Memorial Hospital & Sloan-Kettering Institute

"Although NCI [the National Cancer Institute] is larger than either Memorial Sloan-Kettering or the American Cancer Society, it is not as powerful as either. In fact, historically, the smaller private organizations have interlocked with the federal giant and guide its thinking on many matters." (Ralph Moss, "The Cancer Industry.")

The cancer hospital was founded with John E. Parsons as president and Joseph W. Drexel as treasurer. "Among the prominent ladies interested in its management are Mrs. Paul Dahlgren, Mrs. Henry Day, Mrs. Cullum, Mrs. Matthew Clarkson and Mrs. Howard Townsend. The sum of $250,000 has been promised, on condition that an additional $100,000 can be procured." (Starting a Crusade Against Cancer. N.Y. Corr. Philadelphia Ledger. In: San Francisco Evening Bulletin, Mar. 25, 1884.) The cornerstone was laid later that year. Parsons declared that "The building about to be erected is the absolute gift of Mr. John J. Astor," with Mrs. Astor as prime mover. Dr. William H. Draper followed him as speaker. The larger contributions to the building fund were: John J. Astor, $200,000; Mrs. Cullum, $50,000; Mrs. Robert L. Stuart, $25,000; Mrs. John J. Astor, $20,000; John E. Parsons, Joseph W. Drexel, Morris K. Jesup, William Astor, Mrs. B.D. Worsham, and Isidor Cohnfield, $5,000 each; D. Willis James, S. Inslee, Henry G. Marquand, Julien T. Davies, Mr. and Mrs. Abram S. Hewitt, and Mrs. Gibbs, $1,000 each. (The New-York Cancer Hospital. New York Times, May 18, 1884.)

Members of the board of managers in 1889 were John E. Parsons, President and Acting Treasurer; A. Brayton Ball, M.D., Secretary; Robert Lenox Belknap, George P. Andrews, Mrs. Paul Dahlgren, Mrs. L.C. Jones, Mrs. George C. Clarke, Mrs. Joseph H. Choate, Miss Laura Post, Mrs. Theodore Cuyler, James B. Hunter M.D., W.T. Bull M.D., Clement Cleveland M.D., F.P. Kinnicutt M.D., and George M. Tuttle M.D. (New York Cancer Hospital. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, Apr. 13, 1889.) In 1888, John J. Astor donated $145,000 for a pavillion in honor of his wife, Mrs. Charlotte Augusta Astor; H.O. Havemeyer gave $5,000 in honor of Mary Havemeyer Elder; and Dr. Clement Cleveland gave $2,000. Smaller donations amounted to $2,841. (At the Cancer Hospital. New York Times, Apr. 23, 1889.)

The Women's Hospital didn't want to treat cancer cases, so in 1888 John Jacob Astor offered $200,000 to erect a separate pavillion. "The widow of General Cullum, then vice president of the hospital, ardently advocated the acceptance of Mr. Astor's offer, but in vain. When the matter was decided adversely, she set in motion a plan for an independent cancer hospital and secured the co-operation of influential men and women who agreed with her that if women suffering from cancer were not admitted to the Women's Hospital, they ought to have a refuge of their own... The $200,000 was for the building, and provision had to be made for a site. Mrs. Cullom headed the list with a personal subscription of $50,000. Mrs. John Jacob Astor, Mrs. R.L. Stuart and Mrs. Mary Rogers contributed $25,000 each; Mrs. Astor subscribed $20,000, and Mrs. William Astor, Mrs. B.D. Worsham, John E. Parsons, Isidor Cohnfeld, H.O. Armour, Morris K. Jesup and Joseph W. Drexel gave $5000 apiece." Charles C. Haight was the architect. "The officers were: John E. Parsons, president; Henry E. Pellew, vice president; Joseph W. Drexel, treasurer; and Dr. George L. Peabody, secretary; and these formed the board of managers with Mrs. Matthew Clarkson, Mrs. Henry Day, Mrs. Paul Dahlgren, Mrs. Howard Townsend, George P. Andrews, Dr. William T. Bull, Dr. Clement Cleveland, Dr. James B. Hunter, and Dr. Francis P. Kinnicutt. There was also an associate board, composed of Mrs. Isaac Bell, Mrs. B.K. Stevens, Mrs. F.C. Barlow, Mrs. Joseph H. Choate, Mrs. A.T. Pratt, Mrs. Frederick Bronson, Mrs. G.M. Miller, Mrs. C.A. Peabody, Miss Helen Beach, Mrs. Julien T. Davies, Mrs. William Astor, Mrs. Eugene Schieffelin, Mrs. Frederick R. Jones, Miss Laura Post and Mrs. Lloyd Aspinwall. The consulting physicians were Dr. Fordyce Barker, Dr. T. Gaillard Thomas, Dr. Thomas Addis Emmet, Dr. John T. Metcalfe, Dr. Thomas M. Markoe and Dr. George F. Shrady." Mrs. Elizabeth Hamilton Cullum died four months after the cornerstone was laid, but left the hospital some property in New York City and a large estate in San Francisco. Mrs. John Jacob Astor died the week it opened. The men's pavilion was nearly completed. (Gotham Gossip. New Orleans Daily Picayune, Sep. 8, 1890.)

John Jacob Astor III, grandson of the founder of the Astor fortune, supposedly had little interest in philanthropy, but was persuaded to give the money by his wife, the former Charlotte Gibbs of South Carolina, who died of uterine cancer. She was a trustee of the Women's Hospital, which did not admit cancer patients.

Its officers in 1896 were John E. Parsons, President; Dr. William T. Bull, Vice President; Dr. Henry C. Coe, Secretary; and George C. Clark, Treasurer. Its managers included Miss Laura Post, Mrs. Arthur M. Dodge, Mrs. Mary R. Callender, Mrs. Howard Townsend, Mrs. Charles H. Russell, George G. Haven, Benjamin Perkins, Dr. Charles S. Bull, James William Beekman, William G. Hamilton, Dr. Francis P. Kinnicut, Dr. Clement Cleveland, and H. Walter Webb. (Report of the Cancer Hospital. New York Times, Apr. 25, 1896.)

Dr. William T. Bull, Harvard 1869

Dr. William Tillinghast Bull was one of the most surgeons in America, for performing the first successful operations for appendicitis. He was born in Newport, and his ancestors were among the settlers of Providence Plantation who purchased Rhode Island. He graduated from Harvard in 1869, and the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1872. He announced that he had found a cure for cancer by operation, followed by an injection with a serum made from erysipelas, but "[t]he subsequent results did not bear out what had been expected of the new treatment." In 1893, he married Mrs. James G. Blaine Jr., daughter of Richard Nevins, owner and editor of the Ohio Statesman. He died from a cancer that was on his neck. (Dr. W.T. Bull Dies After Brave Fight. New York Times, Feb. 23, 1909.) His nephew and namesake, Dr. William Tillinghast Bull, Book & Snake 1888, cared for him during his illness. He was a member of the Yale football staff. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates, 1924-1925, p. 216.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates, 1924-1925 / Yale University Library (pdf, 317 pp)

George C. Clark

George Crawford Clark was born in St. Louis, Mo., in 1845 and graduated from the City College of New York in 1863. He was a member of Clark, Dodge & Co. at 51 Wall St. He was also the first president of the American Society for the Control of Cancer. (George C. Clark Dead. New York Times, Feb. 26, 1919.) He was a director of the Northern Securities Company; the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad; the City Investing Company; the Norfolk & Southern Railroad; the Atlantic Mutual Insurance Co., and the Seaman's Bank for Savings. His father was Luther Clapp Clark, a banker in St. Louis. (New England Families, Genealogical and Memorial. By William Richard Cutter, Vol. 1, Lewis Historical Publishing Co., 1914, p. 101.) Donald Geddes, a partner of Clark, Dodge & Co., was a director of the American Tobacco Company.

New England Families, p. 101 / Google Books

George C. Clark's father-in-law was James G. Averell. (Died. New York Times, Feb. 4, 1910.) James George Averell's brother, William John Averell, was the father-in-law of Edward H. Harriman. (The Averell-Averill-Avery family. By Clara Arlette Avery, 1906, p. 577.) "Clark and Harriman met frequently between 1870 and 1875, often at Clark's house. The influence of the Clark family led Harriman to take an interest in social betterment work on the East Side." (E.H. Harriman, Master Railroader. By Lloyd J. Mercer. Beard Books, 2003, pp. 10 and 3.)

The Averell-Averill-Avery family, p. 577 / Google Books
E.H. Harriman, by Lloyd J. Mercer, p. 3 / Google Books

George C. Clark's sister, Julia Goodman Clark, married Samuel Phillips Blagden. The ceremony was performed by his father, Rev. George W. Blagden. (Married. New York Times, Nov. 12, 1879; Death List of A Day. New York Times, May 2, 1906.) Rev. George Washington Blagden, Yale 1823, was an Overseer of Harvard from 1854 to 1859; his wife, Miriam Phillips, was a daughter of John Phillips, Harvard 1788. Wendell Phillips, the abolitionist, was his brother-in-law. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1880-1890, p. 226; The history of the Treman, Tremaine, Truman family in America. p. 1683.) George W. Blagden was the son of George Blagden, a native of Yorkshire, England, who was one of the first settlers in Washington, "having been here from the laying of its foundation-stone. At the time of his death, and for many years previous, he was superintendent of the masons employed on the Capitol, an Alderman of the City, and a Director of the Bank of Washington." (Deaths. Vermont Chronicle, from the National Intelligencer, Jun. 16, 1826.) George W. Blagden had two sisters and a brother, Thomas. (A discourse commemorative of the Rev. George Washington Blagden, D.D. By Charles Agustus Stoddard, p.14.) Emily Blagden married George W. Phillips. She died at age 31. (Died. Boston Daily Atlas, May 2, 1842.) Thomas Blagden married two sisters of Benjamin D. Silliman.

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1880-1890, p. 226 / Google Books
The history of the Treman, Tremaine, Truman family in America, p. 1684 / Google Books
A discourse commemorative of the Rev. George Washington Blagden, D.D. / Google Books

Samuel P. Blagden's brother, George Blagden [Harvard 1856], married Frances Meredith Dexter, a daughter of George Minot Dexter. He began in business in 1865 as a cotton buyer with George Dexter & Co., which was changed to George Blagden & Co. In 1881 he became a stockbroker with Chace & Higginson, and finally a member of Clark, Dodge & Co. (The Lindesei and Limesi Families of Great Britain. By John William Linzee, 1917, p. 780; Harvard Class of 1856, 1899, p. 11.) His daughter-in-law, Mrs. Linzee Blagden, was a founder of the predecessor of the American Heart Association.

The Lindesei and Limesi Families of Great Britain, p. 780 / Google Books
Harvard Class of 1856 / Internet Archive

John Phillips Jr.'s mother, Margaret Wendell, was a royal descendant of King Edward of England. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 170.) John Phillips Sr. (1701-1763) was a member of the Phillips family which founded the Phillips Academies at Andover, Mass. and Exeter N.H., the main feeder schools for Yale and Harvard.

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 170 / Google Books

George C. Clark's niece, Zelina Thérèse Clark, the daughter of his brother, David Crawford Clark of Clark, Dodge & Co., married Donald Peabody Blagden, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Blagden of Upper Saranac, N.Y., formerly of Washington, D.C. His best man was Augustus Silliman Blagden. "Mr. Blagden has three other brothers - Thomas Blagden Jr., Henry Harrison Blagden and Benjamin Douglas Silliman Blagden. His nephew, Augustus S. Blagden Jr., married the former Miss Elise Grace, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Russell Grace, on April 18." (Miss Zelina Clark Married in Church. New York Times, Jun. 9, 1938.) There was also another brother, Augustus S. Blagden. Thomas Blagden operated a camp at Saranac Lake, and owned considerable property in Washington, D.C. (Thomas Blagden. New York Times, Oct. 5, 1938.) Elise Grace Blagden, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Augustus S. Blagden, married Dan W. Lufkin, Skull & Bones 1953. Elsie Grace Blagden Is Married Here. New York Times, Jan. 15, 1961.)

The private banking firm of Clark, Dodge & Co. was a major financier of railroads. Enoch W. Clark and his brother, Joseph W. Clark of Boston, founded E.W. Clark & Brother in New York City in 1834 (Copartnership Notice. Boston Daily Advertiser, Oct. 16, 1834), and E.W. Clark, Dodge & Co. in 1845. (Copartnership Notice. New York Herald, Aug. 11, 1845.) Partners of Clark Brothers & Co. in St. Louis were Joseph W. Clark, Luther C. Clark, Edward Dodge, and Edward Chase. (Banking Houses. Morning Republican, Aug. 29, 1858.) Enoch White Clark founded E.W. Clark & Co. in Philadelphia in 1837. It was active in financing the Mexican War. His grandson, Clarence Mitchell Clark, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1878 and joined the firm in 1900. (Clarence Clark, Financier, Was 77. New York Times, Jun. 30, 1937.) Enoch White Clark's grandaughter, Mary Todhunter Clark, married Nelson A. Rockefeller. Her maternal grandfather was was George B. Roberts, president of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Mrs. John French (Eleanor Clark) and Sen. Joseph S. Clark of Pennsylvania were also Enoch W. Clark's grandchildren. (A 4th Home to Manage. New York Times, Nov. 7, 1958.) Luther C. Clark's son, Louis Crawford Clark, Harvard 1874, also a partner of Clark, Dodge & Co., was the father of Grenville Clark. (Louis C. Clark, Banker, Dies At 71. New York Times, Aug. 18, 1924.) He held $108,000 in stock of the United Fruit Company. (L.C. Clark Left $4,324,222. New York Times, Feb. 1, 1927.) Grenville Clark, Harvard 1903, founded the law firm of Root, Clark & Bird with his law school friends Elihu Root Jr. and Francis W. Bird. (Grenville Clark, Lawyer, 84, Dies. New York Times, Jan. 13, 1967.) He was a member of the Harvard Corporation between 1931 and at least 1936. (Quit Harvard Corporation. New York Times, May 22, 1931; On Harvard Corporation. New York Times, Feb. 25, 1936.)

Joseph W. Clark's son, Randolph Marshall Clark, graduated from Harvard in 1855, and was made a partner in J.W. Clark & Co. in 1856. (Commencement at Cambridge. Boston Daily Advertiser, Jul. 19, 1855; Copartnerships. Boston Daily Atlas, Sep. 26, 1856.) In 1864, he was married to Mary Vinton, by her father, Rev. Alexander H. Vinton, D.D. (Married. Boston Daily Advertiser, May 23, 1864.) Randolph M. Clark died in 1873. "The church was well filled with relatives of the deceased, many of them being Boston business men who went to Dedham to attend the funeral." (Obituary. Boston Daily Advertiser. Sep. 15, 1873.) Joseph W. Clark made a donation of $10,000 to the Episcopal Association for the Relief of Aged and Infirm Clergymen for a memorial to Randolph M. Clark, who was its treasurer for many years. (About Town. Boston Daily Advertiser, May 25, 1881.) His daughter, Eleanor Vinton Clark, married T. Morris Murray. The Murrays are Royal descendants of William the Conqueror. (The Descendants of William the Conqueror. By Alan Freer A.C.I.B.) Their daughter, Anna Morris Murray, was the grandmother of Theo Spencer of the Trust for America's Health (who is also a grandson of John D. Rockefeller 3d). Their daughter, Ethel Randolph Clark, married Ezra Ripley Thayer. Rev. Alexander H. Vinton [Jr.] performed the ceremony. (Married. Boston Daily Advertiser, Jun. 27, 1898.) He was the brother of William S. Thayer, M.D.

The Descendants of William the Conqueror / William I co.uk

Randolph M. Clark's father-in-law, Rev. Alexander Hamilton Vinton, was born in Providence, R.I. in 1807. He graduated from Brown University and then went through the medical course at Yale. After three years, he entered the General Theological Seminary and was ordained in 1835. He was rector of Grace Church in Providence for six years, then of St. Paul's Church in Boston for sixteen years. From 1858 to 1861, he was at the Church of the Holy Trinity in Philadelphia, then St. Mark's Church in New York City until 1869. From 1870 until retiring in 1877 he was rector of Emanuel Church in Boston, and a professor in the Protestant Episcopal Divinity School at Cambridge, Mass. (Other Deaths. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1881; Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1880-1890, p. 47.) Rev. Vinton's sister, Harriette Arnold Vinton, married Dr. John Clarkson Jay in 1872. (Mrs. Jay Dies Suddenly. New York Times, May 14, 1914.) Dr. John Clarkson Jay was a Royal descendant of Philip III, King of France, and Edward I, King of England. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 379.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1880-1890, p. 47 / Google Books
Americans of Royal Descent, p. 379 / Google Books

Dr. Clement Cleveland, Harvard 1867

Dr. Clement Cleveland was attending surgeon and surgical director of City Hospital between 1882 and 1915, and consulting surgeon of Women's Hospital and Memorial Hospital. He was a former president of the American Gynecological Society and the New York Obstitrical Society, and a vice president of the American Society for the Control of Cancer. He retired in 1919. He was born in Baltimore. (Clement Cleveland, Noted Surgeon, Dies. New York Times, Apr. 17, 1934.) He graduated from Harvard in 1867. (Commencement Day at Cambridge. Boston Daily Advertiser, Jul. 18, 1867.) He was a vice president of the Exeter Academy Alumni association (Exeter Men at New York. Boston Daily Advertiser, Mar. 22, 1890.) He was one of the organizers of the American Society for the Control of Cancer. (Rich Women Begin A War on Cancer. New York Times, Apr. 23, 1913.) His father, Anthony Benezet Cleveland, was a half-brother of Mrs. David Low Dodge and of William Cleveland, the grandfather of President Grover Cleveland. (The Genealogy of the Cleveland and Cleaveland Families. By Edmund Janes Cleveland, 1899.)

Anthony Benezet Cleveland / Ancestry.com
Genealogy of the Cleveland and Cleaveland Families / Internet Archive

He married Annie W. Davenport in Boston. (Married. New York Times, Jun. 20, 1874.) His father-in-law was Henry Davenport, a Boston merchant and mill owner connected with the Pacific Mills. His eldest son [Dr. Francis Henry Davenport] was Professor of Gynecology at Harvard Medical School. (Death List of a Day. New York Times, Jan. 25, 1898.) [Clarence Cook Little's grandather was one of the incorporators of Pacific Mills.] The younger son was George Howe Davenport, who was in the lumber business with George H. Peters. His daughter, Dorothea, married William T. Aldrich, Boston architect. (George Howe Davenport. New York Times, Nov. 11, 1932.) William Truman Aldrich was a son of Sen. Nelson W. Aldrich of Rhode Island. His sister, Elsie Aldrich, was maid of honor, and his brother, Richard S. Aldrich, was best man. (Aldrich-Davenport Wedding Monday. New York Times, Mar. 27, 1910.)

The Clevelands' only daughter, Elizaneth 'Elsie' Manning Cleveland, married Robert Gillespie Mead Jr. "The number of bridesmaids was unusually large," and they were Mabel Drake, Elsie Homans, Mabel Lewis, Susie Valentine. Elizabeth Stillman, Frances La Farge, Sarah Thompson, Rosalie Starr, Dora Havemayer, and Ethel Davies. Mead's best man was Lewis Starr, and the ushers were her brother, Harry Cleveland, and her cousin, Charles Cleveland; Frank Mills, William Maclay, Calvert Brewer, Irwin Garfield, E.H. Childs, Acosta Nichols, Charles Pinkerton, and Henry Sanford. (The Weddings of a Day. New York Times, Nov. 10, 1898.) He was an usher at Everett Colby's marriage to Edith Hyde. (Weddings of a Day. New York Times, Jul. 1, 1903.) He graduated from Williams College in 1893, and New York Law School in 1901. He was a director of the South Puerto Rico Sugar Company, and retired as a partner of Rounds, Dillingham, Mead & Nagle. (Robert G. Mead, 75, Lawyer for 40 Years. New York Times, Feb. 27, 1947.) Elsie was one of the founders of the American Society for the Control of Cancer in 1913, and was a member of its board of directors and executive committee in the 1920s. From 1928 through 1939, she was a patroness of the New York City Cancer Committee of the ASCC. (To Raise Funds for Cancer Society. New York Times, Dec. 3, 1928; Looks to Research for Cure of Camcer. New York Times, Oct. 31, 1930; Cancer Relief Group Lauded By Mme. Curie. New York Times, Oct. 28, 1931; Cancer Fund Drive for $30,000 Opens. New York Times, Oct. 25, 1933; Song Recital April 4 to Provide Funds for Quarterly Review on Cancer. New York Times, Mar. 22, 1936; March of Time Honored for War on Disease. New York Times, Oct. 28, 1937; Cancer Work Rewarded. New York Times, Oct. 22, 1938; Booths to Be Set Up During Cancer Week. New York Times, Oct. 24, 1939.)

Their daughter, Theodora Mead, married Theodore Abel of Poznan, Poland. "She first met Mr. Abel in Poland two years ago when she and her mother were traveling there, and again in Warsaw last year, where Miss Mead was doing volunteer work for the Y.M.C.A. Last Winter they again met, this time in Paris, where Miss Mead was studying at the Sorbonne." He had fought in the Polish Army against the Bolsheviki, and was studying sociology at Columbia. Valentine Everit Macy Jr. was an usher. (Theodora Mead to Wed T. Abel. New York Times, Aug. 10, 1923; Weds on Parents' Silver Wedding Night. New York Times, Nov. 10, 1923.) Theodore Abel solicited autobiographies from early Nazis and compiled them into a book, Why Hitler Came Into Power, first published in 1938, later published as The Nazi Movement. He dedicated it to his in-laws.

The Nazi Movement / Google Books

Dr. Clement Cleveland's cousin, Treadwell Cleveland, a lawyer, was a member of Evarts, Choate & Beaman for twenty years. Later, he represented British interests in the admiralty courts. He was born in Philadelphia in 1843, and his father was Charles Dexter Cleveland. He graduated from Rutgers in 1862, and the University of Pennsylvania Law School. (Treadwell Cleveland Dies. New York Times, Jan. 13, 1918.) Treadwell Cleveland's grandfather, Rev. Charles Cleveland (1772-1872) of Boston was anti-tobacco. He said, "Tobacco I abhor in all its forms as I would poison, persuaded that its use has been as a harbinger to 'strong drink,' which has slain thousands and tens of thousands." (How a Centenarian Lives. San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, Jun. 10, 1871.) His son, Charles Dexter Cleveland, married Frances Elsie Homans, a niece of Sheppard Homans. Marshall McLean was best man, and Sheppard Homans Jr., Robert G. Mead, and Acosta Nichols were among the ushers. (A Day's Weddings. New York Times, Nov. 30, 1899.)

Joseph W. Drexel

Joseph W. Drexel was the son of Francis Martin Drexel, who emigrated from Austria to escape being drafted into Napoleon Bonaparte's army. His father founded Drexel & Co. in Philadelphia. He was the younger brother of Anthony J. Drexel, who was associated with him in Drexel, Morgan & Co., and Francis Drexel, whose estate was worth $20 million. He was a partner of Drexel & Co., J.S. Morgan & Co. of London, Drexel, Harjes & Co. of Paris, and Drexel, Morgan & Co. of New York, and a director of the Knickerbocker Trust Co. and 11 different banks. He was a third owner of the Philadelphia Ledger, along with his brother Anthony and George W. Childs, and a personal friend of President Grant, who died at his cottage. (Joseph W. Drexel Dead. New York Times, Mar. 26, 1888.) Mrs. Joseph W. Drexel was Lucy Wharton, a Royal descendant of Henry I. King of France. Their daughters, Lucy and Elizabeth, married Eric B. Dahlgren and John V. Dahlgren. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 364.) Lankenau Hospital in Philadelphia was named for his brother-in-law, John D. Lankenau.

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 364 / Google Books

Mrs. Paul Dahlgren was Annie Rutherford Morgan, daughter of Rev. Dr. William F. Morgan of Newport. She was the widow of the Consul General to Italy, who died in Rome in 1877. Her father-in-law was Admiral Dahlgren of the Civil War. (Mrs Paul Dahlgren. New York Times, Dec. 28, 1911.) Eric B. Dahlgren and John Vinton Dahlgren were sons of Admiral John Adolf Dahlgren. (John Vinton Dahlgren Dead. New York Times, Aug. 12, 1899.)

Dr. Thomas Addis Emmet

Dr. Thomas Addis Emmet was born in Charlottesville, Va. in 1828. His father was Professor John Patten Emmet of the University of Virginia. He received his M.D. at Jefferson Medical College in 1850 and came to New York City. In 1855, he became a surgeon at the Woman's Hospital, and was surgeon-in-chief until 1872. He was a great-nephew of Irish nationalist Robert Emmet, and was a political activist for Irish home rule. He lived on the top floor of his office building at 95 Madison Avenue. (Dr. T.A. Emmet Dead at 90 Years. New York Times, Mar. 2, 1919.) His sister married John N.A. Griswold, Chairman of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. (John N.A. Griswold Dead. New York Times, Sep. 14, 1909.)

Dr. John Patten Emmet was Professor of Chemistry and Materia Medica at the University of Virginia for 17 years. He died in New York City. (Died. Boston Courier, Aug. 18, 1842.) His nephew, C. Temple Emmet of New York City, went to the University of Virginia, "chiefly to study medicine under his uncle." However, he didn't like medicine and studied law with his father, Robert Emmet. C. Temple Emmet, his cousin John Thomas Emmet, and Herman Le Roy, set out for California, but were shipwrecked and detained at Rio de Janeiro for six months. The other two returned to New York, but C. Temple Emmet commenced his law practice in San Francisco in 1849. (The Late C. Temple Emmet. San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, Feb. 28, 1884.) Christopher Temple Emmet, a brother of Robert Emmet the Irish nationalist, married Anne Weston Temple, a Royal descendant of Leofric, "King" of Leicester. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 212.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 212 / Google Books

Dr. Francis P. Kinnicutt, Harvard 1868

Francis Parker Kinnicutt was born in Worcester, Mass. in 1846. He graduated from Harvard in 1868, and in 1871 from the College of Physicians and Surgeons. He was Professor of Clinical Medicine at Columbia University, an attending physician at Presbyterian Hospital, and a consulting physician at several other hospitals. He was a member of the board of directors of the Cancer Hospital, and a former president of the Association of American Physicians. His wife was the former Eleanora Kissel, who died in 1910. (Dr. Kinnicutt Dies At Doctors' Meeting. New York Times, May 3, 1913.) His son, Francis H. Kinnicutt, Harvard 1897 and Harvard Law School, was a partner of Hunt, Hill & Belts between 1910 and 1916, in independent practice until 1932, then an associate of Iselin, Riggs & Ferris. (Francis Kinnicutt, Attorney 38 Years. New York Times, Jul. 4, 1939.) He married Margaret Chanler Emmet, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. Temple Emmet. She was a great-great granddaughter of John Jacob Astor. (Miss Emmet Wed to F.H. Kinnicutt. New York Times, Aug. 23, 1931.)

His son, G. Hermann Kinnicutt, Harvard 1898, was a partner of Kidder, Peabody & Co. He began his business career with J.P. Morgan & Co., and formed Kissel, Kinnicutt & Co. in 1910, which merged with Kidder, Peabody & Co. in 1932. He was a trustee of Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and president of the school of nursing. His wife was May A. Tuckerman. (G.H. Kinnicutt, 66, Investment Banker. New York Times, Dec. 7, 1943.) His daughter, Dorothy May Kinnicutt, married Henry Parish 2d. Her bridesmaids were Rachel L. Lambert, Eleanor P. Schley, Anne B. Dick, Elizabeth S. Polk, Evelyn Oldfield Talbot, Eloise R. Weld, Laura Hazard Holmes and Elizabeth W. Elkins. (Dorothy Kinnicutt Weds H. Parish 2d. New York Times, Feb. 15, 1931.) She was Jackie Kennedy's favorite interior decorator and redid rooms in the White House. (Sister Parish, Grande Dame of American Interior Decorating, Is Dead at 84. By Eric Pace. New York Times, Sep. 10, 1994.)

His grandson, Francis P. Kinnicutt, married Sybil Kane Jay, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Delancey Kane Jay, and granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Jay. (Wedding in Chapel for Sybil Kane Jay. New York Times, Feb. 14, 1937.) She was a Royal descendant of Henry I, King of France, and five other kings of France and England. (The Royal Descents of Mr. Augustus Jay and His Wife, of New York City. In: Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 393.) His great-granddaughter, May Tuckerman Kinnecutt, married James R. Houghton, son of Amory Houghton, former Ambassador to France. Her sisters, Mrs. Ian Baldwin Jr. and Elizabeth Kinnicutt, were matron and maid of honor, and Lura Liggett and Elizabeth Bradford were bridesmaids. (May Tuckerman Kinnicutt Is Bride. New York Times, Jul. 1, 1962.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 393 / Google Books

John E. Parsons

John E. Parsons was a founding member of the executive committee of the American Society for the Control of Cancer in 1913, when it was temporarily called The National Anticancer Association. John E. Parsons had custody of the will of William Earl Dodge Sr., the head of Phelps Dodge & Co., when he died in 1883. Parsons was a director and counsel to the American Sugar Refining Company (aka the Sugar Trust) (No More Secrecy in Sugar Trust. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1908), and his law firm of Parson, Closson & McIlvane represented Horace Havemeyer and other members of the family concerning the estate of Henry O. Havemeyer. (Close Havemeyer Estate. New York Times, Mar. 26, 1910.)

Parsons was also the first president of the Cancer Hospital; a member of the board of the Women's Hospital; a trustee of the Cooper Union; a member of the Council of New York University since 1867; a trustee of the Presbyterian Board of Home Missions; a manager of the American Bible Society; and a member of the Executive Committee of the New York City Mission and Tract Society. His second wife, Mrs. Florence V.C. Bishop, whom he married in 1901, was the widow of Central Trust trustee David Wolfe Bishop, an heir of the Lorillard tobacco fortune. (John E. Parsons, Noted Lawyer, Dead. New York Times, Jan. 17, 1915.) Parsons was a partner of the law firm of Albon P. Man from 1857 to 1884. Man was the attorney for Peter Lorillard and legal advisor to almost all of the Lorillard family (For Sixty Years A Lawyer. New York Times, Apr. 1, 1891.) Charles H. Allen, president of the American Sugar Refining Company, became a director of the Guaranty Trust after its merger with the Morton Trust in 1911 until 1931. Parsons was a partner of Parsons, Shepard and Ogden with Edward M. Shepard and David B. Ogden. Ogden was the father of Mrs. Johnston de Forest, whose husband was a trustee of the Central Union Trust. (Mr. Shepard's Law Firm to Dissolve. New York Times, Sep. 28, 1902.)

The Woman's Hospital

The wife of Charles Abernethy of the Central Trust was a member of the Board of Lady Supervisors of the Woman's Hospital, along with Mrs. Samuel Thorne (The Woman's Hospital. New York Times, Nov. 18, 1881). Parsons was president of the Woman's Hospital in 1897. Edward Cooper and Mrs. Russell Sage were Vice Presidents; Charles N. Talbot, Secretary; Mrs. Fredrick F. Thompson, Treasurers. On the Board of Governors were Mrs. F.V. Hamlin, Mrs. W.L. Andrews, Mrs. Robert W. De Forest, Mrs. Frederick F. Thompson, Mrs. Charles B. Alexander, H.M. Braem, Grenville L. Winthrop, Mrs. Alfred M. Hoyt, Russell Sage, Arthur H. Scribner, Mrs. Whitelaw Reid, Matthew C.D. Borden, Louis B. McCagg, Mrs. Morris K. Jesup, Mrs. Malcolm Graham, Charles N. Talbot, and Benjamin Perkins. (Woman's Hospital to Move. New York Times, Dec. 19, 1897.) Parsons was President of the Board of Governors of the Woman's Hospital in 1906. Major benefactors of its new building included Mrs. Frederick F. Thompson, several gifts including one of $150,000; Mrs. Andrew Carnegie gave $10,000 through Mrs. Morris K. Jesup; Mrs. Malcolm Graham, Mrs. A.D. Juilliard, and Mrs. D.O. Mills gave $5,000 each. Morris K. Jesup, a close friend of Samuel D. Babcock, gave $100,000 in 1891. (New Woman's Hospital Is Ready For Patients. New York Times, Dec. 6, 1906.) Parsons was an executor and trustee of Morris K. Jesup's will, along with his widow, Mrs. Maria De Witt Jesup, and nephew, Thomas De Witt Cuyler, and Benjamin Strong. Jesup left $1,000,000 to the American Museum for Natural History and $100,000 to the Brick Presbyterian Church. Parsons and his brother, William H. Parsons, whom Jesup called "my oldest and best friends," got $2,000 each. (Jesup Relatives Fare Well In Will. New York Times, Feb. 15, 1908; Morris K. Jesup Is Dead At 77. New York Times, Jan. 23, 1908.) Parsons, Jesup and Mills were on the board of trustees of the Metropolitan Trust, along with Dudley Olcott, brother of the head of the Central Trust, and Norman B. Ream, a director of the Guaranty Trust (Metropolitan Trust Company 1905-06. New York Times, Oct. 2, 1901.) Meanwhile, Jesup's old business partner, John S. Kennedy, was president of the Presbyterian Hospital and a trustee of the Central Trust from 1893 until his death in 1909. T. DeWitt Cuyler, a Philadelphia lawyer, was Mrs. Jesup's nephew (Morris K. Jesup's Widow Dead At 80. New York Times, Jun. 18, 1914.) Cuyler was a member of the Committee of the American Tobacco Company's Six Percent Gold Bonds, which were deposited with the Guaranty Trust after its breakup in 1911. Augustus D. Juilliard was a director of the Guaranty Trust from its reorganization in 1892 until 1919.

Parsons was President of the Board of Trustees of the Cooper Union, and the only surviving member of the original board of trustees chosen by Peter Cooper. In 1909, Andrew Carnegie "administered an open rebuke to the smokers and those who had liquor served to them. 'There is one thing I would say about Abraham Lincoln,' he began, 'and you will not fail to see the connection. Lincoln never chewed tobacco or smoked tobacco and never drank liquor.'" (Carnegie Rebukes Diners. New York Times, Feb. 13, 1909.)

John E. Parsons' daughter, Constance, married Montgomery Hare, Yale 1893. (Guide to the Hare Family Papers 1873-1962. The New-York Historical Society.) Montgomery Hare was the son of James Montgomery Hare, U.S. manager of the London Assurance Corporation, later resident manager of the Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society of Norwich, England. (Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates 1932-1933, p 83.) Hare's mother, Mary Emlen Meredith Hare, was a Royal descendant of Edward I, King of England. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p.51.) His brother, Meredith Hare, Skull & Bones 1894, married a sister of Dean Sage Jr. (S&B 1897), who was president of Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center; and his law partner, Edwin O. Holter, S&B 1894, was founding treasurer of the New York Heart Association. Montgomery Hare's cousin, Dr. Hobart Amory Hare, wrote an anti-tobacco paper in 1885. He married a sister of Lowell P. Weicker, Yale 1927.

Guide to the Hare Family Papers / New York University Libraries
Obituary Record of Graduates 1932-1933 / Yale University Library
Americans of Royal Descent, p. 51 / Google Books

Herbert Parsons, Scroll & Key 1890

John E. Parson's son, Herbert Parsons, followed him as president of the Memorial Hospital for the Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases, and President of the Board of Trustees of Canton Christian College. (Herbert Parsons Dies of Injuries. New York Times, Sep. 17, 1925). He was a member of Scroll & Key. He studied at the University of Berlin 1890-91, Harvard Law School 1891-93, and Metropolis Law School, New York City, then entered the law office of Strong & Cadwalader. In 1895 he joined his father's law firm, Parsons Shepard & Ogden and its successor, Parsons, Closson & McIlvane."Entered Military Intelligence Section of War College Division of General Staff in Washington as a civilian in July, 1917; commissioned Major in Signal Reserve Corps in August, 1917, and detailed to Military Intelligence Section, where he was in charge of counter-espionage outside of the Army." He served overseas from 1918-19, studied in the British War Office and spent three weeks in Intelligence Section at American General Headquarters at Chaumont. He was assistant to the military attaché at Berne in January and February 1919. (Herbert Parsons, B.A. 1890. Obituary Record of Graduates of the Undergraduate Schools Deceased During the Year 1925-26, pages 141-144.) Herbert Parsons's son, [Henry] McIlvaine Parsons, was a member of Skull & Bones, 1933.

Yale Obituary Record 1925-26 / Yale University Library (pdf, 350 pp)

Herbert Parsons married Elsie Worthington Clews, only daughter of banker Henry Clews. His ushers were Tompkins McIlvane, Charles Sheldon, G. Beekman Hoppin, and Henry Clews Jr., her brother. Dr. Walton Martin was best man. (Miss Clews Is Married. New York Times, Sep. 2, 1900.) The Parsons's only daughter, Elsie Parsons, married Morehead Patterson, S&B 1920, the son of Rufus L. Patterson, head of American Machinery Company and International Cigar Machinery Company. (Miss Parsons Engaged. New York Times, Apr. 1, 1921; Miss Elsie Parsons Married in Lenox. New York Times, Sep. 11, 1921.) Morehead Patterson was a Yale friend of Briton Hadden, and best man at Henry R. Luce's wedding. He was a director of the Enterprise Development Corporation, a closed investment trust of heirs of William Rockefeller, including Godfrey S. Rockefeller, and Thomas F. Ryan, whose directors included Clendenin J. Ryan, and Frederic W. Lincoln. (Trust to Supply Venture Capital. New York Times, Mar. 31, 1948.) In 1964, he patented a machine for forming cigarette rods out of slurry. (Cigarette Making Machine, Patented Apr. 14, 1964, 3,128,773 U.S. Patent Office.) Herbert Parson's grandson, Herbert Parsons Patterson, was the president of the Chase Manhattan Bank.

Cigarette Making Machine patent, 1964 / tobacco document

Dr. Herbert Parsons Jr. graduated from Yale and Harvard Medical School. He married Margaret Worrall. Her matron of honor was Mrs. Hoyt Ammidon. (Nuptials are Held for Miss Worrall. New York Times, Dec. 1, 1935.)

Mrs. Howard Townsend, Royal

Mrs. Howard Townsend was Justine Van Rensselaer, daughter of Gen. Stephen Van Rensselaer of Albany. She was president of the Colonial Dames of the State of New York. Her husband was Dr. Howard Townsend. (Died. New York Times, Apr. 9, 1912.) Her mother was Harriet Bayard. (Death of a Venerable Albany Lady. From the Albany Times. New York Times, Jul. 22, 1875.) She was a Royal descendant (through the ubiquitous Livingstons) of Louis VI, King of France. (Americans of Royal Descent: A collection of genealogies of American families. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 586.) Dr. Howard Townsend was one of the professors in the Albany Medical College and was on the staff of Albany Hospital. (Dr. Howard Townsend. New York Times, Jan. 20, 1867.) Her cousin, Nathaniel Thayer, was a major donor to Harvard Medical School.

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 586 [if this page on Google doesn't work go to 584] / Google Books

Her son, Howard Townsend, a lawyer, was a member of the board of managers of St. Luke's Hospital, 1896-1902; a trustee of Bellevue and Allied Hospitals, 1901-1902; a trustee of Roosevelt Hospital, 1898, and a member of the board of managers of New York Hospital since 1899, president 1915-1919. (Howard Townsend Dies At Age of 76. New York Times, Apr. 25, 1935.) His first wife, Sophie Witherspoon Dickey, was the daughter of Charles D. Dickey [of Brown Brothers]. (Died. New York Times, Feb. 1, 1892.) He married his second wife, Anne Lowndes Langdon, in 1894. She was a daughter of Eugene Langdon, and a great-granddaughter of Maturin Livingston. (Mrs. Howard Townsend. New York Times, Dec. 1, 1943.) She was a descendant of John Jacob Astor, and a Royal descendant of Henry I King of France (Americans of Royal Descent: A collection of genealogies of American families. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 28), and of Alfred the Great of England (Marion Langdon, Mrs. Royal Phelps Carroll, was her sister, page 632.) Their daughter, Sophie W. Townsend, married John A. Dix, Harvard 1902, a grandson of Gov. John Adams Dix. His sister married Charles Lanier Lawrance. (J.A. Dix to be Bridegroom. New York Times, Apr. 8, 1910; John Adams Dix, Artist, Stockbroker. New York Times, Oct. 2, 1945.) Charles Lanier Lawrance's stepmother's sister married John Jacob Astor IV. Another daughter, Anne Langdon Townsend, married the Marchese Lelio Pellegrini Quarantotti, who was officer of the Noble Guard at the Vatican. (Marchesa Quarantotti, 72; Aided in Charitable Work. New York Times, Feb. 24, 1971.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 28 / Google Books

Dr. Burton J. Lee, Yale 1894

Dr. Burton James Lee was a member of the faculty of Cornell University Medical College since 1903, and a clinical professor of surgery there since 1919. He was cancer specialist and a director of the Memorial Hospital since 1919. He was Secretary of the American Society for the Control of Cancer since 1930. Mrs. Lee was Mabel Kershaw of Tacoma, Wash. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University, 1933-1934, p. 166.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University, 1933-1934 / Yale University Library

Memorial Hospital, 1921

Board of Managers: Herbert Parsons, President; Archer M. Huntington, Vice-President; Archibald Douglas, Secretary; Paul Armitage, Treasurer; Francis R. Appleton, Arthur Choate, Dr. Clement Cleveland, Dr. William B. Coley, Robert E. Dowling, Walter Douglas, Dr. James Ewing, Edwin C. Jameson, Mrs. Wortham James, H. Mortimer Merriman, Dr. Walter L. Niles, Ira A. Place, Miss Laura J. Post, Mrs. Dallas B. Pratt, Charles H. Simmons, and Cornelius Vanderbilt. (Display Ad. Cancer Relief. New York Tribune, Nov. 5, 1921.)

Cancer Relief, New York Tribune, 1921 / Library of Congress

Paul Armitage

Paul Armitage graduated from Columbia in 1894, and Columbia Law School. He was a law partner of Archibald Douglas. Douglas & Armitage added Charles E.F. McCann, son-in-law of F.W. Woolworth, for whose estate Armitage was general counsel for many years. He was treasurer of Memorial Hospital from 1918 to 1930, and a trustee of the James Douglas Trusts for the benefit of the hospital. He was a director and secretary of Hazeltine Research and Hazeltine Electronics, and the Harnett Electrical Corporation, the Suffolk Products Corporation and Electrical Industries, Inc. (Paul Armitage, Lawyer 50 Years. New York Times, Jun. 29, 1949.)

Archibald Douglas

Archibald Douglas Sr. was a member of the law firm of Douglas, Armitage & Halloway, of 30 Rockefeller Plaza. He was born in Tarrytown, N.Y. and graduated from the Columbia School of Mines in 1894. He was chairman of the board of managers of Memorial Hospital, and an alumni trustee of Columbia University. (Arch. Douglas, 72, Lawyer 46 Years. New York Times, Dec. 15, 1943.) Archibald Douglas Jr. [Yale 1926] was a New York State Assemblyman from the 8th District in Manhattan from 1944 to 1958. (Obituaries. New York Times, Apr. 1, 1963.) He was best man at Albert Francke Jr.'s marriage to Eleanor FitzGerald, sister of Desmond FitzGerald [later of the C.I.A.]. (Miss Fitz Gerald Is Wed in Church. New York Times, Jun. 17, 1931.) Archibald Douglas 3d married Wayne Virginia Goss, daughter of Richard Wayne Goss, and sister of Porter Johnson Goss [of the C.I.A.] (Miss Wayne Goss Becomes A Bride. New York Times, Jun. 24, 1956.)

Dr. James Douglas

"The interest of the Douglas family in the hospital began in 1912 when Dr. James Douglas, grandfather of the new chairman of the board of managers, became a member of the board and gave $100,000 for clinical research and an X-ray plant. The new chairman is also a trustee of the General Education Board, the Rockefeller Foundation and the National Industrial Conference Board, Inc." Lewis W. Douglas, president of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York, succeeded his uncle, Archibald Douglas, as chairman of the board of managers of Memorial Hospital. He was the seventh member of his family to be connected with the hospital. (Takes Hospital Post. New York Times, Dec. 20, 1944.)

Dr. James Douglas was born in Quebec, Canada, and graduated from Queen's University, Kingston, in 1858. He was a professor of chemistry at Morrin College before coming to Phoenixville, Penn. in 1875 to head a copper plant. He was President of the Copper Queen Mining Company, which was acquired by the Phelps-Dodge Company, of which he was chairman of the board. He and his associates also controlled the El Paso and Southwestern Railroad and associated lines. His largest gift to Memorial may have been three and three-quarters grams of radium, valued at $375,000. (Dr. James Douglas, Copper Miner, Dies. New York Times, Jun. 26, 1918.) He left $50,000 to McGill University and $300,000 to other institutions, and the residuary, believed to be more than $5 million with extensive holdings in Phelps, Dodge & Co., to his children and grandchildren. Edmund Coffin [S&B 1866] and his sons, James Stuart Douglas and Walter Douglas, were executors. ($350,000 to Institutions. New York Times, Jul. 3, 1918.) Although his daughter died of cancer despite radium treatment, Douglas organized a private research laboratory in Jersey City. Dr. Charles L. Parsons, chief chemist of the US Bureau of Mines, suggested to him and his son[-in-law], Archibald Douglas, that they establish a national radium institute. In Baltimore, Dr. Howard A. Kelly was also researching radium therapy at his private hospital. He treated Rep. Robert G. Bremner of New Jersey, and Rep. Martin D. Foster of Illinois, a physician and Chairman of the House Committee on Mines and Mining, introduced a bill to withdraw public lands containing precious metals. The Bureau of Mines had a new laboratory in Denver which was seeking new methods of extracting precious metals. (Scientists' Eyes on radium Test. New York Times, Dec. 28, 1913.) Parsons' son-in-law, Charles Proctor Cooper, became president of the Presbyterian Hospital in 1943.

Cornell Medical College merged with Memorial to create one of the largest cancer hospitals in the world, "of lesser proportions only than the Middlesex Hospital, London, and the Heidelberg Hospital." Allan A. Ryan, the son of transit and utility baron and Tobacco Trust member Thomas Fortune Ryan, contributed $50,000, and Dr. James Douglas contributed "many times that amount." Memorial and Dr. Howard A. Kelly of Johns Hopkins were to jointly share Douglas's radium. ($1,000,000 Pledged to Cancer Hospital. New York Times, May 2, 1914.)

Dr. James Douglas's son, James Stuart Douglas, was born at Megantic Hill Mine, Que., in 1868. He was President since 1912 of the United Verde Extension Mining Company, which he organized with George E. Tener of Pittsburgh. James S. Douglas's younger sister married Archibald Douglas [~1871-1943]. His sons were Lewis W. Douglas and James Douglas, secretary of the Phelps Dodge Corporation. (J.S. Douglas Dies; Mining Executive. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1949.)

A retired broker named Frederick Bruce left $10,000 to Johns Hopkins University, and $25,000 each to the American Society for the Control of Cancer, Memorial Hospital for the Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases, the New York Heart Association, and other New York institutions. (9 Institutions Share $210,000 By Bruce Will. New York Times, Jun. 21, 1928.)

50th Anniversary Celebration, 1934

Speakers included Dr. John A. Hartwell; Dr. Robert Greenough; Dr. C.C. Little on "Heredity in Cancer;" Dr. E.C. Dodds of London on "Cancerigenic [sic] Agents; Dr. Dr. James Ewing, president of the hospital's medical board; Dr. Livingston Farrand, president of Cornell University; Mrs. Robert G. Mead, chairman of the finance committee of the New York City Cancer Committee, and Dr. George H. Bigelow, Superintendent of Massachusetts General Hospital. Harry Pelham Robbins was president of the board of managers. Members of the committee in charge of the anniversary celebration: Mrs. James Roosevelt, mother of President Franklin D. Roosevelt; Mr. and Mrs. Winthrop W. Aldrich; Mr. and Mrs. Paul Armitage; Lady Astor; Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Astor; Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Baker; Henry Rogers Benjamin; Mrs. French Rayburn Bissell; Mrs. and Mrs. Thomas L. Chadbourne; Mr. and Mrs. E. Gerry Chadwick; Sir Lenthal and Lady Cheatle; Mrs. William Bourke Cockran; Dr. and Mrs. William B. Coley; Dr. and Mrs. Lewis A. Conner; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Debevoise; Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Delafield; Mr. and Mrs. Cleveland E. Dodge; C.H. Donner; Mr. and Mrs. Archibald Douglas; Dr. and Mrs. William A. Downes; Dr. James Ewing; Mrs. E. Marshall Field; Miss Helen C. Frick; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dana Gibson; Miss Belle B. Gurnee; Mr. and Mrs. Howard S. Hadden; Mrs. Morgan Hamilton; Mrs. Edward S. Harkness; Dr. and Mrs. John A. Hartwell; Miss Gertrude Hill; Dr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Holland; Mr. and Mrs. Walter Ewing Hope; Mrs. Walter B. James; Mrs. Wortham James; Mrs. Henry H. Janeway; Mrs. Burton J. Lee; Mr. and Mrs. James T. Lee; Lucius N. Littauer; Colonel and Mrs. Arthur W. Little; Mr. and Mrs. Charles E.F. McCann; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gordon McKay; Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Mead; Mrs. William Brown Meloney; Mr. and Mrs. H. Morton Merriman; Albert G. Milbank; Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Milbank; Mrs. Charles E. Miller; Dr. and Mrs. James Alexander Miller; Mr. and Mrs. David M. Milton; Mr. and Mrs. A. Newbold Morris; Dr. and Mrs. James B. Murphy; Dr. and Mrs. Walter L. Niles; Professor Henry Fairborn Osborn; Mr. and Mrs. John E. Parsons; Mr. and Mrs. James H. Post; Mr. and Mrs. Gordon H. Rentschler; Mr. and Mrs. James H. Ripley; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pelham Robbins; Dr. and Mrs. G. Canby Robinson; Mr. and Mrs. Langdon H. Roper; Mr. and Mrs. George B. St. George; Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Simmons; Mrs. John Stewart; Mrs. James J. Storrow; Mrs. George Tiffany; Mr. and Mrs. Howard Townsend [Jr.]; Mr. and Mrs. T. Ferdinand Wilcox. (Memorial Hospital to Mark 50th Year. New York Times, May 20, 1934.)

Among the members of the social service committee who assisted at the formal opening of the gift shop: Miss Gertrude Hill, who headed the committee; Mrs. T. Ferdinand Wilcox, chairman; Mrs. Edward C. Delafield, Mrs. P. Bernard Phillip, Mrs. Langdon H. Roper, Mrs. Paul Armitage, Mrs. Wilson P. Foss, Mrs. Percival S. Hill, Mrs. L. Valentine Pulsifer, Mrs. Carll Tucker, Mrs. Walter C. Wyckoff, Mrs. Walter K. Earle, Miss Helen C. Frick, Mrs. Charles H. Dickinson, Mrs. Elisha Walker, Mrs. Fordyce B. St. John, Mrs. H. Morton Merriman, Mrs. Burton J. Lee, Miss Jessie L. Roesler, Mrs. Robert C. Ream, Mrs. Archibald Douglas, and Miss Eleanor Mellon. (Tea for Cancer Hospital. New York Times, Nov. 2, 1934.)

Dr. William B. Coley, Yale 1884

William Bradley Coley was born in Westport, Conn. and graduated from Yale in 1884. He taught school in Portland, Ore. for two years before entering Harvard Medical School, where he graduated in 1888. He was an instructor in surgery at Post-Graduate Medical School 1890-1897; lecturer in clinical surgery and associate Columbia University College of Physicians 1897-1909; professor of clinical surgery at Cornell Medical College 1909-1915, and Clinical Professor of Cancer Research 1915-1918. He was attending surgeon of Memorial Hospital until 1933, and a member of the Board of Managers since 1902. Coley was "instrumental in 1902 in securing a gift of $100,000 from Mrs. Collis P. Huntington for the establishment of the Collis P. Huntington Fund for Cancer Research," and he was chairman of the fund since 1909. (Rites Tomorrow for Dr. W.B. Coley. New York Times, Apr. 17, 1936; Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1935-1936, pp. 32-33.) The suppression of Dr. William B. Coley's bacterial toxin treatment for cancer has been attributed to Dr. James Ewing's hostility. Ewing unsuccessfully treated the daughter of the president of the Phelps Dodge Company for breast cancer with radium. Douglas later made a gift to Memorial Hospital of nearly half the radium in the world, and demanded that Ewing be made head of cancer treatment at Memorial, and Ewing refused to allow the use of Coley's Toxins. The American Society for the Control of Cancer was against Coley's Toxins since its formation in 1913, and the American Cancer Society carried on its vendetta. (Coley's Toxins, by Wayne Martin. The Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients, Feb-Mar 2003.).

Martin, 2003 / Second Opinion
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University, 1935-1935 / Yale University Library (pdf, 278 pp)

Charles F. de Ganahl, Royal

Charles Francis de Ganahl was a director of Memorial Hospital since about 1935. He also endowed a cancer clinic at the White Plains, N.Y. hospital. He was born at Ganahl, Texas to Dr. Charles de Ganahl and Virginia Mason Wright de Ganahl. He studied at the Savannah Military Institute and at Texas A&M, then took a business course at Poughkeepsie, N.Y. When he was 20, he was a reporter for an English-language newspaper in Mexico City, then started a sugar plantation that was burned down by revolutionaries in 1910. In 1913 he came to Newburgh, N.Y. and established a shipbuilding plant which made oil tankers for the U.S. government during World War I. In 1923, he went to England and established the Powers Petroleum Company, and Tankers, Ltd. He founded the Venture Exploration Co. in Kenya, with gold mines in East Africa and British Columbia. He was also president of the Fleetwings, Inc., aircraft factory in Bristol, Pa. (C.F. de Ganahl, 69, Plane Maker, Dies. New York Times, May 15, 1939.)

Charles F. de Ganahl also set up the Medway Oil and Storage Company on the Isle of Grain. He disposed of his holdings in 1928. (Americans in BP: From the well head to the Board Room. BP and Castrol Archive, University of Warwick, accessed 4/17/11.) Fred Chase Koch was chief engineer with Medway until 1925. (Fred C. Koch. Fred C. and Mary Koch Foundation, accessed 4/17/11.) Koch was the father of the Koch Brothers, Charles de Ganahl Koch and David Hamilton Koch, who has been on the Board of Overseers and Managers of MSKCC since at least 2005.

"[Dr. Charles de Ganahl], whose father came to America from the Austrian Tyrolean region, remained loyal to the Confederacy after the Civil War and moved to Mexico for several years." "The Ganahls can be traced back to the 1300s in Austria. They owned various enterprises, among them, cotton spinning and milling. Of his 10 children, Johann Ulrich Ganahl (1725-1772) had two sons — Johann and Joseph — who rose to prominence. Joseph’s descendants were those who struck out to America. In 1803, Charles Ganahl’s grandfather, Joseph Ganahl Von Zanzenberg (1754-1833), an Austrian doctor of law and town clerk, received his Patent of Nobility from Holy Roman Emperor Francis II for service during the war with Napoleon. In 1816, his son, Johann Joseph, came to Augusta, and then Savannah, Ga. for the Ganahl Mills. He opted to drop the noble title and only use Ganahl, as a sign of his democratic beliefs. He married Charlotte Elizabeth Conn of Augusta, and of their nine children, four lived past childhood — John Henry, Charles, Joseph and Frank." One of Dr. Charles de Ganahl's grandsons was right-wing Maj. Gen. Edwin Anderson Walker, whom Lee Harvey Oswald attempted to assassinate. (Life was rarely dull for members of the Ganahl family. By Irene Van Winkle. West Kerr Current, 2006.)

Life was rarely dull for members of the Ganahl family / West Kerr Current

Harry Pelham Robbins, Harvard 1894

Harry Pelham Robbins graduated from Harvard in 1894. He married Emily Welles in 1908. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Asher Robbins. Fletcher Harper was best man, and the ushers were Grosvenor Atterbury, Phoenix Ingraham, Richard Newton, Joseph Earl Stevens, and Sumner Gerard of New York City, and Harold P. Bend of St. Paul, Minn. His wife was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Welles, and a great niece of Mrs. William Astor. (Miss Welles to Wed H.P. Robbins. New York Times, Feb. 1, 1908; Miss Emily Welles A Bride. New York Times, Apr. 23, 1908.) He was a member of a special committee of the New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor which leased the Vanderbilt Tenements for three years to experiment with home treatment of people with tuberculosis. (New East Side War Upon Consumption. New York Times, Mar. 21, 1912.) He was a member of the Committee of Sponsors of the New York City Cancer Committee of an exhibit at the Hotel Plaza "to show the public what is being done by hospitals and welfare organizations of the city and vicinity to help cancer patients." (Cancer Committee Plans Exhibit Here. New York Times, May 5, 1935.) He was a longtime winter resident of Palm Beach, Fla., where he died. Mrs. Robbins' brother was Sumner Welles. (H.P. Robbins Dies; Philanthropist, 71. New York Times, Mar. 21, 1946.)

Henry Asher Robbins (1829-1914) was born in Berlin, Conn. He came to New York in 1851. He was in business with his brother, Royal E. Robbins, and was one of the founders of the Waltham Watch Company of Waltham, Mass. His father was Rev. Royal Robbins. Mrs. Robbins was Lizzie Pelham Bend, and the daughter was Mrs. Harry W. McVickar. (Henry Asher Robbins. New York Times, Jan. 23, 1914.) Royal E. Robbins' daughter, Marjorie E. Robbins, married Albert G. Milbank. (Married. New York Times, Jan. 31, 1902.) Rev. Royal Robbins graduated from Yale in 1806. His uncle was Sen. Asher Robbins, Yale 1782. (Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College, 1805-1815, p. 53.)

Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College, 1805-1815, p. 53 / Google Books

Memorial Hospital, 1936

The General Education Board made a gift of $3 million to Memorial Hospital to build a new twelve-story hospital adjacent to the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. The building was designed by James Gamble Rogers. Harry Pelham Robbins was president of Memorial. (Rockefeller Provides $3,000,000 To Build Cancer Hospital Here. New York Times, Apr. 28, 1936.) The cornerstone was laid two years later. Dr. James Ewing was director of the hospital and president of its medical board. Lewis W. Douglas was a member of the board of managers, and Harry Pelham Robbins was president of the hospital. (Cornerstone Laid At Cancer Center. New York Times, May 21, 1938.)

Dr. Frederick Fuller Russell of Boston replaced Dr. Robert B. Greenough, deceased, both as a member of the board of managers of Memorial Hospital for the Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases, and as president of the American Society for the Control of Cancer. (Gets Memorial Hospital Post. New York Times, Jun. 16, 1937.)

Memorial Hospital, 1940s

Dr. Cornelius P. Rhoads, director of Memorial Hospital, announced that it would spend approximately $130,000 on cancer education and research. Contributors included Harry Payne Bingham of New York; M.M. Rippa of Miami Beach; Noel D. Sidford of New York; Lucius N. Littauer of New York; the Jane Coffin Childs Fund; the Commonwealth Fund; the Egbert C. Fuller Trust; the Holmes Foundation; the Pierre S. du Pont Fund; the J.J. Lerner Dental Fund; the Charles Lerner Research Fund; the Elise Strang L'Esperance Fund; the Research Corporation; Standard Brands, Inc.; the Rockefeller Foundation; and the Community Trust. Harry Pelham Robbins was president. (Will Press Cancer Study. New York Times, Jul. 6, 1941.)

Memorial opened a new Cancer Prevention Clinic for Women at York Avenue and East Sixty-eighth Street, in charge of Dr. Elise S. L'Esperance, a member of the hospital's board of managers. (Cancer Clinic Opened. New York Times, Feb. 18, 1942.) Mrs. Percy Livingston Douglas, chairman of the social service committee. was elected to the board of managers of Memorial Hopital. (Elected to Hospital Board. New York Times, Feb. 20, 1942.) Isaac S. Marcosson was chairman of the 60th anniversary committee and a member of the board of managers. Dr. Fred W. Stewart was acting director of the hospital while Dr. Cornelius P. Rhoads was with the armed forces. George F. Holmes was honored for 30 years service as superintendent. (Hospital Praised for Cancer Work. New York Times, May 7, 1944.)

B. Brewster Jennings

Benjamin Brewster Jennings was the grandson of Oliver Burr Jennings, a 10% partner of Standard Oil in 1870, and Benjamin Brewster, a member of the Standard Oil Trust of 1890. His father was Oliver Gould Jennings, S&B 1887. Jennings and Brewster had been partners who went west during the 1849 gold rush in California and became successful dry goods merchants. They sold out and used the proceeds to finance John D. Rockefeller. B. Brewster Jennings graduated from Yale in 1920, and was a member of the Yale Corporation Council from 1958 to 1963 and the Yale Development Committee. He spent his entire business career with the Mobile Corporation and its predecessor, Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, and was its chief executive from 1944 to 1958. (B. Brewster Jennings Is Dead; Ex-Head of Mobil Oil was 70. New York Times, Oct. 3, 1968.)

He was also a director of the New York Trust Company from 1947-1958. Fellow directors included Malcolm P. Aldrich, S&B 1922; Charles J. Stewart, S&B 1918; and Horace Havemeyer Jr., President of the National Sugar Refining Co. (Display Ads, New York Times, Apr. 2, 1947 and Oct. 2, 1952; Display Ad 37. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1955 p. 34.), and Charles Dewey Hilles Jr., S&B 1924, a director of the American Cancer Society (Display Ad 283. New York Times, Oct. 2, 1957 p. 47; Display Ad 39. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1958 p. 3).

Jennings was a member of the board of managers of the Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases since 1944. In 1958, he was elected president, succeeding Laurence S. Rockefeller, who continued as chairman of the executive committee. (Cancer Unit Sets Up Team of Executives. New York Times, Oct. 27, 1958.) In 1962, he was elected chairman of the board of managers. (Memorial Hospital Names Officers. New York Times, Apr. 4, 1962.) In 1959, he was elected to the board of trustees of the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research. (Sloan-Kettering Names 2 Trustees. New York Times, May 3, 1959.)

Sloan-Kettering Institute, 1963 / tobacco document

In 1951, Jennings was drive chairman of the Greater New York Fund [now United Way of New York]. His successor in the 1952 fund drive was Devereux C. Josephs, who was a director of J.P. Morgan & Co. (J.P..Morgan President to Address Fund Group. New York Times, May 26, 1952.) During the 1950s, Jennings was a frequent patron of Mary Lasker's art display benefits for a variety of causes. (Ball of the Roosevelt Hospital on Dec. 14 To Further Institution's Work on Cancer. NYT Nov. 29, 1950; French Paintings to Aid Heart Unit, Jan. 7, 1951; Wildenstein's Art Show Preview Nov. 7 Will Aid Fund Drive of St. Faith's House, Oct. 17, 1951; Loan Art Display to Aid Foundation, Jan. 12, 1954; Matisse Show to Aid Baltimore Museum, Jan. 13, 1955.)

B. Brewster Jennings was a trustee of the National Fund for Medical Education in 1954. Fellow trustees included Elmer H. Bobst, Devereux C. Josephs, Winthrop Rockefeller, Anna M. Rosenberg, and Thomas J. Ross (Letter, Howard Corning Jr. to Dr. C.C. Little, Aug. 16, 1954).

Corning to Little, Aug. 16, 1954 / tobacco document

Jennings was a trustee of the Avalon Foundation, along with Stoddard M. Stevens of Sullivan & Cromwell, and Dr. Thomas Parran, dean of the Graduate School of Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh, who became the fund's director. (Parran to Head Fund. New York Times, Jan. 28, 1958.) The Avalon Foundation was created by Ailsa Mellon Bruce, the daughter of Andrew W. Mellon. Parran was US Surgeon General from 1936 to 1948.

Alfred P. Sloan and Charles Kettering

Alfred P. Sloan Jr. was elected to the board of the Chase National Bank of New York, along with F. Edson White. (Join Chase National Board. New York Times, May 10, 1923 p. 27.) Mrs. Alfred P. Sloan was one of the illustrious boxholders for Edward L. Bernays' famous Green Ball in 1934. In 1945, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation announced a grant of $4,000,000 for a Sloan-Kettering Institute, to be operated by Memorial Hospital. It was billed as "The first application of American industrial research techniques to cancer research" by Alfred P. Sloan Jr., chairman of General Motors Corporation and Dr. Charles F. Kettering, vice president and director of research at GM. $2 million was to go for the building, with $200,000 a year for operating costs for ten years. Sloan was a trustee of Memorial Hospital, of which Dr. Reginald G. Coombe was president. Five trustees of the Research Institute represented Memorial: Coombe; Lewis W. Douglas, president of the Mutual Life Insurance Company, chairman of the hospital board; Frank C. Howard, a hospital trustee; Dr. Joseph Hinsey, dean of Cornell Medical School; and Dr. James B. Murphy, head of cancer research at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. Four represented the Sloan Foundation: Sloan and Kettering; John L. Pratt, a director of General Motors; and George Whitney of J.P. Morgan & Company. (Sloan, Kettering to Combat Cancer. New York Times, Aug. 8, 1945.) Freddy Homburger, of Broin airliner ETS lawsuit fame, was among the first members of the Sloan-Kettering staff in 1945.

Memorial Hospital for the Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases in 1946: Lewis W. Douglas, Chairman, Board of Managers; Reginald G. Coombe, President; James T. Lee, Vice-President; Willard F. Place, Secretary; Edward C. Delafield, Treasurer; Cornelius P. Rhoads, M.D., Director. (Letter from C.P. Rhoads, M.D., to Mr. A. Grant Clarke, Director, Medical Relations Division, Camel Cigarettes, May 15, 1946.) Rhoads gave instructions for making a donation for cancer research, which Clarke wished to earmark for a Dr. Martin.

Rhoads to Clarke, May 15, 1946 / tobacco document

Charles Kettering was also a director of the Temple University Research Institute circa 1947. Alfred P. Sloan Jr. was an honorary director of the American Cancer Society in 1956-57. He was then the honorary board chairman of General Motors Corporation; President of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Inc.; Board Chairman of the Sloan-Kettering Institute; and a director of E.I. duPont deNemours & Co., Braden Copper Co., Kennecott Copper Corp., and J.P. Morgan & Co.

Know Your Board of Directors, ACS 1957 / tobacco document

Mrs. Harry Hopkins was chairman of the Memorial Cancer Center Fund; S. Sloan Colt and Lewis Douglas were co-chairmen of the drive. Mrs. Edward C. Delafield was chairman of the women's division. They planned to raise $4 million to match the Sloan Foundation grant. Karl T. Comptom, the president of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was one of the speakers. (First Poster Out for Cancer Drive. New York Times, Dec. 2, 1945; $4,000,000 Cancer Center Drive Opens Here at Dinner for 1,000. New York Times, Dec. 5, 1945.) Dr. Bradley Coley, head of the Bureau of Education of Memorial Hospital, spoke to a group of magazine, newspaper, and radio writers. "They were the guests of Mrs. Albert D. Lasker, at her home, 29 Beekman Place." (Cancer Field Held Short of Experts. New York Times, Dec. 8, 1945.) Richard Leo Simon of Simon & Schuster was chairman of the book publishing division of the fund drive. (Aids Cancer Center Fund Drive. New York Times, Dec. 27, 1945.) As he broke the ground, Mayor O'Dwyer proclaimed that "I have a distinct feeling of taking part in a sacred rite," and said that they were doing "not man's work, but God's work." Rev. Dr. Frederic S. Fleming, rector of Trinity Parish, pronounced the invocation. (Ground Is Broken for New Cancer Center; O'Dwyer Calls It World Symbol of Hope. New York Times, Jan. 24, 1946.) The heads of the various women's fund raising committees were Mrs. George B. St. George, Mrs. Reginald G. Coombe, Mrs. William Bergh Kip, and Mrs. Frothingham Wagstaff. Mrs. Delafield was chairman of the executive committee, with Mrs. Archibald Douglas Sr. as honorary chairman. (Women Raise $603,659 for Cancer Project. New York Times, Feb. 1, 1946.)

Robert E. Strawbridge Jr.

Robert Early Strawbridge Jr. was the grandson of Justus C. Strawbridge, a founder of the Strawbridge & Clothier department store chain of Philadelphia. His mother was Anita Berwind, the daughter of Charles Berwind, whose brother, Edward J. Berwind, was a director of the Guaranty Trust. (Mrs. Strawbridge Dead in Newport. New York Times, Jul. 21, 1943; Robert Strawbridge Dies At 93; Headed Department Store Chain. New York Times, Dec. 25, 1963.) Robert E. Strawbridge Sr. was a director of the Philadephia National Bank (New Directors of Philadelphia Bank. New York Times, Dec. 1, 1947; Display Ad 39. New York Times, Jan. 14, 1948 p. 39; Display Ad 48. New York Times, Jan. 20, 1954 p. 43.) Robert E. Strawbridge Jr. shared a $170,000 legacy from his great aunt, who was the widow of another Berwind brother, John E. Berwind, with his sister. (Mrs. J.E. Berwind Left Estate of $3,565,000. New York Times, Mar. 29, 1945.) He married Florence Julia Loew, the granddaughter of banker George F. Baker, who was a director of the Guaranty Trust. (Miss Loew Is Wed in Newport Church. New York Times, Aug. 16, 1931.) Robert E. Strawbridge 3d married Alexandra White, the daughter Memorial Hospital head and Liggett & Myers tobacco director Ogden White, and granddaughter of Alexander Moss White, who founded White, Weld & Co. with Francis Weld in 1910. He was "with the Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York." (Alexandra White and a Bank Aide Marry in Jersey. New York Times, Jun. 28, 1964.)

In 1938, Strawbridge Jr. was chairman of the Salvation Army annual fundraising appeal. Henry W. Taft was chairman of its advisory board, and Thomas J. Watson, the president of International Business Machines and a director of the Guaranty Trust, was chairman of its men's division. (Strawbridge Named Head of Salvation Army Drive. New York Times, Jan. 28, 1938.) In 1942-43, he became a limited partner of Reynolds, Fish & Co., which had been stock brokers for William Payne Whitney, S&B 1898. (Exchange Announces Changes In Firms. New York Times, Apr. 25, 1942; Changes in Firms. New York Times, Mar. 1, 1943.) During World War II, he was a lieutenant commander, USNR, "assigned to duty with the Office of Strategic Services in London and Washington." He was a member of the executive committtee of the USO, the advisory board of the Salvation Army, and the Army and Navy Committee of the Y.M.C.A., and vice chairman of the Memorial Cancer Center Fund Campaign when he was elected to the Board of Managers of Memorial Hospital. (On Managers Board of Memorial Hospital. New York Times, Jun. 19, 1946.) He was a co-chairman of the 175th anniversary campaign of the Protestant Episcopal Church in New York, whose steering committee was under the direction of Charles F. Bound, a vice president of the Guaranty Trust. (2 Lead Church Drive. New York Times, Jan. 1, 1958.)

In 1947, the National Advisory Cancer Council of the US Public Health Service gave Memorial Hospital "the largest aggregation of Federal cancer grants ever given to one institution, a total of $142,550 for six projects." They also gave $250,000 to rebuild the Jackson Memorial Laboratory. (New York Hospital Gets Cancer Grant. New York Times, Dec. 13, 1947). Jacqueline Bouvier, who later became the wife of President John F. Kennedy, was a member of the committee of Memorial Hospital's "Salute to Summer" tea and cocktail fundraiser. (Memorial Center to Gain By Party. New York Times, May 19, 1948.) Mrs. Edward F. Hutton, Mrs. F. Trubee Davison [S&B 1918], Mrs. Albert D. Lasker, Mrs. Laurence S. Rockefeller, and Mrs. Morehead Patterson [S&B 1920] were patronesses (Party Will Help Memorial Center. New York Times, May 19, 1950.) "Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Strawbridge Jr. had as their guests at the ball, Mr. and Mrs. Laurance S. Rockefeller, Mr. and Mrs. Winthrop W. Aldrich, Mrs. Ogden White, Mrs. Dodge Sloan, Milton W. Holden and James A. Burden." (Fan Ball At Plaza Aids Cancer Fund. New York Times, Dec. 14, 1950.) The American Cancer Society gave $350,000 to Memorial, which dwarfed the $125,000 for Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, $48,000 for Cornell University Medical College, and $30,000 that New York University-Bellevue Medical Center received. ($553,000 is Given for Cancer Study. New York Times, Feb. 12, 1954.) Strawbridge, James S. Adams, Elmer H. Bobst, Charles Dewey Hilles Jr., and Mrs. Albert D. Lasker were patrons of a benefit for the New York City Cancer Committee of the ACS. Gen John Reed Kilpatrick was chairman of the Committee, the dinner and the premiere. (Cancer Society Will Be Assisted At Fete Dec. 12. New York Times, Nov. 9, 1958.) Florence Strawbridge was active as a fund raiser until at least 1968. (Dinner Dance at Plaza Will Assist Cancer Center. New York Times, May 4, 1968.) He was elected chairman of the United States Polo Association in 1936 and retained the post for two decades. He died in 1986. (Robert Strawbridge Jr. Dies; Former Polo Star and Official. New York Times, Mar. 8, 1986.) In 1939, the British polo team may have received financing via stock rigging by Junius A. Richards, who was later a director of Tobacco and Allied Stocks.

Robert Strawbridge Jr. Dies, Mar. 8, 1986 / New York Times

Former US Army Intelligence Officer Ernst L. Wynder began his medical studies at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, the home base of the Walker family, and came to Memorial in 1951, for which he was a consulting epidemiologist into the 1990s. Wynder founded the American Health Foundation in 1969. And, Carol J. Henry, a research assistant at the Sloan-Kettering Institute until joining a CTR-funded mouse inhalation study which was later pretended to be suppressed research, also testified against the tobacco companies in an ETS lawsuit.

Dr. John Mercer Walker, Skull & Bones 1931

Dr. John Mercer Walker was an uncle of President George Herbert Walker Bush (S&B 1948). John M. Walker's sister, Dorothy Walker, married Prescott S. Bush. (Bush/Walker/Pierce/Robinson Family Tree. In: The Family. The Real Story of the Bush Dynasty. By Kitty Kelly. Random House, 2004.) Two of Walker's brothers, George Herbert Walker Jr. and Louis Walker, were also Bonesmen (1927 and 1936, respectively). Louis Walker was an usher at the wedding of John E. Cookman, who was Joseph F. Cullman Jr.'s assistant at Philip Morris. Prescott Bush was on the Advisory Council of the New England Institute for Medical Research in the early 1960s.

Bush/Walker/Pierce/Robinson Family Tree / Random House (pdf, 3pp)

His Bones classmates included Henry John Heinz 2d of Pittsburgh and Lewis A. Lapham, [of the Bankers Trust where the Cullmans of Philip Morris were directors], while James Ramsay Hunt Jr., later of the C.I.A., and James Gamble Rogers Jr. [who worked for Lord & Thomas on the American Tobacco account], and George Washington Hill Jr. of American Tobacco were slapped for Scroll and Key. (Yale Tap Day Held; 10 Refuse Election. New York Times, May 16, 1930.) He was usher at the wedding of John Holbrook, Scroll & Key 1931.

Walker received his MD from the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia in 1936, and was in private practice until he contracted polio in 1950. He also had a career in investment banking, first with the family firm, G.H. Walker & Co., then as a limited partner in Alex Brown & Co. (Dr. John Walker, 81, President Bush's Uncle. New York Times, Aug. 18, 1990.) In 1939, he married Elsie Louise Mead, of the Mead Corporation family. Nancy Bush was an attendant at the wedding (Louise Mead, Sarah Lawrence Alumna, Becomes Engaged to Dr. John M. Walker. New York Times, Sep. 26, 1939; Miss Elsie Mead Wed in a Church. New York Times, Nov. 26, 1959). He was elected a director of that company in 1957 (Mead Paper Shows a Drop in Earnings; 71 Cents a Share Cleared in 12 Weeks. New York Times, July 11, 1957.) In 1952, he joined Memorial Hospital as clinical assistant in surgery. In 1955, he was made associate attending surgeon and associate clinical director. In 1962, he was elected chairman of the executive committee and chief executive officer of the hospital. He replaced Laurance S. Rockefeller, who resigned. (Memorial Hospital Names Officers. New York Times, April 4, 1962.) He was president of the board of managers of Memorial from 1965 to 1974 and then joined the board of overseers. He was on the research staff of the Sloan-Kettering Institute from 1954-57.

Sloan-Kettering Institute Progress Report, 1954 / tobacco document
Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1956-57 / tobacco document

John M. Walker Jr.

Dr. John M. Walker's son, John M. Walker Jr., a first cousin of President George H.W. Bush, was a member of the Citizens' Committee of the Citizens' Campaign Against Bootleg Cigarettes in 1977. He was a partner of Carter, Ledyard and Milburn. Other members of the Committee included Morris B. Abram, a partner of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison (whose partners John F. Wharton had been a director of Benson & Hedges and Tobacco & Allied Stocks, and Simon H. Rifkind was a director of Loew's Theatres, which acquired Lorillard Tobacco); J. Hugh Bailey, Director of Special Marketing of CNA Insurance; Thomas Henry Guinzburg, Skull & Bones 1950; Mrs. Marian Heiskell, Director of Special Activities of the New York Times; Carl M. Loeb; Bishop Paul Moore; and philanthropist Stewart R. Mott. Its Industry Committee included representatives of P. Lorillard, Philip Morris, R.J. Reynolds, Liggett & Myers, Loews Corporation, Brown & Williamson and Metropolitan Tobacco, as well as six distributors. The purpose of the committee was to fight cigarette smuggling, which deprived New York City of tax revenues. (Monthly Report on Status. Memo from Ralph Murphine to Management Group and Executive Committe, Apr. 1, 1977; Memorandum from Alan Miller to Bernie Robinson, of Philip Morris, Mar. 11, 1983.)

Citizens' Campaign Against Bootleg Cigarettes / tobacco document
Citizens' Campaign Against Bootleg Cigarettes (9pp) / tobacco document
Monthly Report, Apr. 1, 1977 / tobacco document
Miller to Robinson, Mar. 11, 1983 / tobacco document

"Cigarette bootlegging was first made a federal offense with the enactment in November 1978 of S1487, (PL-95-575), the Federal Cigarette Contraband Act of 1978. PL-95-575 makes cigarette bootlegging a Federal offense, punishable by a fine of up to $100,000 or prison of up five years, or both for any person knowingly to ship, transport, receive, possess, sell, distribute or purchase "contraband cigarettes." "Contraband cigarettes" are defined as cigarettes in a quantity in excess of 60,000 lacking tax indicia of the state in which found, in the possession of persons other than four specific classes of persons. This provision of the bill become effective when President Carter signed the bill on Nov. 2, 1978. The law also made it an offense to knowingly make false statements or representations with respect to information requured to be kept in the records of a person who ships, sells or dlstrlbutes any quantlty of cigarettes in excess of 60,000 in a single transaction. This part of the bill became effective April 1, 1979. PL-95-575, which provided the basis for BATF's anti-bootlegging activities, was itself based on research done by the Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations on the cigarette tax evasion problem and published in 1977 as 'Cigarette Bootlegging: A State and Federal Responsibility.'" (TMA National Bulletin. Oct. 9, 1981.) In 1981, Walker was Assistant Secretary for Enforcement and Operations at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms of the Treasury Department. He was appointed after Sen. Jesse Helms (R-NC) alleged that the US Customs Service placed improperly low tariffs on imported tobacco. (Probe of Tobacco Imports Threatens to Run Away With Its Backers. By Ward Sinclair. Washington Post, May 27, 1981.)

TMA National Bulletin, Oct. 9, 1981 / tobacco document
Probe of Tobacco Imports, May 27, 1981 / tobacco document

When R.J. Reynolds Tobacco filed conflict of interest charges against law firm LeBoeuf, Lamb, Leiby & MacRae, Judge John M. Walker Jr. gave LeBoeuf a pass: "In a judicial sleight-of-hand, Judge Walker found that R.J. Reynolds was a former client, even though LeBoeuf was representing it when it filed the lawsuit for Hartford Accident. He concluded that since Mr. Wood alone possessed confidential information from R.J. Reynolds and since that information was not related to the securities litigation, Leboeuf had not violated conflict rules." (Business and the Law. By Stephen Labaton. New York Times, Oct. 9, 1989.)

Business and the Law, Oct. 9, 1989 / tobacco document (pdf, 1p)

Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases, 1952-54

Mrs. Robert Livingston Clarkson was appointed chairman of the women's appeal committee. Mrs. Edward L. Shea was vice chairman. The other committee members were Mrs. Julius Ochs Adler, Mrs. Sidney C. Borg, Mrs. Edward C. Delafield, Mrs. Nelson Doubleday, Mrs. Donald Durant, Mrs. Florence Ferguson, Mrs. Horace Flanigan, Mrs. Charles V. Hickox, Mrs. Winslow Lovejoy, Mrs. Isaac F. Marcosson, Mrs. Leon A. Radler, Mrs. Robert C. Ream, Mrs. Edmund P. Rogers, H. Nelson Slater, and Mrs. Sidney Waldon. (Heads Women's Division In Cancer Center Drive. New York Times, Sep. 16, 1952.)

Mrs. Edward C. Delafield was head of the patroness committee of the benefit for the Trifles and Treasures Thrift Shop of the Social Service Committee. Mrs. Ernest L. Nye was one of her aides. Mrs. Herbert T. Mundin was chairman of the executive committee, and Mrs. John R. Topping [later the second Mrs. Lowell P. Weicker] and Mrs. Walter H. Saunders were vice chairmen. Patronesses included Mrs. Madison H. Lewis, Mrs. Charles H. Theriot, Mrs. Irving H. Pardee, Mrs. James L. Ashley, Mrs. E. Herrick Low, Mrs. Julius Ochs Adler, Mrs. John B. Marsh, Mrs. John Gerdes, Mrs. Douglas L. Elliman, Mrs. Nelson Doubleday, Mrs. Laurance S. Rockefeller, Mrs. Charles Mertz, Mrs. Alfred Easton Poor, Mrs. William O'D. Iselin, Mrs. Seth Milliken, Mrs. Raymond P. Sloan, Mrs. Leonard J. Wyeth, Mrs. Alfred O. Hoyt, Mrs. Duncan M. Findlay, Mrs. John B. Van Horne, Mrs. Enrico N. Stein, Mrs. Hermann G. Place, Mrs. Theodore Schumacher, Mrs. Robert L. Clarkson, Mrs. John E. Davis, Mrs. Charles Breed, Mrs. Draper Boncompagni, Mrs. George H. Quayle, Mrs. A. Victor Barnes, Mrs. Robert C. Ream, Mrs. Dudley B. Bonsal, Mrs. F. Everett Place, Mrs. Clinton B.F. Brill, Mrs. Clemens H. Davis, Mrs. William T. Grant, Mrs. Henry G. Walter Jr., Mrs. Angelika W. Frink, Mrs. James M. Heroy, Mrs. Frothingham Wagstaff, Mrs. Percy L. Douglas, Mrs. Archibald Douglas, Mrs. Frank B. Washburn, Mrs. Townsend McAlpin, Mrs. C. Norman Shaffer, Mrs. Jacques de Thier, Mrs. Donald Halsted, Mrs. Elliot H. Goodwin and Mrs. Jesse H. Van Alstyne. (Aiding Benefit for Social Service Unit. New York Times, Feb. 22, 1953.)

The Charles A. Dana Foundation made a gift of $258,200 for the MSKCC recovery pavillion, occupying almost an entire floor. (Memorial Center Receives $258,000. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1954.)

Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1954

Laurance S. Rockefeller, president of the Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases, announced a $10,000 Assurance Fund Campaign. Donors included the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation; Samuel H. Kress Foundation; Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Kettering; Mrs. Jean Mauze (aka Abbey Rockefeller, whose husband was on the board of directors of Freeport Sulfur with Benno Schmidt in the 1960s and '70s); Laurance S. Rockefeller; and John D. Rockefeller Jr. Dr. C.P. Rhoads, director of the Sloan-Kettering Institute, blamed air pollution and tobacco smoke for increases in lung cancer, and he and members of his staff "demonstrated a test developed in Germany, showing that the lungs of a cigarette smoker retain an unknown substance present in the smoke, when the smoke is inhaled." ($10,000,000 Asked in Cancer Attack. By William L. Laurence. New York Times, March 9, 1954.)

$10,000,000 Asked, 1954 / tobacco document

The Sloan-Kettering Institute Board of Trustees in 1954: Albert Bradley, Executive Vice President, General Motors Corporation; Detlev W. Bronk, Ph.D., President, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research; Reginald G. Coombe, Vice President, The Hanover Bank; Edward C. Delafield, Senior Partner, Delafield & Delafield; Joseph C. Hinsey, Ph.D. Director, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center; Frank A. Howard, Research Consultant, Standard Oil Company (N.J.); Charles F. Kettering, Research Consultant, General Motors Corporation; Eugene W. Kettering, Assistant Chief Engineer, Electro-Motive Division, General Motors Corporation; Deane W. Malott, President, Cornell University; W. Albert Noyes Jr., Ph.D. Chairman, Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester; Ellmore C. Patterson, Vice President, J. P. Morgan & Company, Inc.; John L. Pratt, Engineer and Philanthropist; Laurance S. Rockefeller, Rockefeller Brothers, Inc.; Alfred P. Sloan Jr., Chairman of the Board, General Motors Corporation; Raymond P. Sloan, Vice President and Editorial Director, The Modern Hospital Publishing Co.; Lewis L. Strauss, Chairman, U. S. Atomic Energy Commission (who was also on the Committee on Scientific Policy); George Whitney, Chairman of the Board, J. P. Morgan & Company, Inc.; and Theodore P. Wright, D.Sc. Vice President for Research, Cornell University. The Committee on Scientific Policy was was Bronk, Hinsey, Kettering, Noyes, and Strauss. The Board of Scientific Consultants included Sidney Farber, M.D. Director, Children's Cancer Research Foundation, Inc.; and Choh Hao Li, Ph.D., Professor of Experimental Endocrinology, The Institute of Experimental Biology, University of California (who was personally funded by Mary W. Lasker). Leading funding sources included the American Cancer Society, the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation, and the US Atomic Energy Commission. Ernst L. Wynder was an assistant; the report on his mouse skin-painting work notes that they "mechanically burned" the skins of the mice. President George Herbert Walker Bush's uncle, John Mercer Walker, S&B 1931, joined the scientific staff. (Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, Progress Report VIII, November 1954.)

Sloan-Kettering Institute Progress Report, 1954 / tobacco document

Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases, 1955-57

The Society of the Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases showed a film for fundraising. Mrs. Charles N. Breed Jr. was chairman of the benefit committee. Her aides were Mrs. Bayard Walker, vice-chairman; Mrs. John R. Stevenson, Mrs. Robert M. Barry, Mrs. Charles Saltzman, Mrs. Henry R. Benjamin, Mrs. Francis D. Rogers, Mrs. Joseph W. Briggin, and Mrs. Henry T. Randall. Others were Mrs. Carroll Carstairs, Mrs. Constantine Mittendorf, Mrs. Charles Chace, Mrs. Randolph B. Marston, Mrs. Charles A. Dana, Mrs. Isaac F. Marcossan, Mrs. Dominick Dunne, Miss Laura Leonard, Mrs. Howeth T. Ford, Mrs. Percy Lawson-Johnston, Mrs. Donald Hirst, Mrs. Arthur H. Kudner and Mrs. Alfred O. Hoyt. (Cancer Center Unit Will Gain By Movie. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1955.)

Hoyt Ammidon, vice president of the Vincent Astor Foundation; Dr. Hugh E. Luckey, dean of Cornell University Medical College; Edward L. Shea, president of the Ethyl Corporation; J. Albert Woods, president of the Commercial Solvents Corp.; and Harper Woodward, a director of several aircraft Companies, were elected to the Board of Managers of the Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases. (5 Join Memorial Center Board. New York Times, May 11, 1955.)

Mrs. Alfred O. Hoyt and Mrs. Cornelius C. Felton were co-chairmen of the luncheon for the Trifles and Treasures Gift Shop. Mrs. Donald M. Halstead was chairman of the hostess committee, and Mrs. William Howard Taft 2d headed the patroness committee. The patronesses included Mrs. L. Jarvis Cushing, Mrs. John R. Stevenson, Mrs. Robert Winthrop, Mrs. Hoyt Ammidon, Mrs. Carroll Carstairs, Mrs. Townsend M. McAlpin, Mrs. Charles A. Dana, Mrs. Charles H. Thieriot, Mrs. Nelson Doubleday, Mrs. Robert E. Strawbridge Jr., Mrs. Charles Breed Jr., Mrs. William O'D. Iselin, Mrs. Harvey D. Gibson, Mrs. Julius W. Noyes, Mrs. Harry Payne Bingham, Mrs. B. Brewster Jennings, Mrs. Edward I. Shea, Mrs. Bayard Walker, Mrs. Walter G. Dunnington, Mrs. Waldo M. Hatch, Mrs. Laurance S. Rockefeller, Mrs. Douglas L. Elliman, Mrs. Mellon Bruce, Mrs. Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., Mrs. Edward C. Delafield, Mrs. J. Stillman Rockefeller, Mrs. Reginald G. Coombe, Mrs. Caspar C. de Gersdorff, Mrs. Murray Olyphant, Mrs. Duncan M. Findlay, Mrs. William A. Barstow, Mrs. Percy Lawson-Johnston, Mrs. William A. Clark, Mrs. Donald Durant, Mrs. John W. Cross, Mrs. Grover O'Neill, Mrs. Frank E. Remick, Mrs. Hugh F. Walker, Mrs. William P.T. Preston, Mrs. John W. Galbraith, Mrs. Frank A. Howard, Mrs. Jesse H. Van Alstyne, Mrs. T. Ferdinand Wilcox, Mrs. Albert Bradley, Mrs. Julius Ochs Adler, Mrs. Gene Tunney and Mrs. James Dowd. (Plans Advanced for Thrift Shop. New York Times, Jan. 22, 1956.)

Mrs. Charles A. Dana was executive chairman of the "Salute to Summer" cocktail reception and tea dance. Mrs. Charles F. Darlington was vice chairman, Mrs. Howeth Towsend Ford, president of the society, was honorary chairman. Mrs. Edward C. Delafield and Mrs. Albert Bradley were chairmen of the founders and patroness committee, respectively. Others involved were Mrs. Laurance S. Rockefeller, Mrs. Raymond P. Sloan, Mrs. Cornelius P. Rhoads, Mrs. Dave H. Morris Jr., Mrs. Edward F. Hutton, Mrs. W.H. Dannat Pell, Mrs. Corning Iglehart, Mrs. R. Clifford Wilson, Mrs. Devereux C. Josephs, Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt, Mrs. Robert E. Strawbridge, Mrs. Richard Percy Limburg, Mrs. Victor Weybright, and Mrs. Clark Williams; also Mme. Draper Boncompagni, Mrs. Edmund A. Stanley, Mrs. L. Jarvis Cushing Jr., Mrs. Earl Harkness, Mrs. James Werblow, Mrs. Horace Flanagan, Mrs. Edward L. Shea, Miss Alouise Baker and Mrs. Willcox B. Adsit. Jean R. Southworth, Mrs. Robert W. Sarnoff, and Mrs. John S. Hilson were pictured. (Dance to Assist Cancer Society. New York Times, Mar. 9, 1956.)

Mrs. Howeth Townsend Ford, president of the Society of Memorial Cancer Center, was honorary chairman of the annual fashion show benefit for the gift shop. Mrs. Bayard Walker was executive chairman, and Mrs. Constantine Mittendorf was vice chairman. Mrs. John N. Lindeke was head of the Thrift Shop committee, and Mrs. Percy Lawson-Johnson was a member of the benefit committee. The models included Mrs. Donald Perkins, Mrs. William G. Cahan, Mrs. John S. Burke Jr., Mrs. Edward C. Stanley, Mrs. Harold Behlke and Mrs. Arthur Kudner. Mrs. H. Virgil Sherrill headed the patroness committee; her aides were Mrs. William Howard Taft 2d, Mrs. Clark Williams, Mrs. David Granger, Mrs. Cornelius C. Felton, Mrs. Nelson Doubleday, Mrs. Charles A. Dana, Mrs. Julius Ochs Adler, Mrs. Corning Iglehart, Mrs. Wolcott Blair, Mrs. Laurance S. Rockefeller, Mrs. Albert Bradley, Mrs. Townsend M. McAlpin, Mrs. Isaac F. Marcosson and Mrs. Hoyt Ammidon. Others were Mrs. Edward C. Delafield, Mrs. Henry Ford 2d, Mrs. Duncan M. Findlay, Mrs. Robert E. Strawbridge Jr., Mrs. Albert Tilt, Mrs. Francis Thorne Jr., Mrs. Edgar Eyre, Mrs. Reginald G. Coombe, Mrs. Joseph A. Meehan, Mrs. William G. McKnight, Mrs. R. Stuyvesant Pierpont Jr., Mrs. Raymond P. Sloan, Mrs. Charles H. Theriot, Mrs. Peter Milholland, Mrs. Alfred C. Clark, and Mme. Draper Boncompagni; Mrs. John R. Stevenson, Mrs. Leonard J. Wyeth, Mrs. John Ben Ali Haggin, Mrs. Waldo M. Hatch, Mrs. Winston Frost, Mrs. Charles F. Darlington, Mrs. George Cornish, Mrs. William A. Barstow, Mrs. A. Victor Barnes, Mrs. Devereux C. Josephs, Mrs. A. Wright Post, Mrs. Algernon B. Reese, Mrs. Leon A. Radler, Mrs. Elizabeth Graham, Mrs. Philip Ewald, Mrs. John H. Heminway, Mrs. Donald Hirst, Mrs. Paul Shields, and Mrs. Earl Harkness. (Fashion Display on Wednesday To Aid Memorial Cancer Center. New York Times, Jan. 31, 1957.)

Mrs. Howeth T. Ford hosted the committee for the MSKCC cocktail party-tea dance. Her aides were Mrs. Joseph A. Thomas, and Joseph A. Meehan; Mrs. Arthur H. Kudner, Mrs. George Cornish, Mrs. John W. Chapman, Mrs. Henry F. Wagner, Mrs. Donald Perkins, Mrs. Winston H. Frost, Mrs. Dominick Dunne, Mrs. Gardner Cowles and Mrs. Joseph W. Donner; Mrs. Charles A. Danna, Mrs. Harry Rafter, Mr. and Mrs. Jarvis L. Cushing Jr., Leslie Dorsey and Mrs. William G. Cahan, Peter Lind Hayes, and Mary Healy. Mrs. Frederic G. Cammann headed the May Fair Junior Dance Committee, whose aides included Mrs. George M. Joyce, Mrs. Hitchcock Stone, Mrs. Peter Van Singerland, with Misses Harriet Dunne, Diane Fenton, Fifi Ford, Nancy Hatch, Karyl Kudner and Ruth Pratt. L. Jarvis Cushing headed the men's committee, with Briggs Baugh, Clifford V. Brokaw 3d, Donald Coons, Walter B. Delafield, Paul de Rosiere, Frederick Eberstadt, Rufus Finch, Benjamin H. Gaylord, Lloyd S. Gilmour Jr., Ernest T. Greeff, Donald Hirst, George N. Joyce, David F. Houston, John Munroe, William W. Myrick, Henry B.H. Ripley Jr., John P. Wareham, Charles Van Rensselaer, Harold Palmer, and Truman M. Talley. (Fete May 23 to Aid Cancer Center. New York Times, May 5, 1957.)

Sloan-Kettering Institute Biennial Report, 1955-57

Board of Trustees: Roger Adams, PhD, University of Illinois; Albert Bradley, Chairman of General Motors; Detlev W. Bronk, PhD, President, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research; Reginald G. Coombe, Senior Vice President, The Hanover Bank; Edward C. Delafield, Delafield & Delafield; Joseph C. Hinsey, PhD, Director, New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center; Frank A. Howard, Research Consultant, Standard Oil Co. (New Jersey); Charles F. Kettering, Research Consultant, General Motors Corp.; Eugene W. Kettering, General Motors Corp.; Deane W. Malott, President, Cornell University; W. Albert Moyes Jr. PhD, University of Rochester; John L. Pratt, Engineer and Philanthropist; C.P. Rhoads, MD, Director, Sloan-Kettering Institute; Laurance S. Rockefeller, Rockefeller Brothers Inc.; Alfred P. Sloan Jr., Hon. Chairman, General Motors Corp.; Lewis L. Strauss, Chairman, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission; Robert E. Strawbridge Jr., Director, Strawbridge & Clothier; Warren Weaver PhD, Vice President, Rockefeller Foundation; George Whitney, Director, J.P. Morgan & Co. Inc.; Theodore P. Wright, Vice President, Cornell University. Officers: Alfred P. Sloan Jr., President; Frank A. Howard, President; Edward C. Delafield, Secretary; Ellmore C. Patterson, Treasurer; Harrison V. Smith, Asst. Treasurer; H. Lawrence Hess, Asst. Secretary.

Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1956-57 / tobacco document

Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases, 1958

Officers of the Women's Society of Memorial Cancer Center included Mrs. Edward C. Delafield, honorary founding chairman; Mrs. Randolph B. Marston, vice president; L. Jarvis Cushing Jr., second vice president; Mrs. George Cornish, secretary, and David W. Devens, treasurer. Members of the patronesses committee, Mrs. Lowell P. Weicker, chairman; Mrs. Robert E. Strawbridge Jr., Mrs. Julius Ochs Adler, Mrs. William A.M. Burden Jr., Mrs. Laurence S. Rockefeller, Mrs. William Howard Taft 2d, Mrs. Arthur A. Houghton Jr., Mrs. Robert L. Clarkson, Mrs. Carroll Carstairs, Mrs. John R. Stevenson, Mrs. Clark Williams, Mrs. William Woodward, Mrs. Draper Boncompagni, Mrs. A. Victor Barnes, Mrs. Cornelius C. Felton, Mrs. Corning Iglehart, Mrs. Pierre Bedard, Mrs. Isaac F. Marcosson, Mrs. Joseph A. Meehan, Mrs. William Randolph Hearst, Mrs. David Granger, Mrs. Lowell Wadmond, Mrs. Lawrence Copley Thaw, Mrs. Leonard J. Wyeth, Mrs. Peter Grimm, Mrs. Alfred M. Ehrenclou, Mrs. M. Dorland Doyle, Mrs. Reginald G. Coombe, Mrs. Charles N. Breed Jr., Mrs. Murray Oliphant, Mrs. Peter Milholland, Mrs. Albert Bradley, Mrs. Wolcott Blair, Mrs. Leon A. Radler, Mrs. Carl J. Schmid, Mrs. Earl Harkness, Mrs. Stanley C. Hope and Mrs. Hulbert Aldrich. Mrs. Norman Kent and Mrs. Virgil Sherrill were pictured. (Plans Advanced for Cancer Event. New York Times, Jan. 11, 1958.)

Mrs. Alfred Corning Clark was general chairman of the annual Trifles and Treasures Thrift Shop luncheon and fashion show for MSKCC. Her aides included Mrs. Edward F. Hutton, Mrs. Howeth T. Ford, and Mrs. Lowell P. Weicker. Mrs. John N. Lindeke, president of the thrift shop, was honorary chairman. Ticketholders included Mrs. Alfred Ehrenclou, Mrs. William Woodward, Mrs. Gardner Cowles, Mrs. Walter J. Jeffords, Mrs. Clark Williams, Mrs. Theodore Danforth, Mrs. William de Rham, Mrs. Truman Talley, Baroness de Gunsberg, Mrs. Laurance S. Rockefeller, Mrs. Nelson Doubleday, and Mrs. Jeremiah Maguire. (Cancer Unit Fete Today. New York Times, Feb. 4, 1958.)

Mrs. Arthur H. Kudner was chairman of the eleventh annual Salute to Summer Cocktail Party and Tea Dance benefit. Mrs. Bernard Gimbel and Mrs. Gardner Cowles were vice chairmen, and Mr. and Mrs. Jarvis Cushing were co-chairmen of the junior committee. Other chairmen were Mr. John R. Stevenson, hostess committee; Mrs. Howeth T. Ford, patronesses; Mrs. John W. Chapman, arrangements; Mrs. Donald Perkins, awards, and William S. Rockefeller, men's committee. (Aiding Cancer Center Fete May 19. New York Times, Feb. 12, 1958.)

Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases, 1959

Mrs. Douglas A. McCrary was chairman of the annual Trifles and Treasures Thrift Shop luncheon and fashion show, and Mrs. H. Virgil Sherrill vice chairman. Mrs. Winston H. Frost was head of the hostess committee, and her aides were Mrs. Robert G. Hughes, Mrs. William T. Preston, Mrs. Donald M. Halsted, Mrs. Joseph A. Thomas, Mrs. Donald Hirst, Mrs. Harold L. Behlke, Mrs. Bayard Walker, Mrs. William Harbach, Mrs. Roswell L. Gilpatrick, Mrs. Donald Perkins and Mrs. Francis Cooper Lawrance. Mrs. John N. Lindeke was president of Trifles and Treasures, and Mrs. Charles F. Darlington was president of the Society of Memorial Cancer Center. Members of other committees included Mrs. Alfred Corning Clark, Mrs. George Hyan, Mrs. H. Graves White, Mrs. Ralph S. Stubbs, Mrs. Clarence A. Barnes Jr., Mrs. Becher Hungerford, Mrs. John W. Chapman, Mrs. Atwood H. Miller, Mrs. Harry Rafter, Mrs. Charles J. Parkinson, Mrs. Nelson Crowell and Mrs. Phipps Pearl. (Aides of Cancer Center Meet Today. New York Times, Jan. 15, 1959.) Mrs. Francis Cooper Lawrance and Mrs. Winston Frost were Howard Townsend's nephew's wife and his niece, respectively.

Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases, 1960

Mrs. Edward L. Shea was chairman of patronesses of the luncheon and fashion show benefit in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf-Astoria. Mrs. Robert L. Clarkson was chairman, Mrs. Charles F. Darlington vice chairman, and Mrs. Osborn Elliott was chairman of hostesses. Mrs. Harry Rafter was executive secretary of the Society of Memorial Cancer Center. Patronesses included Mrs. Richard S. Newlin, Mrs. Leonard J. Wyeth, Mrs. Clark Williams, Mrs. Harper Woodward, Mrs. Julius W. Noyes, Mrs. T. Ferdinand Wilcox, Mrs. Searle Whitney, Mrs. James Werblow, Mrs. Clyde E. Weed, Mrs. Henry F. Wanger, Mrs. Bayard Walker, Mrs. J.H. Van Alstyne, and Mrs. Phillips R. Turnbull. Others were Mrs. Roderick Tower, Mrs. Robert E. Strawbridge, Mrs. John R. Stevenson, Mrs. Carl J. Schmidlapp, Mrs. Laurance S. Rockefeller, Mrs. William P.T. Preston, Mrs. Kennett L. Rawson, Mrs. Robert L. Ireland 3d, Mrs. E. Edgar Iglehart, Mrs. Reginald V. Hiscoe, Mrs. Nathaniel P. Hill, Mrs. Donald M. Halsted, Mrs. Artemus L. Gates, Mrs. Howeth T. Ford, Mrs. William A. Barstow, Mrs. Charles N. Breed Jr., Mrs. Alan L. Corey, Mrs. Gardner Cowles, Mrs. L. Jarvis Cushing Jr., Mrs. Suydam Cutting, Mrs. Charles A. Dana, Mrs. Mellon Bruce, Mrs. Thomas H. Choate, Mrs. Carl J. Schmid, Mrs. George Schirer and Mrs. Henry T. Randall. (Patronesses Named for Fete Aiding Cancer Center Feb. 16. New York Times, Jan. 24, 1960.)

Patrons of the May 16 Salute to Summer cocktail party and tea dance included Mrs. H. Stillman Taylor, Mrs. Laurence S. Rockefeller, Mrs. Raymond P. Sloan, Mrs. Angier Biddle Duke, Mrs. John Fremont, Mrs. Edward C. Delafield, Mrs. Jean Mauze, Mrs. Townsend M. McAlpin, Mrs. Gerald M. Livingston, Mrs. Edward F. Hutton, Mrs. Hayes Martin, Mrs. Lowell Wadmond, Mrs. Jorge R. Andre Jr. and Mrs. Frederick C. Cammann. Also, Mrs. William R. Grace, Mrs. Cornelius C. Felton, Mrs. Anthony Del Balso, Mrs. Henry B.H. Ripley Jr., Mrs. Clark Williams, Mrs. W. Whitewright Watson, Mrs. H. Virgil Sherrill, Mrs. John Hammond, Mrs. John W. Galbreath, Mrs. Harper Woodward, Mrs. Victor Weybright, Mrs. Reginald G. Coombe, Mrs. Albert Bradley, Mrs. Frederick R. Childs Jr., Mrs. Edgar W. Garbisch, Mrs. Leon A. Radler, Mrs. Draper Boncompagni, Mrs. Isaac F. Marcosson, Mrs. Charles V. Hickox, Mrs. Ralph K. Robertson, Mrs. Robert E. Strawbridge Jr., Mrs. Donald Perkins, Mrs. Walter B. Delafield, Mrs. Vincent Orssich, Mrs. Herbert T. Mundin, Mrs. Bayard Walker, Mrs. Leonard D. Henry and Mrs. John R. Fell. Mrs. Harold L. Behlke was head of the committee, with Mrs. Hiram S. Gans, Mrs. Howeth T. Ford, Mrs. E. Richard Ede, Mrs. James F. Burns 2d and Mrs. Stanley de J. Osborne. (Sponsors Named For Fete Aiding Hospital Group. New York Times, Mar. 30, 1960.) Mrs. Harold L. Behlke was chairman of the thirteenth annual Salute to Summer cocktail party and tea dance. Mrs. William P.T. Preston was president of the Society. Mrs. Julius W. Noyes was chairman of the patroness committee, which included Mrs. Charles K. Fletcher Jr., Mrs. Clyde E. Weed, Mrs. Bernard Gimbel, Mrs. Gardner Cowles, Mrs. Arthur Gray, Mrs. Frederick S. Moseley Jr., Mrs. Charles N. Breed Jr., Mrs. Donald S. Stralem, Mrs. Walter Mann, and Mrs. William H. Russell. Others were Mrs. Eugene H. Clay, Mrs. Winslow M. Lovejoy, Mrs. Edmund A. Stanley, Mrs. Orson D. Munn, Mrs. A. Walker Bingham, Mrs. Rodney Procter, Mrs. Wallace S. Jordan, Mrs. Archibald Douglas Jr., Mrs. Charles J. Parkinson, and Mrs. Joseph W. Donner. (Party Aids Society of Cancer Center. New York Times, May 17, 1960.)

Mrs. Walker Knapp and Mrs. Preston C. Iverson were co-chairs of the board of directors for the fundraising series for the Reconstructive Surgical Service of MSKCC. Directors included Mrs. John C. Carrington, Mrs. Arthur B. Schoen, Mrs. Anthony del Balso, Mrs. Walter M. Jeffords and Mrs. Alan Schumacher. Members of the committee included Mrs. Charles S. Whitman, Mrs. John P. Morgan 2d, David Bartlett, Edgar Marston, Mrs. Fletcher Godfrey, Russell Forgan Jr., Roy Punnett, Mrs. William Winant 3d, Brownlee Curry, James Miller, Mrs. Owen R. Cheatham and Mrs. Truman Talley. (3 Dinner Dances Will Raise Funds For Cancer Unit. New York Times, Sep. 25, 1960.)

Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1960

Trustees include Laurance S. Rockefeller and Lewis L. Strauss. Peyton Rous, a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors since 1955, was named its first Chairman of that board. The Andre and Bella Meyer Foundation joined the ACS and the National Cancer Institute as major funding sources for its more than $9 million budget. (Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, Progress Report XIV, December 1960, Immunological Studies.)

Sloan-Kettering Institute, 1960 / tobacco document

John R. Heller

Heller was chief of the civilian venereal disease program during World War II, director of the National Cancer Institute from 1948 to 1960, and president and chief executive officer of MSKCC from 1960 to 1964. He continued as vice chairman of its board of trustees, and was a special consultant on international, medical, and scientific affairs for the American Cancer Society. In 1965, he returned to the NCI as special consultant on international activities. (South Carolina Honors Native Son Dr. John R. Heller. The NIH Record, Feb. 20, 1979.) Kenneth Endicott succeeded him as NCI director.

South Carolina Honors Native Son Dr. John R. Heller, Feb. 20, 1979 / tobacco document

"Also in 1957, the Board of Directors of the Society established an Ad Hoc Committee on Smoking and Health. Its members were: Dr. Warren H. Cole, of the University of Illinois College of Medicine; Dr. John R. Heller, then Director of the National Cancer Institute; Dr. Ochsner; Dr. Ernest L. Stebbins, of Johns Hopkins University; Dr. Howard C. Taylor, Jr., Professor and Chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons; Rutherford L. Ellis, Chairman of the Board of Lipscomb-Ellls Co., Atlanta, Ga.; William B. Lewis, Chairman of the Board of Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc., New York City; Monroe J. Rathbone, President and Director of Standard Oil of New Jersey; Dr. Ira DeA. Reid, Professor of Sociology, Haverford College, and Frank L. Taylor, Executive Vice President and Director of the New York Herald Tribune. The Society reafflrmed the importance of presenting basic findings on the link between cigarettes and lung cancer to the public. The Board authorized production of suitable educational materials, including materials designed specifically for high school and college students, and authorized a one-year study of the smoking habits of teen-agers in the Portland, Oregon, school system which would involve nearly 22,000 high school students. Action followed. In December of 1957, the Society began distribution of its leaflet, 'To Smoke Or Not To Smoke.'" (The Position of the American Cancer Society Regarding Tobacco and Lung Cancer. To the City Editor [form letter]. American Cancer Society News Service, Jan. 7, 1964.)

The Position of the American Cancer Society Regarding Tobacco and Lung Cancer, 1964 / tobacco document

"In the spring of 1958, NCI Director Rod Heller gave special emphasis in his testimony on recent developments in viruses and cancer research before the Appropriations Committees of Congress. He reported that several animal cancers had been induced by injection of cell-free extracts from leukemic tissues and tumors. These extracts had been filtered to remove all particles the size of bacteria or larger. Viruses were shown to be involved in the induction of the cancers. He also reported that the notion that viruses could cause cancer in man was of growing acceptance among cancer investigators. Nobel Laureate Wendell Stanley, who was a member of the National Advisory Cancer Council (NACC) and later a member of the NCI Board of Scientific Councilors (for NCI Intramural Research Programs), also testified before Congressional Appropriations Committees in favor of a larger budget than the one proposed by the Administration. He called for expanded research in viruses and cancer work and presented scientific evidence supporting the call for the expansion. Based on these presentations, in part, the Congress called for vigorous effort to stimulate research and training efforts in the study of the possible viral origin of human cancers. The aim of the effort was an expansive one: to search for viruses causing human cancers and their prevention. To the regular appropriation for the NCI of $27.814 million, the Congress appropriated an additional $1 million for added viruses and cancer efforts... At the November 1958 NACC meeting, the NCI established, with Council endorsement, a Panel on Viruses and Cancer with Council member Stanhope Bayne-Jones as Chairman... During the initial stages, responsibility for the conduct of the Program was given to Carl G. Baker who recently had become the NCI Assistant Director after nearly two and a half years as Assistant to Dr. Joe Smadel, Associate Director for Intramural Research, NIH.. (An Administrative History of the National Cancer Institute’s Viruses and Cancer Programs, 1950-1972. By Carl G. Baker, M.D) This was part of a flurry of publicity which led to the ripoff of "The Special Virus Cancer Program Masquerade."

History of the National Cancer Institute’s Viruses and Cancer Programs / National Institutes of Health (pdf, 379pp)

"In 1959, the [American Cancer Society] Board established the Committee on Tobacco and Cancer to succeed the Ad Hoc Committee which had guided the Board since 1957. Dr. Taylor was named chairman, a position he held until the fall of 1963. The Committee was composed of distinguished physicians and laymen, including: James M. Brittain, Director of the Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Co.; Dr. Frank W. Foote, Jr., of Memorial Hospital, New York City; Dr. Heller; Dr. Leonard W. Larson, Bismark, N.D., pathologist and former president of the American Medical Association; Mr. Lewis; Arthur L. Montgomery, President of the Atlanta, Ga., Coca-Cola Bottling Co., and Allied Plants; James T. Mountz, Boston, Mass., attorney; Dr. Ochsner; Dr. I. S. Ravdin of the University of Pennsylvania and in 1963 President of the American Cancer Society; Victor A. Scholis, Louisville, Ky., Vice President and Director of Stations WHAS and WHAS-TV; Dr. Wendell M. Stanley, Director of the Virus Laboratory, University of California, and 1946 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry; Dr. Stebbins; Waldo I. Stoddard, Grand Rapids, Mich., banker; and Dr. Ashbel C. Williams, Jacksonville, Fla. surgeon." (The Position of the American Cancer Society Regarding Tobacco and Lung Cancer. To the City Editor [form letter]. American Cancer Society News Service, Jan. 7, 1964.)

The Position of the American Cancer Society Regarding Tobacco and Lung Cancer, 1964 / tobacco document

"'The Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute work as partners,' Dr. John R. Heller, former director of NCI, declared in 1960. 'The Director of the Institute is a member of the board of directors of the American Cancer Society, and the scientific advisory committees of both organizations interlock'" (Richard Carter, 1961:142. In: Ralph Moss, "The Cancer Industry.")

Benno C. Schmidt

Schmidt was on the board of overseers of MSKCC from about 1960 until 1990. He was a business partner of John Hay Whitney, one of Mary W. Lasker's allies in the National Cancer Act of 1971, and was a member of the President's Cancer Panel of the National Cancer Institute. Meanwhile, his business cronies were on the board of directors of Philip Morris.

The Benno C. Schmidt Page

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1961-63

Mrs. James W. Donner and Mrs. Wallace Jordan were co-chairmen of the tea dance benefit. Committee chairmen included Mrs. Hiram S. Gans, patronesses; Mrs. E. Richard Ebe, awards; Mrs. Walter B. Delafield, junior committee; and Mrs. Frank Schiff, arrangements. Mrs. Donald Perkins was president of the Society. Patronesses included Mrs. A. Walker Bingham 3d, Mrs. Charles A. Dana, Mrs. Edgar W. Garbisch, Mrs. William L. Laurence, Mrs. E. Hutton Timpson, Mrs. Bayard Walker, Mrs. Robert D.L. Gardiner, Mrs. Herbert T. Mundin, Mrs. Robert E. Strawbridgen Jr., and Mrs. George Hyam. Others were Mrs. Maurice Silverstein, Mrs. Bernhard K. Schaefer, Mrs. Elizabeth M. Morrison, Mrs. Thomas C. Amory, Mrs. F. Donald MacLean, Mrs. Jean Mauze, Mrs. Draper Boncompagni, Mrs. Andre de Coppet and Miss Anna R. Alexandre. (Cancer Center Will Be Assisted By a Tea Damce. New York Times, Mar. 30, 1961.)

Mrs. Joseph W. Donner and Mrs. Wallace S Jordan were co-chairmen of the Salute to Summer cocktail tea dance. Mrs. Walter B. Delafield was head of the junior committee. Mrs. Ernest T. Greeff, Mrs. Truman M. Talley, Mrs. James F. Burns 3d, Mrs. Frederick Eberstadt, Miss Janet Felton, Miss Patricia Perkins, Mrs. Frederic G. Cammann, Mrs. John Fraser, Mrs. Stuart Duncan and Mrs. Frederick C. Tanner Jr. assisted. (Kettering Cancer Unit Will Benefit Monday. New York Times, May 12, 1961.)

Mrs. William G. Cahan and Mrs. Frank E. Schiff were co-chairs of the MSKCC Salute to Summer coctail tea dance. Mrs. Gardner Cowles was chairman of patronesses, and other committee chairman were Mrs. Peter Lind Hayes (Mary Healy), Mrs. Ernest H. Martin, Mrs. Maurice Silverstein, Andrew M. Blum, and David Cassidy. Committee members included Mrs. Robert L. Forshay, Mrs. George Hyam, Mrs. Preston C. Iverson, Mrs. J. Neal Dow, Mrs. Thomas W. Boykin Jr., Mrs. William L. Laurence, Mrs. Martin Le Boutillier, Mrs. Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt, Mrs. Bernhard K. Schaefer, Mrs. Duncan MacGuigan, Mrs. William Talbert, Miss Arline Johnson, Mrs. Walter B. Delafield, Mrs. A. Walker Bingham 3d, Mrs. Winston Wilson, Mrs. Garrick Stephenson, Mrs. Kelly Dickson, Miss Marion Ross, Mrs. Elliott W. Plowe, and Mrs. Randolph B. Marston. (Sloan-Kettering to Raise Funds At May 14 Fete. New York Times, Feb. 25, 1962.)

Mrs. William G. Cahan and Mrs. Frank E. Schiff were co-chairmen of the cocktail tea dance, and Mrs. Gardner Cowles was chairman of patronesses. Those who had taken tables included Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Blum, Mr. and Mrs. L. Jarvis Cushing Jr., Mr. and Mrs. William Russell, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Donner, Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Foshay, Dr. and Mrs. Cahan, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Perkins and Mrs. Clark Williams; also Mr. and Mrs. Schiff, Mr. and Mrs. George Hyam, Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Plowe, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Muller, Mrs. Bernard Cone, Mrs. Eugene Kettering, Mr. and Mrs. Laurance S. Rockefeller, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Silverstein, Mr. and Mrs. Wallace S. Jordan and Mrs. Jeane Kerbs; Mrs. Lillian Manger, Dr. and Mrs. Hayes Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Howard, Mr. and Mrs. Carleton Cameron, Mr. and Mrs. James Werblow, Mr. and Mrs. Whitewright Warson, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Boykin, Mrs. Elizabeth Morrison, Mr. and Mrs. H. Virgil Sherrill and Mr. and Mrs. R. Frank Brooks.Mrs. Harry Rafter was executive secretary of the Society. (Sloan-Kettering To Be Assisted At Fete Monday. New York Times, May 9, 1962.)

Mrs. Howeth Townsend Ford was chairman of the annual Pink and White Ball to benefit Cancer Care Inc., of which she was a member of the board of trustees. Mrs. Sidney B. Wood Jr. was vice chairman; Mrs. William A. Waters, chairman of gifts committee; Mrs. Sheppard H.C. Davis, chairman of the program committee; and Winston Wilson and I. Jerome Riker, co-chairmen of the men's committee. Frank A. Vanderlip Jr. was honorary chairman. Committee members included Mrs. Charles Berns, Mrs. Howard Ellis Cox, Mrs. Charles A. Dana, Mrs. Basil O'Connor and Mrs. J. Halladay Philbin. (Dinner Dance June 22 to Aid Cancer Care. New York Times, May 29, 1963.)

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the National Museum of Racing at Saratoga, N.Y., split proceeds of about $100,000 from the Belmont Ball at the Waldorf-Astoria. Mrs. John A. Morris and Mr. Morris were hosts to Rear Adm. and Mrs. Gene Markey, Mr. and Mrs. Chester J. LaRoche, Mr. and Mrs. Norton Adams, Russell Nype, the master of ceremonies, and Mrs. Nype, James M. Wareham, Karl Herzer, and A. Musgrave. Mrs. Donald Perkins, the other vice chairman, and her husband had Mrs. Wallace S. Jordan, Dr. and Mrs. Henry T. Randall and Mrs. André de Coppet. The James Cox Bradys entertained Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Gerry, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Strawbridge entertained Mr. and Mrs. Charles Shipman Payson and Mrs. William Woodward. Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. du Pont had Mr. and Mrs. William Joshua Barney Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Albert E. Hart, Mr. and Mrs. John Butler and Miss Lana du Pont. Others who took tables were Col. and Mrs. Leonard D. Henry, Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Cowles, Mr. and Mrs. Leo T. Kissam, Mr. and Mrs. George Shirer, Mrs. Warren Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Laurance S. Rockefeller, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred G. Vanderbilt, Mrs. Elizabeth N. Arden, Mr. and Mrs. H.N. Bostwick Jr., David H. Carnahan, Mr. and Mrs. F. Skiddy Von Stade, Mr. and Mrs. John C. Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Clarkson, Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Dunne, Mr. and Mrs. Horace Flannigan, Mrs. Arthur Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest T. Greeff, Mr. and Mrs. Ashley T. Cole, Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Del Balso, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Hanes, Mrs. Reginald V. Hiscoe, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Iselin, Mrs. William C. Langley, Mrs. Edward S. Moore, Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Salmon, Joseph M. Roebling, Mrs. Donald Strales, and Mr. and Mrs. George D. Widener. (Elite of Racing Meet in Waldorf At Belmont Ball. New York Times, Jun. 8, 1963.)

Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1963

Trustees include Laurance S. Rockefeller and Lewis L. Strauss. Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research Progress Report XV, Viruses and Cancer, January 1963, reviews the subject to date, including the work of Stewart and Eddy on the polyoma virus.

Sloan-Kettering Institute, 1963 / tobacco document

Dedication of the Kettering Laboratory, Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, May 6, 1964.

Dedication of Kettering Laboratory, May 6, 1964 / tobacco document

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1964-65

Mrs. Gardner Cowles was chairman of the MSKCC Thrift Shop luncheon and Fashion show benefit. Mrs. Harold L. Behlke was president of the Society, and Mrs. John N. Lindeke was president of the thrift shop. Mrs. Harry Rafter was executive secretary of the Society. (Waldorf Benefit Set for Sloan-Kettering. New York Times, Jan. 21, 1964.)

James Cox Brady was chairman of the annual Belmont Ball, which raised funds for MSKCC as well as the National Museum of Racing. Mrs. John A. Morris and Mrs. Donald Perkins were vice chairmen. Members of ball committees included Mrs. Charles A. Dana, Mr. and Mrs. Reginald N. Webster, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore C. Baer Jr., Cortright Wetherill, Ogden Phipps, Whitney Stone, Mrs. Richard D. Vanderwarker, Miss Patrice Jacobs, Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Strawbridge Jr., and Mr. amd Mrs. Howeth T. Ford. Also, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund C. Monell, Mrs. John O. Needles, J. Samuel Perlman, Ashley T. Cole, Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Foshay, Mr. and Mrs. Harold L. Behlke, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Russell, Nicholas Benton, Alfred R. Heath, Mr. and Mrs. Francis Kernan, Mrs. Whitewright Watson, and Walter M. Jeffords Jr. (The Belmont Ball Will Raise Funds For 2 Agencies. New York Times, May 24, 1964.)

Mrs. David Granger was chairman of the annual luncheon for the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Thrift Shop. Mrs. William Barkely Harding was chairman of patronesses; Mrs. Sandford R. Johnson chairman of hostesses; Mrs. W. Wainwright Warson was chairman of arrangements, and Mrs. Paul R. Hughes and Mrs. John N. Lindeke were co-chairmen of the thrift shop. Mrs. Harold L. Behlke was president of the Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Committee members were Mrs. Charles W. Nichols Jr., Mrs. Alex Neil Lilley, Mrs. R.L. Ireland 3d, Mrs. Randolph B. Marston, Mrs. H. Virgin Sherill, Mrs. John E.B. Murphy, Mrs. Clarence A. Barnes Jr., Mrs. Becher Hungerford, Miss Isabel Marting, Mrs. Charles C. Notebaert, Mrs. Phipps Pearl, and Mrs. Donald Perkins. (Sloan-Kettering Will Gain Feb. 4 At Waldorf Fete. New York Times, Jan. 19, 1965.)

Mrs. Howeth Townsend Ford was chairman of the Salute to Summer at the Starlight Roof of the Waldorf-Astoria. Mrs. William Leonard and Mrs. Randolph B. Marston were vice chairmen. John E.B. Murphy was chairman of the men's committee, with Charles B. Russell, Thomas A. Halleran, Roswell L. Gilpatrick, Joseph E. Slater, George J. Maguire, David E. Cassidy, Thomas H. Wolf, David W. Devens, and Theodore C. Baer assisting. Other committee members were Mrs. Gardner Cowles, Mrs. John R. Fell, Mrs. Frank E. Schiff, Mrs. Clarence A. Barnes Jr., Mrs. Paul L. Hughes, Mrs. H. Virgil Sherrill, Mrs. Thomas W. Boykin, Mrs. Robert MacWilliamson, Mrs. Joseph W. Donner and Miss Margaret Dale Ames. (Cocktail Dance On May 13 to Aid Cancer Center. New York Times, May 2, 1965.)

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1966

Mrs. William G. Cahan was chairman of the luncheon and fashion-show committee; Mrs. Gardner Cowles chairman of arrangements; Mrs. Roswell L. Gilpatrick, chairman of hostesses, and Mrs. Arthur A. Houghton Jr., chairman of patronesses. Mrs Randolph B. Marsten was president of the society, and Mrs. John N. Lindeke chairman of the thrift shop. Committee members for the luncheon were Mrs. Clarence A. Barnes Jr., Mrs. Charles Finch, Mrs. Donald M. Halsted, Mrs. William Seawell, Mrs. Sandford R. Johnson, Mrs. Maurice Silverstein, Mrs. William H. Russell, and Mrs. Stanley Arnold. (Fashions Lunch Feb. 3 to Assist Sloan-Kettering. New York Times, Jan. 16, 1966.)

Mrs. John R. Fell and Mrs. Gardner Cowles were co-chairmen of the Twentieth Anniversary Salute to Summer dinner dance. Benefit committee members were Mrs. Nelson A. Rockefeller, Laurance S. Rockefeller, Mrs. Arthur A. Houghton Jr., Mrs. Robert F. Kennedy, Mrs. Carter Burden, Mrs. Douglas Auchincloss, Mrs. Thomas H. Choate, Mrs. T. Suffern Tailer, Mrs. Lewis W. Douglas, Mrs. Munn Baker, Mrs. Stephen E. Smith, Mrs. McDonnell Ford, Mrs. Osborn Elliott, Mrs. William vanden Heuvel, Mrs. Lewis T. Preston, Mrs. Frederick A. Melhado, Mrs. Winston H. Frost, Mrs. Kingman Douglas, Mrs. Donald S. Stralem, Mrs. John McGuigan, Mrs. Frank E. Schiff, Mrs. Roswell L. Gilpatric, Mrs. Leland Hayward, Mrs. Bailey Gimbel and Mrs. Gilbert Miller. The junior committee was Mrs. Thomas M. Bancroft Jr., Mrs. John R. Fell Jr., Mrs. L. Stoddard Horn, Mrs. Frederick A. Cushing, Mrs. Michael Thomas, Mrs. L.H. van Gerbig, Mrs. Carl W. Timpson, Mrs. L. Jarvis Cushing, Mrs. William H. Russell, Mrs. Nicholas Benton, Mrs. Joseph W. Donner, Mrs. Theodore C. Baer Jr. and Miss Wendy Vanderbilt. (May 18 Dinner At Plaza to Help Sloan-Kettering. New York Times, Apr. 7, 1966.)

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1967

Mrs. René Bouché was chairman of the luncheon and fashion show committee. The luncheon chairmen were Mrs. Zachary Scott, Miss Minnie Cushing, and Mrs. William G. Cahan. Mrs. John N. Lindcke was Thrift Shop chairman, and Mrs. Randolph B. Marston was president of the society. Members of the luncheon committee were Mrs. Clarence A. Barnes Jr., Mrs. John R. Drexel 3d, Miss Isabel Marting, Mrs. Charles B. Finch, Mrs. Henry T. Mortimer, Mrs. Henry J. Heintz 2d, Mrs. Armin St. George, Mrs. Paul L. Hughes, Mrs. Theodore Weicker [Jr.], Mrs. Harold L. Behlke, Mrs. Arthur A. Houghton Jr., Mrs. Gardner Cowles, Mrs. William Leonard, Mrs. Osborn Elliott, Mrs. Ernest H. Martin, Mrs. Roswell L. Gilpatric, Mrs. Donald Perkins, Mrs. Jacob Javits, Mrs. Donald M. Halsted, and Mrs. James Werblow. Among the patronesses were Mrs. Duncan MacGuigan, Mrs. Jean Mauze [Abbey Rockefeller], Mrs. Bevan Holliday, Mrs. H. Lawrence Bogert Jr., Mrs. George Hyam, Mrs. Robert C. Scull, Mrs. Thaddeus F. Walkowitz, Mrs. Lauris Norstad, Mrs. Leon A. Radler, and Mrs. Bigelow Watts. (Fashions Lunch Feb. 2 to Benefit Cancer Patients. New York Times, Jan. 22, 1967.)

The Duchess of Windsor was honorary chairman of the international haute couture fashion shows at Alexander's. Mrs. Nelson A. Rockefeller and Mrs. Gardner Cowles were co-chairmen. Patronesses included Mrs. Eleanor Searle Whitney, Mrs. Laurance S. Rockefeller, Mrs. T. Suffern Tailer, Mrs. Lawrence Copley Thaw, Mrs. Iva S.V. Patcevitch, Mrs. C. Douglas Dillon, Mrs. John R. Drexel 3d, Mrs. John F.C. Bryce, Mrs. George F. Baker Jr., Mrs. Samuel P. Peabody and Mrs. Theodore S. Bassett 2d. (Sloan-Kettering Center to Gain. New York Times, Aug. 30, 1967.)

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1968

Board of trustees of the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute: Marion W. Boyer (Chairman), Detlev W. Bronk, Ph.D., Reginald G. Coombe, Edward C. Delafield, Frederic G. Donner, Harold W. Fisher (Vice Chairman), Joseph C. Hinsey, Ph.D., Frank L. Horsfall Jr., M.D. (President and Director), Eugene W. Kettering (Vice Chairman), Richard D. Lombard, Colin M. MacLeod, M.D., André Meyer [of Lazard Freres], Ellmore C. Patterson; Emanuel P. Piore, Ph.D., Laurance S. Rockefeller, Benno C. Schmidt, Harrison V. Smith (Treasurer), Robert M. Stecher, M.D., Robert E. Strawbridge Jr., John M. Walker M.D., T.F. Walkowicz Sc.D., Thomas J. Watson Jr., and Ogden White [a director of Liggett & Myers Tobacco]. Other officers: William Rockefeller, Secretary; Leo Wade, M.D., Vice President and Deputy Director; C. Chester Stock, Ph.D., Vice President and Director, Walker Laboratory; Oscar Bodansky, M.D., Ph.D., George B. Brown, Ph.D., Joseph H. Burchenal, M.D, and John S. Laughlin, Ph.D., Vice Presidents; Bernhard L. Mecke, Vice President for Business Affairs; Leon W. Zecker, Vice President, Finance; James H. Wickersham Jr., Assistant Treasurer, and Frances Muñoz, Assistant Secretary. (Report of the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1968.)

Report of the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1968 / tobacco document

Mrs. John R. Fell and Mrs. William L. Hutton were co-chairmen of the spring dinner dance for MSKCC. Mrs. Howard Dean and Mrs. H. Virgil Sherrill were vice chairmen. It was sponsored by Alexandra de Markoff-Parfums Hermès. Committee chairmen were Mrs. T. Suffern Tailer, Mrs. Michael M. Thomas, Mrs. Neil A. McConnell, Col. Serge Obolensky, Mrs. Irving Koerner and Michael Baldwin. The arrangement committee was Mrs. John R. Drexel 3d, Mrs. Gardner Cowles, Mrs. Laurence S. Rockefeller, Mrs. Harcourt Amory Jr., Mrs. Samuel Pryor Reed, Mrs. Thomas H. Choate, Mrs. Guy Rutherford, Mrs. Alexander Cushing, Mrs. Edmund C. Lynch, Mrs. Stephen E. Smith, Mrs. Joseph A. Meehan, Mrs. René Bouché, Mrs. Roswell L. Gilpatrick, Mrs. Arthur A. Houghton Jr., and Mrs. Robert E. Strawbridge Jr. Others were Mrs. Patricia Kennedy Lawford, Mrs. Edward F. Hutton, Mrs. Leland Hayward, Mrs. Charles B. Grosvenor, Mrs. Anne McDonnell Ford, Mrs. Bayard Walker, Mrs. Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Mrs. Walter B. Delafield and Mrs. Edwin F. Russell. Mrs. David Granger was president of the society. The event netted about $35,000 the previous year. (Dinner Dance at Plaza Will Assist Cancer Center. New York Times, May 4, 1968.)

Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Benefits, 1970

Mrs. Walter B. Delafield was chairman of the annual luncheon and fashion show. Those assisting her included Mrs. Elliot H. Goodwin, president of the society; Mrs. John A. Dunbar, chairman of the shop; Mrs. Kerryn King, chairman of patronesses; Mrs. Randolph B. Marston, chairman of arrangements, and Mrs. George S. Johnston, chairman of hostesses. (Sloan-Kettering Fashion Benefit Planned for Feb. 5. New York Times, Jan. 25, 1970.)

Mrs. John R. Fell, Mrs. William L. Hutton, and Mrs. Howard B. Dean were co-chairmen of a dinner dance benefit for MSKCC. Mrs. Elliott H. Goodwin was president of the Society. Committee members included Mrs. William F. Buckley Jr. [S&B 1950], Mrs. J. Frederick Byers 3d, Countess Rudolpho Crespi, Mrs. Harilaos Theodoracopulos, Mrs. H. Virgil Shenill, Mrs. Thomas Schippers, Mrs. Frank E. Schiff, and Mrs. Lewis A. Lapham [S&B 1931]; also, Mrs. Richard Pistell, Mrs. Randolph B. Marston, Mrs. Joseph Lauder, Mrs. Theodore S. Gary, Mrs. Gianluigi Gabetti, Mrs. Walter B. Delafield, Mrs. Marella Agnelli and Mrs. W. Palmer Dixon. Committee heads included Madelin Thayer Gilpatric, Mrs. David Granger and Mrs. R.L. Ireland 3d. (Dance Wednesday to Assist Sloan-Kettering Society. New York Times, May 8, 1970.)

1980 International Symposium on Cancer

The Advisory Committee of the Symposium on Cancer, presented by Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society, Sep. 14-18, 1980, included Laurance S. Rockefeller, Chairman of the Board of MSKCC; Benno C. Schmidt, Chairman of the Board of Memorial Hospital; James D. Robinson III, Vice Chairman of the Board of Memorial Hospital; Lane W. Adams, Executive Vice President of the American Cancer Society; Frank J. Rauscher, the ACS's Senior Vice President for Research; and NCI Director Vincent DeVita. The Program Committee included future AHF trustee Jerome J. DeCosse; Mathilde Krim; LaSalle D. Leffall, then immediate past president of the American Cancer Society, who shortly became a trustee of the AHF; and Frank J. Rauscher. Other participants included Mathilde Krim; LaSalle D. Leffall; Sir Richard Doll ("The Interphase Between Epidemiology and Cancer Control"); Arthur C. Upton; Alfred G. Knudsen (CTR 1986-94); John Weisburger, longtime research director of the AHF; R. Lee Clark and his assistant, Joseph Painter; and former Rep. Paul G. Rogers.

International Symposium on Cancer, 1980 / tobacco document

Paul A. Marks

Marks replaced Lewis Thomas as president of Memorial Sloan-Kettering. "Dr. Marks, a hematologist and authority on human genetics, has been vice president for Health Sciences and director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center/Institute of Cancer Research at Columbia University since 1973. An advisor to the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and other government bodies over the years, Dr. Marks has served as member of the President's Cancer Panel (1976-1979), the President's Biomedical Research Panel (1975-1976), and most recently as a member of the President's Commission on the accident at Three Mile Island." (Director at Columbia Cancer Center to Head MSKCC.)

Director at Columbia Cancer Center to Head MSKCC / tobacco document

Marks, Benno C. Schmidt and R. Lee Clark were members of the President's Cancer Panel in 1976. ([Members of the President's Cancer Panel, 1976, and National Advisory Cancer Council, 1957-71] J Natl Cancer Inst 1977 Aug;59(2suppl):763.)

President's Cancer Panel - J Natl Cancer Inst 1977 / tobacco document

Marks was on the Editorial Board of Science in 1992, along with Philip Morris director Elizabeth E. Bailey and David Baltimore, and in 1993 and 1994. Daniel E. Koshland Jr. was Editor. (Science 1992 Jul 31;257:595; Science 1993 Jan 8;259:159; Science 1994 Sep 9;265:1507.)

Science, July 31, 1992 / tobacco document
Science, Jan. 8, 1993 / tobacco document
Science, Sep. 9, 1994 / tobacco document

1987 board members were James D. Robinson 3d, chairman and chief executive of the American Express Company; John S. Reed, chairman and chief executive of Citicorp; Richard L. Gelb, chairman and chief executive of the Bristol-Myers Company; and Clifton C. Garvin Jr., former chairman and chief executive of the Exxon Corporation. Benno C. Schmidt was chairman. (Dr. Marks' Crusade. By Philip M. Boffey. New York Times, Apr. 26, 1987.)

Dr. Marks' Crusade, Apr. 26, 1987 / New York Times

John S. Reed

Reed was a trustee of MSKCC from at least 1986 until 2002. He was a director of Philip Morris from 1975 until 2003, and again since 2004.

The John S. Reed Page

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 2002

Laurance S. Rockefeller and James D. Robinson III were honorary co-chairmen. Louis V. Gerstner Jr. was Vice Chairman of Boards, and Chairman of the Board of Managers of the Sloan-Kettering Institute [was Chairman & CEO of RJR Nabisco Holdings since 1989];. Former National Institutes of Health Director Harold Varmus, in whose administration some research on the role of infection in chronic diseases proceeded at last, was President and Chief Executive Officer.

Mrs. Elmer H. Bobst was still on the Board of Overseers, along with Mrs. Joseph A. Califano Jr., Mrs. Ann Dibble Jordan, Richard Gelb, and Sanford I. Weill.

Mrs. Charles A. Dana Jr., Mrs. Thomas L. Kempner, Mrs. Milton Petrie, and Linda Gosden Robinson were on the 10-woman Advisory Council of The Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 2002. (Link died, Board and Society, 2002 Annual Report http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/shared/graphics/AR2002/14_BoardAndSociety.pdf)

2003 Trustees of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) include Mrs. Elmer H. Bobst; Mrs. Joseph A. Califano Jr.; Mrs. Milton Petrie; and Laurance S. Rockefeller.

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 2005

James D. Robinson III, Honorary Chairman; Douglas A. Warner III, Chairman; Richard I. Beattie, Vice Chairman of Boards, Chairman, Board of Managers, Memorial Hospital; Louis V. Gerstner, Jr., Vice Chairman of Boards, Chairman, Board of Managers, Sloan-Kettering Institute; Harold Varmus, MD, President & CEO; Clifton S. Robbins, Treasurer; Peter O. Crisp, Secretary; Paul A. Marks, MD, President Emeritus.

Managers: Frederick R. Adler, Richard I. Beattie, Roland W. Betts [G.W. Bush crony], Mrs. Elmer H. Bobst, Mrs. Edwin M. Burke, Mrs. John J. Byrne, Mrs. Joseph A. Califano, Jr., Peter O. Crisp, Stanley F. Druckenmiller, Steve Forbes, Richard N. Foster, Stephen Friedman, Ellen V. Futter [J.P. Morgan Chase]; Philip H. Geier, Jr., Louis V. Gerstner, Jr., Albert H. Gordon, Jonathan N. Grayer, John R. Gunn, Mrs. Charles Gwathmey, William B. Harrison, Jr., Benjamin W. Heineman, Jr., Mrs. Ann Dibble Jordan, David H. Koch, Marie-Josée Kravis, Mrs. Evelyn H. Lauder, Mrs. Jean Remmel Little, Mrs. John L. Marion, Paul A. Marks, MD, Donald B. Marron, Henry A. McKinnell, Jr., PhD, James G. Niven, E. Stanley O'Neal, Bruce C. Ratner, Clifton S. Robbins [was director of RJR Nabisco Holdings]; Josephine Robertson, James D. Robinson III, Benjamin M. Rosen, David M. Rubenstein, Jack Rudin, Mrs. Bijan Safai, Fayez S. Sarofim, Norman C. Selby, H. Virgil Sherrill, Stephen C. Sherrill, William C. Steere, Jr. [Chair. Emer. Pfizer Inc.], J. McLain Stewart, Michael L. Tarnopol [d. 2005], Carl W. Timpson, Jr., Harold Varmus, MD, Lucy R. Waletzky, MD, Douglas A. Warner III, Sanford I. Weill, Deborah C. Wright, Mortimer B. Zuckerman.

Board of Overseers Emeriti: Richard M. Furlaud, James W. Kinnear, Elizabeth J. McCormack, PhD, Thomas A. Murphy [d. 2006], Mrs. Arnold Schwartz, Frederick Seitz, PhD.

Board of Scientific Consultants: Martin D. Abeloff, MD, Chairman; Richard Axel, MD, Philip A. Cole, MD, PhD, Titia de Lange, PhD, Joseph L. Goldstein, MD, Tyler E. Jacks, PhD, Eric S. Lander, PhD, Arthur Levinson, PhD, Dan R. Littman MD, PhD, Frank McCormick, PhD, Paul Nurse, PhD, FRS, Carol L. Prives, PhD, Stanley R. Riddell, MD, Charles L. Sawyers, MD, Ralph Weissleder, MD, PhD, Irving L. Weissman, MD, Samuel A. Wells, Jr., MD. (Boards of Overseers and Managers, 2005 Annual Report, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/shared/graphics/AR_2005/05AR_BoardsOverseers_p36.pdf link died.)

David H. Koch, MIT 1962

David Hamilton Koch is a co-owner and executive vice president of Koch Industries. He has a bachelor's degree (1962) and a master's (1963) in chemical engineering from MIT. He joined Koch Industries, founded by his father, Fred C. Koch, in 1970. In October 2007, he donated $100 million to Massachusetts Institute of Technology for cancer research. He has also been on the National Cancer Advisory Board of the National Cancer Institute, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Tex., Rockefeller University, Johns Hopkins University, and the Aspen Institute. (Koch, David Hamilton. The New Netherland Institute, accessed 4/14/12.) In 1883, he and his brother, Charles de Ganahl Koch, bought out their other brothers, William Ingraham Koch and Frederick Robinson Koch, in Koch Industries, the second largest privately held company in the U.S. Net worth, about $4.5 billion. (#45 David Hamilton Koch. Forbes Magazine.) David H. Koch was the Libertarian Party's vice-presidential candidate in the 1980 presidential election. He was a founder and chairman of Citizens for a Sound Economy in 1984. He contributed $20 million to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine for a research building named for himself; $30 million to MSKCC; $25 million to M.D. Anderson; $25 million to New York-Presbyterian Hospital; $10 million to Cold Spring Harvor Laboratory; and other institutions. (Wikipedia.) He was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1992, which is the focus of his research philanthropy. His father's old boss at Medway and namesake of his brother, Charles F. de Ganahl, was also a director of MSKCC.

Koch, David Hamilton / The New Netherland Institute

His father, Fred Chase Koch, graduated from MIT with a degree in chemical engineering practice in 1922. He began his career with the Texas Company in Port Arthur, Texas, and then became chief engineer with the Medway Oil & Storage Company on the Isle of Grain in Kent, England. In 1925, he joined an MIT classmate, P.C. Keith, at Keith-Winkler Engineering, later Winkler-Koch, in Wichita, Kansas. "In 1927, Koch developed a more efficient thermal cracking process for turning crude oil into gasoline. This process led to bigger yields and helped smaller, independent oil companies compete. The larger oil companies instantly sued and filed 44 different lawsuits against Koch. Koch won all but one of the lawsuits. (That verdict was later overturned when it was revealed that the judge had been bribed.)" Winkler-Koch built 15 cracking units in the U.S.S.R. between 1929 and 1932, and trained Soviet technicians. In 1940, he joined other partners in Wood River Oil and Refining Company, the predecessor of Koch Industries.

Fred C. Koch / Wikipedia

His mother, Mary Clementine Robinson, was the daughter of Dr. Ernest F. Robinson and Mary Burnet Kip (1876-1923) of Kansas City, Mo., and granddaughter of William Ingraham Kip Jr., Yale 1860, son of the Protestant Episcopal Bishop of California. Kip Jr. was secretary of the American Legation in Tokyo in 1862, and later a statistician for the Government. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1918-1919, pdf p. 39.) Robinson and Kip were married at Trinity Cathedral in Omaha. Her attendant was Libby McCalla, daughter of Admiral McCalla of San Francisco. (Will Marry Miss Kip in Omaha Today. Lawrence Daily World, Feb. 6, 1904.) Dr. Ernest L. Robinson was the son of D.H. Robinson. He was a first cousin of Herbert Spencer Hadley [Governor of Missouri 1909-1913, who as Attorney General had prosecuted the Standard Oil Company for antitrust violation, later Chancellor of Washington University.] (Personal Mention. Lawrence Daily World, Dec. 3, 1900.) Mary Burnet Kip was the granddaughter of Elizabeth Clementine Dodge.

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1918-1919 / Yale University Library (pdf, 493 pp)
Herbert S. Hadley / Wikipedia

David H. Koch's namesake, David Hamilton Robinson (1837-1895), Professor of Latin Language and Literature at Kansas University, graduated from Rochester University in 1859, and received his Masters there in 1866. (Commencements. New York Times, Jul. 14, 1866.) He and Chancellor Snow were the first faculty of the University of Kansas when it opened in 1866. (Death of Prof. Robinson. Lawrence Gazette, Jul. 25, 1895.) He was born in Cato, N.Y., and married Henrietta P. Beach in Olathe, Kansas in 1869. (The Delta Upsilon Decennial Catalogue, 1903, p. 390.) She was a daughter of Rev. Isaac Closson Beach, Yale 1826. She was one of the first students at the University of Kansas, and the only member of the junior class. "With her winning disposition and under those idyllic conditions it is not to be wondered at that she accepted a marriage certificate instead of a diploma and became the wife of her Latin instructor." Their three sons and a daughter all went to the University of Kansas. (Mrs. Robinson Dead. Lawrence Daily World, Jan. 29, 1906; Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale College, June 1870 to June 1880, p. 88.)

The Delta Upsilon Decennial Catalogue, 1903, p. 390 / Google Books
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1870-1880, p. 88 / Google Books

Evelyn H. Lauder

Evelyn H. Lauder founded the Pink Ribbon Campaign for breast cancer. She was the wife of Leonard A. Lauder, chairman of the Estée Lauder Companies, where she was a senior vice president. Her parents were refugees from Austria who came to the U.S. in 1940. (Evelyn H. Lauder, Champion of Breast Cancer Research, Dies at 75. By Cathy Horyn. New York Times, Nov. 12, 2011.)

James W. Kinnear

James W. Kinnear graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1950, and joined Texaco in 1954. He was a director of Texaco since 1977, and was President and CEO of Texaco from 1987 to 1993. He was a director of Corning Inc. since 1978, and was a member of the Board of Overseers and Managers of MSKCC since at least 1994. (Director bio, Corning Inc., 1995.)

Corning Inc. 1995 DEF 14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 2006

James D. Robinson III, Honorary Chairman; Douglas A. Warner III, Chairman; Richard I. Beattie, Vice Chairman of Boards and Chairman, Board of Managers, Memorial Hospital; Clifton S. Robbins, Treasurer; Louis V. Gerstner, Jr., Vice Chairman of Boards and Chairman, Board of Managers, Sloan-Kettering Institute; Peter O. Crisp, Secretary; Harold Varmus, MD, President and Chief Executive Officer; Paul A. Marks, MD, President Emeritus.

Managers: Frederick R. Adler, Richard I. Beattie, Roland W. Betts, Mrs. Elmer H. Bobst, Mrs. Edwin M. Burke, Mrs. John J. Byrne, Mrs. Joseph A. Califano, Jr., Peter O. Crisp, Stanley F. Druckenmiller, Steve Forbes, Richard N. Foster, Stephen Friedman, Ellen V. Futter, Philip H. Geier, Jr., Louis V. Gerstner, Jr., Jonathan N. Grayer, John R. Gunn, Mrs. Charles Gwathmey, William B. Harrison, Jr., Benjamin W. Heineman, Jr., Mrs. Ann Dibble Jordan, David H. Koch, Marie-Josée Kravis, Mrs. Evelyn H. Lauder, Mrs. Jean Remmel Little, Mrs. John L. Marion, Paul A. Marks, MD, Donald B. Marron, James G. Niven, E. Stanley O’Neal, Bruce C. Ratner, Clifton S. Robbins, Josephine Robertson, James D. Robinson III, Benjamin M. Rosen, David M. Rubenstein, Jack Rudin, Mrs. Bijan Safai, Fayez S. Sarofim, Norman C. Selby, H. Virgil Sherrill, Stephen C. Sherrill, William C. Steere, Jr., J. McLain Stewart, Scott M. Stuart, Carl W. Timpson, Jr., Harold Varmus, MD, Lucy R. Waletzky, MD, Douglas A. Warner III, Sanford I. Weill, Deborah C. Wright, Mortimer B. Zuckerman.

Board of Overseers Emeriti: Richard M. Furlaud, James W. Kinnear, Elizabeth J. McCormack, PhD, Mrs. Arnold Schwartz, Frederick Seitz, PhD.

Board of Scientific Consultants: Martin D. Abeloff, MD, Chairman; Richard Axel, MD, Philip A. Cole, MD, PhD, Titia de Lange, PhD, James R. Dowling, MD, Laurie Glimcher, PhD, Joseph L. Goldstein, MD, Tyler E. Jacks, PhD, Eric S. Lander, PhD, Caryn Lerman, PhD, Arthur Levinson, PhD, Frank McCormick, PhD, Paul Nurse, PhD, FRS, Carol L. Prives, PhD, Stanley R. Riddell, MD, Janet Rossant, PhD, Ralph Weissleder, MD, PhD, Irving L. Weissman, MD.

Boards of Overseers and Managers, 2006 / MSKCC (pdf)
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cast 06-13-14