The Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York

The Mutual Life, 1845-46

"It commenced, without capital, on the 1st of February, 1843. At the close of its second year, (31st of January, 1845), it had issued 1086 policies, and its net accumulated premiums was $97,278. At the termination of the third year, on the 31st January, 1846, the whole number of policies issued was 2133, and its net accumulated premiums, after paying all losses and expenses, was $215,571..." The Trustees were Morris Robinson, President; Benjamin D. Stillman [sic], R.H. McCurdy, Robert B. Minturn, C.W. Faber, Mortimer Livingston, Theodore Sedgewick, Stacy B. Collins, William Barnwell, William Moore, Zebedee Cook Jr., Jonathan Miller, John H. Swift, Joseph B. Collins, James S. Wadsworth, Henry W. Hubbell, Gouverneur M. Wilkins, John V.L. Pruyn, Thomas W. Olcott, Charles Ely, Fitz Greene Halleck, Robert Schuyler, Amos S. Perry, Thomas Tuckerman, Isaac G. Pearson, John C. Cruger, Alfred Pell, David C. Colden, John C. Thacher, Rufus L. Lord, W.S. Wetmore, Joseph Blunt, William J. Bunker, Gideon Hawley, and there were two vacancies. Samuel Hannay was Secretary, and E. Cushing M.D. was the examining physician in Cleveland, Ohio. (The Mutual Life Insurance. The Cleveland Herald, Jul. 18, 1846.) "Stillman" was a misspelling of Silliman. (Display Ad. Milwaukie Sentinel, Apr. 28, 1845.) Dr. Erastus Cushing of Cleveland, Ohio, was the grandfather of Dr. Harvey Cushing.

Zebedee Cook Jr.

Zebedee Cook Sr. was a mast maker in Newburyport, Mass. (Display Ad. Political Gazette, Oct.1, 1795.) He was Chairman of the Board of Selectmen of Newburyport, which ordered that "all vessels arriving fom Guadaloupe or Martinico, shall anchor at Quarantine ground, till the Health-Officer has been on board and reported." (Take Notice. Newburyport Herald, Nov. 29, 1808.) Zebedee Cook married Elizabeth Whitney in 1825. (Married. Salem Gazette, Apr. 7, 1825.) He died in 1845. (Deaths. Boston Daily Atlas, Sep. 5, 1845.)

Whitney, Elizabeth (1771-1857) / Whitney Research Group

In 1811, there was a big fire in Newburyport, which wiped out most of the downtown, including Zebedee Cook Jr.'s dry goods store. "On Friday evening last, at half past 9 o'clock, the citizens of this town were alarmed with a cry of fire, which proved to have taken effect at the place where they have so repeatedly been summoned in the course of the present season on a similar occasion; and where it has for some time past been anxiously feared some incendiary intended to accomplish the purpose which is now effected... It is estimated that upwards of two hundred buildings were burnt, most of which were Stores and Dwelling-Hoses; in which number nearly all the Dry Goods Stores in town are included; four Printing Offices, being the whole number in town; and including the Herald Office; the Custom-House; the Surveyor's Office; the Post-Office; two Insurances Offices; (the Union and the Phenix;) the Baptist Meeting-House; four Attorneys' Offices; four Book-Stores, the loss in one of which is Thirty Thousand Dollars, and also the Town Library." (Dreadful FIRE! Newburyport Herald, Jun. 5, 1811.) [A few weeks later, under the pretext of imminent danger, the town of Salem, about 20 miles down the coast, passed a smoking ban.]

In 1813, Z. Cook Jr. arrived at the Port of Boston in the ship Commodore Preble, from Cadiz. One of his fellow passengers was Samuel A. Storrow. (Centinel Shipping List. Columbian Centinel, Dec. 11, 1813.) In 1814, Zebedee Cook Jr. (1786-1858) opened an insurance office in the Exchange Coffee House in Boston. (Display Ad. Salem Gazette, Apr. 15, 1814.) In 1820, he chartered and opened the Eagle Insurance Company in the former place of the Office of Discount and Deposit for the United States Bank, Boston, with himself as President. (House of Representatives. Salem Gazette, Jun. 13, 1820; Display Ad. Boston Repertory, Sep. 26, 1820.) In 1824, he was a member of a committee formed "for the purpose of adopting suitable measures to interest the attention of Congress in the suppression of the piratical hordes which infest the shores of the Islands of Cuba and Porto Rico." The other members were William Gray, Thomas H. Perkins, Francis J. Oliver, and William Sturgis. (Meeting at Merchants' Hall. Independent Chronicle and Boston Patriot, Dec. 15, 1824.) His business references included Stephen White, of Salem; J. & T.H. Perkins & Sons; Samuel G. Perkins; Bryant & Sturgis; Caleb Loring; Pascal P. Pope; Daniel Webster; Willard Phillips; and Charles G. Loring, of Boston (Insurance. Essex Register, Dec. 10, 1827); and Lorman & Son, R.H. Douglass & Co., William Howell & Son, and Riggs, Peabody & Co., Baltimore. (Insurance. Baltimore Patriot, Aug. 15, 1828.) In 1834, in Gloucester, Mass., he married Ann S. Trask, daughter of Hon. Israel Trask. (Marriages. Salem Gazette, Apr. 8, 1834.) He was President of the Mutual Safety Insurance Company of New-York from 1840 until resigning in 1848. Alfred Pell, the Vice-President, resigned as well. (Insurance. Portsmouth Journal of Literature and Politics, Jun. 13, 1840; Boston Daily Atlas, Dec. 4, 1848.) He died in South Framingham, Mass., in 1858. (Obituary. New York Times, Jan. 27, 1858.)

Clarence Cook was the fourth son of Zebedee Cook. (Died. New York Times, Jun. 3, 1900). Clarence Chatham Cook was born in Dorcester, Mass. in 1828, and graduated from Harvard in 1849. "He studied architecture, and for several years was occupied as a teacher. In 1863 he began the publication of a series of articles in The New York Tribune on American art. These articles were continued at intervals until 1869, when he became the Paris correspondent of that paper. He remained abroad for several years." (Clarence Cook Dead. Jun. 3, 1900.) The Tribune was anti-smoker Horace Greeley's paper. His sister married James Lovell Little of Boston (Married. Boston Daily Atlas, Oct. 21, 1843), and his grandnephew, Clarence Cook Little, was Director of the American Society for the Control of Cancer.

John C. Cruger

John Church Cruger was born in New York City in 1807. "His family was one of the oldest in the Metropolis, two members, both named John Cruger, having filled the office of Mayor of New-York in the early days of its history." He was educated in France, returned to study law, and became a lawyer. He soon retired to "devote himself to the life of a country genetleman on his beautiful seat on the Hudson, known as Cruger's Island, which he purchased in 1835." He was a Whig candidate for Congress in 1852. (Funeral of John Church Cruger. New York Times, Nov. 20, 1879.) His wife, Euphemia Van Rensselaer, was the daughter of Stephen Van Rensselaer, Lord of the Manor of Rensselaerswyck, and a Royal descendant through the Livingstons of Louis VI, King of France. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 587.) They were the parents of Stephen Van Rensselaer Cruger.

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 587 / Google Books

John Cruger came from Germany before 1700 and married a member of the Cuyler family. One of the early Crugers married the daughter of a Bristol banker, Samuel Peach, and was a Member of Parliament between 1774 and 1790, and later a U.S. Senator from New York. Many were West India merchants on Curacao and Santa Cruz. Nicholas Cruger sent Alexander Hamilton from Santa Cruz to New York. One of John C. Cruger's aunts married William Bard, and his cousin married Rufus Delafield. (Original Family Records, Cruger. By Edward F. De Lancey. New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, April 1875, p. 78.)

New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 1875 / Internet Archive

Charles Ely, Yale 1825

Charles Ely was born in West Springfield, Mass., and came to New York City after his first wife, Harriet Kent, died. He was a member of the dry goods firm of Merritt, Ely & Co. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1880-1890, p. 119.) His grandson, Morris Upham Ely, Wolf's Head 1898, was vice president of the Ely Anode & Supply Co. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1932-1933, p. 94.) Henry B. Hyde of the Equitable was employed by Merritt, Ely & Co. from 1850 to 1852. The Ely family held a reunion in Lyme, Conn. in 1878. (Reunion of the Ely Family. New York Times, May 6, 1878.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1880-1890, p. 119 / Google Books
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1932-1933 / Yale University Library (pdf, 271 pp)

Morris Robinson, Royal

Morris Robinson Esq. (1787-1849) was a Royal descendant of Edward I, King of England. He married Henrietta Elizabeth, a daughter of Capt. William Duer of the U.S. Army, who was also a Royal. His daughter, Harriet Duer Robinson, married Albert Gallatin, grandson of the banker Albert Gallatin. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 108.) Moses H. Grinnell replaced him as President of the Mutual Life Insurance Company. (City Intelligence. New York Herald, May 9, 1849.) He was married a few months after being appointed cashier of the Bank of Orange County in Goshen (Bank of Orange County. Orange County Patriot, Sep. 21, 1913; Married. New York, The Olio, Dec. 4, 1813.) He was elected cashier of the United States Bank in Philadelphia a few years later. (New York, the American, May 20, 1820.) He was vice president and a director of the American Life Insurance and Trust Company of Baltimore. (Classified Ad. Washington DC, The Globe Oct. 27, 1835; Daily National Intelligencer, Mar. 2, 1836.) He was President of the U.S. Bank of New York, a private bank financed by Richard Alsop and George Griswold. (The U.S. Bank of New York. Washington DC, Daily National Intelligencer, Dec. 5, 1839.) A tablet of the Canadian Society of New York which commemorates him for establishing "the business of modern life insurance on the American Continent, Feb. 1st, 1843." It states he was born in Wilmot, Nova Scotia, on Sep. 2, 1784. (Robinson Tablet Unveiled. New York Times, Feb. 3, 1903.) William Betts was his niece's husband.

Americans of royal descent, p. 108 / Google Books

Theodore Sedgwick, Royal

Theodore Sedgwick was the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. He graduated from Columbia College, and at the age of 25, was an attaché of the Livingston Legation in Paris. He wrote a biography of the Ambassador, and was a frequent contributor to Harper's Monthly. (Obituary. New York Times, Dec. 10, 1859.) He was born in Albany in 1811. His grandfather, Theodore Sedgwick, was Speaker of the House in the sixth Congress, and his father, Theodore Sedgwick, was a Massachusetts state legislator. He wrote a biography of William Livingston, Governor of New Jersey, and served in the legation to Paris while Edward Livingston was Minister. He returned to New York in 1835, and was a law partner of Robert Sedgwick. (Death of the Hon. Theodore Sedgwick. New York Herald, Dec. 15, 1859.) He and his wife, Sara Ashburner, who was born in Bombay, India, were buried in Section C of the Sedgwick Pie. (Sedgwick Family Plot, Stockbridge Cemetary.) His sister was Catharine Maria Sedgwick, the famous author. (Obituary. Boston Daily Advertiser, Aug. 2, 1867.)

Sedgwick Family Plot / Sedgwick.org

His grandfather and father graduated from Yale in 1765 and 1798, respectively. His father married Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College, May 1763 - July, 1778, p. 146; and June, 1792 - Spetember, 1805, p. 336.) His mother, Susan Anne Livingston, was a daughter of Matthew R. [Ridley] and Catharine Livingston, daughter of William Livingston, Governor of New Jersey, and a Royal descendant of Louis VI, King of France. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 589.)

Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College, 1763- 1778 / Internet Archive
Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College, 1792-1805, p. 336 / Google Books
Americans of Royal Descent, p. 589 / Google Books

Benjamin D. Silliman, Yale 1824

Benjamin Douglas Silliman was the son of Gen. Gold Selleck Silliman (Yale 1796), and the grandson of Gen. Gold Selleck Silliman (Yale 1752), and great-grandson of Judge Ebenezer Silliman (Yale 1727). Prof. Benjamin Silliman (Yale 1796) was his uncle. His mother was Hepsa Ely, daughter of Rev. David Ely (Yale 1769), whose clan contributed at least two dozen Yalies. After the War of 1812, his father gave up his successful law practice in Newport, R.I., and moved to New York City, then Brooklyn, N.Y. in 1823. Benjamin D. Silliman was admittted to the bar in 1829, and was counsel to the National Bank of Commerce for over half a century. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 3.) He was one of the organizers of the Society of Alumni of Yale College, with Elias H. Ely [Yale 1810] as Treasurer. (Yale College. New-York Spectator, Sep. 20, 1831.) "Mr. Silliman never married, and his nearest relatives living are his sister, Mrs. Laura S. Blagden of Washington; two nieces, Miss Caroline Taylor, who was his housekeeper, for years, and Mrs. Samuel Carey of Manhattan; another niece, Mrs. Harriet Silliman Matherson of Brooklyn, and two nephews. It is expected that the greater part of Mr. Silliman's estate will go to these relatives. No estimate of the value of the estate could be obtained yesterday, but it is known to be very large. Mr. Silliman inherited a fortune from an aunt, and was also left part of the estate of his brother. He owned the valuable piece of property at the southeast corner of Broadway and Wall Street, Manhattan; his residence in Brooklyn, also a valuable property, a country seat at Babylon, L.I., and other real and personal estate." The little corner at Broadway and Wall Street which his aunt, Mary McGregor, left him was about thirty by forty feet in size, and "enjoys the reputation of being the most valuable piece of ground in this city, if not in the world." (Benj. D. Silliman Dead. New York Times, Jan. 25, 1901.) It was sold for $700,000 to the Mercantile Trust Company of St. Louis, "acting as agents for interests whose identity was not disclosed." The United Cigar Stores Company held a lease on the building. (Most Costly Site in New York Sold. New York Times, Jun. 7, 1905.) From 1877 until his death, he was a business partner of Philip H. Adee, Yale 1873. In 1897, he made a deposition about his family's long friendship with the William H. King, of the King family of Newport, Rhode Island, several of whom had been partners of Russell & Co. in the China trade.

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 3 / Google Books

Two of his sisters married Thomas Blagden Sr. of Washington, D.C. Emily Greene Silliman Blagden died in Washington in 1853. (Deaths. Daily National Intelligencer, Nov. 7, 1953.) Their son, Silliman Blagden, graduated from Yale in 1869. He practiced law in New York for five years, then "devoted himself to private interests in Washington." Several years later he became an evangelist in New England and Canada. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 908.) Thomas Blagden Sr. was a member of the Board of Health for several years (Board of Health. Daily National Intelligencer, Jun. 5, 1829; Jun. 2, 1834.) He died in 1870. (Died. New York Times, Feb. 4, 1870.) Laura Silliman Blagden died at the home of her son, Thomas Blagden Jr., in Upper Saranac, N.Y., at the age of 89. "Blagden Road was named after Mrs. Blagden's husband, who died thirty years ago. The family have been residents of Mount Pleasant for more than a generation, and still occupy their home, 'Argyle,' in that section." (Death of Mrs. Blagden. Washington Post, Jan. 26, 1908.) Thomas Blagden was a brother of George W. Blagden, whose wife was a Royal. Their son married the sister of George C. Clark of Clark, Dodge & Co., and one of Thomas Blagden Jr.'s sons married Clark's niece.

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 908 / Google Books

His niece, Harriet Silliman Blagden, married Arthur Mathewson MD, Yale 1858, an opthalmic and aural surgeon in Brooklyn, N.Y. They took up residence at the Blagden family estate in Washington in 1906. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1920-1921, p. 12.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1920-1921 / Yale University Library (pdf, 304 pp)

James S. Wadsworth

James Samuel Wadsworth "attended both Harvard University and Yale University, studied law, and was admitted to the bar, but had no intention of practicing. He spent the majority of his life managing his family's estate," until going into politics. He was one of the organizers of the Free Soil Party, which joined the Republican Party in 1856. He was commissioned a Major General of the New York state militia before getting command of a brigade in the Army of the Potomac. He was wounded in battle in 1864 and died in a Confederate field hospital. (Barker Family Tree, accessed 2/23/10.) He married Mary Craig Wharton. (James Wadsworth Family Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.) James S. Wadsworth, Esq., of Genesee was a director of the Colonial Life Insurance Company of Scotland. Fellow directors included Nathaniel Thayer, and its Governor was The Right Hon. The Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, Governor General of Canada. (Insurance. New York Times, Jan. 2, 1854.)

Barker Family Tree / Blogspot.com
James Wadsworth Family Papers / Library of Congress

His son, James Wolcott Wadsworth, was educated at the Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven and was preparing to enter Yale when his father died. He enlisted in the Union Army instead. He was a New York state official until 1881, then a member of Congress (with one break) until 1907. He was President of the Geneseo National Bank and the Genesee River National Bank of Mount Morris. He married Louise Travers, daughter of William R. Travers of New York. (Familiar Figure in Geneseo. New York Times, Dec. 25, 1926.) The ushers were John Travers, her brother; Rowland Redmond, W.A. Duer and Richard Peters. (Marriage in High Life. From the Newport R.I. News, Sep. 16. St. Louis Globe-Democrat, Sep. 20, 1876.)

Another son, Craig Wharton Wadsworth, married Evelyn Peters, a Royal descendant of Robert Bruce, King of Scotland. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 267.)

Americans of royal descent, p. 267 / Google Books

James Wolcott Wadsworth Jr., Skull & Bones 1898, was U.S. Senator from New York from 1915 to 1927, and U.S. Representative from 1933 to 1950. He was a trustee of Cornell University, and a director of the Genesee Valley National Bank & Trust Company. He married Alice Evelyn Hay, daughter of John Hay. Their children were Mrs. William S. Symington 3d, Yale ex-23, James Jeremiah Wadsworth [S&B] 1927, and Reverdy Wadsworth 1936. (Obituary Record of Graduates of the Undergraduate Schools Deceased during the Year 1951-1952, p. 34.) U.S. Sen. James W. Wadsworth Jr. was a director of the Frontier Mortgage Corporation, whose fellow directors included Bronson Rumsey and Brig. Gen. H.C. Bickford of Toronto, Canada. (Display Ad. Dunkirk Evening Observer, Jun. 23, 1921.) His wife's sister married Payne Whitney, S&B 1894, and he and Whitney were executors of John Hay's will. (Will of John Hay Filed. Washington Post, Jul. 21, 1905.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1951-1952 / Yale University Library (pdf, 215 pp)

The Wadsworth family "is about the nearest approach to the British landed gentry that can be found in republican America... The first native born American of the name, James Wadsworth, of Durham, Conn., became a member of the committee of safety at the breaking out of the Revolutionary war." (The Wadsworths of the Genesee Valley. By Elbert O. Woodson. Logansport Journal, Jul. 20, 1906.). James Wadsworth, Yale 1748, had no living children and left his property to nephews and nieces. (Biographical sketches of the graduates of Yale College, May, 1745-May, 1763, p. 192.)

Biographical sketches of the graduates of Yale, 1745-1763 / Internet Archive

James Wadsworth, Yale 1787, was a nephew of Gen. James Wadsworth, Yale 1748. He and his older brother William bought land in the townships of Geneseo and Avon of New York State from their father's second cousin, Jeremiah Wadsworth. "From February 1796 to November 1798 he was in Europe, with the cooperation of Robert Morris, Aaron Burr, DeWitt Clinton, and others, interesting foreign capitalists in American investments." (James Wadsworth. (Dictionary of American Biography Base Set. American Council of Learned Societies, 1928-1936.) He married Naomi Wolcott, and their daughters married Martin Brimmer (Harvard 1814) and Sir Charles Murray, a son of the Earl of Dunmore. (Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College Vol. IV., July 1778 - June, 1792, p. 582.) He left $900,000 in trust to his grandson, Martin Brimmer of Boston, who left no heirs. The other heirs put claims on it, but the court ruled against his English grandson, Charles J. Murray. (Wadsworth Estate Settled. New York Times, Sep. 20, 1896.)

Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale, 1778-1792 / Internet Archive

James Wadsworth 1787's nephew, James Wadsworth, Yale 1841, studied law with Benjamin D. Silliman. He was mayor of Buffalo and a state senator. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1890-1900, p. 32.) His son, Wedworth Wadsworth, Book & Snake 1867, "spent some years in the custom house in New York following his graduation," then traveled and painted. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1926-1927, p. 215.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1890-1900, p. 32 / Google Books
Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1926-1927 / Yale University Library (pdf, 346 pp)

William S. Wetmore

William Shepard Wetmore (1801-1862) was born in Vermont, but was raised by his uncle, Samuel Wetmore, in Middlrtown, Connecticut after his mother died. He went to sea at age 14. "In 1823, he was shipwrecked near Valparaiso, to which port he had gone as supercargo of one of the ships of Edward Carrington & Co., of Providence, a business partner of his uncle. In Valparaiso he went to work for the firm Richard Alsop of Middletown, Connecticut. This eventually led to a partnership of Alsop, Wetmore and Cryder in 1825 with John Cryder of Philadelphia. He retired from the firm around 1831, and, apparently on advice from his doctor, left for Canton, China where in 1833 he established the firm of Wetmore & Co. with Joseph Archer of Philadelphia. The company went on to be one of the largest mercantile houses in the East Indies brokering tea, tea papers, silks, spices, wines, ports, hemp, pearl buttons, copper and coffee, and on occasion opium, though apparently in lesser quantities than rival British houses." (Letters to William Shepard Wetmore, China Trade merchant and supercargo, 1827-1840. Description of auction items. PBA Galleries, accessed 6-19-11.) He and his first wife, Esther Phillips Wetmore, Samuel Wetmore's daughter, were married at St. Pancras New Church in London. (Table Talk. London, The Age, Oct. 29, 1837.) She died the next year. (Died. New-York Spectator, Nov. 1, 1838.) His second wife was Anstiss Derby Rogers. (Married. Boston Daily Atlas, Sep. 9, 1843.) She was a great-granddaughter of Elias Hasket Derby, the pioneer of the China Trade, and of Rev. John Rogers, the fifth president of Harvard. (Geo. Peabody Wetmore. Newport Mercury, Mar. 24, 1894.) He was a mortgageholder of the New York, Providence and Boston Railroad (Display Ad. Boston Daily Atlas, Oct. 2, 1844), and a New York director of the Liverpool and London Fire and Life Insurance Company (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 25, 1852.) He was a Vice President in the U.S. of the Medical Missionary Society in China, for whom Russell & Co. were Treasurers. S. Wells Williams was Recording Secretary. (Medical Missionary Society in China. New York Times, May 19, 1853, from the China Mail, Mar. 3, 1853.) His uncle, Samuel Wetmore, was a founder of that company, and was guardian of the younger siblings of partner Samuel W. Russell. (At a Court of Probate Held in Middletown in and for the District of Middletown on the 24th of Sept. A.D. 1810.) He was a personal friend of George Peabody. (Mr. Peabody. Boston Daily Atlas, Sep. 23, 1856.)

Letters to William Shepard Wetmore / PBA Galleries

Partners of Wetmore & Co. prior to June 12, 1856 were John Burgess Goodridge and Oliver Everett Roberts. It was dissolved by Roberts, and Wetmore joined Franklin Delano Williams and William Wetmore Cryder as Wetmore, Williams & Co. (Notice. Shanghai North China Herald, Jun. 20, 1857.) Roberts tried to assign the property of the firm to Oliver H. Perry, U.S. Consul at Canton, but William Shepard Wetmore had it set aside and cancelled by decree of the Court of the U.S. Commissioner in China, and obtained sole control. S. Wells Williams was Clerk of Court. (Intimations. North-China Herald, Sep. 5, 1857.) Stating that the firm was "perfectly solvent," he expelled Roberts and formed Wetmore, Williams & Co. with Franklin Delano Williams and William Wetmore Cryder. It was to operate from Shanghai, with agents in Macao, Hong Kong, and Foochow, unless conditions at Canton improved. (Notice. North-China Herald, Sep. 5, 1857.) In 1847, William S. Wetmore was the first to import gutta-percha, used for insulating underwater cables. (Gutta-Percha. San Francisco Evening Bulletin, Feb. 23, 1869.)

His father, Seth Wetmore (1769-1830), of St. Albans, Vermont, was a probate judge, member of the Vermont Legislature, and a Fellow of the University of Vermont. (Deaths. New Hampshire Statesman and Concord Register, Sep. 18, 1830.) He was briefly a merchant in New York; his property was seized pursuant to "an act for relief against absconding and absent debtors." (Notice. New York Daily Advertiser, Jul. 8, 1797.) The Legislature of the State of Vermont passed a special Act of Insolvency in favor of Seth Wetmore, of Middlebury, "freeing and discharging the said Seth Wetmore from his debts on surrendering up his property to the subscribers for the use and benefit of his creditors." (Bennington, Vermont Gazette, Nov. 23, 1798.)

William S. Wetmore's son, George Peabody Wetmore, Skull & Bones 1867, was born in London, England in 1846. He graduated from Columbia Law School and was admitted to the bars of New York and Rhode Island. He was Governor of Rhode Island for two terms, beginning in 1885, and U.S. Senator from 1895 to 1913. He was a trustee of the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale, and of the Peabody Education Fund. He married Edith Malvina Keteltas, daughter of Eugene Keteltas, of the class of 1822 at Yale who graduated from Union College. They had four children. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates, 1921-1922, p. 47.) His daughter, Annie Derby Rogers Wetmore, married William Watts Sherman.

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1921-1922 / Yale University Library (pdf, 299 pp)

His grandson, William Shepard Keteltas Wetmore, Yale 1897, was a member of the party to survey a route for the Hankow-Canton Railway in 1898. During World War I, he was in charge of the Information Bureau of the Red Cross at Nice, France in 1917, and then a rest club in France. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates, 1924-1925, p. 135.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates, 1924-1925 / Yale University Library (pdf, 135 pp)

The Mutual Life, 1847-49

Trustees: Morris Robinson (President), William J. Hyslop, R.H. McCurdy, Frederick S. Winston, C.W. Faber, Mortimer Livingston, Theodore Sedgwick, Stacy B. Collins, John H. Swift, Joseph B. Collins, James S. Wadsworth, Henry W. Hubbell, Gouverneur M. Wilkins, John V.L. Pruyn, Frederick Whittlesey, Charles Ely, John C. Cruger, Walter Joy, Alfred Pell, David C. Colden, John C. Thatcher, Rufus L. Lord, William Betts, Joseph Blunt, Isaac G. Pearson, William Barnwell, William Moore, Zebedee Cook, Jonathan Miller, Fitz Greene Halleck, Robert Schuyler, Amos S. Perry, Joseph Tuckerman, Gideon Hawley, William J. Bunker, (one vacancy). Samuel Hannay, Secretary; Minturn Post, Physician to the Company. (Daily National Intelligency, Feb. 15, 1847.) In 1848, Halleck, Hawley, and Schuyler were replaced by David A. Comstock, Eugene Dutilh, and Moses H. Grinnell. H.S. Durand was the agent in Racine; P.R. Foy, Physician. (Display Ad. Racine Advocate, Mar. 29, 1848.) Livingston and Lord left, J.P. Yelverton was elected, and Robert Schuyler returned. (Display Ad. Cleveland Daily Herald, Mar. 3, 1849.)

William Betts

William Betts was the son of Samuel Betts, a New York merchant, and Susanna Lake, of the island of Santa Cruz in the West Indies, where he was born in 1802. He graduated from Columbia College in 1820. After studying law with David B. Ogden, he practiced law for a few years with Gerard W. Morris, then joined the firm of his father-in-law, Beverly Robinson, as Betts, Emmet & Robinson at No. 52 Wall-street. He was counsel to the New York Life Insurance Company was well as the Mutual Life, and a trustee of Columbia College and the College of Physicians and Surgeons. "He devoted himself principally to conveyancing, but occasionally appeared in the old Court of Chancery, where he was counsel for the plaintiff in the case of Monroe against Douglas, in which James Monroe, son of President Monroe, sought to secure from Mr. Douglas, his brother-in-law, a redistribution of property left to the family by Sir William Douglas, of Scotland." He left a son, Beverly Robinson Betts, and a daughter, Caroline, who married her cousin, Henry Barclay Robinson, of Fredericton, New Brunswick. (Death of William Betts. New York Times, Jul. 6, 1884.) Anne Dorothea Robinson was a granddaughter of Col. William Duer [1805-1879], Royal. Morris Robinson was an uncle of Mrs. Betts. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 108.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 108 / Google Book

Robert H. McCurdy

Robert H. McCurdy (1800-1880), was the father of Richard A. McCurdy. He was a partner of the dry goods firm of McCurdy, Aldrich & Spencer. The elder McCurdy and his former partner, Herman D. Aldrich, died on the same day, and they had a joint funeral. It was an Episcopal service in which Dr. George L. Prentiss, a Presbyterian clergyman from the Union Theological Seminary, participated on behalf of McCurdy's remains. Charles Butler was one of those who attended. (Obituary 1, New York Times, Apr. 6, 1880 p. 5; The Two Dead Partners. New York Times, Apr. 8, 1880 p. 8.) Partner William Spencer died in New Haven in 1868. (Died. New York Times, Feb. 11, 1868 p. 5.) He was a director of the Continental Insurance Company in 1861, along with NYGIC directors Samuel D. Babcock, A.A. Low, and John Caswell; also Hiram Barney of the Butler law firm and George W. Lane of the Central Trust. (Ad 7. The Independent, Jan. 31, 1861;130(635):7.) McCurdy, Aldrich & Spencer was the predecessor firm of Low, Harriman & Co., whose senior partners were James Low (~1809-1898) and Oliver Harriman (1829-1904).

Herman Daggett Aldrich's wife was Elizabeth Wyman of Baltimore, whose brother, William, was the donor of Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus. (Elizabeth Wyman Aldrich. New York Times, Jan. 20, 1904 p. 9; $500,000 for Johns Hopkins. New York Times, Dec. 1, 1903.) The Wymans' father, Samuel Wyman Sr., came to Baltimore from Lowell, Mass., and had been interested in New England cotton mills for many years. (William Wyman Is Dead. New York Times, Nov. 27, 1903.) Wyman's cousin, William Keyser, and Francis Jencks/Jenks donated their land to JHU along with his. (Land for Johns Hopkins. New York Times, Feb. 5, 1901.) Henry Walters was one of the unnamed potential donors (Johns Hopkins University. New York Times, Apr. 23, 1901.) Another brother, Samuel Wyman Jr., was associated with Herman Aldrich after the latter retired from McCurdy, Aldrich & Spencer. (Death List of a Day. New York Times, May 17, 1899.) Samuel Wyman Jr. left a trust fund from the income of 200 shares of the Continental Insurance Company for Katherine Nolan Dudley, daughter of the Right Rev. Thomas U. Dudley; and $25,000 to his friend, Seth G. Babcock. A nephew, Spencer Aldrich, Jacob B. Underhill, and Thomas U. Dudley Jr. were executors. (The Will of Samuel Wyman, Jr., Filed. New York Times, May 20, 1899.)

The Homewood Campus / Johns Hopkins University

The Mutual Life, 1850-51

Trustees: Joseph B. Collins (President), William J. Hyslop, R.H. McCurdy, Frederick S. Winston, C.W. Faber, John P. Yelverton, Theodore Sedgwick, Stacy B. Collins, John H. Swift, John Wadsworth, S.M. Cornell, Gouverneur M. Wilkins, John V.L. Pruyn, Frederick Whittlesey, Charles Ely, John C. Cruger, Walter Joy, Alfred Pell, David C. Colden, Alfred Edwards, William Betts, Joseph Blunt, Isaac G. Pearson, Henry Wells, William Moore, Zebedee Cook, Jonathan Miller, David A. Comstock, Robert Schuyler, James Chambers, Joseph Tuckerman, Moses H. Grinnell, William J. Bunker, Eugene Dutilh, Francis S. Lathrop, and J.O. Thatcher. Isaac Abbott, Secretary; R. Thompson M.D. and R. Howard M.D., Medical Examiners for Columbus, C.T. Flowers, Agent, Columbus. (Display Ad. Daily Ohio Statesman, Jan. 18, 1850; Cleveland Herald, May 24, 1851.)

The Mutual Life, 1852

Trustees: Joseph B. Collins (President), R.H. McCurdy, F.S. Winston, C.W. Faber, J.P. Yelverton, T. Sedgwick, S.B. Collins, John H. Swift, J. Wadsworth, Samuel M. Cornell, G.M. Wilkins, John V.L. Pruyn, George R. Clark, Charles Ely, John C. Cruger, Abraham Dininger, Alfred Pell, M.H. Grinnell, Alfred Edwards, William Betts, Joseph Blunt, Isaac G. Pearson, Henry Wells, William Moore, Jonathan Miller, D.A. Comstock, Robert Schuyler, James Chambers, Joseph Tuckerman, John M. Stuart, William J. Bunker, Nathaniel L. Hayden, F.S. Lathrop, Samuel E. Sproulls, Louis J. Battelle, and Eugene Dutilh. Isaac Abbatt, SEcretary; Charles Gill, Actuary. (Display Ad. Philadelphia North American, Oct. 14, 1852.)

The Mutual Life, 1854

Trustees of the Mutual Life Insurance Company, 1854: Frederick S. Winston, President; R.H. McCurdy; Joseph B. Collins; W. Smith Brown; J.P. Yelverton; Hamlin Blake; John H. Swift; J. Wadsworth; Samuel M. Cornell; G.M. Wilkins; John V.L. Pruyn; George R. Clark; Ezra Wheeler; J.P. Treadwell; Abraham Bininger; M.H. Grinnell; Alfred Edwards; William Betts; Joseph Blunt; Isaac G. Pearson; Samuel D. Babcock; William Moore; Jonathan Miller; William H. Popham; C.H. Norton; John M. Stuart; William J. Bunker; Nathaniel Hayden; L. Edgerton; Eugene Dutilh; R.G. Moulton; Samuel E. Sproull; Charles J. Stedman; Richard Patrick; Lucius Robinson; Lewis Battelle. Secretary: Isaac Abbatt; Actuary: Charles Gill. (Insurance. New York Times, Feb. 17, 1854.)

William Smith Brown

The Brown family owned the Port Morris Land and Improvement Company, which held property along the New-York and New Haven Railroad, with a half-mile frontage on the East River. Three of them were incorporators of the Southern Railroad Company. (New Companies Incorporated. New York Times, Jun. 28, 1885 p.3; New York's Bankers, Merchants and Manufacturers. New York Times, Aug. 18, 1885). William Smith Brown was one of the founders of the Demilt Dispensary. (City Items. New York Tribune, Mar. 24, 1852.) He died in Heidelberg, Germany. (Obituary Notes. New York Times, Jun. 26, 1892.) His son, William Reynolds Brown, married Ellen Watkins Babcock, a daughter of Samuel D. Babcock's uncle, Capt. David Sherman Babcock. Their son, Donald W. Brown, was Vice President of the Puritan Mortgage Corporation, whose directors included his uncle, Joseph N. Babcock, and Thomas J. Watson, President of the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company, which became the International Business Machine Corporation. (Donald Brown Dies On Vacation. New York Times, Aug. 25, 1931; Display Ad 25. New York Times, Nov. 19, 1932 p. 21; Display Ad 1. New York Times, Apr. 15, 1924 p. 2.)

The Mutual Life, 1856

Board of Trustees: Frederick S. Winston (President), Millard Fillmore, David Hoadley, William V. Brady, Richard Patrick, Joseph Blunt, Nathaniel Hayden, Jonathan Miller, Abm. Bininger, J.P. Yelverton, John Wadsworth, William J. Bunker, H.A. Smythe, R.H. McCurdy, John V.L. Pruyn, William Betts, S.M. Cornell, S.E. Sproulls, John M. Stuart, Hamlin Blake, Alfred Edwards, Lucius Robinson, Samuel D. Babcock, Rod. G. Moulton, I.G. Pearson, William Moore, John H. Swift, Eugene Dutilh, Charles T. Stedman, Cephas H. Norton, J.P. Treadwell, Ezra Wheeler, William H. Popham, Lycurg. Edgerton, and W. Smith Brown. Isaac Abbatt, Secretary; Minturn Post M.D., Medical Examiner. (Insurance. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1856.)

The Mutual Life, 1857-1859

Trustees of the Mutual Life Insurance Company, 1858: Frederick S. Winston, President; Millard Fillmore; David Hoadley; William V. Brady; Henry A. Smythe; Robert H. McCurdy; John V.L. Pruyn; William Betts; Isaac Green Pearson; William Moore; John H. Swift; W.E. Dodge; Richard Patrick; Joseph Blunt; Nathaniel Hayden; Jonathan Miller; Abraham Bininger; John P. Yelverton; John Wadsworth; William J. Bunker; Samuel M. Cornell; Samuel E. Sproulls; John M. Stuart; Hamlin Blake; Alfred Edwards; Lucius Robinson; Samuel D. Babcock; George S. Coe; Charles J. Stedman; Cephas H. Norton; J.P. Treadwell; Ezra Wheeler; William H. Popham; Lycurgus Edgerton; W. Smith Brown; George R. Clark. Secretary: Isaac Abbatt; Actuary, Sheppard Homans; Medical Examiner, Minturn Post, M.D.; General Agent, Henry H. Hyde. (Insurance. New York Times, Jul. 1, 1857.) In 1858, Treadwell left and William K. Strong joined. (Financial. New York Times, May 17, 1858.) In 1859, Miller left and Alex W. Bradford became a trustee. (Insurance. New York Times, May 26, 1859.)

General Agent Henry H. Hyde was the father of Henry Baldwin Hyde (1834-1899), who founded the Equitable Life Assurance Society in 1859, after seven years as a clerk at the Mutual. (Death of Henry B. Hyde. New York Times, May 3, 1899.)

William E. Dodge Sr.

The Dodge family settled at Salem, Massachusetts in 1629, and branched into Connecticut during the Revolutionary times. David Low Dodge, the head of a private school at Norwich, married a daughter of the Rev. Aaron Cleveland, the grandfather of ex-president Cleveland. "In 1802, David Low Dodge went into business in Hartford, Conn., and three years later founded the wholesale dry goods house of Higginson, Dodge & Co. of Boston, New York and Baltimore, which was destined to become the largest wholesale house of its day, but dissolved in the trade disturbances attendant upon the Embargo act. For some years following the dissolution, David L. Dodge lived in Connecticut, entering business in New York once more, however, in the firm of Ludlow & Dodge, from which he retired in 1827." His daughter, Mary Abiah Dodge, married New York merchant Norman White, the father of Rev. Erskine Norman White, Yale 1854, both of whom were directors of Union Theological Seminary. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1910-1915, p. 18.) Peter Ludlow was David L. Dodge's partner in Ludlow and Dodge, which dissolved in 1817. (Notice. New York Commercial Advertiser, Jul. 2, 1817.) William E. Dodge Sr.'s mother, Sarah Cleveland, was an aunt of Dr. Clement Cleveland of Memorial Hospital and the American Society for the Control of Cancer.

[EN White] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1910-1915, p. 18 / Google Books

His son, William Earl Dodge, born in 1805, established Huntington & Dodge that year in New York. He married the daughter of Anson Green Phelps of Phelps & Peck, metal dealers, and entered the firm, which became Phelps, Dodge & Co. in 1833. William Earl Dodge Jr. was born in 1832 and became a partner in 1864. Both were active in the Evangelical Alliance and the National Temperance Society, and William E. Dodge Jr. was active in the Young Men's Christian Association. He was a trustee of the New York Life Insurance Company. He married Sarah, the daughter of Panama Railroad President David Hoadley in 1854. William E. Dodge Sr. died in 1883, and William E. Dodge Jr. in 1903. (William E. Dodge Dead. New York Times, Aug. 10, 1903.) William Earl Dodge [3d] graduated from Princeton in 1879, and married Emeline, the daughter of Oliver Harriman. (A Brilliant Social Event. New York Times, Dec. 7, 1879.)

William E. Dodge Sr.'s brother-in-law, Daniel James, was a partner of Phelps-Dodge, which did business in Liverpool as Phelps, James & Co. Dodge was an original incorporator of the New-York and Erie Railroad, a director of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, and the New Jersey Central, and one of the founders of the Mutual Life Insurance Company, the Atlantic Mutual Marine Insurance Company, the Bowery Fire Insurance Company, the United States Trust Company, the Greenwich Savings Bank, the City Bank, and the American Exchange National Bank, "in all of which he was a Director from the time of their organization until his death." He owned lumber mills and up to 400,000 acres of timber land in Wisconsin, Michigan, Georgia, West Virginia, Texas, and Canada. He left seven sons - William E. Dodge Jr., Anson G.P. Dodge, Rev. David Stuart Dodge, Gen. Charles C. Dodge, Norman W. Dodge, George E. Dodge, and Arthur M. Dodge. (A Good Life-Work Ended. New York Times, Feb. 10, 1883.) Mrs. Dodge and sons William E. and D. Stuart Dodge [Yale 1857] were the executors of his will, which was in the custody of John E. Parsons. His estate was estimated at $5 million net. (William E. Dodge's Will. New York Times, Feb. 18, 1883.) Mrs. Arthur M. Dodge was an officer of The New York Cancer Hospital in 1896. (Report of the Cancer Hospital. New York Times, Apr. 25, 1896; Arthur Murray Dodge. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased from June 1890, to June, 1900, p. 476.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale 1890-1900, p. 476 / Google Books

Rev. David Stuart Dodge, Yale 1857, was president of the board of trustees of the Syrian Protestant College in Beirut, Lebanon, president of the Presbyterian Board of Home Missions 1899-1915, and president of the National Temperance Society from 1903 until his death. [These had all been funded by his father's bequests]. He married Ellen Ada Phelps, daughter of John Jay Phelps. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1921-1922, pp. 17-18.) She was a sister of William Walter Phelps, Skull & Bones 1860. Rev. Dodge's son, Francis Phelps Dodge, Yale 1894, was involved with Life Extension Institute. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926, pp. 157-158.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1921-1922 / Yale University Library (pdf, 299 pp)
Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926 / Yale University Library (pdf, 350 pp)

William Earl Dodge Sr.'s brother, David Stuart Dodge, Yale 1826, was a physician in Hartford, Conn. They had ten children, including one who graduated in the Yale class of 1866. (Obituary Record, Yale 1859-1870m p. 330.) His son, Frederic Nevins Dodge, Scroll & Key 1866, was a lawyer with the E.A. Bliss lumber company, then an official in the New York Custom House since 1887. His mother was a daughter of Erastus Hyde. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1925-1926, pp. 35-36.) His grandson, Effingham Nevins Dodge, Elihu 1906, was editor of the Yale Alumni Weekly from 1906-1907. He was a law partner of Montgomery Hare, Yale 1893 [who married John E. Parson's daughter]. He enlisted in Naval Intelligence in 1918. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1940-1941, p. 111.)

Obituary Record, Yale 1859-1870 / Internet Archive
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1940-1941 / Yale University Library (pdf, 290 pp)

William Earl Dodge Sr.'s sister, Elizabeth Clementine Dodge, married Col. Edmund Burke Stedman in 1830, then William Burnett Kinney in 1841. Her oldest daughter married William Ingraham Kip Jr., son of the bishop of California. (Personal and General Notes. New Orleans Picayune, Nov. 26, 1889.) Their son, Edmund Clarence Stedman (1833-1908), Yale 1853, was a stockbroker and poet. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased from June 1900, to June, 1910, p. 874; Arthur Griffin Stedman, p. 1080.) Her granddaughter, Mary Burnet Kip, was the grandmother of the Koch Brothers.

[EC Stedman] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 874 / Google Books
[AG Stedman] Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 1080 / Google Books

Officers and directors of the Phelps-Dodge Company, formed to take over the assets of Phelps, Dodge & Co.: James Douglas, President; Cleveland H. Dodge, Arthur Curtiss James, and James McLean, Vice Presidents; and George Notman, Secretary and Treasurer; George H. Agnew, E. Heyward Perry [sic - E. Hayward Ferry], Francis L. Hine, and William Church Osborne. (Phelps-Dodge Company Election. New York Times, Dec. 23, 1908.)

Sheppard Homans

Sheppard Homans was born in Baltimore in 1831. He graduated from Harvard "in the early sixties," with honors in mathematics. He was a mathematician for the Union Pacific Railroad in St. Louis for a few years before returning East. He was consulting actuary for the Mutual Life Insurance Company and President of the Provident Savings Life Insurance Society. (Died in Central Park. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1898.) Sheppard Homans' daughter, Helen Homans, the tennis player, married Marshall McLean. (R.L. Hoguet Weds Miss Lynch in Paris. New York Times, Jun. 28, 1907.) His father, I. Smith Homans, founded the Bankers' Magazine in 1846.

His niece, Frances Elsie Homans, daughter of Edward Cranch Homans, married Charles Dexter Cleveland, son of Treadwell Cleveland. Sheppard Homans Jr. was an usher, and Mr. and Mrs. Edmund C. Stedman were among the guests. (A Day's Weddings. New York Times, Nov. 30, 1899.) Edward C. Homans, a stockbroker, was born in St. Louis ca. 1843, and came to New York around 1863. He suffered from a cancer of the neck, which was cut out by Dr. W.T. Bull in 1893. "He had never been well since." He had five daughters and a son. (New York Tribune, Sep. 10, 1894.) A son, Howard P. Homans, was senior partner of Homans & Co., an investment firm. He graduated from Princeton in 1901. (Howard P. Homans. New York Times, Nov. 13, 1962.) He was an early resident of 1 Beekman Place. (Mrs. Joseph E. Willard Buys 31 Rooms in 1 Beekman Place. New York Times, May 28, 1930.)

His brother, Isaac Smith Homans 2d, graduated from Harvard as a civil engineer. He was an owner of the Northern Railroad of New Jersey and one of the founders of Engelwood. (I. Smith Homans. Boston Daily Advertiser, Dec. 1, 1879.) His son, Thomas Simmons Homans, graduated from Yale in 1892. He was a Linotype designer. His great-grandfather was Capt. Benjamin Homans, chief clerk of the Navy and acting secretary in 1814. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates, 1926-1927, p. 245.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates, 1926-1927 / Yale University Library (pdf, 346 pp)

The Mutual Life, 1861-62

Board of Trustees: Frederick S. Winston (President), William Moore, Isaac Green Pearson, William J. Bunker, John P. Yelverton, Alfred Edwards, John M. Stuart, Samuel E. Sproulls, Lucius Robinson, John V.L. Pruyn, Robert H. McCurdy, John H. Swift, William Betts, John Wadsworth, Alexander W. Bradford, George R. Clark, Samuel M. Cornell, W. Smith Brown, William H. Popham, Ezra Wheeler, Wellington Clapp, Samuel D. Babcock, David Hoadley, William V. Brady, George S. Coe, Nathaniel Hayden, John E. Devlin, Lycurgus Edgerton, M.M. Freeman, Millard Fillmore, Hamlin Blake, Henry A. Smyth, W.E. Dodge, W.K. Strong, William M. Vermilye, and Richard Patrick. Isaac Abbatt, Secretary; Sheppard Homans, Actuary; Minturn Post, M.D., Medical Examiner. H.B. Merrell, Agent for Wisconsin; E.B. Wolcott, M.D. and F.A. Luning, Medical Examiners for Milwaukee Agency, and James Prentice, M.D., for Portage. (Display Ad. Wisconsin State Register, May 18, 1861.) Blake, Edgerton, and Swift were replaced by Martin Bates Jr., William A. Haines, and Seymour L. Husted. (Display Ad. Wisconsin State Register, Apr. 12, 1862.)

Wellington Clapp

Wellington Clapp was in the dry goods commission trade, with a large Southern trade up until the Civil War. "His firm, Clapp & Kent, failed in 1861. In 1862 he formed the banking firm of Clapp & Grinnell, with H[orace] F. Clark, Com. Vanderbilt's son in law, as a special partner. The house soon became a noted one in Wall st. and did a large business." He was also a director of the Bank of Commerce and the Continental Life Insurance Company. He died in his 78th year, and left three sons and three daughters, one of whom was the wife of Dr. Donald, rector of Trinity Church in Boston. (Boston Daily Advertiser, Mar. 25, 1893.) Dr. E. Winchester Donald's sister, Mary, was the wife of Prof. John Wesley Churchill, Harvard 1865, professor of pulpit delivery in the Andover seminary since graduation in 1869, and the regular instructor in elocution at Phillips Academy from 1867-1896, of which he was a trustee. (Profound Grief. Lowell Sun, Apr. 14, 1900.) Emma Clapp married Robert Cochran, their daughter married Louis Sidney Carrere, who were the in-laws of U.S. Sen. William Warren Barbour of New Jersey.

William A. Haines

William A. Haines was a partner of Halsted & Haines, dry goods. He was born in Elizabeth, N.J., in 1822 and died of Bright's disease. His son, William A. Haines, was a member of the firm also. (Death of a Prominent Merchant. New York Times, Mar. 9, 1880.) Partner James M. Halsted was a director of the Equitable Life Assurance Society.

The Mutual Life, 1864-65

Annual reports of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New-York, 1864-1873, 1879-1888, 1905, 1908-1910, 1913-1915, 1917, and 1919 at Columbia University.

Annual reports of the Mutual Life Insurance Company / Columbia University

Board of Trustees, 1864: Frederick S. Winston, President; John V.L. Pruyn; William Moore; Robert H. McCurdy; Isaac Green Pearson; Martin Bates; William J. Bunker; William Betts; John P. Yelverton; John Wadsworth; Alfred Edwards; Nathaniel Hayden; John M. Stuart; Oliver H. Palmer; Samuel E. Sproulls; Samuel M. Cornell; Lucius Robinson; W. Smith Brown; Millard Fillmore; Alex. W. Bradford; Richard Patrick; William H. Popham; William A. Haines; Ezra Wheeler; Seymour L. Husted; Samuel D. Babcock; David Hoadley; Henry A. Smythe; William V. Brady; W.E. Dodge; George S. Coe; William K. Strong; William M. Vermilye; John E. Develin; Wellington Clapp; and M.M. Freeman. Secretary, Isaac Abbatt; Actuary, Sheppard Homans; Assist. Sec., Theodore W. Morris; Cashier, Frederick M. Winston; Medical Examiner, Minturn Post M.D.; Assist. Medical Examiner, Isaac L. Kip M.D. Counsel, William Betts and Lucius Robinson; Attorney, Richard A. McCurdy. (Annual Report, Feb. 1, 1864.) In 1865, William Bunker left the board and Alonzo Child joined. (Annual Report, Feb. 1, 1865.)

Isaac L. Kip, M.D.

Isaac Lewis Kip married William V. Brady's daughter, Cornelia. (Married. New York Times, Jun. 4, 1858.) He was a son of Leonard W. Kip, and he had two brothers, William W. Kip, a lawyer, and another brother who was a missionary to China. (Death List of a Day. New York Times, Mar. 27, 1897.) Isaac L. Kip died in 1911. (Died. New York Times, Oct. 8, 1911.) His grandson, Philip Kip Rhinelander, married a daughter of Henry Martyn Alexander. (Miss Rhinelander to Wed a Banker. New York Times, Sep. 14, 1921.) The Kip family was descended from Hendrick Kype, one of the founders of the Dutch West India Company. (William V.B. Kip Is Dead Here At 65. New York Times, Jan. 15, 1937; The Kip/Kipp Family of New Amsterdam (New York).)

The Kip/Kipp Family of New Amsterdam (New York) / Rootsweb

The Mutual Life, 1866-67

Trustees of the Mutual Life Insurance Company, 1866: Frederick S. Winston, President; John V.L. Pruyn; William Moore; Robert H. McCurdy; Isaac G. Pearson; Martin Bates; William Betts; John P. Yelverton; John Wadsworth; Alfred Edwards; John M. Stuart; Oliver H. Palmer; Samuel E. Sproulls; Samuel M. Cornell; Lucius Robinson; W. Smith Brown; Richard Patrick; William H. Popham; William A. Haines; Ezra Wheeler; Seymour L. Husted; Samuel D. Babcock; Alex. W. Bradford; David Hoadley; Henry A. Smythe; William V. Brady; W.E. Dodge; George S. Coe; William K. Strong; William M. Vermilye; John E. Develin; Wellington Clapp; Alonzo Child; Henry E. Davies; Richard A. McCurdy, Vice President; Francis Skiddy. Secretaries: Isaac Abbatt, Theodore W. Morris; Actuary, Sheppard Homans; Medical Examiners, Minturn Post, M.D., Isaac L. Kip, M.D. Betts, Robinson, and Bradford were Counsel. (Financial. New York Times, Mar. 6, 1866.) In 1867, Yelverton and Stuart left; Bradford remained only as Counsel. (Annual Report, Feb. 1, 1867.)

The Mutual Life, 1868-70

Board of Trustees: Frederick S. Winston, John V.L. Pruyn. William Moore, Robert H. McCurdy, Isaac Green Pearson, Martin Bates, William Betts, John Wadsworth, Alfred Edwards, Oliver H. Palmer, Samuel E. Sproulls, Samuel M. Cornell, Lucius Robinson, W. Smith Brown, Richard Patrick, William H. Popham, William A. Haines, Ezra Wheeler, Seymour L. Husted, Samuel D. Babcock, David Hoadley, Henry A. Smythe, William V. Brady, William E. Dodge, George S. Coe, William M. Vermilye, John E. Develin, Wellington Clapp, Alonzo Child, Henry E. Davies, Richard A. McCurdy, Francis Skiddy, J. Elliot Condict, James C. Holden, Hugh N. Camp. (Annual Report, Feb. 1, 1868.) In 1868, Herman C. von Post joined the board; G.S. Winston replaced Minturn Post left as Medical Examiner. (Annual Report, Feb. 1, 1869.) Moore and Brady left, and George C. Richardson and Alexander H. Rice joined the board in 1870. (Annual Report, Feb. 1, 1870.)

George C. Richardson

George C. Richardson was the head of the Boston dry goods house which succeeded A. & A. Lawrence & Co. It became the selling agents for the Lowell Manufacturing Co., Everett Mills, Booth Cotton Mills, York Manufacturing Co., Lewiston, Tremont and Suffolk Mills, and the Massachusetts Cotton Mills. He was born in Royalton, Mass. in 1808, and went to Boston in 1835. He was a partner with George D. Dutton up to 1855, later Beebe, Richardson & Co., Richardson, Deane & Co., George C Richardson & Co., and George C. Richardson, Smith & Co. He became a director of the Union Bank in 1850 and was its president since 1863, and was a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Company from 1870 until his death. (Obituary. New York Times, May 21, 1886.)

The Mutual Life, 1871-72

Board of trustees: Frederick S. Winston, John V.L. Pruyn, Robert H. McCurdy, Isaac G. Pearson, Martin Bates, William Betts, John Wadsworth, Alfred Edwards, Oliver H. Palmer, Samuel E. Sproulls, Samuel M. Cornell, Lucius Robinson, W. Smith Brown, Richard Patrick, William H. Popham, William A. Haines, Ezra Wheeler, Seymour L. Husted, Samuel D. Babcock, David Hoadley, Henry A. Smythe, William E. Dodge, George S. Coe, William M. Vermilye, John E. Develin, Wellington Clapp, Alonzo Child, Henry E. Davies, Richard A. McCurdy, Francis Skiddy, J. Elliot Condict, James C. Holden, Hugh N. Camp, Herman C. von Post, George C. Richardson, and Alexander H. Rice. Richard A. McCurdy, Vice President; Sheppard Homans, Actuary; John M. Stuart, Secretary; L.C. Lawton, Asst. Actuary; Frederic Schroeder, Assistant Secretary; C.A. Hopkins, Cashier; William Betts, LL.D., Hon. Lucius Riobinson, Hon. Henry E. Davies, Counsel; Isaac L. Kip, M.D., G.S. Winston, M.D., Medical Examiners. (Display Ad, New York Times, Jan. 25, 1871, p. 7.) In 1872, Hoadley left the board and William F. Babcock joined. (Annual Report, Jan. 1, 1872.)

The Mutual Life, 1873-74

Board of Trustees: Frederick S. Winston, President; John V.L. Pruyn, Robert H. McCurdy, Isaac Green Pearson, Martin Bates, William Betts, John Wadsworth, Oliver H. Palmer, Samuel E. Sproulls, Samuel M. Cornell, Lucius Robinson, W. Smith Brown, Richard Patrick, William H. Popham, William A. Haines, Seymour L. Husted, Samuel D. Babcock, David Hoadley, Henry A. Smythe, William E. Dodge, George S. Coe, William M. Vermilye, John E. Develin, Henry E. Davies, Richard A. McCurdy, Francis Skiddy, J. Elliot Condict, James C. Holden, Herman C. von Post, George C. Richardson, Alexander H. Rice, William F. Babcock, F. Ratchford Starr, Frederick H. Cossitt, and Lewis May. John M. Stuart, Secretary, Frederic Scroeder, Asst. Secretary; W.H.C. Barlett, Actuary, L.C. Lawton, Asst. Actuary; C.A. Hopkins, Cashier.

The Mutual Life, 1879-80

Board of Trustees: Frederick S. Winston, Robert H. McCurdy, William Betts, Samuel M. Cornell, Samuel E. Sproulls, Lucius Robinson, William H. Popham, Samuel D. Babcock, William Smith Brown, Henry A. Smythe, William E. Dodge, George S. Coe, John E. Develin, Martin Bates, William A. Haines, Seymour L. Husted, Oliver H. Palmer, Henry E. Davies, Richard A. McCurdy, Francis Skiddy, James C. Holden, Herman C. von Post, George C. Richardson, Alexander H. Rice, William F. Babcock, F. Ratchford Starr, Frederick H. Cossitt, Lewis May, Oliver Harriman, Thomas Dickson, Henry W. Smith, John H. Sherwood, Egisto P. Fabbri, George H. Andrews, and Robert Olyphant. (Annual Report, Jan. 1, 1879.) In 1880, George F. Baker, Joseph Thompson, and Benjamin B. Sherman joined the board. (Annual Report, Jan. 1, 1880.)

Robert Olyphant

Robert Olyphant was a partner of Ward, Talbot & Olyphant, coal merchants, from 1874 until retiring in 1910. He was also a director of the Title Guarantee and Trust Company and the Thompson-Starrett Company. "He was a great-grandson of the David Olyphant who came to this country from Jamaica, B.W.I. before the Revolution and settled in Charleston, S.C., later serving as Surgeon General of the American forces in the South and after the war moving to Newport, R.I." He was president of the Sons of the Revolution from 1914 to 1925. His father was Robert Morrison Olyphant, and his grandfather was David Washington Cincinnatus Olyphant. (Robert Olyphant Dies At Age of 75. New York Times, Dec. 1, 1928.) He was an activist with the Hospital Saturday and Sunday Association from its early days (Mrs. Richard Irwin Resigns. New York Times, Nov. 18, 1896), and president of its successor, the United Hospital Fund (Hospital Aided By Churches. New York Times, Dec. 29, 1916; 57 Hospitals Share $525,000 Fund Here. New York Times, May 12, 1922.) His brother, John Kensett Olyphant, was the father of John K. Olyphant Jr.

His son, Robert Olyphant, married Grace Oakey, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Forbes Oakey. His brother, Donald Olyphant, was best man. (R.M. Olyphant, Jr., Weds. New York Times, Jun. 6, 1917.) Donald Olyphant, a painter, married Anne de Courjament, daughter of French capitalist Count de Courjament, in 1919. They met while he was an aviator in the A.E.F. They were divorced in 1925, and he married Germaine Louise Jacques, daughter of Auguste Jacques of Cognac, France. (Donald Olyphant Married. New York Times, Mar. 28, 1928.) Their sister, Amy Gordon Olyphant, married William de La Roche Anderson. Her cousin, Helen Talbot Olyphant, was maid of honor. (Weddings Of A Day. New York Times, Nov. 20, 1904.)

His father, Robert Morrison Olyphant, was president of the Delaware & Hudson Railroad for twenty years. He was named for Robert Morrison, a famous missionary to China. He graduated from Columbia in 1842, joined his father's firm, Talbot, Olyphant & Co., and made a trip to China in 1844. "Mr. Olyphant reorganized his father's company in 1858 and again visited the Orient. He retired from the mercantile trade in 1873. Long after his retirement Mr. Olyphant became assistant to the President of the Delaware & Hudson Railroad. He was elected to a Vice Presidency of the road, and later became president." He retired in 1903 but remained honorary Chairman of the Executive Committee. (Robert M. Olyphant Dies At 93 Years. New York Times, May 4, 1918; Robert Olyphant. In: Scots and Scots Descendants in America. By Donald John MacDougall, 1917, p. 330.)

Scots and Scots Descendants in America, p. 330 / Google Books

Dr. David Olyphant was a nephew of Lord Olyphant. He moved from South Carolina to Rhode Island in 1785, and married Ann Vernon there. His son, David W.C. Olyphant, "entered the counting-room of his cousin, Samuel King, senior partner of King & Talbot, a firm engaged in the then flourishing trade with China." In 1817 he returned to New York and associated with George W. Talbot, formerly of King & Talbot. In 1818, he was employed by Thomas H. Smith, and was Smith's agent in China from 1820-1823 and 1826 "until the spectacular failure of his employer" (1827 or 1828). He founded Talbot, Olyphant & Company with Charles Nicoll Talbot, his friend's son, and was in China again from 1834-1837 and 1850 to 1851. He died in Cairo, Egypt on the return trip. Talbot, Olyphant & Co. were "merchants in the China trade, whose record of cooperation with missionaries and refusal to engage in the opium trade gained for their office in China the nick-name of 'Zion's Corners.'" "He and his partners provided free passage to China for many missionaries, including the distinguished S. Wells Williams." Robert Morrison Olyphant married Sophia, daughter of William Vernon of Middletown, R.I. in 1846, who died in 1855; and married her sister, Anna, in 1857. (Olyphant, David Washington Cincinnatus; and: Olyphant, Robert Morrison. Dictionary of American Biography Vol. XIV, 1935. Dumas Malone, ed.) [Perhaps D.W.C. Olyphant caused this "spectacular failure," in the name of "God." -cast]

Dictionary of American Biography / Internet Archive

Olyphant & Company of China failed in 1878. The largest preferred creditors were Drexel, Morgan & Co., the Government of the Republic of Peru. William W. Parkin (a grandson of David W.C. Olyphant), George W. Talbot, Hobart Seymour Geary, and Talbot Olyphant of New York, Tobias Pim of Belfast, Ireland, and John F. Seaman of Newburg were the partners, the last three of whom were in China. The firm began importing nitrate of soda from Peru, and made an agreement to import coolies from China to Peru. (Olyphant & Co.'s Failure. New York Times, Dec. 9, 1878.) William H. Wisner held a number of notes on them. (A Wide-Reaching Failure. New York Times, Dec. 8, 1878.) Other large creditors were Forbes, Forbes & Co., London; Brown, Shipley & Co., London; total liabilities about $645,000. (The Failure of Olyphant & Co. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1879.) Robert M. Olyphant, William W. Parkin, Richard R. Tyers and George W. Talbot, surviving partners of Olyphant & Co., received a judgement of $574. (Alabama Claims. Boston Daily Advertiser, May 20, 1884.)

The Mutual Life, 1881-83

Board of Trustees: Frederick S. Winston, William Betts, Samuel E. Sproulls, Samuel M. Cornell, Lucius Robinson, William Smith Brown, Samuel D. Babcock, Henry A. Smythe, William E. Dodge, George S. Coe, John E. Develin, Martin Bates, Seymour L. Husted, Oliver H. Palmer, Henry E. Davies, Richard A. McCurdy, James C. Holden, Herman C. von Post, George C. Richardson, Alexander H. Rice, William F. Babcock, F. Ratchford Starr, Frederick H. Cossitt, Lewis May, Oliver Harriman, Thomas Dickson, Henry W. Smith, John H. Sherwood, George H. Andrews, Robert Olyphant, George F. Baker, Benjamin B. Sherman, Joseph Thompson, Dudley Olcott, Anson Stager, and Frederic Cromwell. (Annual Report, Jan. 1, 1881.) Davies left. (Annual Report, Jan. 1, 1882.) In 1883, Betts left, and Julien T. Davies and Robert Sewell joined the board. (Annual Report, Jan. 1, 1883.)

The Mutual Life, 1884-85

Board of Trustees: Samuel E. Sproulls, Lucius Robinson, Samuel D. Babcock, Henry A. Smythe, George S. Coe, John E. Develin, Seymour L. Husted, Oliver H. Palmer, Richard A. McCurdy, James C. Holden, Herman C. von Post, George C. Richardson, Alexander H. Rice, William F. Babcock, F. Ratchford Starr, Frederick H. Cossitt, Lewis May, Oliver Harriman, Thomas Dickson, Henry W. Smith, John H. Sherwood, George H. Andrews, Robert Olyphant, George F. Baker, Benjamin B. Sherman, Joseph Thompson, Dudley Olcott, Anson Stager, Frederic Cromwell. Julien T. Davies, Robert Sewell, William Bayard Cutting, S. Van R. Cruger, Charles R. Henderson, and George Bliss. (Annual Report, After May 1, 1884.) Smythe, Palmer, Dickson and Cutting left, and Rufus W. Peckham, J. Hobart Herrick, and William P. Dixon joined. (Annual Report, 1885.)

S. Van Rensselaer Cruger, Royal

Col. Stephen Van Rensselaer Cruger was the son on John Church Cruger and Euphemia White Van Rensselaer, daughter of Stephen Van Rensselaer, "the last patroon of Rensselaerswyck," the Dutch colony on the Hudson River. He was born in New York City in 1844 and educated mainly in Europe. He enlisted in the U.S. Army at age 17, and fought at Gettysburg and the Georgia campaign, and achieved the rank of lieutenant colonel. He went into real estate in 1867, and managed several large estates. He was appointed comptroller of Trinity Church in 1880, and managed all of its property. He was a trustee and treasurer of St. Stephen's College, the Mutual Life Insurance Company, the New York Life Insurance and Trust Company, and the U.S. branch of the Commercial Union Insurance Company; and a director of the Illinois Central Railroad. He married Julie Grinnell, daughter of Thomas W. Storrow of Boston. (The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Volume 7, 1897, p. 85.) He was the head of S.V.R. Cruger & McVickar, real estate. His wife received his entire estate. Lewis Cass Ledyard was counsel. (S.V.R. Cruger's Will. New York Times, Jul. 29, 1898.)

National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1897, p. 85 / Google Books

As controller of the Trinity Church Corporation, Cruger was opposed to carrying out the Health Department order that there be running water on each floor of the Corporation's tenements. He said, "We believe it is better not to have water in old houses. The water in the yard is accessible for all tenants. The tenants of such houses are usually dirty, and if they had water in the halls the floors would always be wet. Our tenants are better off with water in the yard than in the halls. Another thing, the expense of making such improvements would be great." (Water Not Supplied Freely. New York Times, Dec. 9, 1894.) He employed Frederick L. Hoffman (later a statistician for the ASCC) to compile a report denying the Health Department's charge that the death rate was much higher in the Trinity tenements than in the city at large.

Mrs. S.V.R. Cruger was Julie Grinnell Storrow, a well-known author under the name of Julien Gordon. She was the daughter of Thomas Wentworth Storrow, a packet ship owner, and Sarah Saunders Paris, and was born in Paris, France. She studied in Europe and spoke fluent French, Italian and German, and later Russian. (Chance, Mrs. Julie Grinnell. The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Volume 14, 1910, p. 160.) After her husband died, she moved to Washington, D.C. and dined with the Russian Ambassador, the Austrian Minister and others, and the Marquise de Talleyrand. (Society in Washington. New York Times, Dec. 28, 1901 and Dec. 5, 1902.) Mrs. Cruger's sister Katherine married Francis McNeil Bacon.

National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, 1910, p. 160 / Google Books

The Mutual Life, 1886-87

Samuel E. Sproulls, Lucius Robinson, Samuel D. Babcock, George S. Coe, John E. Develin, Seymour L. Husted, Richard A. McCurdy, James C. Holden, Herman C. von Post, George C. Richardson, Alexander H. Rice, F. Ratchford Starr, Frederick H. Cossitt, Lewis May, Oliver Harriman, Henry W. Smith, John H. Sherwood, Robert Olyphant, George F. Baker, Joseph Thompson, Dudley Olcott, Frederic Cromwell, Julien T. Davies, Robert Sewell, S. Van R. Cruger, Charles R. Henderson, George Bliss, Rufus W. Peckham, J. Hobart Herrick, William P. Dixon, Robert A. Grannis, Nicholas C. Miller, Henry H. Rogers, and John W. Auchincloss. (Annual Report, 1886.) George C. Richardson left, and Bartow W. Van Voorhis, Theodore Morford, and William Babcock joined. (Annual Report, 1887.)

Granville M. White M.D., Yale 1877

Granville Moss White graduated from Yale School of Law in 1877, then studied medicine at Columbia and received his M.D. in 1884. He was connected with the Mutual Life Insurance Company since 1886, first as medical examiner and medical director until 1903, then as secretary and second vice president between 1903 and retirment in 1929. He was a director of the Morristown Trust Company for 29 years. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1931-1932, p. 238.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1931-1932 / Yale University Library (pdf, 311 pp)

The Mutual Life, 1888-89

Board of Trustees: Samuel E. Sproulls, Lucius Robinson, Samuel D. Babcock, George S. Coe, John E. Develin, Richard A. McCurdy, James C. Holden, Herman C. von Post, Alexander H. Rice, F. Ratchford Starr, Lewis May, Oliver Harriman, Henry W. Smith, Robert Olyphant, George F. Baker, Joseph Thompson, Dudley Olcott, Frederic Cromwell, Julien T. Davies, Robert Sewell, S. Van R. Cruger, Charles R. Henderson, George Bliss, Rufus W. Peckham, J. Hobart Herrick, William P. Dixon, Robert A. Grannis, Nicholas C. Miller, Henry H. Rogers, John W. Auchincloss, Theodore Morford, William Babcock, Preston B. Plumb, and William D. Washburn. (Annual Report, 1888.) In 1889, Stuyvesant Fish, Augustus D. Juilliard, and Charles E. Miller joined the board. (Display Ad. Raleigh News & Observer, Feb. 13, 1889.)

The Mutual Life, 1890-91

Board of Trustees: Frederick S. Winston, Samuel E. Sproulls, Lucius Robinson, Samuel D. Babcock, George S. Coe, Richard A. McCurdy (President), James C. Holden, Hermann C. von Post, Alexander H. Rice, Lewis May, Oliver Harriman, Henry W. Smith, Robert Olyphant, George F. Baker, Joseph Thompson, Dudley Olcott, Frederick Cromwell, Julien T. Davies, Robert Sewell, S. Van Rensselaer Cruger, Charles R. Henderson, George Bliss, Rufus W. Peckham, J. Hobart Herrick, William P. Dixon, Robert A. Granniss (Vice President), Nicholas C. Miller, Henry H. Rogers, John W. Auchincloss, Theodore Morford, William Babcock, Preston B. Plumb, William D. Washburn, Stuyvesant Fish, Augustus D. Juilliard, Charles E. Miller, and James W. Husted. Isaac F. Floyd, 2d Vice President; William J. Easton, Secretary; A.N. Waterhouse, Auditor; Frederick Schroeder, Assist. Secty.; Emory McClintock, Actuary; John Tatlock, Assist. Actuary; Charles B. Perry, 2d Assist. Actuary; Frederick Cromwell, Treasurer; John A. Fonda, Asisist. Treasurer; William P. Sands, Cashier; Edward P. Holden, Assist. Cashier; William G. Davies, Solicitor; William W. Richards, Comptroller. Medical Directors: Gustavus Winston, M.D., Walter R. Gillette M.D., and E.J. Marsh, M.D. (Display Ad. New Orleans Daily Picayune, Feb. 24, 1890.) Nicholas C. Miller, William D. Washburn, and Frederick S. Winston were replaced by Walter R. Gillette and James E. Granniss. (Display Ad. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, Feb. 28, 1891.)

George I. Bliss, Yale 1898

George Isaac Bliss was an actuary and statistician with the Mutual Life from 1898 until his retirement in 1938. He was born in Courland, Russia. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1946-1947, p. 43.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1946-1947 / Yale University Library (pdf, 241 pp)

William J. Easton

William J. Easton retired in 1919 as Secretary of the Mutual Life Insurance Company, where he had spent 54 years. He died at age 71. (William J. Easton. New York Times, Mar. 5, 1920.) His son, Kerner Easton, married Margaret Sinclair Smith, daughter of R.A.C. Smith. (Miss Smith Wed in Secret. New York Times, Aug. 31, 1915.)

The Mutual Life, 1905

Ambrose Tighe, Skull & Bones 1879

Tighe was a native of New York, who moved to St. Paul, Minnesota in 1886 and specialized in municipal and real estate law. He was admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court in 1892 by motion of William H. Taft, S&B 1878, who was then the U.S. Solicitor General. He was attorney for the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York since 1890, the Eastman Kodak Company since 1900, for Fairbanks, Morse & Co. since 1926, and for a number of Minnesota counties and municipalities, including St. Paul 1920-28. He organized the St. Paul & Suburban Railway Co.; purchased the Duluth, Red Wing & Southern Railroad and became its president; organized and became vice president of Luger Lumber Co. in 1904, and served as counsel until 1918. He was vice president of C. Gotzian & Co., shoe manufacturers, 1906-1909, and married Harriet Gotzian, the daughter of Conrad Gotzian. They were the parents of Laurence Gotzian Tighe, S&B 1916, and Richard Lodge Tighe, S&B 1923. (Bulletin of Yale University, Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University 1928-1929, pp. 78-79.) Laurence G. Tighe, S&B 1916, was a partner of Brown Brothers and of Brown Brothers Harriman & Co.

Obituary Record 1928-1929 / Yale University Library (pdf, 394 pp)

The Guaranty Trust and the Mutual Life

In the purge of the Mutual Life Insurance Company in 1905, the public fuss created by the Armstrong insurance investigation spared the crooked insiders, while scaring the others off the board.

"In the Mutual Life Building are quartered the United States Mortgage and Trust Company, the Guaranty Trust Company, the Morton Trust Company, and the National Safe Deposit Company, in all of which the Mutual itself as well as various of its officers and Trustees have been interested, and in addition to this certain of the Trustees who have been members of the 'inner circle' have occupied offices in the building for their private purposes." (Says Mutual Officers Cared Only For Power. New York Times, Apr. 1, 1906 p. 3.)

In 1891, the New York Guaranty and Indemnity Company was reorganized under the auspices of the Mutual Life Insurance Company. (The New Trust Company. New York Times, Oct. 21, 1891, p. 10.) Its name was later changed to the Guaranty Trust Company of New York.

The Mutual Life Insurance Company was the principal sponsor of the National Union Bank, which not only made it "a depository for its own assets, but has ordered the agencies in other cities to select a local bank, which employs the National Union, as a New York correspondent. This plan, it is expected, will bring at once about $6,000,000 into the hands of the new concern. John D. Crimmins, with the traction syndicate back of him; Oliver H. Payne, with the Standard Oil Company; Frederick P. Olcott, with the Central [Trust] Company; H. McK. Twombly, with some of the Vanderbilt business; S.L. [sic] D. Babcock, Luther Kounze and William C. Whitney, each representing millions, are in the directory." Its president, J.C. Hendrix "twenty years ago, was the Brooklyn reporter for a New York morning paper." (How It is Arranged. Atlanta Constitution, Apr. 12, 1893.)

In 1902, sixteen of the thirty-five trustees of the Mutual Insurance Company of New York were also directors of the Guaranty Trust or Central Trust (Babcock, McCurdy, Baker, Cromwell, Henderson, Rogers, Juilliard, Gillette, Haven, Bowdoin, Iselin, WC Whitney (former), Jarvie, Speyer, Lanier, and Twombly). Frederick P. Olcott's brother, Dudley, was also a trustee, as was Samuel D. Babcock's son-in-law, William P. Dixon, and another relative, William Babcock; and Richard A. McCurdy was President of the Mutual. (Display Ad 3. New York Times, Jan. 1, 1902 p. 4.) In 1905, Babcock and Whitney were gone, and Robert H. McCurdy and ex-Secretary of War Elihu Root had been elected in their places. (Display Ad 6, Mutual Life Insurance Co. New York Times Feb. 4, 1905 p. 7 [a special ad with dates of election].)

Richard A. McCurdy and his friends in the Guaranty Trust set up McCurdy (who had planned to retire that year anyhow) to be the scapegoat of the investigation. H.H. Rogers was Chairman of the Agency Committee, which by-laws gave the general supervision of all agency matters; while George F. Baker was Chairman of the Finance Committee, and was for many years Chairman of the subcommittee on Salaries, "which fixed, or allowed President McCurdy to fix, the compensation," which formed the basis of the board's action against him and the Raymond firm. But, when it was proposed to punish the delinquencies of this inner circle, it was blocked. Board members Stuyvesant Fish and Effingham B. Morris of the Girard Trust Company of Philadelphia resigned. (Fish Likely to Serve On Lawson Committee. New York Times, Feb. 25, 1906.) Other members of Mutual's Finance Committee were Charles R. Henderson, George G. Haven, Augustus D. Juilliard, Adrian Iselein Jr., James N. Jarvie and Emory McClintock, Vice President and Actuary. They were all relected after McCurdy resigned and fled to "exile" in France, except that Henderson was transferred to the new Real Estate Committee, and Frederic Cromwell was substituted for George G. Haven. "On reliable authority it is ascertained that as matters stand now George F. Baker, retaining his old place as ranking member of the Finance Committee, is ruling the Mutual's affairs. Indeed, Wall Street men declared yesterday that Mr. Baker had recently expressed the opinion that the reorganization of the Mutual Life on the terms which he had mapped out would be carried out regardless of the opposition that might be encountered from Policy Holders' Campaign Committees, and regardless of public criticism generally. Mr. Baker, it is understood, has been in constant communication with President Peabody about the naming of the committees, a condition that was predicted last Fall when Mr. Peabody, whose law firm was counsel for the First National Bank, was elected upon the insistence of Mr. Baker and Henry H. Rogers of the Standard Oil Company." (Mutual Stands Pat; George F. Baker Rules. New York Times, Jun. 1, 1906.) The investigation subsequently revealed that Vice President McClintock had personally directed the company's lobbying efforts in Boston. (M'Clintock's Orders to Lobbyist Out Now. New York Times, Aug. 17, 1906.)

They allowed McCurdy to put numerous relatives on the payroll and draw lavish salaries. These included his son, Robert H. McCurdy; son-in-law, Louis A. Thebaud; his brother-in-law, and Dr. Elias J. Marsh, as Medical Director; and Thebaud's cousin, Peter Stuyvesant Pillott, as Inspector of Risks. Dr. Walter R. Gillette, First Vice President, was a brother of a partner in Chamberlain & Gillette, General Agents for the company in Texas. Vice President Robert A. Graniss's cousin, Howard Lewis, was General Agent for the Mutual in northern New York. General Agent Raymond was a brother of Charles H. Raymond. McCurdy and his family reaped $4,643,926 in salary and commissions between 1885 and 1905. (McCurdy Family's Millions From Mutual Life. New York Times, Oct. 7, 1905 p. 4.) The Mutual brought suit against McCurdy et al. to recover $3,371,341, and then settled for $815,000. (Mutual Gets $815,000 Ends M'Curdy Suits. New York Times, Mar. 5, 1909.) By 1910, McCurdy was being lauded as "one of the three great figures in life insurance."

George G. Haven was punished for squealing on the gang: "To this influence of Mr. Baker is attributed in large degree the retirement of George G. Haven from the Finance Committee and the implied retirement of Mr. Haven from a place of prominence in Mutual Life affairs. Mr. Haven was formerly one of the innermost members of the 'inner circle,' and even a member pro tem., according to his testimony, of the sub-committee of the Finance Committee, which voted President McCurdy an additional $50,000 a year in 1901 in lieu of pension, which Mr. McCurdy was prohibited from receiving under the by-laws of the company. The other two members of this committee were George F. Baker and Augustus D. Juillliard, both of whom testified before the Armstrong Committee before Mr. Haven was called to the stand. Mr. [Charles Evans] Hughes did not elicit much information from either of them about the increase in salary and how it was voted, but when Mr. Haven was called he told about the work of the sub-committee, explaining that he personally had served on it only two or three times when he was called in through the absence of one of the members. It was soon after this that the Lawyers Mortgage matter came out, and it has been an open secret in financial quarters that considerable resentment was felt toward Mr. Haven by certain of his fellow-members of the 'inner circle.' In the Lawyers Mortgage deal Messrs. Juilliard, Cromwell, Haven, Jarvie and Iselin were involved in addition to Mr. McCurdy." (Mutual Stands Pat; George Baker Rules. New York Times, Jun. 1, 1906.)

Edwin W. Coggeshall, who was President of the Lawyers' Mortgage Insurance Company in 1901, testified that he had offered to sell a block of 1000 shares of the increased capital stock of his company to the Mutual. These were accepted by Richard A. McCurdy on behalf of the Mutual, but subsequently split up between Mutual board members. All except Adrian Iselin, Jr., were members of the Finance Committee, "and were among the party who originally advocated the immediate election of Charles A. Peabody to the Presidency of the company, opposing the plan suggested by other Trustees to postpone electing a permanent President until the Mutual's own investigating committee had completed its work." Coggeshall said that instructions were received to issue the 1000 shares to N.B. Putnam, Jr., who turned out to be a clerk in the Guaranty Trust. (Mutual Trustees Divided Stock. New York Times, Dec. 23, 1905.) Dudley Olcott and James Speyer, who were elected Trustees in 1880 and 1898, respectively, resigned in March, 1906, after Charles A. Peabody was successfully installed as President. Peabody subsequently became a director of the Guaranty Trust.

Charles A. Peabody

Charles A. Peabody (1849-1931) was President of the Mutual Life Insurance Company from 1906 until retiring in 1927. He was a director of the Farmers Loan and Trust from at least 1900 to at least 1929, and a director of the Guaranty Trust Company from 1911-26. After graduating from Columbia University and Columbia Law School, he joined his father's law firm, Peabody, Baker and Peabody. Partner Fisher Ames Baker was counsel to the First National Bank and the uncle of its President, George Fisher Baker. "It was said at the time Mr. Peabody left law for insurance, that the change was, at least in part, due to the influence of the elder Baker in the councils of the Mutual." Peabody was trustee of the estate of the first John Jacob Astor since 1893, and was associated with William Waldorf Astor and represented him in this country. At his death, he was on the boards of directors of City Bank Farmers Trust Company, Mutual Life Insurance Company, Oregon Short Line Railroad, Central of Georgia Railway, Illinois Central Railroad and Union Pacific Railroad, and was a trustee of the Church Pension Fund and member of the board of managers of Delaware & Hudson Company. (C.A. Peabody Dies; Insurance Figure. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1931.) His granddaughter, Anita Peabody Hadden, married Arthur W. Page Jr, whose brother Walter H. Page became chairman of the Morgan Guaranty Trust.

William H. Truesdale

William Haynes Truesdale was born near Youngstown, Ohio, in 1851. He was educated in Rock Island, Ill., and became a clerk in the Rockford, Rock Island & St. Louis Railroad, which became part of the Burlington system. In 1872 he became cashier and purchasing agent, and went to Frankfort, Germany, as the company's transfer agent. In 1874, he was connected with the law firm firm of Osborn & Curtis in Rock Island, then in 1879 was general freight agent of the Logansport & Crawfordsville railroad. In 1881, he was traffic manager, then vice president of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & St. Louis Railway, and was appointed its receiver when it went under in 1888. In 1894, he was third vice president and general manager of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad, becoming first vice president in 1899. He resigned that year to be president of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western. He retired as president in 1925, but continued as chairman until 1930. He married Annie Topping of Terre Haute, Ind. (Wm. H. Truesdale, Rail Official, Dies. New York Times, Jun. 3, 1935.) He left the bulk of his estate, which was reputed to be "well over $1,000,000," to their three children. (Truesdale Will Filed in Greenwich Court. New York Times, Jun. 19, 1935.) William H. Truesdale was a member of the National Committee to raise $5 million for the Church Pension Fund of the Episcopal Church. (To Raise $5,000,000 for Church Pension. New York Times, Jan. 12, 1916.) He donated $1000 to the American Society for the Control of Cancer. ($50,000 to Cancer Society. New York Times, Feb. 20, 1927.)

William H. Truesdale was born in Poland, Ohio, and his father was Dr. Calvin Truesdale, a prominent physician in Rock Island, Ill. ("Sam" Sloan Chairman. Syracuse Evening Herald, Mar. 3, 1899.) Dr. Calvin Truesdale was vice president and general manager of the Rock Island railway. He had lived in Rock Island since 1854, and was its mayor for four years. (Dr. Calvin Truesdale. Chicago Inter Ocean, Jun. 11, 1895.) He was a director of the Rockford, Rock Island and St. Louis Railroad. (Will It Hold? Chicago Inter Ocean, Oct. 15, 1874.) He received his M.D. in 1845 at Western Reserve College. (Commencement Exercises in the Western Reserve College. The Ohio Observer, Aug. 20, 1845.) Dr. Calvin Truesdale died at the home of his son, attorney H.C. Truesdale, in Minneapolis. (Calvin Truesdale Dead. Minneapolis, The Penny Press, Jun. 10, 1895.)

Hiram Calvin Truesdale's son, Cavour L. Truesdale, graduated from Yale in 1914. His daughter, Sarah Helen, married Dr. Angus Washburn Morrison (1884-1949), Elihu 1906, a neurologist in Minneapolis. His M.D. was from Johns Hopkins in 1910. Their three sons graduated from Yale, and their daughter married a Yale graduate. He had three Yale cousins as well. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University, 1948-1949, p. 57 / 58.) He was a grandson of Dorilus Morrison of Maine, who was the first mayor of Minneapolis. The family owned timber lands and mills, grain elevators, and were officers of a local bank. (Angus Washburn Morrison, M.D. In: History of Minneapolis, Gateway to the Northwest, 1923, pp. 233-235.) Their daughter married John Pillsbury Snyder Jr., Yale 1935. His father was a grandson of Gov. John Sargeant Pillsbury, who started the Pillsbury Company with his brothers. (309 Ramsay Road. Wayzata Historical Society.) He refused Scroll & Key, Berzelius, Book & Snake, and Elihu. His cousin, John S. Pillsbury, took Bones. (Innovations Mark Tap Day at Yale. New York Times, May 11, 1934.) His grandfather, Minneapolis attorney Fred B. Snyder, married Susan May Pillsbury in 1885. He was a regent of the University of Minnesota since 1912, and was a personal friend of all eight of its presidents. (F.B. Snyder, U. Regent for 39 Years, Dies. Winona Republican-Herald, Feb. 14, 1951.) The last officer named Pillsbury, George Sturgis Pillsbury, left the Pillsbury Company in 1969, citing the family's other enormous financial interests, held by the Sargent Management Co. He and three of his four children were educated at Yale. He, his brother and a cousin remained as directors. John Pillsbury Snyder continued as a vice president. (Giant Pillsbury Company Finds Self Without Pillsbury For First Time. The Register, Danville, Va., Nov. 30, 1969.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1948-1949 / Yale University Library (pdf, 186 pp)
Angus Washburn Morrison, M.D. / USGenWeb Archives

William H. Truesdale's daughter, Marie Melville Truesdale, married Richard Mervin Bissell of Chicago. He was Western manager of the Hartford Fire Insurance Company in Chicago. His ushers were Charles Hamill and Victor Elling of Chicago, Joseph F. Kernan and John R. Halsey [Scroll & Key 1884] of New York, the bride's brother, Calvin Truesdale, and her cousin, Franklin Steele of Minneapolis. His brother, Arthur Bissell, was best man. (Weddings of a Day. New York Times, Jun. 26, 1901.) Richard M. Bissell, Yale 1883, was with the Hartford Fire Insurance Company from 1883 to 1941, and president of Hartford Accident & Indemnity from 1913 to 1934. He was a lecturer on insurance at Yale between 1903 and 1914, and a governor of Mory's Association from 1936 to 1939. His brothers-in-law were Calvin Truesdale, Yale 1907, and Melville D. Truesdale, Yale 1915. Their children were William Truesdale Bissell, Skull & Bones 1925; Mrs. Hector Prud'homme (Yale 1925), and Richard Mervin Bissell Jr., Yale 1932. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University, 1941-1942, p. 25.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1941-1942 / Yale University Library (pdf, 320 pp)

Richard M. Bissell Jr. refused election to Skull & Bones. (Yale Tap Day Critic Accepts Election. New York Times, May 15, 1931.) He attended the London School of Economics in 1932-33, and Yale graduate school from 1933-39, where he was a research assistant and part-time instructor. He was an economic analyst at the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce of the Commerce Department 1941-42; was at the War Shipping Administration 1942-45; and was in the Office of War Mobilization and Reconversion 1945-46. He was professor of econmics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1948. Paul G. Hoffman and Wayne Chatfield-Taylor (Scroll & Key 1916) were also examined at this hearing. (House Committee on Appropriations, Apr. 20, 1948, p3.) "In July, 1947 Bissell was recruited by Averell Harriman to run a committee to lobby for an economic recovery plan for Europe. The following year he was appointed as an administrator of the Marshall Plan in Germany and eventually became head of the Economic Cooperation Administration." "In 1954 he was placed in charge of developing and operating the Lockheed U-2 'spy plane'. Bissell and Herbert Miller, another CIA officer, chose Area 51 in 1955 as the site for the test facility for the U-2, and Bissell supervised the test facility and its build up until he resigned from the CIA." He was appointed Deputy Director for Plans in 1958. In 1960, he oversaw plans for covert action against Cuba, using the same team from its Guatemala action. [CIA Inspector General Lyman B. Kirkpatrick Jr., whose in-laws had ties to the United Fruit Co., put the blame for its failure on Bissell -cast.] In 1962, he left the CIA, and was replaced by Richard Helms. (Richard M. Bissell Jr. Wikipedia, accessed 02/05/12.)

House Committee on Appropriations, 1948 / eBooksRead
Richard M. Bissell, Jr. / Wikipedia

Richard M. Bissell Jr. married Ann Bushnell, daughter of Mrs. Winthrop G. Bushnell. (Garden Wedding For Ann Bushnell. New York Times, Jul. 7, 1940.) Winthrop Grant Bushnell graduated from Yale in 1888. He was with the Edison Manufacturing Company until 1906. He invested in electric street railways, lighting, and power properties in New England, Ohio, and Cuba. He was associated with Alden M. Young for several years. He was chairman of the executive committee of the New Haven chapter American National Red Cross War Fund and other major campaigns. He married Harriet Elizabeth Scofield, daughter of Levi Tucker Scofield and Elizabeth Clark Wright, and they had two daughters. One of his four surviving brothers was Rev. Samuel C. Bushnell {S&B] 1874. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1921-1922, p. 437 / 134.) W.G. Bushnell was among a group at the Saranac Inn which included Mr. and Mrs. A.M. Young, Mrs. J.H. Goss, George Milton Smith and Herbert Gallaudet. A few miles away at the Ampersand, Desmond FitzGerald's uncle was on his honeymoon. (Saranac Inn. New York Tribune, Sep. 16, 1906.) While golfing in Augusta, Ga., Bushnell met John D. Rockefeller, who introduced him to the daughter of his old friend, Levi T. Scofield, and encouraged their romance. They were married in Cleveland by Rockefeller's pastor. (Rockefeller A Matchmaker. New York Times, Jun. 22, 1911.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1921-1922 / Yale University Library (pdf, 299 pp)
New York Tribune, Sep. 16, 1906, p. 2 / Library of Congress

Richard M. Bissell Sr.'s father, George Francis Bissell, was born in Manchester, Conn., in 1827. He went to Dubuque, Iowa in 1850, where he was local agent for the Hartford Fire Insurance Company. He was appointed general agent for the West in 1863, with Chicago as his headquarters. He was a prominent member of the Union League Club, and its president from 1889-90. He had two other sons, Frank R. Bissell and Arthur G. Bissell. (The Obituary Record. Chicago Inter Ocean, Jun. 26, 1895.) He was Second Vice President and a director of the American Exchange National Bank. (Choosing Officers. Chicago Inter Ocean, Jan. 13, 1892; Few Changes Made. Chicago Inter Ocean, Jan. 10, 1894; Heads of the Banks. Chicago Inter Ocean, Jan. 9, 1895.)

Cornelius Vanderbilt III, Royal, Scroll & Key 1895

Cornelius Vanderbilt was great-grandson of the Commodore. He was the oldest son of Cornelius Vanderbilt and Alice Claypoole Gwynne. He got his mechanical engineering degree at Yale in 1899, and made many inventions. His father disapproved of his marriage to Grace Wilson, and when he died in 1899, left him $500,000 and income from a trust fund of $1 million, while his four siblings received approximately $7,350,000 each. His brother, Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt, who got the $36 million residuary estate, promptly gave him $6 million from it. The Vanderbilts were friends of Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, entertained Prince Henry of Prussia and Duke Boris of Russia, and were entertained by Czar Nicholas II and the royal family of Russia. He was an incorporator of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company, in alliance with August Belmont. His other brothers were William Henry Vanderbilt 1893, who died during college, and Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt 1902. His sisters were Mrs. Harry Payne Whitney and Countess Széchenyi. (Gen. C. Vanderbilt Dies On His Yacht. New York Times, Mar. 2, 1942.) He was a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Company 1902-1938, and a director of numerous other corporations [including the Central Union Trust]. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1941-1942, p. 72.) He was among the Chase directors who left American Express due to the Banking Act of 1933 (Five New Directors in American Express. New York Times, May 5, 1934). His mother was a Royal descendant of Edmund Ironsides, King of England, and his grandfather Flagg was mayor of New Haven. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 162.) He was an usher at Frank L. Polk's wedding in 1908.

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1941-1942 / Yale University Library (pdf, 320 pp)
Americans of Royal Descent, p. 162 / Google Books

The Mutual Life, 1908-10

Officers: Charles A. Peabody, President; Emory McClintock, Vice-President and Actuary; Granville M. White; George T. Dexter, 2d Vice-President; George T. Dexter, 2d Vice President; James Timpson, 2d Vice-President; William J. Waston, Secretary; William Frederick Dix, Secretary; Charles H. Warren, Treasurer. Board of Trustees: George F. Baker, Pres. First National Bank, New York City; Hugo Baring, banker, N.Y.C.; Charles S. Brown, real estate, N.Y.C.; Dumont Clarke, Pres. American Exchange National Bank; Emory W. Clark, Vice-Pres., First National Bank of Detroit; Cyrus H.K. Curtis, Publisher, Philadelphia; Julien T. Davies, lawyer, N.Y.C.; William B. Dean, iron and steel, St. Paul, Minn.; Charles D. Dickey, Brown Brothers & Co., N.Y.C.; William P. Dixon, lawyer, N.Y.C.; H. Rieman Duval, Pres. American Beet Sugar Company, N.Y.C.; Frederick H. Eaton, Pres. American Car and Foundry Co., N.Y.C.; William F. Harrity, lawyer, Philadelphia; Augustus D. Juilliard, merchant, N.Y.C.; William H. Lambert, retired, Philadelphia; Charles Lanier, banker, Winslow, Lanier & Co., N.Y.C.; Alfred E. Marling, real estate, N.Y.C.; J. Rogers Maxwell, Pres. Atlas Portland Cement Co., N.Y.C.; Emory McClintock, Vice-President and Actuary; George P. Miller, lawyer, Milwaukee, Wis.; Theodore Morford, Pres. Sussex National Bank, Newton, N.J.; Thomas M. Mulry, Pres. Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank of New York; Charles A. Peabody, President; Emile O. Philippi, merchant, Paris, France; Herman Ridder, publisher, N.Y.C.; Alfred M. Shook, Pres. First Savings Bank and Trust Co., Nashville, TN; Charles Emory Smith, publisher, Philadelphia; Leroy Springs, banker and cotton merchant, Lancaster, S.C.; Louis Stern, merchant, N.Y.C.; Henry W. Taft, lawyer, N.Y.C.; Benjamin F. Tracy, lawyer, N.Y.C.; William H. Truesdale, Pres. Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad; Cornelius Vanderbilt, N.Y.C.; Maj. Gen. James H. Wilson, retired; Robert B. Woodward, banker, N.Y.C. (Annual Report, Dec. 31, 1907.) In 1910, Baring, Clarke, Dickey, Lanier, and Morford were gone; replaced by James M. Beck, lawyer in N.Y.C.; Wayne MacVeigh, lawyer, of Bryn Mawr, Penn.; William H. Porter, Pres. Chemical National Bank, N.Y.C.; Stewart Shillito, Pres. The John Shillitto Co., Cincinnati; and Woodrow Wilson, President of Princeton University. (Annual Report, 1910.)

Charles S. Brown

Charles Stelle Brown "studied in City College and then in Germany and entered the real estate business here in 1873, specializing in valuations and appraisals. In 1901 he formed a partnership with the late Douglas Robinson, brother-in-law of President Theodore Roosevelt. After Mr. Robinson's death in 1918 the firm became Brown, Wheelock, Harris & Co., with Mr. Brown as chairman of the board." He was also trustee or director of the Fulton Trust, the Title Guarantee and Trust, the North British and Mercantile Insurance Co., Consolidated Gas Co., and other firms. He was on the governing board of New York Hospital since 1904. He was a member of the Jekyl Island Club. His father was Lewis Blanchard Brown. (C.S. Brown Dead; Realty Broker, 84. New York Times, Jul. 22, 1935.)

Frederick H. Eaton

Frederick Heber Eaton was born in Berwick, Penn., and educated in the public schools. He became engaged in manufacturing in 1880, and was elected President and a director of the American Car and Foundry Company in 1902. He was also a director of the Columbia Trust Company, the Seaboard National Bank, the American Beet Sugar Company, and several other firms. (Frederick H. Eaton Dead. New York Times, Jan. 29, 1916.)

The Mutual Life, 1913-15

Board of Trustees: George F. Baker, N.Y.C.; James M. Beck, lawyer, N.Y.C.; Charles S. Brown, real estate, N.Y.C.; Joseph H. Choate Jr., lawyer, N.Y.C.; Emory W. Clark, Vice-President, First National Bank of Detroit; James C. Colgate, banker, N.Y.C.; Cyrus H.K. Curtis, publisher, Philadelphia; Julien T. Davies, lawyer, N.Y.C; William B. Dean, iron and steel, St. Paul, Minn.; William P. Dixon, lawyer, N.Y.C.; H. Rieman Duval, Pres. American Beet Sugar Co.; Frederick H. Eaton, Pres. American Car and Foundry Co.; Augustus D. Juilliard, merchant, N.Y.C.; Wayne MacVeigh, lawyer, Bryn Mawr, Penn.; Alfred E. Marling, real estate, N.Y.C.; Edwin S. Marston, Pres. Farmers' Loan and Trust Co.; Emory McClintock, Consulting Actuary; George P. Miller, lawyer, Milwaukee; John J. Mitchell, Pres. Illinois Trust & Savings Bank, Chicago; Thomas M. Mulry, Pres. Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank of New York; Charles A. Peabody, President; William H. Porter, banker, N.Y.C.; Herman Ridder, publisher, N.Y.C.; John G. Shedd, Pres. Marshall Field & Co., Chicago; Stewart Shillito, Pres. The John Shillitto Co., Cincinnati; Alfred M. Shook, Pres. First Savings Bank and Trust Co., Nashville; Leroy Springs, banker and cotton merchant, Lancaster, S.C.; Louis Stern, merchant, N.Y.C.; Henry W. Taft, lawyer, N.Y.C.; Benjamin F. Tracy, lawyer, N.Y.C.; William H. Truesdale, Vice President, and Pres. Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad; Paul Tuckerman, N.Y.C.; Cornelius Vanderbilt, N.Y.C.; James H. Wilson, contractor and engineer, Wilmington, Del.; Edwin W. Winter, N.Y.C.; and Robert B. Woodward, banker, N.Y.C. (Annual Report, Dec. 31, 1912.) In 1914, Shook was replaced by William U. Hensel, Lancaster, Pa. (Annual Report, Dec. 31, 1913 and Dec. 31, 1914.)

Joseph H. Choate Jr., Harvard 1897

Joseph H. Choate Jr. (1876-1968) was the son of Joseph H. Choate, New York lawyer and Ambassador to England from 1899 to 1905. He went to London with his father as Third Secretary of the Embassy, then returned in 1901 to finish at Harvard Law School. He became a senior partner of Choate, Byrd, Léon & Garretson (later Choate, Regan, Davis & Hollister). During World War I, he conducted the chemical section of the Alien Property Custodians Bureau. He was a founder of the Chemical Foundation, building up a dye industry through patent suits. He opposed the Volstead Act and 18th Amendment, and became chairman of the Federal Alcohol Control Administration until the 1935 Supreme Court decision against the National Recovery Act eliminated its authority. He was a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York and of the Bank of New York, and a governor of New York Hospital. (Joseph H. Choate, Lawyer, 91, Dead. New York Times, Jan. 20, 1968.) He married Cora Lyman Oliver, daughter of Brig. Gen. Robert Shaw Oliver. His best man was his cousin, George B. de Gersdorff, and Bayard Cutting, R. Monroe Ferguson, N. Penrose Hallowell, Francis Kinnicutt, and William Woodward were ushers. (Mr. Choate's Son Married. New York Times, Jun. 7, 1903.)

His father, Joseph Hodges Choate (1832-1917) graduated from Harvard in 1852, and from Harvard Law School. His father's cousin, Rufus Choate, a famous lawyer, gave him a letter of introduction to William M. Evarts, and he joined Butler, Evarts & Southmayd in 1856. It became Evarts, Southmayd & Choate in 1859, and Evarts Choate & Beaman in 1884. He was Ambassador to the United Kingdom from 1899 to 1905. His father, Dr. George Choate, of Salem, Mass., also graduated from Harvard. (Joseph Hodges Choate Dies Suddenly; Famous Lawyer and Statesman was 85; Last Week's Activities Weakened Him. New York Times, May 15, 1917.) Most of his assets were stocks and bonds, mainly the Great Northern, Northern Pacific, and Pennsylvania Railroads, but also 480 shares in the United Fruit Co. put at $64,320. (Put Choate Estate Value At $4,629,879. New York Times, Jan. 13, 1918.) His son Joseph, daughter Mabel, and a nephew, Carl A. de Gersdorff, were executors and trustees. ($3,000,000 Estate to Choate Family. New York Times, May 22, 1917.) Joseph H. Choate was an attorney for the American Tobacco Company (Tobacco trust rights. New York Times, Nov. 18, 1896.)

Mrs. Choate was Caroline Dutcher Sterling (1837-1929) of Cleveland, Ohio. (The Sterling Genealogy, Vol 2. By Albert Mack Sterling, 1909, p. 680.) She was on the board of managers in the early years of the Memorial Cancer Hospital. (New York Cancer Hospital. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, Apr. 13, 1889.)

The Sterling Genealogy / Archive.org (pdf, 768 pp)

Joseph H. Choate Sr.'s nephew, Arthur Osgood Choate (1875-1962), was also a manger of Memorial. (Display Ad. Cancer Relief. New York Tribune, Nov. 5, 1921.) He was senior partner of Clark, Dodge & Co., which he joined in 1919. (Arthur Choate, 87, Investment Broker. New York Times, Jun. 20, 1962.) Mrs. Choate was the second president of the Girl Scouts. She was born in a manor house called Hyde Hall. "The house was built by her great-grandfather George Hyde Clarke, a great-grandson of George Clarke, Acting Colonial Governor of New York from 1734 to 1740" (Mrs. Arthur Choate Dies At 80; A Long Time Girl Scout Leader. New York Times, May 18, 1967; (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 465.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 465 / Google Books

Arthur Osgood Choate Jr. (1911-1987), Harvard 1934, was also a general partner and executive committee chairman of Clark Dodge & Company. (Arthur O. Choate Jr. New York Times, Apr. 22, 1987.) His ex-wife, who was Helen Whitney Bourne, helped raise funds for Memorial Sloan Kettering (4th Annual Fete For Cancer Center. New York Times, May 6, 1961.) His sister, Anne Hyde Choate, married Ellmore C. Patterson Jr., vice chairman of the Morgan Guaranty Trust, who was on the board of trustees and treasurer of the Sloan-Kettering Institute between 1954 and 1968. Their brother, Thomas Hyde Choate, was a partner of White, Weld & Co. (Miss Choate Is the Bride Of Executive. New York Times, May 16, 1982.) Mrs. Thomas H. Choate [Jane Harte], was involved at Memorial as well. (Patronesses Named for Fete Aiding Cancer Center Feb. 16. New York Times, Jan. 24, 1960; May 18 Dinner At Plaza to Help Sloan-Kettering. New York Times, Apr. 7, 1966; Dinner Dance at Plaza Will Assist Cancer Center. New York Times, May 4, 1968.)

The Mutual Life, 1917-19

John G. Agar, lawyer, N.Y.C.; George F. Baker, N.Y.C.; James M. Beck, lawyer, N.Y.C.; Edward J. Berwind, merchant, N.Y.C.; Charles S. Brown, real estate, N.Y.C.; Joseph H. Choate Jr., lawyer, N.Y.C.; Emory W. Clark, Vice-President, First & Old National Bank of Detroit; James C. Colgate, Bennington, Vt.; Cyrus H.K. Curtis, publisher, Philadelphia; Grafton D. Cushing, Boston, Mass.; Julien T. Davies, lawyer, N.Y.C; William B. Dean, iron and steel, St. Paul, Minn.; William P. Dixon, lawyer, N.Y.C.; H. Rieman Duval, Pres. American Beet Sugar Co.; J. Levering Jones, lawyer, Philadelphia; Augustus D. Juilliard, merchant, N.Y.C.; Alfred E. Marling, real estate, N.Y.C.; Edwin S. Marston, Pres. Farmers' Loan and Trust Co.; George P. Miller, lawyer, Milwaukee; John J. Mitchell, Pres. Illinois Trust & Savings Bank, Chicago; Charles A. Peabody, President; William H. Porter, banker, N.Y.C.; John G. Shedd, Pres. Marshall Field & Co., Chicago; Stewart Shillito, Pres. The John Shillitto Co., Cincinnati; Leroy Springs, banker and cotton merchant, Lancaster, S.C.; Louis Stern, merchant, N.Y.C.; Henry W. Taft, lawyer, N.Y.C.; Edwin Thorne, N.Y.C.; William H. Truesdale, Vice President, and Pres. Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad; Paul Tuckerman, N.Y.C.; Cornelius Vanderbilt, N.Y.C.; Rodman Wanamaker, merchant, N.Y.C.; Thomas Williams, N.Y.C.; James H. Wilson, contractor and engineer, Wilmington, Del.; and Edwin W. Winter, N.Y.C. (Annual Report, Dec. 31, 1916.) In 1919, Dean was gone; Arthur V. Davis, merchant, Pittsburgh, was new. (Annual Report, Dec. 31, 1918.)

S. Sloan Colt, vice president of the Bankers Trust Company, Charles Proctor Cooper, vice president of A.T.&T., and John King Ottley, President of the First National Bank of Atlanta, were elected trustees. (Mutual Life Elects 3 Trustees. New York Times, Jun. 6, 1931.)

W. Randolph Burgess, Vice Chairman of the National City Bank, was elected a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Company. (Elected By Mutual Life. New York Times, Nov. 28, 1940.)

The Mutual Life, 1941

Charles E. Adams, Joseph S. Auerbach, Lewis H. Brown, William Marshall Bullitt, W. Gibson Carey Jr., Joseph H. Choate Jr., Emory W. Clark, James C. Colgate, S. Sloan Colt, Charles P. Cooper, John W. Davis, F. Trubee Davison, Lawrence A. Downs, Charles E. Dunlap, Leon Fraser, David F. Houston (former Chancellor, Washington University-St. Louis), William D. Mitchell, Roland S. Morris, John K. Ottley, Frank L. Polk, William C. Potter, Elihu Root Jr., Henry Lee Shattuck, John Sloane, Robert C. Stanley, Robert T. Stevens, Henry W. Taft, Myron C. Taylor, John C. Traphagen, Paul Tuckerman, Vanderbilt Webb, Clarence M. Wooley. (Insurance Bosses Used Jobs to Further Their Own Interests, SEC Says. The Capital Times, Mar. 13, 1941.)

Frank L. Polk, partner of the law firm of Davis, Polk, Lansing, Wardwell & Reed, was a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Company from 1930 to 1943.

The Mutual Life, 1942

Lewis W. Douglas was president of the Mutual. Trustees nominated to serve for three years were Charles E. Adams, Chairman, Air Reduction Company Inc.; Lewis H. Brown, President of the Johns-Manville Corporation; W. Gibson Carey Jr., President of the Yale & Towne Manufacturing Co.; F. Trubee Davison, in military service; Charles E. Dunlap, President of the Berwind-White Coal Mining Co., and a director of the Guaranty Trust; Leon Fraser, President of the First National Bank of the City of New York; William D. Mitchell, Counsellor at Law; New York; Alexander E. Patterson, Executive Vice President of the Mutual; John Sloane, Chairman of W.& J. Sloane; Robert C. Stanley, Chairman and President of the International Nickel Company of Canada Ltd.; Robert T. Stevens, fomer president of J.P. Stevens & Co., in military service; and John C. Traphagen, President of the Bank of New York. (Display Ad. New York Times, Nov. 18, 1942 p. 20.)

Lewis W. Douglas

Lewis Douglas succeeded David F. Houston as president of the Mutual Life. He was born in Douglas, Ariz. in 1894 and graduated from Amherst College in 1916, then spent a year at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He had been a US Representative (D-AZ) from 1927-33, when he was appointed U.S. Director of the Budget. "When the President rejected the policy of a balanced budget Mr. Douglas declined to agree with Mr. Roosevelt's views" and resigned. He had been principal and vice chancellor of McGill University since 1938, which he resigned, but continued as a governor. He married Margaret Zinsser. (Mutual Life Picks A New President. New York Times, Jun. 9, 1939.) He was elected a vice president and director of American Cyanamid in 1934. (L.W. Douglas Joins Chemical Conern. New York Times, Dec. 11, 1934.) He was assistant lease-lend expeditor with W.A. Harriman in London (Lewis W. Douglas Named London Lease-Lend Aide. New York Times, Jan. 28, 1942), and was an advisor to Gen. Lucius Clay in the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force military government of Germany. Clay's immediate assistants and counselors were the Director of Intelligence, the Joint Intelligence Committee and a mission from the Office of Strategic Services. (Hard Policy Fixed for Ruling Reich. New York Times, May 17, 1945.) He was president of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York from 1940-47, and a director of General Motors from 1944-65; and was appointed to the US Advisory Committee on Information (USIA) in 1959. (Douglas, Lewis Williams, 1894-1974. Congressional Bio.) He married Peggy Scharmann Zinsser, the youngest daughter of Fredrick George Zinsser. (Married. New York Times, Jun. 21, 1921.) Her sister, Ellen Zinsser, married John J. McCloy. Her nephews, Stuart and Peter Douglas, were ushers. Lewis W. Douglas and F. Trubee Davison were among the guests. (Other Weddings. New York Times, Apr, 26, 1930.) He was the grandson of James Douglas, the President of the Phelps-Dodge Company, who had been the major benefactor of James Ewing of the American Society for the Control of Cancer; and he succeeded his uncle, Archibald Douglas, as chairman of the board of managers of Memorial Hospital in 1944.

Douglas, Lewis William / US Congress

The Mutual Life, 1945

Lewis W. Douglas, president. Trustees nominated to serve for three years were Charles E. Adams, Chairman, Air Reduction Company Inc.; Lewis H. Brown, President of the Johns-Manville Corporation; W. Gibson Carey Jr., President of the Yale & Towne Manufacturing Co.; F. Trubee Davison; Charles E. Dunlap, President of the Berwind-White Coal Mining Co.; E. Roland Harrison [sic], partner of Brown Brothers, Harriman; William D. Mitchell, Counsellor at Law; New York; Alexander E. Patterson, Executive Vice President of the Mutual; John Sloane, Chairman of W.& J. Sloane; Robert C. Stanley, Chairman and President of the International Nickel Company of Canada Ltd.; Robert T. Stevens, Chairman of J.P. Stevens & Co.; and John C. Traphagen, President of the Bank of New York. (Display Ad. Chicago Daily Tribune, Nov. 9, 1945 p. 21.)

The Mutual Life, 1951

Trustees nominated to serve for three years were Charles E. Adams, Chairman, Air Reduction Company Inc.; F. Trubee Davison; Louis W. Dawson, New York; Charles E. Dunlap, President of the Berwind-White Coal Mining Co.; John W. Hanes, Vice President and Director, Olin Industries Inc.; E. Roland Harriman, partner of Brown Brothers, Harriman; William D. Mitchell, Partner, law firm of Mitchell, Capron, Marsh, Angulo & Cooney, New York; John Sloane, Chairman of W.& J. Sloane; Robert T. Stevens, Chairman of J.P. Stevens & Co.; and Thomas J. Watson Jr., Executive Vice President of International Business Machines Corp. (Display Ad. New York Times, Nov. 7, 1951 p. 32.)

Artemus L. Gates, S&B 1918, was elected a trustee of Mutual Life Insurance (Former High Navy Aide Made Insurance Trustee. New York Times, Apr. 1, 1952.)

The Mutual Life, 1954

Trustees nominated to serve for three years were Charles E. Adams, Director, Air Reduction Company Inc.; F. Trubee Davison; Louis W. Dawson, President of the Mutual; Charles E. Dunlap, President of the Berwind-White Coal Mining Co.; John W. Hanes, Chairman of Finance Committee and Director, Olin Industries Inc.; E. Roland Harriman, partner of Brown Brothers, Harriman; Robert P. Koenig, President, Cerro de Pasco Corporation; William D. Mitchell, Partner, law firm of Mitchell, Capron, Marsh, Angulo & Cooney, New York; John Sloane, Chairman of W.& J. Sloane; and Thomas J. Watson Jr., President of International Business Machines Corp. (Display Ad. New York Times, Oct. 28, 1954 p. 42.)

The Mutual Life, 1957

Trustees nominated to serve for three years were S. Sloan Colt, director, Bankers Trust Company.; F. Trubee Davison; Louis W. Dawson, President of the Mutual; Charles E. Dunlap, President of the Berwind-White Coal Mining Co.; John W. Hanes, Director and Consultant, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation; E. Roland Harriman, partner of Brown Brothers, Harriman; Oveta Culp Hobby, President, Editor and Director, The Houston Post; Robert P. Koenig, President, Cerro de Pasco Corporation; John Sloane, Retired; and Thomas J. Watson Jr., President of International Business Machines Corp. (Display Ad. Cicago Daily Tribune, Nov. 7, 1957 p. N10.)

The Mutual Life, 1960

Trustees nominated to serve for three years were S. Sloan Colt, Director and member of Executive and Trust Committees, Bankers Trust Company.; F. Trubee Davison; Louis W. Dawson, Chairman of the Mutual; Charles E. Dunlap, Chairman of the Berwind-White Coal Mining Co.; John W. Hanes, Director of the Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation; E. Roland Harriman, partner of Brown Brothers, Harriman; Oveta Culp Hobby, President, Editor and Director, The Houston Post; Robert P. Koenig, President, Cerro de Pasco Corporation; Frank Pace Jr., Chairman of General Dynamics Corp.; and Thomas R. Wilcox, Executive Vice President of The First National Bank of New York. (Display Ad. New York Times, Nov. 4, 1960 p. 56.)

"CHARLES J. BUESlNG, C.L.U.* Lincroft, N. J.; Delegate-Director (1963-). Field Underwriter, Mutual Of New York. ACS New Jersey Division: Member, Board of Trustees and Executive Committee (1945- ); Past President, Past Crusade Chairman. Recipient, ACS Natl.-Div. Award; Member: Board, Life Underwriters' Association of New York; Life Managers' Assn. of N. Y. (Past Pres.); American Society of Chartered Life Underwriters." (1966 House of Delegates and Board of Directors. American Cancer Society Inc., p. 12.)

ACS Board of Directors, 1966 / UCSF

H.I. Romnes, the Chairman of A.T.&T. and a director of the American Cancer Society, became a trustee in 1967. (Mutual Life Appoints Romnes to Its Board. New York Times, Oct. 3, 1967.)

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cast 01-09-15