnett, 2d Vice Pres.; Samuel Sloan, Jr., Secretary; Augustus V. Heely, William B. Cardozo, Cornelius R. Agnew, Asst. Secretaries. Directors: Samuel Sloan, William Waldorf Astor, D.O. Mills, Franklin D. Locke, James F. Horan, George F. Baker, A.G. Agnew, Charles A. Peabody, Hugh D. Auchincloss, James Stillman, Henry A.C. Taylor, D.H. King, Jr., E.R. Holden, William Rowland, Edward R. Bacon, Henry H. Rogers, Archibald D. Russell, Edwin S. Marston, Moses Taylor Pyne, Stephen S. Palmer, Cleveland H. Dodge, Frederick Geller, John L. Riker, Robert C. Boyd, Henry Hentz, H.V.R. Kennedy, P.A. Valentine. (Display Ad 19. New York Times, Dec. 29, 1906 p. 10; Display Ad 55. New York Times, Jan. 6, 1907.)

Henry King Smith, Yale 1898

"Associated with Farmers' Loan and Trust Company and its successor, City Bank Farmers Trust Company, New York City, 1898 until retirement in 1937 (vice president in charge of London branch 1906-37), director American Chamber of Commerce, London, on executive committee Yale Alumni Association of Great Britain 1917-1931.." He died in London in 1948. His father, William Allen Smith, was a corporation treasurer with Harvey Steel Company. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1947-1948, p. 48.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1947-1948 / Yale University Library (pdf, 254 pp)

The Farmers Loan and Trust Company, 1909

Directors: William W. Astor, Darius O. Mills, Franklin D. Locke, James F. Horan, George F. Baker, Andrew G. Agnew, Charles A. Peabody, Hugh D. Auchincloss, James Stillman, Henry A.C. Taylor, D.H. King Jr., E.R. Holden, William Rowland, Edward R. Bacon, Henry H. Rogers, Archibald D. Russell, Edwin S. Marston (President), Moses Taylor Pyne, Stephen S. Palmer, Cleveland H. Dodge, Frederick Geller, John L. Riker, Robert C. Boyd, Henry Hentz, H. VanRensselaer Kennedy, P.A. Valentine, Samuel Sloan. Secretary: Augustus V. Heely. (Trow's Directory, 1909.)

The Farmers Loan and Trust Company, 1913

Edwin S. Marston, President; Cornelius R. Agnew, William B. Cardozo, and J. Herbert Case, Vice Presidents; Augustus V. Heely, Secretary; Directors: William A. [sic] Astor, Franklin D. Locke, George F. Baker, Percy Chubb, Charles A. Peabody, Thomas Thacher, Hugh D. Auchincloss, James A. Stillman, Edgar Palmer, Henry A.C. Taylor, D.H. King Jr., Edward R. Bacon, Archibald D. Russell, Edwin S. Marston, Moses Taylor Pyne, Cleveland H. Dodge, Henry Hentz, Ogden Mills, John J. Riker, Samuel Sloan, J. William Clark, Percy A. Rockefeller, John W. Sterling, H.R. Taylor, Frank A. Vanderlip, and Augustus V. Heely. In 1913 a clerk, James E. Foye, was arrested for stealing stocks and bonds of the Union Pacific Railroad and the General Electric Company, and selling them in Philadelphia. (Seize Clerk for $500,000 Theft. New York Times, Nov. 26, 1913.)

The Farmers Loan and Trust and George F. Canfield were trustees of the trust estate of $1,831,000 left by Mrs. Margaret T. Schley, wife of Dr. James Montfort Schley. (Fight Schley Accounting. New York Times, Jun. 17, 1915.)

Percy A. Rockefeller, Skull & Bones 1900

Percy Avery Rockefeller (1878-1934) was the son of William Rockefeller, President of Standard Oil Company of New York. He was associated with father in business from 1900 to 1922. He was a brother of William G. Rockefeller, Yale 1892; and Walter Jennings (S&B 1880) and Oliver Gould Jennings (S&B 1887) were his cousins. (Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1934-1935, pp. 106-107.) Percy A. Rockefeller was an usher at the wedding of Dr. D. Hunter McAlpin, the son of tobacco man D.H. McAlpin, to his sister, Emma Rockefeller, in 1895. (Dr. D.H. M'Alpin's Bride. New York Times, Dec. 13, 1895.)

Yale Obituary Record 1934-1935 / Yale University Library (pdf, 260 pp)

His son, Avery Rockefeller, attended Yale in the class of 1926. He founded Schroder, Rockefeller & Co. with Helmut Schroder in the 1930s, and was its chairman of the board. He retired in 1967, when it merged into the J. Henry Schroder Corporation. He was a director of the Air Reduction Company, the J. Henry Schroder Bank & Trust Company and the J. Henry Schroder Banking Corporation. (Avery Rockefeller, Investment Banker and Conservationist. New York Times, May 23, 1986.) His daughter, Joan, married David H. McAlpin, a grandson of Dr. D. Hunter McAlpin. (Joan Rockefeller Wed in Greenwich. New York Times, Jun. 14, 1953.)

William Goodsell Rockefeller, Yale 1892, was treasurer of the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey until 1991; then secretary, treasurer and a director of the Amalgamated Copper Company, a director of the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, the Columbia Bank and Lincoln National Bank of New York, Union Pacific Railroad, Oregon Short Line Railroad, and other companies. He married a daughter of James Stillman and Elizabeth Rumrill, and they had five children: William Avery Rockefeller, Yale 1918; Godfrey Stillman Rockefeller, Scroll & Key 1921; James Stillman Rockefeller; John Sterling Rockefeller; and Almira Geraldine Rockefeller. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1922-1923 p. 173.) His brother Percy and friends Samuel F. Pryor and William E.S. Griswold [S&B 1899] were trustees and executors of his will. His estate was valued at about $10 million. (W.G. Rockefeller Left All to Family. New York Times, Jan. 31, 1923.) He was among directors of the Amalgamated Copper Company who failed to show up when directed to appear and show cause why they should not be jailed, fined or otherwise punished for contempt of court. (Financiers in Trouble. New York Times, Nov. 24, 1901; Sunpaenas Copper Directors. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1902.) Amalgamated was financed by an effectively interest-free $39 million loan from the National City Bank. The bank loaned the public money to buy Amalgamated stock, which they were forced to sell at a loss when the bottom dropped out of the copper market. Rockefeller and Henry H. Rogers made $36 million from this trickery. (Thomas Lawson's Tale of "Frenzied Finance." New York Times, Aug. 20, 1904.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1922-1923 / Yale University Library (pdf, 385 pp)

The Farmers Loan and Trust Company, 1915

Directors: William Waldorf Astor, Edward R. Bacon, Francis M. Bacon Jr., George F. Baker, Percy Chubb, J. William Clark, Cleveland H. Dodge, Henry Hentz, Franklin D. Locke, Edwin S. Marston (President), Ogden Mills, Edgar Palmer, Charles A. Peabody, Moses Taylor Pyne, Anton A. Raven, John J. Riker, Percy A. Rockefeller, Archibald D. Russell, Samuel Sloan, John W. Sterling, James A. Stillman, Henry A.C. Taylor, Henry B. Taylor, Thomas Thacher, Frank A. Vanderlip, Thomas F. Victor, Beekman Winthrop. Vice President and Secretary: Augustus V. Heely. Vice Presidents: Cornelius R. Agnew, Samuel Sloan, William B. Cardozo, J. Herbert Case. (Directory of Directors in the City of New York, 1915 Vol. 1939, p. 788.)

The Farmers Loan and Trust Company, 1916

Directors: Henry A.C. Taylor, Charles A. Peabody, William Waldorf Astor, Ogden Mills, Franklin D. Locke, George F. Baker, Francis M. Bacon Jr., Samuel Sloan (Vice President), John A. Riker, Percy A. Rockefeller, Thomas Thacher, Anton A. Raven, Beekman Winthrop, Henry R. Taylor, Thomas F. Vietor, John W. Sterling, Edwin S. Marston (President), Moses Taylor Pyne, J. William Clark, Cleveland H. Dodge, Henry Hentz, Frank A. Vanderlip, James A. Stillman, Edgar Palmer, Archibald D. Russell. Vice President and Secretary, Augustus V. Heely; Horace F. Howland, William A. Duncan, Robert E. Boyd, and Edwin Gibbs, Assistant Secretaries; Cornelius R. Agnew, William B. Cardozo, and J. Herbert Case, Vice Presidents. (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 18, 1916 p. 16.) Taylor, Baker, Rockefeller, Vietor, Sterling, Dodge, Vanderlip, Stillman, and Palmer left the board due to the Clayton Act. No replacements were named. (Law Hits Trust Co. Board. New York Times, Oct. 20, 1916.)

James H. Perkins

James H. Perkins was born in Milton, Mass., and graduated from Harvard in 1898. He became an executive of the Walter Baker & Co. chocolate company of Milton, Mass. In 1908 he joined the American Trust Company of Boston. He succeeded Charles H. Sabin as President of the National Commercial Bank of Albany, after Sabin left to join the Guaranty Trust. In 1914, Perkins became a Vice President of the National City Bank. "With America's entance into the World War Mr. Perkins went to France, assuming complete control of this country's European Red Cross organizations. In September, 1918, he became a colonel in the A.E.F. and was assigned to general headquarters at Chaumont as assistant chief of staff of the Second Army, later of the Third Army, or Army of Occupation at Coblenz." (Perkins New Head of National City. New York Times, Feb. 28, 1933.) According to the memoirs of Frank A. Vanderlip, the original idea for the American International Corporation grew out of discussions between Stone & Webster, who were "were convinced there was not much more railroad building to be done in the United States," and Perkins and Vanderlip. Sabin and Perkins' cousin's husband Robert F. Herrick were directors in 1917. (Chapter VIII, 120 Broadway, New York City. Wall Street and the Bolshevik Revolution, by Antony Sutton.) One of the organizers of Walter Baker & Co. was the stepfather of Junius A. Richards.

Ch. VIII, Wall Street and the Bolshevik Revolution / Reformed-Theology

In 1919, he resigned from the National City to become a full partner in Montgomery & Company as Lieut. Col. Theodore Roosevelt withdrew. (Financial Notes. New York Times, Sep. 3, 1919.) Montgomery & Co. financed the Union Oil Co. of Delaware, of which he became a director (To Buy Union Oil Stock. New York Times, Sep. 10, 1919), and the Loew movie interests in Famous Players-Lasky (Players-Lasky to Expand. New York Times, Oct. 16, 1919.) His fellow partners of Montgomery & Co. included J. Taylor Foster, S&B 1908, who later became a director of Benson & Hedges prior to its merger with Philip Morris (Display Ad 215. New York Times, Jan. 2, 1921; Display Ad 124. New York Times, Jun. 1, 1921.)

Perkins was elected President of the Farmers' Loan and Trust in 1921. (James H. Perkins Trust Co. Head. New York Times, Apr. 22, 1921.) In December of that year, he headed a committee of bondholders of the Havana Tobacco Company, which was announced to have defaulted on the interest on its 3% 20-year gold bonds, with the Guaranty Trust as depository. (Protective Committee Formed. New York Times, Dec. 2, 1921); Root, Clark, Buckner & Howland were Counsel. (Display Ad 31. New York Times, Nov. 19, 1923 p. 26.) It was reorganized as the Cuban Tobacco Company, Inc., with Frederick J. Fuller, A.L. Sylvester, and James H. Perkins as Voting Trustees (Display Ad 29. New York Times, Jun. 11, 1927 p. 31.) In 1925, Farmers' Loan and Trust and the Central Union Trust jointly formed the Central Farmers' Trust Company in Palm Beach, Florida, with Perkins as a director and Franklin L. Babcock as President. (To Open Bank In Florida. New York Times, Sep. 4, 1925). In 1920, the Farmers' Loan & Trust was trustee for major stockholders of the American Tobacco Company, Annie A. Arents and G. Arents. During the 1920s, Farmers became a major stockholder in the American Tobacco Company, and James H. Perkins was on American's board of directors between 1926 and 1929. In 1929, Perkins was a member of the advisory committee of Yale's Institute of Human Relations, along with Henry W. Taft (S&B 1880), whose father, Alphonso, was a founder of Skull & Bones and a Cincinnati crony of Perkins' grandfather, James H. Perkins. In 1929, Farmers merged with the National City Bank, of which fellow IHR advisory board member George E. Roberts was a Vice President.

The Perkins Family

In 1917, Perkins was Assistant Commissioner of the American Red Cross for France and Belgium. (The American Relief Clearing House, by Percy Mitchell. Herbert Clark, Paris, 1922.) "During the World War, Mr. Perkins served in France and was given complete charge of this country's European Red Cross organizations. In September of that year he was made a colonel in the A.E.F. and was assigned to general headquarters at Chaumont as assistant chief of staff of the Second Army, later of the Third Army, or the Army of Occupation, at Coblenz." (James H. Perkins, Banker, Is Dead. New York Times, Jul. 13, 1940.)

The American Relief Clearing House / Richard Hacken, Brigham Young University

Perkins was on the board of directors of Lillian Wald's Henry Street Settlement. Fellow IHR advisory committee member William Darrach was also a director, and Charles Evans Hughes and Edwin R.A. Seligman were longtime correspondents of Wald.

Lillian Wald Papers, 1895-1936 / Microformguides.com (pdf, 73pp)

James H. Perkins died of a heart attack after a dinner with Arthur M. Anderson, a partner of J.P. Morgan & Co. At his death, Perkins was chairman of the board of the National City Bank and president of Farmers Loan and Trust. He was also Chairman of the International Banking Corporation, a director of the American and Foreign Insurance Company, Consolidated Gas Company, New York Edison Company, Oregon Short Line Railroad Company, Globe Indemnity Company, Federal Union Insurance Company, Newark Fire Insurance Company, Royal Insurance Company Ltd., Sperry Realty Company, and Star Insurance Company, a member of the executive committee of the Union Pacific Railroad, and a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York, and of Smith College and Sarah Lawrence College. At one time, he was an overseer of Harvard College. (James H. Perkins, Banker, Is Dead. New York Times, Jul. 13, 1940.) James Handasyd Perkins was the son of Edward Cranch Perkins and Jane Sedgwick Watson. His first wife was Alice Mandell Stone. (James Handasyd Perkins - Alice Mandell Stone. Sedgwick.org.) His brother, Thomas Nelson Perkins, was a Fellow of the Harvard Corporation from 1905 to 1924, except for a break to serve on the Reparations Committee in Europe; and a member of the Harvard Corporation again in 1936. His brother, John Forbes Perkins, married Mary Coolidge, daughter of John Templeton Coolidge Jr., while he later married her sister, Katrine Parkman Coolidge. (Society at Home and Abroad. New York Times, Oct. 28, 1906.)

James Handasyd PERKINS / Katharine Parkman COOLIDGE / Sedgwick.org

His son, Richard S. Perkins, and son-in-law, Albert L. Nickerson [Jr.], were also on the board of directors of the Farmers Loan and Trust, and his daughter, Mrs. Franklin E. Parker Jr., was on the advisory committee of the Women's Banking and Trust department.

The Farmers Loan and Trust Company, 1922

Directors in 1922: James H. Perkins, Edwin S. Marston, Charles A. Peabody, Franklin D. Locke, Lewis Iselin, John G. Agar, Percy R. Pyne, Samuel Sloan, John J. Riker, Henry R. Taylor, Francis M. Bacon Jr., Robert L. Gerry, Parker D. Handy, Augustus V. Heely, Ogden Mills, Beekman Winthrop, Eustis Paine, Frederick Osborn. (A Century of Banking in New York, 1822-1922. By Henry Wysham Lanier. The Gilliss Press, 1922.) Joseph P. Cotton and Lewis L. Delafield were elected members of the board; S. Sloan Colt was elected a vice president. (Union National Dividend. New York Times, Dec. 22, 1922.) The Farmers' Loan and Trust Company was trustee for the William Waldorf Astor Estate, and sold the W.W. Astor property on the southwest corner of Eighth Avenue and Forty Fifth Street. "An interesting feature of the sale of this property was contained in the Title Company report showing that the last transfer was on Oct. 31, 1828, when John Jacob Astor secured the property from his father, who had held it for many years before." ($1,000,000 Building for Lexington Avenue. New York Times, Mar. 16, 1922.)

Lewis L. Delafield, Royal

Lewis Livingston Delafield (1863-1944) was the son of Lewis Livingston Delafield and Emily Prime Delafield. He was senior partner in the law firm Hawkins, Delafield & Longfellow. "He was an expert in setting up charitable trust funds." His wife was the former Charlotte Hoffman Wyeth. (Lewis Delafield, Lawyer 60 Years. New York Times, Sep. 28, 1944.) He was an executor of the will of Morgan partner George W. Perkins. (G.W. Perkins Will Leaves to Family $10,000,000 Estate. New York Times, Jun. 23, 1920.) His cousin Julia Delafield, daughter of Maturin L. Delafield, married Frederick W. Longfellow. (A Day's Weddings. New York Times, May 1, 1901.) His brother, Edward C. Delafield, became a director of the Farmers after he died.

His father, Lewis Livingston Delafield (1834-1883) was the attorney in America for the Direct United States Cable Company and the French Cable Company. He was also executor for a large number of estates, and counsel for the Roosevelt Hospital and a number of other charities. He graduated from Columbia College in 1855, studied law in the office of Alexander Hamilton Jr., and opened an office with three friends, John Ewing, William Burns, and Robert Cutting. His father was Major Joseph Delafield. He married Emily Prime, daughter of Frederick Prime, and they had three sons and one daughter who survived him. (Obituary. New York Times, Mar. 29, 1883.)

The Prime family married into the Jay family, who are Royal descendants of Philip III, King of France. Frederick Prime's sister Laura married Dr. John Clarkson Jay, and he married Dr. Jay's sister, Mary Rutherford Jay. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 379.) Their brother, Rufus Prime, married Agatha Temple, descendant of Leofric, "King" of Leicester, and Lady Godiva. (ibid., p. 210.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 379 / Google Books

Frederick Prime (1807-1887) was the youngest son of Nathaniel Prime, founder of the firm of Prime, Ward & King of New York. He attended Yale College [but has no obituary], and studied law with his future father-in-law, Peter A. Jay. After his first wife died, he married a daughter of Robert Hare of Philadelphia. They had three daughters, one of whom lived in New Haven, and a son, who lived in Philadelphia. (Obituary. New York Tribune, Jul. 14, 1887.) His son was Professor Frederick Prime of Girard College. He graduated from Columbia in 1865 after serving a year in the Civil War. "He was also President of several iron and electrical companies in Alabama and Pennsylvania, and from 1891 until 1893 was President of the Edison Electric Light Company of Philadelphia." (Professor Frederick Prime. New York Times, Jul. 16, 1915.) Two sons were Alfred Coxe Prime, Yale 1904, of Philadelphia, and Dr. Frederick Prime of New York City. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926, p. 258.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926 / Yale University Library (pdf, 350 pp)

Dr. Frederick Prime was born in Baltimore. He received his B.S. in 1902 and M.D. in 1905 at the University of Pennsylvania. He was a consulting radiologist at St. Luke's Hospital since 1921, and assistant professor of cancer research at Columbia University from 1920 to 1939. (Dr. Frederick Prime. New York Times, Oct. 14, 1952.) He married Mary Gardiner Allen, daughter of the late Judge Benjamin Robbins Curtis, in Paris, France. (Married. New York Times, Feb. 22, 1911.) His work with radium at the Crocker Laboratory at Columbia indicated that low doses stimulated growth of tumor cells. Dr. Francis Carter Wood was the director of the Crocker Institute. (Cancer Grows By the Use of Radium. New York Times, Dec. 18, 1916; Sees Little Gain in Fight on Cancer. New York Times, Jan. 12, 1930.) His son, Syvester Gardiner Prime, married Jacqueline Elma Cartier, daughter of Jacques Cartier the English jeweler, and granddaughter of John Harjes, the banker. George Arents 3d was one of the ushers. (Miss J.E. Cartier Becomes a Bride. New York Times, Jul. 30, 1939.) One of his wife's sisters was Mrs. William Gilman Low, while another married his cousin, Seth Low 2d.

Cornelia Prime, a cousin of Dr. Frederick Prime, left a trust fund of $100,000 for the Huntington Hospital. (Miss Prime's Estate Aids Many Charities. New York Times, Mar. 7, 1923.)

The Farmers Loan and Trust Company, 1925

The Farmers Loan and Trust Company established a Women's Banking and Trust department, with Anne H. Houghton as manager. "For many years Miss Houghton was associated with W.B.H. Dowse of Boston, President of Reed & Barton, silversmiths, and a widely known lawyer in New England. She also held a responsible position with the United States Fastener Company of Boston, besides opening, organizing and developing the compound interest department of the National American Bank at 8 West Fortieth Street. Her training likewise included a course in banking at Columbia University." Members of her advisory committee were Mrs. Samuel Sloan, Chairman; Mrs. Cornelius Agnew, Mrs. Franklin E. Parker Jr., Mrs. Robert W. Carle, Mrs. Otto H. Kahn, Mrs. Frederick P. Delafield, Mrs. E.C. Wagner, Mrs. Roland Redmond, Mrs. Cornelius Tiers and Mrs. C.M. Woolley. (Woman Executive Named By A Bank. New York Times, Sep. 16, 1925.)

Frederick Prime Delafield, Royal

Frederick Prime Delafield was a son of Lewis L. Delafield. His mother was the daughter of Gen. Henry Van Rensselaer and Elizabeth Ray King, and a Royal descendant of Louis VI, King of France. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 587.) He was a partner of the law firm of Hawkins, Delafield & Longfellow, and an expert in state and municipal securities law. He was one of the organizers and a director of the Studebaker Corporation. (Frederick P. Delafield. New York Times, Dec. 15, 1924.) Frederick Prime Delafield married Elsie Barber, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Barber. (Married. New York Times, Nov. 12, 1898.) Frederick Prime Delafield was an usher at the wedding of William B. Dinsmore Jr. to Marion De Peyster Carey, whose stepfather was Richard Delafield. (Many Bright Weddings. New York World, Jun. 5, 1905.) Frederick P. Delafield participated in a benefit for the American Society for the Control of Cancer in 1927. (Ball to Help Medical Work. New York Times, Feb. 27, 1927.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 587 / Google Books

Frederick Prime Delafield Jr. graduated from Harvard in 1924. He married Katherine Sedgwick Colby, daughter of Bainbridge Colby, who was President Wilson's Secretary of State. (Frederick P. Delafield. New York Times, Jul. 15, 1951.)

His brother-in-law, Donn Barber, Berzelius 1893, was an architect who designed the Department of Justice building in Washington, D.C., the Travelers' Insurance and Aetna Life buildings, the City Bank & Trust Company building, and Berzelius Hall in New Haven. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1924-1925, p. 221.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1924-1925 / Yale University Library (pdf, 317 pp)

The Farmers Loan and Trust Company, 1929

Board of Directors: John G. Agar, Francis M. Bacon, Gilbert G. Browne, Joseph P. Cotton, Edward P. Currier, Lewis L. Delafield, Charles D. Dickey, Donald Durant, Robert L. Gerry, Parker D. Handy, E. Roland N. Harriman [S&B 1917], Augustus V. Heely, David F. Houston, Irving H. Meehan, Ogden Mills, Frederick Osborn, Charles A. Peabody, James H. Perkins, Percy R. Pyne 2d, Samuel Sloan, and Paul M. Warburg. (Display Ad 172. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1929 p. 48.)

City Bank Farmers Trust Company, 1930

City Bank Farmers Trust Company formed the City Farmers Fund, "C," Inc. "Under the present plan estates have to be administered as separate entities after death, the trust reverting to the estate. Under the extended plan it is said that the mingling of funds for investment will [be] permissible after death while thereby continuing the same type of supervision that is possible under the uniform trust." Officers were James H. Perkins, president, Lindsay Bradford, vice president; and George S. Moore, secretary and treasurer. Directors were James H. Perkins, Samuel Sloan, William B. Cardozo, Lindsay Bradford, Donald Durant, Gilbert Brown, Donald Byrnes, and Walter Reid Wolf. (City Bank Trust Widens Its Service. New York Times, Mar. 13, 1930.) Nicholas Frederic Brady (1878-1930), son the financier of the American Tobacco Company, was a director of the City Bank Farmers Trust at his death in May 1930.

In 1931, Reginald B. Taylor and Charles D. Lanier were elected to the board. (Many Banks Change Directing Boards. New York Times, Jan. 14, 1931.)

Lindsay Bradford, Elihu 1914

Lindsay Bradford was an investment banker with Hambleton & Co. after graduating from Yale. In 1917, he joined the Navy and served as a lieutenant junior grade through World War I. He was with the New York Trust Company from 1919 to 1927, when he joined the Farmers Loan and Trust Company as a vice president. "Mr. Bradford, who has a broad experience in handling trusts and investments, was elected a director of the trust company in 1934 and president on March 10, 1936. On Dec. 4, 1951, he was elected vice chairman of the board. He retired on Dec. 31, 1956." He was also a director of the Merchants Fire Insurance Company, the Phoenix Indemnity Company, the Delaware and Hudson Company, the Royal Exchange Assurance Company, El Paso Natural Gas Company and the Ritz Carlton Hotel Company. He was a former trustee or director of the New York Foundation, the Carnegie Institution of Washington, the Institute of International Education, Phillips Academy, Barnard College, Bennington College, and the Russell Sage Foundation. (L. Bradford, 67, Retired Banker. New York Times, Oct. 7, 1959.) He was elected to the Elihu Club at Yale. (Post-Tap Day Honors. New York Times, May 20, 1913.) He was an organizer of the Security Management Company of Maryland, whose directors included Irving Fisher (S&B 1888), William S. Gray Jr., and Artemus L. Gates (S&B 1918). (Trust Company Organized. New York Times, Oct. 19, 1928.) He was a group chairman of the fundraising campaign of the New York City Cancer Committee. (Will Help Cancer Drive. New York Times, Mar. 24, 1949.)

He was a relative of Edward Anthony Bradford, Scroll & Key 1873. He was chairman of the first board of editors of Yale Record, and a reporter and eventually editor of the New York Times. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1927-1928, p. 52; Edward Bradford, Editor, Dead at 76. New York Times, May 5, 1928.) He left most of his estate to Yale University, and his stock in the New York Times to The New York Times Company. He was distantly related to Alanson B. Houghton, and left his stock in "Owen Houghton Incorporated" to the Houghtons of Corning, N.Y. His widow and the Farmers' Loan & Trust Company were executors of the will and trustees of the trust funds. (Yale Benefited By E.A. Bradford Will. New York Times, May 24, 1928.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1927-1928 / Yale University Library (pdf, 366 pp)

Lindsay Bradford Jr. was an usher at the wedding of James Norman Mellor to Mary-Audrey Weicker [sister of Lowell P. Weicker Jr., Yale 1953]. (Mary-Audrey Weicker Bride on L.I. New York Times, Nov. 1, 1959.)

Walter Reid Wolf, Yale 1919

Wolf joined the Farmers Loan and Trust as a clerk after graduating from Yale. He became a vice president in 1930 and senior vice president in 1941. He had been a director of the U.S. advisory board of the Zurich Insurance Company in Switzerland, a director of the Aglic Management and Investment Corporation and the American Guarantee and Liability Insurance Company; a trustee of the Empire City Savings Bank and a special partner of the brokerage firm, Joseph Walker & Sons. During World War II, he was deputy manager of the War Finance Committee in New York. From 1951 to 1953, he was deputy director of the Central Intelligence Agency. He continued in banking and insurance after retiring as a director in 1954. (Walter Reid Wolf Is Dead at 68; Served First National City Bank. New York Times, May 19, 1963.) In 1928, he was personal assistant to the President of the Farmers Loan and Trust, and a director and one of three members of the investment committee of Sterling Securities, an investment trust. Charles P. Taft 2d, Yale 1918, was a fellow director. (Display Ad. Syracuse Herald, May 23, 1928.)

City Bank Farmers Trust Company was trustee of the $40 million trust fund set up for American policyholders of Lloyd's, with the approval of the British Board of Trade, the British Treasury Department and the Bank of England. (British Law Bars Risk Payments On Nazi Ships Covered by Lloyd's. By J.G. Forrest. New York Times, Apr. 21, 1940.)

City Bank Farmers Trust Company, 1945

Directors: Gordon S. Rentschler, Chairman of the Board; Lindsay Bradford, President. Directors: Gilbert G. Browne, 22 William Street; W. Randolph Burgess, Vice-Chairman, National City Bank of New York; J. Herbert Case, 22 William Street; Edward C. Delafield, Delafield & Delafield; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice-President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; Robert W. Dowling, President, City Investment Company; Samuel Sloan Duryee [Skull & Bones 1917], Spence, Hotchkiss, Parker & Duryee; A.P. Giannini, Chairman of the Board, Bank of America National Trust and Savings Association; Douglas Gibbons, Douglas Gibbons & Co., Inc.; Robert L. Hoguet, Chairman of the Board, Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank; Charles D. Lanier, 22 William Street; George W. Perkins, Vice President, Merck & Co., Inc.; Henry C. Taylor, Taylor, Clapp & Beall; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; Earle S. Thompson, President, American Water Works and Electric Company, Inc.; Walter Reid Wolf, Senior Vice President; Boykin C. Wright, Wright, Gordon, Zachry, Parlin & Cahill. (Display Ad 104. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1945 p. 23.)

Edward Coleman Delafield, Princeton 1899, Royal

Edward C. Delafield went into banking and was vice president and president of the Franklin Trust Company in 1914. In 1920, the bank merged with the Bank of America, and in 1931 with the City Bank Farmers Trust Company. In 1937, he became a senior partner in the investment counseling and stock exchange firm of Delafield & Delafield, and retired in 1970. His grandfather was Maj. Joseph Delafield. (Edward C. Delafield, 98, Dead; Donated Estate to Columbia U. By Werner Bamberger. New York Times, Apr. 23, 1976.) Edward C. Delafield was the son of Maturin L. Delafield. His first wife was Margaretta Stockton Beasley, whose uncle was Moses Taylor Pyne. His brother, Joseph L. Delafield, was best man., and ushers were his brother, J. Ross Delafield, Percy Pyne, Alexander M. Hadden, Mercer Beasley and Robert Southard. (Other Incidents in Society. New York Tribune, May 1, 1900.) His second wife was Clelia C. Benjamin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Romeyn Benjamin. (E.C. Delafield Weds After Reno Divorce. New York Times, Feb. 5, 1928.) He was the Treasurer and/or a trustee of Memorial Hospital for the Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases or the Sloan-Kettering Institute from at least 1946 to 1968. (Letter from C.P. Rhoads, M.D., to Mr. A. Grant Clark, Director, Medical Relations Division, Camel Cigarettes, May 15, 1946.) Edward C. Delafield was an incorporator and director of the Delafield family association, of which Richard Delafield was president. (Famous Delafield Family Is Now Incorporated. New York Times, May 12, 1912.)

Rhoads to Clarke, May 15, 1946 / tobacco document
Famous Delafield Family Is Now Incorporated, 1912 / New York Times

Mrs. Edward C. Delafield was chairman of the women's division of the Memorial Cancer Center Fund. (First Poster Out for Cancer Drive. New York Times, Dec. 2, 1945; $4,000,000 Cancer Center Drive Opens Here at Dinner for 1,000. New York Times, Dec. 5, 1945.) She was the founding president of the Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. She became a member of the center's board in 1946 and remained a member of the Board of Overseers Emeriti at her death. (Clelia B. Delafield, Philanthropist, 92. New York Times, Oct. 19, 1995.) Their daughter, Margaretta Stockton Delafield, married William Bergh Kip. (Miss Delafield Wed to W.B. Kip. New York Times, Jun. 20, 1926.) Kip was with the O.S.S.

Clelia B. Delafield, Oct. 19, 1995 / New York Times

Edward C. Delafield's son, Walter Benjamin Delafield, was in the Navy. He married Jean Lincoln Tanburn. (W.B. Delafield Weds Jean Lincoln Tanburn. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1959.) Mrs. Walter B. Delafield was a longtime activist at Memorial Loan Kettering Cancer Center. Their daughter, Kristin Delafield, married James Gordon Auchincloss, a son of Bayard Cutting Auchincloss of Santa Barbara, Cal., and a grandson of Reginald L. Auchincloss. (James G. Auchincloss, a Law Student, and Kristin Morris Delafield are Wed. New York Times, Jul. 19, 1987.) Rev. John Twiname performed the ceremony at her sister Leslie's marriage to Michael Tinati. (Leslie L. Delafield Is Bride. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1987.)

Edward C. Delafield was an usher for his brother, John Ross Delafield, who married Violetta S. White, daughter of John Jay White. One of her cousins was Amy Gordon Olyphant. (Weddings of a Day. New York Times, Jun. 15, 1904.) John Ross Delafield, Princeton 1896, was a lawyer and a brigadier general in the Ordnance Department of the Army. (Brig. Gen. John Delafield Dies; Army Reservist and Lawyer, 89. New York Times, Apr. 9, 1964.) The wife of his brother-in-law, Mrs. John Jay White, was an activist of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. (Mrs. John Jay White, a Peace Advocate. New York Times, Jul. 19, 1937.) John White Delafield was a major in the O.S.S. (Mrs. Anita Reilly Wed. New York Times, Feb. 15, 1951; Records of the Office of Strategic Services, 1919 - 2002, National Archives.)

Edward C. Delafield's sister, Julia Livingston Delafield, married Edward Ridley Finch. (Miss Delafield A Bride. New York Times, Jan. 19, 1913.) Her husband graduated from Yale in 1895 and Columbia Law School in 1898. He was a Supreme Court Justice and Presiding Justice of the Appellate bench until 1943, when he founded the law firm of Finch & Schaefler. (Edward Ridley Finch, 91, Dies; State Appeals Judge Until 1943. New York Times, Sep. 16, 1965.) Their daughter, Anne Crane Delafield Finch, married Major Howard Ellis Cox. (Anne Finch Bride in Floral Setting. New York Times, May 9, 1943.) Mary Ann Livingston Delafield Cox married Brinkley Stimson Thorne [Skull & Bones 1968, first cousin of David Hoadley Thorne S&B 1966], and grandson of Landon K. Thorne. Her younger brother, Edward Finch Cox, married Tricia Nixon, daughter of President Richard M. Nixon. (Mazie Cox Will Be Wed Sunday to Brink Thorne. New York Times, Sep. 5, 1973.) John Colby, son of C.I.A. Director William E. Colby and its longtime master of dirty tricks, was Edward F. Cox's groomsman at their 1971 wedding. (Colby of C.I.A. - C.I.A. of Colby. New York Times, Jul. 1, 1973.) Cox and all but one of the eight groomsmen were graduates of Princeton in 1968. The only exception was Robert Horsburgh, a Peace Corps volunteer in Iran. (More on the Wedding. New York Times, May 11, 1971.)

Samuel Sloan Duryee, Skull & Bones 1917

Samuel Sloan Duryee was counsel to the law firm of Parker, Duryee, Zunino, Malone & Carter since founding its predecessor in 1926. He was a trustee of the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled, and a governor of the New York Hospital. He served in the 302nd Artillery during World War I, and in World War II was special assistant to Under Secretary of War Robert P. Patterson. (Samuel S. Duryee, 86, a Lawyer; Active in New York Philanthropy. New York Times, Apr. 28, 1979.) He was an usher at the wedding of Morris Hadley, S&B 1916, who was a major in his artillery unit. Other ushers were Seth Low and Alan Campbell (S&B 1919) of New York, William Gammell Jr., T. Jefferson Coolidge, Harcourt Amory Jr., Ralph Bradley, Lincoln Baylies, Philip H. English, John W. Blodgett Jr., Kinley J. Tener (S&B 1916), Farwell Knapp (S&B 1916), Louis C. Zahner, and Bennett Sanderson. Mrs. Samuel Sloan Colt was matron of honor. (Miss Blodgett Wed to Morris Hadley. New York Times, Jul. 13, 1919.) His daughter, Nina Duryee, was with the Navy Intelligence Service during World War II. She married Dr. Harrison Frederick Wood, an assistant physician at the Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, formerly with the U.S. Public Health Service. (Nina Duryee Married to Dr. Harrison Wood. New York Times, Aug. 3, 1952.)

George W. Perkins (Jr.)

George W. Perkins was the son of J.P. Morgan partner George W. Perkins. He graduated from Princeton in 1917. His first wife, Katharine, was the daughter of Princeton professor August Trowbridge. Her bridal attendants included President Cleveland's daughter, Marion, and Dorothy Dulles. He was a member of the International Committee of the Y.M.C.A. (Geo. W. Perkins, Jr., Takes Jersey Bride. New York Times, Jun. 20, 1917.) She died in 1918, and he married Linn Merck, the daughter of George Merck. (George W. Perkins Jr. Weds Miss Merck. New York Times, Dec. 18, 1921.)

His brother-in-law, George Wilhelm Merck, was the chairman of Merck Sharp & Dohme, Inc. He was a member of the executive committee of the American Cancer Society and a director of the Colgate-Palmolive Company. The Merck chemical dynasty was founded in Darmstadt, Germany in 1668 by Friedrich Jacob Merck. (George W. Mercke Dies At Age of 63. New York Times, Nov. 10, 1957.)

His daughter, Anne Perkins, married Francis Higginson Cabot Jr. of Virginia, Harvard '49, a grandson of Francis H. Cabot of New York. (Anne Perkins Wed to F.H. Cabot Jr. New York Times, Jun. 26, 1949.) "Francis Higginson Cabot, Jr. (13 February 1895, Staten Island - 4 February 1956) was the son of Francis Higginson Cabot of Massachusetts's famous Cabot family. He was educated at Gorton School and graduated from Harvard in 1917 with an AB. When he left Harvard, he entered the Officers' Material School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was promoted Chief Quartermaster in July 1917; commissioned ensign in September, and sent to the U.S.S. Connecticut. He became a temporary lieutenant in the United States Navy, and resigned on 13 December 1918. On his return to America, Cabot became a clerk and assistant secretary with the American International Corporation. In 1923, he became one of the Vice Presidents at Stone & Webster, Inc. He continued with Stone & Webster until 1935. The previous year he became President of the General Public Service Corporation. He was the corporation's Chairman of the Board, from 1935 to 1942; and Director General, in 1943. Cabot began supporting the war industries in January 1941, when he joined the Office of Production Management and the Office of War Production. He continued in this capacity, until September 1943. Earlier that year, he became director of the Commodities Bureau. He briefly served as assistant deputy director general for the Industry Division." (Wikipedia, accessed 06-10-07.)

His grandson, Francis Colin Cabot, married Marie House Kohler, a niece of former Wisconsin Governer Walter Jodok Kohler, Jr., who escorted her down the aisle. (Marie House Kohler Is Bride in Wisconsin. New York Times, Jun. 30, 1974.) Kohler was the Chairman of the American Cancer Society in the 1950s.

City Bank Farmers Trust Company, 1947-50

Directors: Gordon S. Rentschler, Chairman of the Board; Lindsay Bradford, President. Directors: Gilbert G. Browne, 22 William Street; W. Randolph Burgess, Vice-Chairman, National City Bank of New York; J. Herbert Case, 22 William Street; Edward C. Delafield, Delafield & Delafield; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice-President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; Robert W. Dowling, President, City Investment Company; Samuel Sloan Duryee [Skull & Bones 1917], Spence, Hotchkiss, Parker & Duryee; A.P. Giannini, Founder-Chairman, Bank of America National Trust and Savings Association; Douglas Gibbons, Douglas Gibbons & Co., Inc.; Robert L. Hoguet, Amend & Amend; Charles C. Parlin, Shearman, Sterling & Wright; George W. Perkins, Vice President, Merck & Co., Inc.; Henry C. Taylor, Taylor, Pinkham & Co., Inc.; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; Earle S. Thompson, President, American Water Works and Electric Company, Inc.; Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co.; Walter Reid Wolf, Senior Vice President; Boykin C. Wright, Shearman, Sterling & Wright. (Display Ad 39. New York Times, Apr. 3, 1947 p. 39.) In 1948, Rentschler left and Burgess became Chairman, and William Gage Brady Jr., Chairman of the Board of the National City Bank, and Richard S. Perkins of Harris, Upham & Co. became directors. (Display Ad 29. New York Times, Apr. 5, 1948 p. 31.) In 1949, Gibbons and G.W. Perkins left. Display Ad 49. New York Times, Oct. 5, 1949 p. 47.) In 1950, L.M. Giannini, President Bank of America National Trust and Savings Association replaced A.P. Giannini. (Display Ad 280. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1950 p. 84.)

Richard S. Perkins

Richard Sturgis Perkins was the son of James Handasyd Perkins. He was born in Milton, Mass. in 1910. (Perkins, Richard S. New York Times, Apr. 13, 2003.) He was a trustee of the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1959 to 2000. (The President's Report 2004-2005. Carnegie Institution of Washington, p. 4.) He was with Thompson Fenn & Co., Hartford, 1929-32; with Wood, Struthers & Co., N.Y.C., 1932-34; with Smith, Barney, Harris, Upham & Co., 1934-36; and a partner, Smith, Barney, Harris, Upham & Co., 1936-51. (Richard Sturgis Perkins. Marquis Who's Who, 2006.) His first wife was Adaline Havemeyer, the daughter of Horace Havemeyer. (Miss Adaline Havemeyer Becomes Bride of R.S. Perkins in Heavenly Rest Church. New York Times, May 8, 1935.) In 1950, he was elected to the board of trustees of Roosevelt Hospital. He was also a director of the Columbia Insurance Company of New York, Imperial Assurance Company of New York, Phoenix Indemnity Company, and the Ritz-Carlton Hotel. (Joins Board of Trustees of the Roosevelt Hospital. New York Times, May 3, 1950.) In 1951, he was elected a trustee of the New York Life Insurance Company. (Trust Company Executive Named to N.Y. Life Board. New York Times, Oct. 18, 1951.) In 1952, he was elected to the boards of the Royal Insurance Company Ltd., the British and Foreign Marine Insurance Company, Ltd., the Thames and Mersey Marine Insurance Company, Ltd., the Royal Indemnity Company, Globe Indemnity Company, Queen Insurance Company of America, Newark Insurance Company, Star Insurance Company of America, American and Foreign Insurance Company and Virginia Fire and Marine Insurance Company, all members of the Royal-Liverpool Insurance Group. His father had been a director of them from 1922 to 1940. (Joins Insurance Boards of Royal-Liverpool Group. New York Times, Oct. 21, 1952.) He replaced W. Randolph Burgess as a director of International Telephone and Telegraph, who resigned to become a special deputy of the Secretary of the Treasury. Perkins was also a director of the Hotel Astor, Inc., the Carlton House, Prudential Insurance Company of Great Britain, and Hudson Insurance Company. (City Bank Farmers Head Added to I.T. & T. Board. New York Times, Jan. 21, 1953.) In 1956, he was elected a director of the Phelps-Dodge Corporation. (Banker Made Director of Phelps-Dodge Corp. New York Times, Sep. 6, 1956.) In 1958, he was elected a director of Allied Chemical Corporation. (Allied Chemical Elects Banker as a Director. New York Times, Jul. 30, 1958.) After the City Bank Farmers Trust was absorbed, he became vice chairman of the National City Bank, as well as president, chairman, and chief executive officer of the First National City Trust Co., and was an honorary director of Hospital Corporation of America (HCA). (Richard Sturgis Perkins. Marquis Who's Who, 2006.)

Perkins, Richard S. / New York Times
The President's Report 2004-2005 / Carnegie Institution of Washington (pdf, 14 pp)

Richard S. Perkins Jr. graduated from Yale in 1958. (Mildred Baxter, R.S. Perkins Will Be Married. New York Times, Jun. 26, 1961.) He founded and operated two publishing companies from 1972 to 1984; then, he was a Vice President of Drexel, Burnham and Lambert and L.F. Rothschild until 1988. He founded SalTec International and has been a director of it since 1996. (About Us. SalTec International.)

About Us / SalTec International

City Bank Farmers Trust Company, 1951-52

Directors: W. Randolph Burgess, Chairman of the Board; Lindsay Bradford, President. William Gage Brady Jr., Chairman of the Board of the National City Bank; Gilbert G. Browne, 22 William Street; J. Herbert Case, 22 William Street; William Rogers Coe, Vice-President and Treasurer, The Virginia Railway Company; Edward C. Delafield, Delafield & Delafield; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice-President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; Robert W. Dowling, President, City Investment Company; Samuel Sloan Duryee, Spence, Hotchkiss, Parker & Duryee; L.M. Giannini, President Bank of America National Trust and Savings Association; Robert L. Hoguet, Amend & Amend; Charles C. Parlin, Shearman, Sterling & Wright; Richard S. Perkins, Harris, Upham & Co.; Henry C. Taylor, Taylor, Pinkham & Co., Inc.; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; Earle S. Thompson, President, The West Penn Electric Company; Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co.; Walter Reid Wolf, Senior Vice President. (Display Ad 330. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1951 p. 89.) In 1952, Perkins became President of the Board of Directors. (Display Ad 39. New York Times, Jul. 3, 1952 p. 33.)

City Bank Farmers Trust Company, 1953

Directors: Howard C. Sheperd, Chairman of the Board; Lindsay Bradford, Vice Chairman; Richard S. Perkins, President. Gilbert G. Browne, 22 William Street; William Rogers Coe, Vice-President and Treasurer, The Virginia Railway Company; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice-President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; Robert W. Dowling, President, City Investment Company; Samuel Sloan Duryee, Spence, Hotchkiss, Parker & Duryee; Albert L. Nickerson, Vice-President, Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, Inc.; Charles C. Parlin, Shearman, Sterling & Wright; James S. Rockefeller, President, The National City Bank of New York; Henry C. Taylor, Taylor, Pinkham & Co., Inc.; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; Earle S. Thompson, President, The West Penn Electric Company; Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co.; Walter Reid Wolf, Senior Vice President. (Display Ad 36. New York Times, Jan. 6, 1953 p. 35.)

Albert L. Nickerson [Jr.]

Albert L. Nickerson Jr. was the son-in-law of James H. Perkins; he married Perkins' daughter Elizabeth. He was with the Standard Oil Company of New York. (Elizabeth Perkins, Sarah Lawrence Senior, Betrothed to Albert Lindsay Nickerson. New York Times, Nov. 1, 1935; Elizabeth Perkins Married At Home. New York Times, Jun. 14, 1936.) Nickerson was elected to the board of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company in 1965. Departing directors included Jeremiah Milbank of Milbank & Co., a director since 1927, Harry C. Hagerty, and Robert W. Woodruff, chairman of Coca-Cola. (Five Directors Are Named to the Board of Metropolitan Life Insurance. New York Times, Apr. 16, 1965.)

City Bank Farmers Trust Company, 1954

Directors: Howard C. Sheperd, Chairman of the Board; Lindsay Bradford, Vice Chairman; Richard S. Perkins, President. Gilbert G. Browne, 22 William Street; William Rogers Coe, Vice-President and Treasurer, The Virginia Railway Company; Freeman J. Daniels, Perkins, Daniels & Perkins; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice-President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; Robert W. Dowling, President, City Investment Company; Samuel Sloan Duryee, Parker, Duryee, Benjamin, Zunino & Malone; Albert L. Nickerson, Vice-President, Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, Inc.; Charles C. Parlin, Shearman, Sterling & Wright; James S. Rockefeller, President, The National City Bank of New York; Henry C. Taylor, Taylor, Pinkham & Co., Inc.; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; Earle S. Thompson, President, The West Penn Electric Company; Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co.; Walter Reid Wolf, Senior Vice President. (Display Ad 38. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1954 p. 35.

City Bank Farmers Trust Company, 1955-58

Directors: Howard C. Sheperd, Chairman of the Board; Lindsay Bradford, Vice Chairman; Richard S. Perkins, President. Gilbert G. Browne, 22 William Street; William Rogers Coe, Vice-President and Treasurer, The Virginia Railway Company; Freeman J. Daniels, Perkins, Daniels & Perkins; Hunt T. Dickinson, 405 Lexington Avenue; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice-President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; Robert W. Dowling, President, City Investment Company; Samuel Sloan Duryee, Parker, Duryee, Benjamin, Zunino & Malone; Frederick M. Eaton, Shearman & Sterling & Wright; Albert L. Nickerson, Vice-President, Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, Inc.; James S. Rockefeller, President, The National City Bank of New York; Henry C. Taylor, Taylor, Pinkham & Co., Inc.; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; Earle S. Thompson, President, The West Penn Electric Company; Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co. (Display Ad 33. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1955 p. 31.) In 1956, George F. Baker Jr., Trustee George F. Baker Trust, joined the board. (Display Ad 136. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1956 p. 33.) In 1957, Eben W. Pyne, Executive Vice President, joined the board. Joseph E. Morris and Alexander W. McGhee were also executive vice presidents, and Bascom N. Torrance was Vice President and Chairman, Trust Investment Committee. (Display Ad 212. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1957 p. 82.) In 1958, William F. Oliver, President, The American Sugar Refining Company, joined the board. (Display Ad 36. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1958 p. 33.) In 1959, J. Ed. Warren, Chairman of the Executive Committee, Cities Service Company, joined the board. (Display Ad 48. New York Times, Jan. 6, 1959 p. 45.)

First National City Trust Company, 1960

Directors: George F. Baker Jr., Trustee George F. Baker Trust; Gilbert G. Browne, 22 William Street; William Rogers Coe, Trustee, The Coe Foundation; Freeman J. Daniels, Perkins, Daniels, McCormack & Collins; Hunt T. Dickinson, 405 Lexington Avenue; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice-President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; Robert W. Dowling, President, City Investment Company; Samuel Sloan Duryee, Parker, Duryee, Benjamin, Zunino & Malone; Frederick M. Eaton, Shearman & Sterling & Wright; George S. Moore, President The First National City Bank of New York; Albert L. Nickerson, President, Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, Inc.; William F. Oliver, President, The American Sugar Refining Company; Richard S. Perkins, Chairman of the Board; Eben W. Pyne, President; James S. Rockefeller, Chairman of the Board, The National City Bank of New York; Henry C. Taylor, Taylor, Pinkham & Co., Inc.; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; Earle S. Thompson, Chairman of the Board, The West Penn Electric Company; J. Ed. Warren, President, Cities Service Company; Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co. (Display Ad 41. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1960 p. 41.) In 1961, they became the Trust Advisory Board of The First National City Bank.

Trust Advisory Board of the First National City Bank, 1961

George F. Baker Jr., Trustee George F. Baker Trust; William Rogers Coe, Trustee, The Coe Foundation; Freeman J. Daniels, Perkins, Daniels, McCormack & Collins; Hunt T. Dickinson, 405 Lexington Avenue; Robert W. Dowling, President, City Investment Company; Samuel Sloan Duryee, Parker, Duryee, Benjamin, Zunino & Malone; Frederick M. Eaton, Shearman & Sterling & Wright; George S. Moore, President; Albert L. Nickerson, President, Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc.; William F. Oliver, President, The American Sugar Refining Company; Richard S. Perkins, Chairman of the Executive Committee; Eben W. Pyne, Senior Vice President; James S. Rockefeller, Chairman. (Display Ad 40. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1961 p. 41.)

The National City Bank

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