Missouri Smokers' Rights Election Archive

Breathe Easy Missouri's Psychopathic Lies

"This website was supported by Cooperative Agreement Number U58/CCU722795-01 between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS)." Its lies are copied from TobaccoScam, the anti-smoker website at the University of California - San Francisco, home of anti-smoking charlatan Stanton Glantz, who wrapped his bogus ETS-heart disease study in an EPA wrapper to deceive the public that it had been approved by the EPA - talk about a tobacco scam, he wrote the book!

"Are patrons at risk, along with restaurant and bar employees? It is sometimes argued that while long term exposure to secondhand smoke boosts the risk of cancer, short term exposure in a restaurant or a bar does no real damage. This is false. Breathing secondhand smoke for just twenty minutes has substantial, adverse effects on the heart, blood, and blood vessels. That's why making restaurants and bars (as well as workplaces) smokefree was associated with a 40% drop in hospital admissions for heart attacks when Helena, Montana, implemented a smokefree policy." (Secondhand Smoke: A Little is Dangerous Tobacco Scam 11/17/2007.)

Secondhand Smoke: A Little is Dangerous / Breathe Easy Missouri

The truth: The Montana study is garbage because they don't even know if patients were exposed to secondhand smoke.

The truth: Heart disease death rates have fallen steadily since 1961 to levels below those of the year 1900. These declines began before there were decreases in smoking, and long before smoking bans began to proliferate in the 1980s. (In: Achievements in Public Health, 1900-1999: Decline in Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke -- United States, 1900-1999. MMWR 1999 Aug 6;48(30):649-656.)

HDrates

The decline in death rates since 1970 has been as large among smokers as among non-smokers: "Nonsudden CHD death decreased by 64% (95% CI 50% to 74%, Ptrend<0.001), and SCD rates decreased by 49% (95% CI 28% to 64%, Ptrend<0.001). These trends were seen in men and women, in subjects with and without a prior history of CHD, and in smokers and nonsmokers." (Temporal trends in coronary heart disease mortality and sudden cardiac death from 1950 to 1999: the Framingham Heart Study. CS Fox, JC Evans, MG Larson, WB Kannel, D Levy. Circulation 2004 Aug 3;110(5):522-527.) The Framingham death rates paralleled those in the general US population. The equal decline in heart disease death rates among men and women occurred despite non-equal rates of smoking and quitting smoking.

Fox / Circulation 2004 abstract

For socioeconomic reasons, smokers and passive smokers are more likely to have been exposed to infections that cause heart disease, such as cytomegalovirus. The anti-smokers' studies deliberately ignore the role of infection, in order to falsely blame active smoking and secondhand smoke for the excess. This is the reason that the pretended effects of secondhand smoke that they trumpet so loudly are so similar to the pretended effects of active smoking.

CMV & other infections cause heart disease

Breathe Easy Missouri also lies that "Secondhand smoke also causes wheezing, asthma attacks and other respiratory symptoms, and burning eyes, nose and throat. These effects, if caused by any industrial pollutant, would warrant strong corrective action." (Secondhand Smoke: A Little is Dangerous Tobacco Scam 11/17/2007.) This is a lie, because death rates from asthma have more than doubled since the anti-smoking movement began - including among children, and their health care utilization for asthma continues to increase.

New Views About Asthma Causes

And official OSHA policy contradicts the lie that "These effects, if caused by any industrial pollutant, would warrant strong corrective action": "Because the organic material in tobacco doesn't burn completely, cigarette smoke contains more than 4,700 chemical compounds. Although OSHA has no regulation that addresses tobacco smoke as a whole, 29 CFR 1910.1000 Air contaminants, limits employee exposure to several of the main chemical components found in tobacco smoke. In normal situations, exposures would not exceed these permissible exposure limits (PELs), and, as a matter of prosecutorial discretion, OSHA will not apply the General Duty Clause to ETS." (02/24/2003 - Reiteration of Existing OSHA Policy on Indoor Air Quality: Office Temperature/Humidity and Environmental Tobacco Smoke. Standard Number: 1910.1000.)

Reiteration of Existing OSHA Policy on Indoor Air Quality / OSHA

The Missouri Foundation for Health

"The Missouri Foundation for Health was created in January 2000 to receive assets accumulated by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Missouri (BCBSMo) prior to its conversion from nonprofit to for-profit status. Today, MFH is the largest health care foundation in the state and is among the largest of its kind in the country." The creation of the foundation was ordered by the Missouri Supreme Court after the AG accused BCBSMo of violating of Missouri laws governing conversion of non-profits to for-profit status. BCBSMo's for-profit subsidiary, RightChoice, merged with WellPoint Health Networks in 2001, making the foundation's assets about $900 million. In 2004, MFH launched a $40 million, nine-year Tobacco Prevention & Cessation Initiative. (History. Missouri Foundation for Health, accessed 1/28/08.) Former President George H.W. Bush's younger brother, William H.T. "Bucky" Bush, was a director of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Missouri and RightCHOICE Managed Care, which merged into WellPoint, where he is now a director. The fraudulent EPA report on secondhand smoke, which was written by anti-smoking activists concealed behind illegal pass-through contracts, was released during the Bush administration, with Bush's 1992 campaign manager on the board of directors of the crooked firm.

The MFH Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Initiative "met with representatives from the Missouri Statewide Tobacco Steering Committee" [presumably the same lot of gangsters from the ACS, AHA and ALA that cause all the nation's problems] to develop its program. "Grantees are large organizations with annual operating budgets that meet or exceed $2 million. Four regional grants were awarded in 2004 and 2005 to Randolph County Health Department, Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Curators of University of Missouri and American Lung Association. Community grants are awarded to smaller community-based agencies that implement models and activities designed in conjunction with a regional grant recipient." (Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Initiative. Missouri Foundation for Health, accessed 1/28/08.)

The Center for Tobacco Policy Research at Saint Louis University School of Public Health "was selected as the evaluator for the Missouri Foundation for Health’s Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Initiative" in 2005. Its goals are to increase the tax on tobacco products (ended November 2006); implement smoke-free workplace programs; promote school-based prevention programs; advocate for tobacco policy change (new in 2007) [i.e., smoking bans]; and eliminate tobacco related disparities (new in 2007) [a euphemism for picking on minorities]. Passive smoking study author Ross Brownson is a member of the "CTPR Team." "Dr. Brownson is the Director of the Prevention Research Center and Chair and Professor of Community Health at Saint Louis University School of Public Health. He serves as Co-Investigator of the Best Practices Project and the Economic Impact Project. Dr. Brownson's research interests include chronic disease epidemiology, tobacco use prevention, promotion of physical activity, and evaluation of community-level interventions. His tobacco policy research focuses on environmental tobacco smoke and he is a member of the Guide to Community Preventive Services Task Force." (Center for Tobacco Policy Research, accessed 1/28/08.)

Pfizer PAC & Corporate Political Contributions Report 2005 – 2006 Cycle / Pfizer (pdf, 110 pp)

Legislation

House Bill 34 (2009)

HB34 Requires the State of Missouri to match any grant moneys received by the state for smoking cessation up to a $2 million cap. Sponsor: David Sater; CoSponsor: Raymond Weter. 01/08/2009 - Read Second Time (H).

http://www.house.mo.gov/content.aspx?info=/bills091/bills/HB34.HTM

House Bill 38 (2009)

HB38 Creates the Tobacco Use Prevention, Cessation, and Enforcement Trust Fund to be used by the Department of Health and Senior Services for a comprehensive tobacco control program. Sponsor: David Sater; CoSponsor: Raymond Weter. 01/08/2009 - Read Second Time (H).

http://www.house.mo.gov/content.aspx?info=/bills091/bills/HB38.HTM

House Bill 205 (2009)

HB205 Fire-safe cigarette act. Sponsor: Michael L. Parson; CoSponsor: Mark J. Bruns. 01/08/2009 - Read Second Time (H).

http://www.house.mo.gov/content.aspx?info=/bills091/bills/HB205.HTM

House Bill 1207

HB1207, Prohibits the use of tobacco products in the State Capitol. 05/18/2007 - Referred: Corrections and Public Institutions (H). Hearing not scheduled. Bill currently not on a calendar. (1-30-08)

http://house.mo.gov/content.aspx?info=/bills071/bills/HB1207.htm

House Bill 1330

HB1330 Requires the State of Missouri to match any grant moneys received by the state for smoking cessation up to a $2 million cap. 01/10/2008 - Read Second Time (H). Hearing not scheduled. Bill currently not on a calendar. (1-28-08)

http://www.senate.mo.gov/08info/house/bills/hb1330.htm

House Bill 1709

HB1709 Creates the Tobacco Use Prevention, Cessation, and Enforcement Trust Fund to be used by the Department of Health and Senior Services for a comprehensive tobacco control program. 01/22/2008 - Read Second Time (H). Hearing not scheduled. Bill currently not on a calendar. (1-28-08)

http://www.senate.mo.gov/08info/house/bills/hb1709.htm

House Bill 1738

HB1738 Requires tobacco paraphernalia to be kept behind the checkout counter. 01/22/2008 - Read Second Time (H). Hearing not scheduled. Bill currently not on a calendar. (1-30-08)

http://house.state.mo.us/billtracking/bills081/bills/HB1738.htm

HJR 5 (2009)

HJR5 Proposes a constitutional amendment prohibiting smoking tobacco products in public places or public meetings. Sponsor: Joseph Fallert Jr. 01/08/2009 - Read Second Time (H).

http://www.house.mo.gov/content.aspx?info=/bills091/bills/HJR5.HTM

Senate Bill No. 843

SB 843 - This act creates the "Youth Smoking Prevention Trust Fund," which shall be funded by moneys received under the Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement. The Commission for Youth Smoking Prevention is established in the Department of Health and Senior Services. The Commission shall fund youth smoking prevention programs modeled after evidence-based programs proven to reduce youth smoking. 1/14/2008 - Second Read and Referred S Seniors, Families and Public Health Committee. (1-28-08)

http://www.senate.mo.gov/08info/bills/sb843.htm

Senate Bill No. 946

SB 946 - This act creates the tobacco use prevention, cessation and enforcement fund. Beginning fiscal year 2009, payments received from the strategic contribution fund will be deposited into the newly created fund to be used for a comprehensive tobacco control program. 1/16/2008 - Second Read and Referred S Seniors, Families and Public Health Committee. (1-28-08)

http://www.senate.mo.gov/08info/bills/sb946.htm

Gov. Jeremiah W. "Jay" Nixon, Democrat

Nixon defeated Kenny Hulshof (R) by 58.4% to 39.5%.

Former Governor Matt Blunt, R - Health Fascist

He is the son of U.S. Rep. Roy Blunt, and brother of Philip Morris lobbyist Andrew Blunt. Gov. Blunt has announced that he won't run for re-election. Good riddance - Blunt believes in health fascist Big Lies: "Smoking is one of the leading healthcare cost drivers. In Missouri, smoking takes thousands of lives and devastates families. We all pay the costs of smoking through increased insurance premiums, social welfare for smokers and most significantly through the loss of family and friends afflicted with cancer. The tobacco settlement funds have been misused in the past, and I propose that one million of those dollars be spent on smoking prevention and cessation this year." (2006 State of the State Address, Jan. 11, 2006.) The state got about $140 million per year of settlement money stolen from smokers in 2006. The various settlement slush funds (Healthy Families Trust Fund-Seniors and Catastrophic Prescription Drug Account; Healthy Families Trust Fund-Health Care Treatment and Access Account; Healthy Families Trust Fund- Tobacco Prevention, Education, and Cessation Account; Healthy Families Trust Fund-Life Sciences Research Account; and Healthy Families Trust Fund-Early Childhood Care and Education Account) were all transferred into the Healthy Families Trust Fund by executive order in June. Blunt also signed into law Senate Bill 567, which allowed employers to provide or contract for health insurance at a lower deductible level for employees who do not smoke or use tobacco products. (Blunt Signs Legislation Expanding Coverage for Cancer Patients. July 7, 2006.) Blunt received $1275 from Pfizer in 2005-2006.

More millions for persecution: "Gov. Matt Blunt today announced he will recommend an unprecedented $11.6 million to help Missourians quit smoking and prevent young people from getting hooked on tobacco. Gov. Blunt is recommending a 50 fold increase to create the state’s first comprehensive smoking cessation initiative as part of his plan to improve Missourians’ health, enhance health care services for low-income Missourians and support ongoing access to care for the nearly 830,000 Missourians served by Mo HealthNet." (Gov. Blunt Recommends $11.6 Million to Help Missourians Quit Smoking. Press Release, Jan. 8, 2008.)

Vicious lies that smoking causes preterm births: "Unfortunately, the number of premature births continues to rise and has increased by more than 30 percent since 1981. In half the cases, the reason for premature birth is not known. Doctors do know that if a woman does not smoke, eats a good diet, takes folic acid, and gets proper pre-natal care, there is a better chance of the mother carrying the baby to term. The Surgeon General reported in 2006 that cigarette smoking increases the risk for infertility, preterm delivery, stillbirth, low birth weight, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)." (Gov. Blunt Recognizes Prematurity Awareness Day. Press Release, Nov. 13, 2007.) And this has occurred despite their persecution of smokers, despite higher rates of prenatal care, and despite folic acid. So, what's their solution? PERSECUTE SOME MORE! We're fed up with this crap, and we don't want these abusive charlatans, who victimize innocent women with undeserved guilt, running our health establishment!

"'Pregnancy and tobacco smoke is a dangerous combination,' Gov. Blunt said. 'If we can educate more women in Missouri about these dangers and convince them to stop smoking, we can improve the health of thousands of mothers and babies.'" "Women who are pregnant should avoid all tobacco smoke – they shouldn't smoke themselves or breathe secondhand smoke,” said Stan Cowan, manager of the health department’s Tobacco Use Prevention Program." "According to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, babies born to women who smoke are 1.5 to 3.5 times more likely to have a low birth weight than babies born to nonsmoking mothers. Babies with a low birth weight are at higher risk for serious health problems throughout their lives." (Gov. Blunt Recognizes January as National Birth Defects Prevention Month. Press Release, Jan. 9, 2008.) All of this is deliberate, willful scientific fraud! The predominant cause of preterm births, stillbirths and neonatal deaths is in fact known - it is acute chorioamnionitis. But the anti-smokers deliberately use defective studies that ignore this infection, in order to falsely blame tobacco. And the fact that the rates of preterm birth have steadily risen since 1981, despite intensive persecution of smokers, PROVES that maternal smoking is not to blame.

Chorioamnionitis Causes Perinatal Illnesses Blamed on Smoking

Missouri House of Representatives

Missouri House of Representatives Member Roster / State of Missouri

H-1 - Brian Munzlinger, R. Munzlinger defeated Keri Cottrell, D, in 2008.

H-2 - Rebecca Payne McClanahan, D. Member Appropriations - Health, Mental Health and Social Services Committee. "Rep. McClanahan is a Mental Health Nursing Consultant. She has spent over 30 years working as a Nurse Educator at Truman State University in Kirksville. Rep. McClanahan is the Immediate Past Vice-President of the Missouri Nurses Association." McClanahan defeated Thom Van Vleck, R, in 2008.

H-3 - James Whorton, D. Guernsey defeated Mike Hepler, D, in 2008.

H-4 - Mike Thomson, R. Thomson defeated Rick Oswald, D, in 2008.

H-5 - Jim Guest, R. Member Health Care Policy Committee. Guest defeated Mike Waltemath, D, in 2008.

H-6 - Rachel L. Bringer, D. Bringer was re-elected in 2008.

H-7 - John Quinn, R. Mike Lair, R, defeated Harry Wyse, D, in 2008.

H-8 - Tom Shively, D. Shively defeated Mike Austin, R, in 2008.

H-9 - Paul Quinn, D. Quinn was re-elected in 2008.

H-10 - Terry L Witte, D. Witte defeated Gary Linnenbringer, R, in 2008.

H-11 - Ed Schieffer, D. Co-sponsor of HB1738, Requires tobacco paraphernalia to be kept behind the checkout counter. Schieffer defeated Dan Colbert, R, and David A. Leefe, CST, in 2008.

H-12 - Doug Funderburk, R. "St. Charles County Council Chairman Doug Funderburk said he was trying to get a proposed ban on a workshop agenda this fall." (Debate Over Smoking in Restaurants in St. Charles County. St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sep. 2, 2004.) Co-sponsor of HB1709, Creates the Tobacco Use Prevention, Cessation, and Enforcement Trust Fund to be used by the Department of Health and Senior Services for a comprehensive tobacco control program. Funderburk defeated Richard Lesh, D, in 2008.

H-13 - Robert F. Onder, R. "Rep. Onder has practiced medicine in St. Charles County since 1995 and is also an Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine at Washington University in St. Louis. He is a small businessman who founded Allergy and Asthma Consultants, PC and Midwest Clinical Research, LLC." M.D. 1987 Washington University School of Medicine, J.D. 1993 St. Louis University Law School. He has been published in a medical journal: The ethics of placebo-controlled trials: the case of asthma. RF Onder. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2005 Jun;115(6):1228-1234. In 2008, Chuck Gatschenberger, R, defeated David E. Hurst, D.

H-14 - Joe M. Smith, R. In 2000 Smith would use tobacco settlement funds for every proposed purpose (Expand health sciences research at Missouri state universities; expand health care treatment for smoking related illnesses; provide prescription drug benefits for the elderly; expand smoking cessation and prevention programs; create an emergency budget reserve fund; provide tax refunds to Missouri residents; assist farmers in making the transition from growing tobacco to growing different crops; improve public school buildingsFund preschool for children of low-income families). (Missouri State Legislative Election 2000 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Smith defeated Douglas R. Broste, D, in 2008.

H-15 - Sally Faith, R. Faith defeated Michael Niemeyer, D, in 2008.

H-16 - Mark A. Parkinson, R, defeated Kristy Manning, D, in 2008.

H-17 - Vicki Schneider, R. Past member Cancer Society. As of 11/13/08, Kenny Bierman, D, 10,945; Schneider, !0,870.

H-18 - Ann Zerr, R, defeated Tim Swope, D, and John R. Alsup, L, in 2008.

H-19 - Cynthia Davis, R. Vice-Chairman, Health Care Policy Committee. Sponsor of HB1207, Prohibits the use of tobacco products in the State Capitol. Davis defeated Debbie Cook, D, and David J. Malan, I, in 2008.

H-20 - Danielle Moore, R. In 2008, Jeanie Riddle, R, defeated David Moen, D.

H-21 - Steve Hobbs, R. Hobbs defeated Kelly Schultz, D, in 2008.

H-22 - Therese Sander, R. Sander's website spews ant-smoking crap: "In recognition of the almost 10,000 Missouri lives lost each year to tobacco use, the state’s top health official encourages smokers to call the Missouri Tobacco Quitline: 1-800-QUIT-NOW. The Quitline offers free tobacco cessation counseling to help Missourians kick the tobacco habit. 'Peter Jennings’ death is tragic and certainly has raised the nation’s awareness,' said Julia M. Eckstein, director of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, 'yet death from tobacco use happens every day right here in Missouri. I hope all my fellow Missourians will take the opportunity to encourage our loved ones who smoke to take advantage of resources like our Missouri Tobacco Quitline.' 'There is no such thing as a safe level of exposure to tobacco smoke,” said Janet Wilson, manager of the Tobacco Use Prevention Program for the state health department. “Whether it’s light cigarettes or secondhand smoke from someone close to you, tobacco smoke is a proven cancer-causing agent.' blah blah blah blah (Missourians mourn lives lost to tobacco use. State Representative Therese Sander. http://www.theresesander.com/?sectionid=7&parentid=1&sectiontree=7&itemid=16.) As of 11/13/08: Sander 7,961; Gail Brown, D, 7,361.

H-23 - Robert "Jeff" Harris, D. Harris received $325 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2002, Harris wanted to greatly increase the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2002 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.)

H-24 - Edward Robb, R. As of 11/13/08: Chris Kelly, D, 12,491; Robb 12,080.

H-25 - Judy Baker, D-Columbia. Member - Appropriations, Health, Mental Health and Social Services, and Health Care Policy Committees. "Elected to the House in 2004, Rep. Baker is a Adjunct Professor of Managerial Economics at Columbia College in Columbia, Missouri and a Healthcare Consultant and a Managing Partner at Cura Advantage, a healthcare consulting firm." President of Healthy Missourians caucus. Advisory Board Member for the Center for Health Transformation. In 2008, Mary Wynne Still, D, defeated Ryan Asbridge, R.

H-26 - Joe Aull, D-Marshall. Aull was re-elected in 2008.

H-27 - H. Edward Wildberger, D. Minority Caucus Chairman. In 2006, Wildberger wanted to greatly increase the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2006 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Wildberger was re-elected in 2008.

H-28 - Robert Schaaf, R. MD St. Louis University School of Medicine 1983. Chairman of the Board of the Missouri Doctors Mutual Insurance Company (MoDocs), which he helped form in 2004 to provide medical liability insurance to Missouri doctors; board member Missouri State Medical Foundation. In 2005, he sponsored a bill to allow employers to provide or contract for health insurance at reduced rates for employees who do not use tobacco products. Schaaf received $325 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Schaaf defeated Mark Sheehan, D, in 2008.

H-29 - Martin T. Rucker, D. Rucker was re-elected in 2008.

H-30 - Jason Brown, R-Platte City. In 2005, he sponsored legislation to require entities that sell or distribute tobacco products or rolling papers to obtain a license from the Division of Alcohol and Tobacco Control within the Department of Public Safety; and to give juvenile court jurisdiction in cases involving children under the age of 17 who violate possession or use of tobacco product laws. Brown defeated Mary Anne Baier, D, in 2008.

H-31 - Trent Skaggs, D-North Kansas City. "Rep. Skaggs is a partner in Hospital Management Consulting, LLC, which he helped start in 2000." Skaggs was re-elected in 2008.

H-32 - Jason Grill, D-Parkville. Grill was re-elected in 2008.

H-33 - Jerry Nolte, R-Gladstone. Nolte defeated Terry Stone, D, in 2008.

H-34 - Timothy Flook, R-Liberty. "Rep. Flook received a Bachelor of Arts degree in History and Philosophy from William Jewell College in 1989. While at William Jewell, Flook was also an Honors Scholar studying at St. Peter’s College of Oxford University." Flook defeated Tom Niffen, D, in 2008.

H-35 - Doug Ervin, R-Kearney. Ervin defeated Jim Baldwin, D, in 2008.

H-36 - Bob Nance, R-Excelsior Springs. Co-sponsor of HB1709, Creates the Tobacco Use Prevention, Cessation, and Enforcement Trust Fund to be used by the Department of Health and Senior Services for a comprehensive tobacco control program. Nance defeated Barbara Lanning, D, in 2008.

H-37 - Mike Talboy, D-Kansas City. Talboy was re-elected in 2008.

H-38 - Ryan Silvey, R-Kansas City. Silvey defeated Josh Reed, D, in 2008.

H-39 - Beth Low, D. "Elected to the House in 2004, Rep. Low previously worked as Community Organizer and Program Director for the Missouri Progressive Vote Coalition." In 2006, Low wanted to "slightly increase" the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2006 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Low defeated Lance Weber, L, in 2008.

H-40 - John P. Burnett, D. Burnett received $150 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Burnett was re-elected in 2008.

H-41 - Shalonn "KiKi" Curls, D. Member Appropriations - Health, Mental Health and Social Services Committee. Curls was re-elected in 2008.

H-42 - Leonard Hughes, D. Hughes was re-elected in 2008.

H-43 - Craig C. Bland, D. Member Health Care Policy Committee; Special Committee on Health Insurance. Sponsor of HB1835, Requires the State Board of Education to establish a coordinated health program to prevent student obesity, cardiovascular disease, and type II diabetes. 01/24/2008 - Introduced and Read First Time (H). Hearing not scheduled. House Bills for Second Reading. Roman Lee LeBlanc, D, was elected in 2008.

H-44 - Jenee' M. Lowe, D. In 2000, Lowe wanted to "slightly increase" the cigarette tax, and use tobacco settlement funds to expand health sciences research at Missouri state universities; expand health care treatment for smoking related illnesses; expand smoking cessation and prevention programs; and assist farmers in making the transition from growing tobacco to growing different crops. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2000 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Jason Kander, D, was elected in 2008.

H-45 - Jason R. Holsman, D. Sponsor of HB1738, Requires tobacco paraphernalia to be kept behind the checkout counter. Holsman defeated Jonathan P. Main, R, in 2008.

H-46 - Kate Meiners, D-Kansas City. Meiners received $300 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Meiners was re-elected in 2008.

H-47 - Jeff Grisamore, R. Member Appropriations - Health, Mental Health and Social Services Committee. Grisamore received $200 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Grisamore defeated Jason A. Norbury, D, in 2008.

H-48 - Will Kraus, R-Raytown. Kraus defeated Joe Volpe, D, in 2008.

H-49 - Terry Young, D. Tom McDonald, D, was elected in 2008.

H-50 - Michael R. Brown, D. Brown was re-elected in 2008.

H-51 - Ray Salva, D-Sugar Creek. Salva was re-elected in 2008.

H-52 - Paul LeVota, D-Independence. Minority Floor Leader. LeVota defeated Gary E. Hisch, R, in 2008.

H-53 - Curt Dougherty, D. Dougherty defeated Brent Lasater, R, in 2008.

H-54 - Gary Dusenberg, R. Dusenberg defeated Mark D. Matzeder, D, and Bobby Foster, L, in 2008.

H-55 - Bryan Pratt, R. Speaker Pro Tem. Pratt defeated Mike O'Donnell, D, and Kevin Parr, L, in 2008.

H-56 - Brian Yates, R. Yates defeated Chris Ruggles, D, in 2008.

H-57 - Talibdin El-Amin, D-St. Louis. El-Amin was re-elected in 2008.

H-58 - Rodney R. Hubbard, D-St. Louis. James T. Morris, D, was elected in 2008.

H-59 - Jeanette Mott Oxford, D-St. Louis. Grassroots Coordinator for the American Lung Association 2001-04. In 2003, she was Grassroots Coordinator for the Missouri Partnership on Smoking or Health, gloating in triumph over the smoking ban in all buildings owned by the City of St. Louis. (Lessons Learned in Municipal Buildings Campaign. By Jeanette Mott Oxford. Missouri Tobacco Use Prevention Program Update, July/August 2003.) Re Amendment 3 on the Nov. 7, 2006 ballot, which would have raised the cigarette tax from 17 to 97 cents per pack, Oxford spouted the usual stale cant: "I am likely to vote yes on this bill because raising tobacco taxes reduces smoking. Higher tobacco taxes have been proven to be an effective part of a comprehensive tobacco use prevention program. However, higher tobacco taxes are also regressive tax policy, and I hesitate to vote for any policy that has a disproportionate negative income on families with low incomes. Given that tobacco companies target low income citizens to recruit them as smokers while they are young, I believe we must take appropriate steps to fight back. Right now tobacco companies spend more than half a million dollars PER DAY in MO to recruit new smokers, while the state spends little more than half a million A YEAR to fight back. Comprehensive tobacco use prevention strategies are needed to counter the efforts of the tobacco industry. Having seen too many friends and relatives die of tobacco-related illness, I am anxious to see Missouri cut smoking rates. Families with low incomes especially need help in getting free of an addiction that robs their families of so much." In 2006, she wanted to greatly increase the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2006 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Co-sponsor of HB1709, Creates the Tobacco Use Prevention, Cessation, and Enforcement Trust Fund to be used by the Department of Health and Senior Services for a comprehensive tobacco control program; HB1738, Requires tobacco paraphernalia to be kept behind the checkout counter.

Jeanette Mott Oxford oozes the phony self-righteousness of the scapegoating persecutor, who lies and twists and distorts everything. She manipulates peoples' feelings with an anecdote about someone who died of emphysema. It's clear she believes that smoking causes emphysema, period. And that no further research is needed, because she know everything she will ever need to know. She wants to stop all smoking, and this is her pretext. she and her ilk are the minde-paralyzing pestilence of the health establishment, and it's because of THEM that there has been virtually no research on the role of chronic infection in emphysema. They don't want to know anything - except that smoking is to blame. "But as time went by," she gibbers, "it became clear that the tobacco industry had deliberately lied to the public while selling a product that causes death when used as directed." [In fact, it is the anti-smoking vermin who have systematically committed scientific fraud for six decades, in order to falsely blame smoking for diseases caused by infection - and the tobacco companies let them, because the very first thing the anti-smokers had done was to take them over.] "Nicotine levels were manipulated to promote addiction, and corporate documents, once secret, proved that tobacco companies researched, targeted, and marketed to children." [The cigarette companies developed tobacco mixes with a higher ratio of nicotine to tar, in order to pander to the anti-smokers' health claims that tar caused lung cancer, and this is how the spin-doctoring anti-smoker filth purposely distorted and misconstrued it. In fact, this lie contradicts another of their favorite lies that smokers "precisely titrate" the amount of nicotine they receive, which if true would make it impossible for anyone to slip any extra nicotine, besides being unnecessary in the first place because the filkth claim that smokers are all "addicted anyway. But that's how it always goes with chronic psychopathic liars - they tell so many lies that their lies end up contradicting each other.] "The weight of this evidence led to the historic 1998 tobacco settlement agreement ($206 billion over 25 years) between 46 states and the industry." [Another stinking lie. The (anti-smoker controlled) tobacco companies settled because it looked as if they were winning, and they even insisted on settling for more money than the anti-smokers were demanding. It was nothing but a show trial designed to manipulate the public to accept a vast shovel-out of smokers' money into the pockets of their enemies and persecutors. And her pile of misrepresentations is rationalized in the supposed name of "tobacco's victims," namely the smokers who have been the victims for six decades of a systematic campaign of lies, defamation and persecution, courtesy of depraved parasites like Jeanette Mott Oxford. (It's Time to Keep the Promise to Missouri's Tobacco Victims. By Jeanette Mott Oxford. Missouri Forum, March 5, 2003.) Oxford defeated Michael J. Peters, Jr., L, in 2008.

It's Time to Keep the Promise to Missouri's Tobacco Victims / National Women's Editorial Forum

H-60 - Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis. Nasheed was re-elected in 2008.

H-61 - Connie "LaJoyce" Johnson, D. Minority Whip. "In addition to her legislative duties, Rep. Johnson is an attorney, employed at the Law Firm of Armstrong Teasdale, LLP in St. Louis, Missouri. She works primarily in the litigation practice group. She is also an adjunct professor at the St. Louis University School of Public Health." In 2008, Chris Carter, D, was elected.

H-62 - Dennis Wood, R-Kimberling City. Wood defeated Peter D. Tsahiridis, D, in 2008.

H-63 - Robin Wright-Jones, D. In 2008, Tishaura O. Jones, D, defeated Nels Williams, I.

H-64 - Rachel Storch, D-St. Louis. She is the daughter of Dr. Gregory Storch. (Special News. From the Top, Washington University Department of Neurology Newsletter, 2007 May;11(11):6.) Storch defeated Mark Robert Opheim, CST, in 2008.

H-65 - Michele Kratky, D, was elected in 2008.

H-66 - Michael Vogt, D. Vogt defeated Jerry Morgan, R, in 2008.

H-67 - Michael Daus, D-Jefferson City. In 2008, Mike Colona, D, was elected.

H-68 - David Sater, R. Member Appropriations - Health, Mental Health and Social Services, and Health Care Policy Committees. Pharmacist, has served as President of the American Cancer Society. Sater "argues that if taxpayers pay the bills, they should be able to mandate that Medicaid recipients take courses to improve their health." (Healthy Habits Could Improve Medicaid's Bottom Line. By Brent Martin. Missourinet, Nov. 15, 2005.) Sater received $200 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2006, Sater wanted to "slightly increase" the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2006 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Sponsor of HB1330, Requires the State of Missouri to match any grant moneys received by the state for smoking cessation up to a $2 million cap; and HB1709, Creates the Tobacco Use Prevention, Cessation, and Enforcement Trust Fund to be used by the Department of Health and Senior Services for a comprehensive tobacco control program. Sater was re-elected in 2008. He sponsored HB34, to requires the State to match any grant moneys it receives for smoking cessation; and and HB38, to create the Tobacco Use Prevention, Cessation, and Enforcement Trust Fund.

H-69 - Regina Walsh, D. Minority Caucus Vice-Chair. Walsh defeated Kellen Markovich, I, and Julie Stone, L, in 2008.

H-70 - John L. Bowman, D. Bowman received $300 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2008, Sharon L. Pace, D, was elected.

H-71 - Esther Haywood, D. In 2004, Haywood wanted to greatly increase the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2004 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Haywood received $300 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2008, Don Calloway, D, was elected.

H-72 - Maria Chappelle-Nadal, D. Chappelle-Nadel was re-elected in 2008.

H-73 - Margaret Donnelly, D. Member Appropriations - Health, Mental Health and Social Services Committee. In 2008, Steve Brown, D, defeated Daniel F. O'Sullivan Jr., R.

H-74 - Tony George, D. In 2008, Steve Webb, D, was elected.

H-75 - Bruce Darrough, D. In 2008, Bert Atkins, D, was elected.

H-76 - Michael Spreng, D. Spreng received $150 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Spreng defeated Donald L. Simmons II, CST, in 2008.

H-77 - Michael George Corcoran, D. Corcoran was re-elected in 2008.

H-78 - Clint Zweifel, D-Florissant. Zweifel received $150 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2008, Margo McNeil, D, defeated T.R. Carr, R.

H-79 - Albert Joseph Liese, D. Liese was re-elected in 2008.

H-80 - Theodore Hoskins, D-St. Louis County. Hoskins was re-elected in 2008.

H-81 - Juanita Head Walton, D. In 2000, Walton would use tobacco settlement funds to expand health care treatment for smoking related illnesses, provide prescription drug benefits for the elderly, expand smoking cessation and prevention programs, assist farmers in making the transition from growing tobacco to growing different crops. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2000 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) In 2008, Rochelle Walton Gray, D, was elected.

H-82 - Sam Page, D. "Rep. Page is a practicing physician who is board certified in anesthesiology and pain management. He was appointed in 2000, by the late Gov. Mel Carnahan to the Missouri Senior Rx Program." BA chemistry University of Missouri-Kansas City, MD University of Missouri-Kansas City School. In 2000, Page wanted to "slightly increase" the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2004 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Page received $300 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2008, Jill Schupp, D, defeated Frank Plescia, R.

H-83 - Jake Zimmerman, D. Zimmerman was re-elected in 2008.

H-84 - Allen Icet, R. Icet received $325 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Icet was re-elected in 2008.

H-85 - Jim Lembke, R. Lembke received $300 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2008, Vicki Lorenz Englund, D, defeated Cloria Brown, R.

H-86 - Jane Cunningham, R. "Rep. Cunningham is married to Gary Cunningham, Deputy Assistant Secretary at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, a Presidential appointee." In 2000, Cunningham wanted to use tobacco settlement funds to provide tax refunds to Missouri residents and "Other." (Missouri State Legislative Election 2000 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Cunningham received $300 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2008, Cole McNary, R, defeated Martha (Marty) Ott, D.

H-87 - Scott Muschany, R. In 2008, John J. Diehl, Jr., R, defeated Mark Zoole, D.

H-88 - Neal C. St. Onge, R. St. Onge received $125 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2008, Andrew Koenig, R, was elected.

H-89 - Timothy W. Jones, R. "He is the nephew of current State Representative Kenny Jones." Jones defeated George (Boots) Weber, D, in 2008.

H-90 - Sam Komo, D. Member Health Care Policy Committee. Komo was re-elected in 2008.

H-91 - Kathlyn Fares, R. Fares received $300 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2008, Jeanne Kirkton, D, defeated Randy Jotte, R.

H-92 - Dr. Charles R. Portwood, R. Chiropractor. 2003 American Cancer Society’s Statesman of the Year. Portwood received $450 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2008, Sue Allen, R, defeated Ronica (Ronnie) Herman, D, and Donald R. Griffin, CST.

H-93 - Dwight Scharnhorst, R. Scharnhorst defeated Phil Bognar, D, in 2008.

H-94 - Rick Stream, R. Stream defeated Deb Lavender, D, in 2008.

H-95 - Jim Avery, R In 2008, Mike Leara, R, defeated Alice Geary Sgroi, D.

H-96 - Patricia M. Yaeger, D. Yaeger defeated Ronald E. Levy, R, in 2008.

H-97 - Walt Bivins, R Bivins defeated Jan Polizzi, D, in 2008.

H-98 - Brian D. Nieves, R. Majority Whip. Vieves defeated Jim Mense, D, in 2008.

H-99 - Mike Sutherland, R. Sutherland defeated Patrick Lewis, D, in 2008.

H-100 - Sue Schoemehl, D. Shoemehl defeated Nick Haul, R, in 2008.

H-101 - Tim Meadows, D. Meadows was re-elected in 2008.

H-102 - Jeff Roorda, D. Roorda was re-elected in 2008.

H-103 - Ron Casey, D. Casey was re-elected in 2008.

H-104 - Joe Fallert, D. Fallert was re-elected in 2008. Fallert sponsored HJR5, a constitutional amendment prohibiting smoking tobacco products in public places or public meetings.

H-105 - Michael Frame, D. Frame was re-elected in 2008.

H-106 - Steven Tilley, R. Majority Floor Leader. Tilley received $325 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Tilley was re-elected in 2008.

H-107 - Brad Robinson, D. In 2004, Robinson wanted to greatly increase the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2004 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) As of 11/13/08: Linda R. Fischer, D, 7,700; Louie Seiberlich, R, 7,170.

H-108 - Thomas Villa, D. In 2008, Jacob Hummel, D, was elected.

H-109 - Kevin Threlkeld, R. Rep. Threlkeld is a primary care physician, MD University of Missouri-Kansas City. Threlkeld received $100 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2008, Scott D. Dieckhaus, R, defeated Kent Cunningham, D.

H-110 - Belinda Harris, D. Harris was re-elected in 2008.

H-111 - Charles Schlottach, R. Schlottach defeated Tod C. DeVeydt, D, in 2008.

H-112 - Tom Loehner, R. In 2004, Loehner wanted to "slightly increase" the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2004 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Loehner defeated Tom Tramel, D, in 2008.

H-113 - Mark J. Bruns, R. Bruns defeated Al Mueller, D, in 2008. He cosponsored HB205, fire-safe cigarette act.

H-114 - Bill Deeken, R. Deeken defeated Leonard J. Steinman, D, and Janine Steck, WI, in 2008.

H-115 - Rodney Schad, R. Member Health Care Policy Committee. Schad was re-elected in 2008.

H-116 - Tom Self, R. Self was re-elected in 2008.

H-117 - Kenneth Jones, R. Jones was re-elected in 2008.

H-118 - Stanley Cox, R. Cox defeated Stan Bowlin, D, in 2008.

H-119 - Larry Wilson, R. Wilson was re-elected in 2008.

H-120 - Shannon Cooper, R. Cooper received $325 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. As of 11/13/08, Scott N. Largent, R, 8,892; Kristi L. Kenney, D, 8,539.

H-121 - David Pearce, R. American Cancer Society Relay for Life, treasurer. Pearce received $100 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. As of 11/13/08: Denny L. Hoskins, R, 7,000; Jim Jackson, D, 6,870.

H-122 - Michael McGhee, R. McGhee defeated Beth Grubb, D, in 2008.

H-123 - Brian Baker, R. In 2008, Chris Molendorp, R, defeated Juan I. Alonzo, D.

H-124 - Luke Scavuzzo, D. Scavuzzo defeated Jim Danner, R, in 2008.

H-125 - Barney Joe Fisher, R. Fisher defeated Carla K. Keough, D, in 2008.

H-126 - Edgar G. H. Emery, R. Emery defeated Linda Marie Crane, D, in 2008.

H-127 - Steve Hunter, R. Hunter received $325 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Tom Flanigan, R, was elected in 2008.

H-128 - Bryan P. Stevenson, R. Member Appropriations - Health, Mental Health and Social Services Committee. Stevenson was re-elected in 2008.

H-129 - Ron Richard, R. Richard received $325 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Richard was re-elected in 2008.

H-130 - Kevin Wilson, R. Wilson was re-elected in 2008.

H-131 - Marilyn Ruestman, R. Majority Caucus Secretary. Ruestman was re-elected in 2008.

H-132 - Don Ruzicka, R. Ruzicka defeated Charles Dake, D, in 2008.

H-133 - Michael Parson, R. Parson was re-elected in 2008. He sponsored HB205, fire-safe cigarette act.

H-134 - Jim Viebrock, R. Viebrock was re-elected in 2008.

H-135 - Charles Denison, R. Denison received $450 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Denison defeated Nancy Hagan, D, in 2008.

H-136 - B.J. Marsh, R. In 2008, Eric Burlison, R, defeated Nick Beatty, D.

H-137 - Charlie Norr, D. Norr defeated Ronald D. Day, R, in 2008.

H-138 - Sara Lampe, D. Minority Caucus Secretary. In 2004, Lampe wanted to slightly decrease the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2004 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Lampe defeated Michael S. Goodart Jr., R, in 2008.

H-139 - Shane Schoeller, R. Schoeller defeated Janet Adams, D, in 2008.

H-140 - Bob Dixon, R. Majority Caucus Chairman. Dixon was re-elected in 2008.

H-141 - Jay Wasson, R. Wasson defeated Ron Shawgo, D, in 2008.

H-142 - Raymond 'Ray' Weter, R. Member Appropriations - Health, Mental Health and Social Services Committee. "Representative Weter completed his education at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Kansas City in Respiratory Therapy. He became Director of Respiratory Therapy in Joplin, Missouri. In 1976, Representative Weter furthered his education in Clinical Cardiovascular Perfusion. He eventually became the Director of the Perfusion Team in two of the state’s foremost open heart surgery programs." Weter defeated Richard Green, WI, in 2008. He cosponsored HB34, to requires the State to match any grant moneys it receives for smoking cessation; and HB38, to create the Tobacco Use Prevention, Cessation, and Enforcement Trust Fund.

H-143 - Maynard Wallace, R. Co-sponsor of HB1330, Requires the State of Missouri to match any grant moneys received by the state for smoking cessation up to a $2 million cap. Wallace defeated Cathy Hilliard, D, in 2008.

H-144 - Van Kelly, R. In 2008, Tony Dugger, R, defeated Dennis Lee Chilton, D.

H-145 - Mike Cunningham, R. Cunningham was re-elected in 2008.

H-146 - Darrell Pollock, R. Pollock received $150 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Pollock was re-elected in 2008.

H-147 - Don Wells, R. Wells was re-elected in 2008.

H-148 - David Day, R. Day was re-elected in 2008.

H-149 - Bob May, R. In 2008, Dan W. Brown, R, defeated Wayne Bledsoe, D, and Dennis E. Hustead, CST.

H-150 - Jason Smith, R. Smith defeated James D. Ellis, D, in 2008.

H-151 - Ward Franz, R. Franz received $300 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Franz defeated Kathleen Hensley, I, and Robert Lee Mills, CST, in 2008.

H-152 - J. C. Kuessner, D. Assistant Minority Floor Leader. Huessner defeated Eric (Rick) Mansfield, R, and Thad Wheeler, CST, in 2008.

H-153 - Mike Dethrow, R. Dethrow was re-elected in 2008.

H-154 - Gayle Kingery, R. Kingery defeated Larry S. Busby, L, in 2008.

H-155 - Robert Wayne Cooper, R. Member, Appropriations- Health, Mental Health and Social Services Committee; Chair, Health Care Policy Committee. "Rep. Cooper is a physician [University of Kentucky College of Medicine 1975]. He has been in general practice since 1987 and worked in emergency medicine as an ER physician from 1980-86 in Lake of the Ozarks. He served as chief of staff for Lake Regional Hospital from 1991-93." Also a missionary. In 2002, Cooper wanted to greatly increase the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2002 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Cooper received $550 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Cooper defeated Nancy J. Pope, D, and James O. Jackson Jr., WI, in 2008.

H-156 - Rod Jetton, R. In 2000, Jetton wanted to slightly decrease the cigarette tax, and wanted to use tobacco settlement funds to provide prescription drug benefits for the elderly and tax refunds to Missouri residents. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2000 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Jetton received $325 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. In 2008, Shelley (White) Keeney, R, defeated Michael R. Winder, D.

H-157 - Scott A. Lipke, R. Lipke defeated Jennifer Friedrich, CST, in 2008.

H-158 - Clint Tracy, R, defeated Robert Roland, L, in 2008.

H-159 - Billy Pat Wright, R. Wright defeated Bill Burlison, D, in 2008.

H-160 - Ellen Brandom, R. Brandom was re-elected in 2008.

H-161 - Steve Hodges, D. Hodges was re-elected in 2008.

H-162 - Terry Swinger, D. Member Health Care Policy Committee. Swinger was re-elected in 2008.

H-163 - Tom Todd, D. Todd defeated Pat (Wilson) Allen, I, in 2008.

Missouri Senate

Missouri Senate 2008 Member Roster / State of Missouri

1 - Harry Kennedy, D. Member Health and Mental Health Committee. Jim Lembke, R, defeated Joan Barry, D, in 2008.

2 - Scott Rupp, R. Rupp received $400 from Pfizer in 2005-2006.

3 - Kevin Engler, R. Majority Caucus Whip. Engler defeated Dennis Riche, D, in 2008.

4 - Jeff Smith, D-St. Louis. Member Seniors, Families and Public Health Committee and Governor's Advisory Council on Physical Fitness and Health.

5 - Maida Coleman, D. In 2000, Coleman wanted to "slightly increase" the cigarette tax, and use tobacco settlement funds to expand health sciences research at Missouri state universities; expand health care treatment for smoking related illnesses; provide prescription drug benefits for the elderly; assist farmers in making the transition from growing tobacco to growing different crops; and fund preschool for children of low-income families. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2000 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Robin Wright-Jones, D, defeated Robert Christophel, L, in 2008.

6 - Carl Vogel, R.

7 - John Loudon, R. Jane Cunningham, R, defeated Kevin Leeseberg, D, in 2008.

8 - Matt Bartle, R. Member Governor's Advisory Council on Physical Fitness and Health. Bartle received $300 from Pfizer in 2005-2006.

9 - Yvonne Wilson, D. Member Seniors, Families and Public Health Committee. Sponsor of SB843, Creates a trust fund and commission for youth smoking prevention. She sponsored a similar bill in 2007, which passed the committee. In 2002, Wilson wanted to greatly increase the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2002 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Wilson was re-elected in 2008.

10 - Jolie Justus, D. Member Seniors, Families and Public Health Committee. "Senator Justus is also the Director of Pro Bono Services for the law firm of Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP."

11 - Victor Callahan, D. CAllahan received $450 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Callahan was re-elected in 2008.

12 - Brad Lager, R. Lager received $250 from Pfizer in 2005-2006.

13 - Timothy P. Green, D. Green received $100 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Green defeated Eric S. Harris, L, in 2008.

14 - Rita Heard Days , D. Member Missouri Area Health Education Centers Council. In 2002, Days wanted to greatly increase the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2002 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.)

15 - Michael Gibbons, R. President Pro Tem. Member Health and Mental Health Committee. Gibbons received $500 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Eric Schmitt, R, defeated James Trout, D, in 2008.

16 - Frank Barnitz, D. Minority Caucus Chairman. In 2004, Barnitz wanted to "slightly increase" the cigarette tax. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2004 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.)

17 - Luann Ridgeway, R, Majority Caucus Chair. "Following graduation from undergraduate college, Luann received a scholarship to study at Oxford University, Oxford, England. She returned to the United States to attend law school [University of Missouri, Kansas City Law School in 1981]." In 2000, Ridgeway wanted to use tobacco settlement funds to expand health care treatment for smoking related illnesses; create an emergency budget reserve fund; provide tax refunds to Missouri residents; assist farmers in making the transition from growing tobacco to growing different crops; and "Other." (Missouri State Legislative Election 2000 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Ridgway defeated Sandra Aust, D, in 2008.

18 - Wes Shoemyer, D. Member Health and Mental Health Committee. Sponsor of SJR 35, Allows counties and St. Louis City to adopt regulations affecting public health and welfare that are more restrictive than state law. 1/16/2008 - Second Read and Referred S Agriculture, Conservation, Parks & Natural Resources Committee.

19 - Chuck Graham, D. Assistant Minority Floor Leader. Graham received $300 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Kurt Schaefer, R, defeated Chuck Graham, D, and Christopher W. Dwyer, L, in 2008.

20 - Dan Clemens, R.

21 - Bill Stouffer, R. Member Seniors, Families and Public Health Committee. Stouffer defeated Joe Sadeghi, D, in 2008.

22 - Ryan McKenna, D. McKenna is a co-sponsor of SB 946, the Tobacco Use Prevention, Cessation and Enforcement fund to fund a comprehensive tobacco control program. He is a third-generation legislator.

23 - Tom Dempsey, R. Dempsey is a sponsor of SB 946, Tobacco Use Prevention, Cessation and Enforcement fund to fund a comprehensive tobacco control program. In 2000, Dempsey wanted to slightly decrease the cigarette tax, and use tobacco settlement funds to provide tax refunds to Missouri residents. (Missouri State Legislative Election 2000 National Political Awareness Test. Project Vote Smart.) Dempsey defeated Larry Willis, D, in 2008.

24 - Joan Bray, D.

25 - Rob Mayer, R. Mayer defeated M. Shane Stoelting, D, in 2008.

26 - John Griesheimer, R.

27 - Jason Crowell, R. Crowell received $300 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Crowell defeated Linda Sanders, D, in 2008.

28 - Delbert Scott, R Scott received $300 from Pfizer in 2005-2006.

29 - Jack Goodman, R. Assistant Majority Floor Leader. Member Seniors, Families and Public Health Committee. "Senator Goodman served as Chairman of the 7th U.S. Congressional District Republican Committee and is presently on the Government Relations Committee of the American Lung Association of Missouri." Goodman received $250 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Goodman was re-elected in 2008.

30 - Norma Champion, R. Chair, Seniors, Families and Public Health. Champion received $500 from Pfizer in 2005-2006.

31 - Chris Koster, D. Koster received $450 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. David Pearce, R, defeated Chris Benjamin, D, in 2008.

32 - Gary Nodler, R

33 - Chuck Purgason, R. Chair Health and Mental Health Committee. Purgason defeated Eric Reeve, D, in 2008.

34 - Charlie Shields, R. Majority Floor Leader. Vice Chair Health and Mental Health Committee. Shields received $500 from Pfizer in 2005-2006.

U.S. House of Representatives

1 - William "Lacy" Clay Jr., D, voted for HR-1108, the Kennedy-Cornyn/Waxman bill for FDA regulation of tobacco, and for its successor, HR-1256 (2009). Clay received $4000 from Pfizer in 2005-2006, and $1000 from Eli Lilly & Co. in 2006. Clay defeated Robb E. Cunningham (Lib) in 2008.

2 - Todd Akin, R, voted against HR-1108, the Kennedy-Cornyn/Waxman bill for FDA regulation of tobacco, and against its successor, HR-1256 (2009). Akin received $2000 from Pfizer in 2005-2006, $1000 from Eli Lilly & Co. in 2006. Akin defeated William C. Haas, D, in 2008.

3 - Russ Carnahan, D, was a co-sponsor of and voted for HR-1108, the Kennedy-Cornyn/Waxman bill for FDA regulation of tobacco, and voted for its successor, HR-1256 (2009). Carnahan defeated Chris Sander, R; Kevin C. Babcock, L, and Cynthia Redburn CST, in 2008.

4 - Ike Skelton, D, voted for HR-1108, the Kennedy-Cornyn/Waxman bill for FDA regulation of tobacco, and for its successor, HR-1256 (2009). Skelton received $4000 from Pfizer in 2005-2006. Skelton defeated Jeff Parnell, R, in 2008.

In 1978, Skelton got campaign donations from the Tobacco People's Public Affairs Committee. (Federal Election Commission Registration Form, June 5, 1978.)

Federal Election Commission Registration Form, June 5, 1978 / UCSF (pdf, 2 pp)

5 - Emanuel Cleaver, D, voted for HR-1108, the Kennedy-Cornyn/Waxman bill for FDA regulation of tobacco, and for its successor, HR-1256 (2009). Cleaver defeated Jacob Turk, R, in 2008.

6 - Samuel B. Graves, R, voted for HR-1108, the Kennedy-Cornyn/Waxman bill for FDA regulation of tobacco, but against its successor, HR-1256 (2009). Graves received $8000 from Pfizer in 2005-2006, and $2000 from Eli Lilly & Co. in 2006. Graves defeated Kay Barnes, D, and Dave Browning, L, in 2008.

7 - Roy Blunt, R, did not vote on HR-1108, the Kennedy-Cornyn/Waxman bill for FDA regulation of tobacco, and likewise on its successor, HR-1256 (2009). He is the father of anti-smoker Gov. Matt Blunt. Blunt received $10,000 from Pfizer in 2005-2006, and $10,000 from Eli Lilly & Co. in 2006. In 1998, Blunt sponsored legislation "to prod states to revoke [drivers] licenses for two months for teens caught buying or smoking tobacco... states failing to pass such measures could lose 40 percent of the federal funds they use to fight substance abuse under the bill" (Bill would take keys away from teen smokers. By Libby Quaid. AP, June 25, 1998, pp. 15-16.) Blunt defeated Richard Monroe, D; Keven Craig, L; and Travis Maddox, CST, in 2008.

Bill would take keys away from teen smokers, 1998 / UCSF (pdf, 21 pp)

Philip Morris rewarded Blunt with a fundraiser. As of June 19, 2000, the ROYB Fund had $18,000. (Steve Parrish Cordially invites you to a luncheon Honoring Congressman Roy Blunt (R-MO) Chief Deputy Whip. June 19, 2000.)

Luncheon Honoring Congressman Roy Blunt / UCSF (pdf, 4 pp)

"Guys: Roy Blunt's having breakfast next Wed., Jul. 26 to benefit his own reelection account -- minimum 1k to attend. We budgeted 4k for Blunt and have given him $1750 (all of it in 1999). We did give 3k to his leadership pac." (Email from John H. Fish to Murray W. Jones and Donald D. Foreman, of R.J. Reynolds, July 21, 2000.)

Roy Blunt's breakfast, Jul. 21, 2000 / UCSF (pdf, 1 p)

An Anti-Smoker Big Lie: "Only hours after Rep. Roy Blunt was named to the House’s third-highest leadership job in November, he surprised his fellow top Republicans by trying to quietly insert a provision benefiting Philip Morris USA into the 475-page bill creating a Department of Homeland Security, according to several people familiar with the effort... The new majority whip, who has close personal and political ties to the company, instructed congressional aides to add the tobacco provision to the bill—then within hours of a final House vote—even though no one else in leadership supported it or knew he was trying to squeeze it in." (Sleeping With Cancer. From the Truth Caucus. Jan. 13, 2006. http://www.smartwhitehouse.org/?m=200601) The rest of the story, not mentioned by the anti-smoker spin-meisters: "The provision would have made it harder to sell tobacco products over the Internet and would have cracked down on the sale of contraband cigarettes, two practices that cut into Philip Morris's profits... In an interview last week, Blunt said he pushed for the tobacco provision after talking with John F. Scruggs, vice president of government affairs for Altria Group Inc., Philip Morris's parent company. 'It's good policy,' Blunt said. Philip Morris has contributed more than $150,000 to political committees affiliated with Blunt since 2001, according to Federal Election Commission records." (GOP whip slipped Philip Morris favor into bill, sources say. By Jim VandeHei. Washington Post, June 11, 2003.) Whoopie, what a HUGE outrage against public morality.

"Mr. Blunt, the GOP powerhouse from Strafford in southwest Missouri, is the party's whip and a close ally of Majority Leader Tom DeLay of Texas. Last fall, without telling Mr. DeLay or Speaker Dennis Hastert, Mr. Blunt tried to sneak an amendment at the last minute into the bill creating the Department of Homeland Security. The amendment would have made it harder to sell cigarettes on the Internet, and would have cracked down on black market tobacco products. The problem wasn't so much the substance of the amendment, which might reduce underage smoking. Rather it was the way Mr. Blunt tried to sneak it past the House. Mr. Hastert removed the provision as soon as he learned about it. But, according to The Washington Post, House leaders have tried to keep Mr. Blunt's actions secret for fear of being accused of using homeland security to benefit big tobacco companies. Apparently Mr. Blunt has no such qualms. 'It's a serious homeland security issue,' he said this week, applying the all-purpose Osama bin Laden defense. Mr. Blunt maintains that contraband tobacco helps fund terrorist organizations. There also are questions about Mr. Blunt's close connections to Philip Morris. After splitting in 2002 with Roseann Blunt, his wife of 35 years, Mr. Blunt began dating Abigail Perlman, the former finance director for the National Republican Congressional Committee. She is now director of governmental affairs for Philip Morris Management Corp., the company's lobbying arm. And Mr. Blunt's younger son, Andrew Blunt, a recent graduate of the University of Missouri Law School, is a lobbyist for Philip Morris in Jefferson City. A spokeswoman for Mr. Blunt told the Post-Dispatch's Philip Dine that Ms. Perlman is not Mr. Blunt's contact on tobacco issues, and insisted that Mr. Blunt and his state-lobbyist son do not discuss federal issues. In April, The Wall Street Journal disclosed that Roy Blunt had secretly tried to amend the Iraq war appropriations bill in a way that would benefit United Parcel Service, Inc., another Missouri lobbying client of Andrew Blunt." (Editorial. Big Tobacco's Sweetheart. St. Louis Dispatch, June 13, 2003.) In October, he married Abigail Perlman, head of government affairs for Altria Corp. (Rep. Blunt Plans to Wed Tobacco Lobbyist Washington Post, Sep. 11, 2003.)

Meanwhile, Philip Morris has been controlled by the anti-smokers for decades! The stepson of the head of the American Cancer Society, who was the most powerful health lobbyist in history, was on its board of directors for twenty years! This is why PM has always let the anti-smokers get away with their scientific fraud, and purposely threw the Minnesota lawsuit. And look at Wisconsin's corrupt Cancer Society dictatorship, where the fundraising machine that has controlled the governors of both parties for at least the last twenty years is literally interlocked with Philip Morris and the Cancer Society!

8 - Jo Ann Emerson, R, was a co-sponsor of and voted for HR-1108, the Kennedy-Cornyn/Waxman bill for FDA regulation of tobacco, and voted for its successor, HR-1256 (2009). Emerson defeated Joe Allen, D; Branden C. McCullough, L, and Richard L. Smith, CST, in 2008.

9 - Blaine Luetkemeyer, R, voted against HR-1256 (2009), FDA Regulation of Tobacco. His predecessor, Kenny Hulshof, R, did not vote on HR-1108, the Kennedy-Cornyn/Waxman bill for FDA regulation of tobacco. Hulshof received $10,000 from Pfizer in 2005-2006, $4000 from Eli Lilly & Co. in 2006, and $2000 from Johnson & Johnson in 2008. He ran for Governor in 2008. Blaine Luetkemeyer, R, defeated Judy Bakwer, D, and Tamara A. Millay, L, in 2008.

U.S. Senate

Christopher S. Bond, R

Claire McCaskill, D

C. Charles Stokes, Big Wheel of Health Fascism

C. Charles "Charlie" Stokes was appointed Deputy Director of the Missouri Department of Health in 1988 by Gov. John Ashcroft. Future passive smoking author Ross Brownson, Ph.D. was named director of the newly-created Division of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in August of 1988. The Bureau of Cancer Epidemiology and Control he formerly headed was turned into the Bureau of Smoking, Tobacco and Cancer within the Division. (Missouri Department of Health 1989 Annual Report.)

Missouri Department of Health 1989 Annual Report / UCSF (pdf, 60 pp)

The CDC Foundation - created to circumvent Congressional funding and oversight: "The National Foundation for CDC began in February when C. Charles Stokes was hired as its executive director. The foundation has received a $1 million gift from the Robert W. Woodruff Foundation and a $500,000 grant from the CDC." T. Marshall Hahn, retired CEO of Georgia-Pacific Corp., was chairman of the foundation's board. (New foundation to support CDC on many fronts. By Maria Saporta. Atlanta Constitution, Jun. 28, 1995.) "Created by Congress, the CDC Foundation is a private, not-for-profit corporation dedicated to helping the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) achieve its vision of "Healthy People in a Healthy World, Through Prevention". (Who We Are, CDC Foundation 1997.) Rogers was on the Board of Directors of the CDC Foundation from at least 2000. (CDC Foundation 2001 Annual Report.) "When the American Legacy Foundation was established in 1998, it identified as one of its key goals 'to reduce youth tobacco use.' Before Legacy could design media campaigns and education programs targeting youths, however, the new organization had to gather information about teen smoking habits. But it was faced with a dilemma: no comprehensive youth tobacco surveillance system existed to collect these important data. Determined not to let this become a setback, the Legacy Foundation began talking with CDC to see if the groups could work together to quickly complete a school based survey. Researchers at CDC were also interested in data on youth smoking and tobacco knowledge but could not gather this information easily because the agency had no appropriated funding for a national survey. Looking for potential solutions, the groups approached the CDC Foundation for help. Because of the Foundation’s unique independent, non-profit status, it was able to serve as the coordinator of the project, working with government scientists to provide technical support and hiring an outside contractor, Macro International, Inc., to conduct the survey. The Legacy Foundation provided the funding. With the CDC Foundation’s swift implementation of the project, The National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS) was completed within several months, and data were collected, analyzed and reported by the end of the year - in time for Legacy to launch its planned media campaign in early 2000." (CDC Foundation Helps Get the Word Out About Tobacco. CDC Foundation 2000 Annual Report.) "The National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS) was conducted September-October 1999 by the American Legacy Foundation in collaboration with the CDC Foundation and with technical assistance from the CDC... Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Programs States can use the NYTS and their YTS data to develop, monitor, and evaluate the elements of their comprehensive tobacco control programs as defined in the CDC`s Best Practices For Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs. Best Practices provides states with recommended strategies and funding levels for effective programs to prevent and reduce tobacco use, eliminate the public`s exposure to secondhand smoke, and identify and eliminate disparities related to tobacco use and its effects among different population groups." (CDC: Facts About -- Youth Tobacco Surveillance United States, 1998- 1999 National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS). M2 Presswire, Oct. 13, 2000.)

CDC Foundation Helps Get the Word Out About Tobacco, 2000 / CDC Foundation
CDC: Facts About -- Youth Tobacco Surveillance United States, 1998- 1999 / ProQuest

Stokes and the CDC Foundation had a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grant for $49,595 from Jul 2006 - Dec 2007 for:

Nonprofit administration of potential tobacco settlement funding for smoking cessation / RWJF

Stokes is still President and CEO of the foundation. "Charles Stokes was named the first executive director of the CDC Foundation in February 1995. Before then, he worked at the Missouri Department of Health for 22 years, including 12 years as deputy director. Mr. Stokes chaired the American Public Health Association’s expert panel that developed “Healthy Communities 2000,” a set of model standards being used by state and local health departments throughout the United States. He has also served as president of the Missouri Public Health Association and the Missouri Institute of Public Administration." (Stokes bio, CDC Foundation, accessed 2/16/2008.) The foundation is one of the five "partner organizations" of billionaire Michael Bloomberg's $125 million "Bloomberg Philanthropies" which spread anti-smoking to Third World countries which have so far escaped the lunacy.

Missouri ASSIST

James R. Davis was the Project Director of Missouri ASSIST. "The Executive Committee is comprised of four representatives from the Department of Health, four from the American Cancer Society, and one from the American Heart Association. The American Lung Association (ALA) of Eastern Missouri and the American Lung Association of Western Missouri will also be represented. However, ALA will have just one vote." "During the 1992 legislative session, a law limiting smoking in all public buildings and restricting the sale of tobacco to minors was finally enacted. Missouri was the 46th state to enact clean indoor air legislation and the 49th state to restrict the sale of tobacco products to minors. Specifically, the law makes it illegal to smoke in public places (including work places) except in a designated smoking area, and illegal to sell tobacco products to anyone under the age of 18. On August 28, 1992, public places were designated nonsmoking unless the proprietor or person in charge designated a smoking area. The proprietor is not required to have a smoking area, but can designate up to 30% of the premises for smoking. The state law does not pre-empt stronger ordinances. This long-awaited action sets the stage for smoking cessation and education endeavors at various community levels. It will encourage worksites to promote cessation and policy. efforts, and it will begin to establish a norm of posi~ivity for peers of children who do not purchase or use tobacco. A brief description of the passage of this legislation will provide a clear picture of the policy environment and resources in Missouri. The Missouri Coali,ion on Smoking and Health, an organization made up of voluntary health organizations (including the .-kmerican Cancer Society., American Heart Association, and .american Lung .Association), the Missouri State Medical Association, nursing organizations, Missouri Extension Homemakers, and approximately 20 other tobacco-control advocacy. organizations, hired one of Missouri's top lobbyists. This lobb.vist was able to work closely with other health lobbyists in suggesting strategies that would help the Coalition to attain passage of the legislation. The lobbyist also maintained frequent communication with key legislators. Passage of the legislation included negotiations with the tobacco industry. The lobbyist was able to work with the industry and come up with trade-offs that left the clean indoor air bill acceptable to the Coalition as well as to the governor's office." [p 44.]

Missouri ASSIST / UCSF (pdf, 177 pp)

<= HOME

cast 06-01-09

Carol AS Thompson, Madison, Wisconsin

Mail to: {click here}