The New York Life Insurance Company

The Nautilus Mutual Life Insurance Company, 1846

Trustees: James D.P. Ogden (President), James Brown, H.W. Hicks, A. Norrie, P.M. Wetmore, Robert B. Coleman, M.O. Roberts, Richard E. Purdy, O. Bushnell, Richard Irvin, D.A. Comstock, James Harper, R.F. Carman, William H. Aspinwell, Henry K. Bogert, Thomas W. Ludlow, C.F. Lindsley, A.M. Merchant (Vice President), John Cryder, R.H. Morris, S.S. Benedict, and Loring Andrews. Lewis Benton, Secretary; Pliny Freeman, Actuary; George Wilkes M.D. and Cornelius R. Bogert M.D., Medical Examiners. Office was at 68 Wall St. (Milwaukee Sentinel and Gazette, Oct. 29, 1846.)

Loring Andrews

Loring Andrews was "the wealthiest man in the New York leather trade," and expanded into industrial real estate. He was "an early and a large subscriber for the Atlantic Telegraph Cable Company." He made an endowment of $100,000 to fund professorships at New York University in 1866. (Obituary. New York Times, Jan. 24, 1875; Loring Andrews. By Wallace C. Andrews. America's Successful Men: The City of New York, Henry Hall, ed., 1895.) His daughter Isabel married Count Eberhard von Linden, Chamberlain to the King of Wurtemberg, in 1876. Her trust fund was embezzled by Francis H. Weeks. (To Examine Francis H. Weeks. New York Times, Oct. 18, 1894.)

Loring Andrews / Ancestry.com

Loring Andrews' son, James Bruyn Andrews, Yale 1861, was a law partner of Eugene Schuyler (Yale 1859), who was afterward US Minister to Greece. James B. Andrews was U.S. Consul at Valencia, Spain, from Aug. 1866 to Nov. 1867. He returned to the U.S. in 1869, then from 1871 lived abroad in Mentone, France. He married Fanny Griswold Field, daughter of Cyrus W. Field of New York. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 1212.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 1212 / Google Books

Cornelius R. Bogert, M.D., Yale 1820

Cornelius Robert Bogert was born in New York City in 1800. He received his medical degree at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1824. He spent six years in Cuba as medical attendant to the slaves on several large plantations owned by Wright, Shelton & Co. He was medical examiner of the New York Life from its organization until his death in 1877. His father, John G. Bogert, a lawyer, was the Russian Consul for the port. (Obituary. New York Times, Nov. 11, 1877; Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1870-1880, p. 288.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1870-1880, p. 288 / Google Books

Henry K. Bogert

Henry Kneeland Bogert was the senior partner of Bogert & Kneeland, of the cotton trade. He was also a director of the Union Trust Company, the Atlantic Insurance Company, and the Arctic Fire Insurance Company. (Obituary. New York Times, Aug. 31, 1875.) His wife, Mary Elizabeth Bogert (1803-1891), was Cornelius R. Bogert's sister. Their grandfathers were brothers. (Society of Descendants of Jean Mousnier de la MONTAGNE (1595-1670).)

Descendants of Jean Mousnier de la MONTAGNE / Ancestry.com

His son, Henry A. Bogert, Columbia 1846, was a lawyer. "His specialty was real estate, and it was said of him that he had examined more titles than any other lawyer in the city. He was selected as the attorney of the New York Life Insurance Company because of his knowledge of real estate values." He retired in 1893. His wife was Mary Lawrence, daughter of John L. Lawrence, the president of the Seventh National Bank. (Henry A. Bogert Dead. New York Times, Jul. 14, 1905.) Their son, Henry Lawrence Bogert, was a real estate lawyer and a trustee of the Queens County Savings Bank of Flushing. (H.L. Bogert Dies; Real Estate Lawyer. New York Times, Mar. 6, 1933.) Henry Lawrence Bogert Jr., Yale 1934, was a vice president of Bankers Trust Company until World War II, when he was a major in the U.S. Air Transport Command in Asia. Afterward, he joined Eastman Dillon and its successors. (H. Lawrence Bogert, Ex-Investment Banker. New York Times, Jun. 17, 1992.) Mrs. H. Lawrence Bogert Jr. did fund-raising for Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. (Fashions Lunch Feb. 2 to Benefit Cancer Patients. New York Times, Jan. 22, 1967.) The senior Bogert's daughter, Mary Lawrence Bogert, married William Elliman of Butterick & Elliman, NYSE. They were the parents of Lawrence B. Elliman of Pease & Elliman, real estate, and of Kenneth Benbow Elliman, Douglas Ludlow Elliman, Roland Franklin Elliman, and Rosalie Southgate Elliman. (William Elliman Dead. New York Times, Feb. 22, 1914.)

Douglas L. Elliman "was a leader in arranging the gradual migration of the city's wealthiest residents from the private mansions that lined Fifth and Madison Avenues to the luxury apartment houses that sprang up on Park Avenue and points east, such as Sutton Place." (Douglas L. Elliman Dies at 89; Leader in Real Estate Activities. New York Times, Feb. 14, 1972.) Douglas L. Elliman was a patron of the New York City Cancer Committee "Florida Preview" fundraising dinner for the American Cancer Society. (Cancer Society Will Be assisted at Fete Dec. 12. New York Times, Nov. 9, 1958.) Mrs. Douglas L. Elliman was Katherine Scales. She was born in Greensboro, N.C., and lived in New Orleans with her family before moving to Richmond, Va. She graduated from the Cathedral School in Washington, D.C., and studied at the Sorbonne. They were married in 1929. She was also on the advisory board of the American Red Cross, and was active on behalf of Presbyterian Hospital. (Mrs. D.L. Elliman, A Civic Leader, 61. New York Times, Dec. 18, 1957.) She was vice chairman and head of the women's campaign committee of the New York City Cancer Committee in its campaign to raise $1.5 million in Manhattan and the Bronx for the American Cancer Society. (Sloan Gets Medal For Cancer Fight. New York Times, Apr. 2, 1951.) Her mother, Mrs. Catharine Henderson Scales, married Henry Wellington Cobb of the American Tobacco Company. (Cobb-Scales. New York Times, Sep. 14, 1907.) His niece, Lucie Langhorne Cobb, married George Washington Hill, of the American Tobacco Company. (Miss Lucie Cobb Weds George W. Hill. New York Times, Oct. 17, 1907.) Her previous husband was Edward Moon. She was a niece of Admiral Scales and great-niece of Governor [Alfred Moore] Scales of North Carolina. Her cousin, Jane Bethel Scales, married Warren Leslie Jr., Yale 1922. (Leslie-Scales. New York Times, Jun. 22, 1926.)

John Cryder

John Cryder of Philadelphia was a business partner of William S. Wetmore in the China Trade. He married Mary W. Wetmore, daughter of Samuel Wetmore. (Married. New York Spectator, Oct. 16, 1830.)

Samuel Canby Paxson

Samuel C. Paxson was President of the New York Produce Exchange Company. (The Death of Samuel C. Paxson, Esq. New York Times, Jul. 28, 1860.) He began business in the flour trade in 1832, and was the first president of the Corn Exchange. His son, William Paxson, was also a member of his father's firm and of the Produce Exchange. (Obituary Notes. New York Times, May 17, 1893.) Samuel C. Paxson's wife, Elizabeth Drinker, was a royal descendant of William the Conqueror, King of England. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 293.) His daughter, Elizabeth Drinker Paxson, married Theodore Gilman. (Died. New York Times, Nov. 20, 1912.) Samuel C. Paxson's father was William Paxson of Philadelphia. (Died. New York Times, Sep. 4, 1858.) The Paxsons were disowned Quakers. (Paxson Family: Sixth Generation. By M.J.P. Grundy, 2002.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 293 / Google Books
Paxson Family: Sixth Generation / Ancestry.com

Theodore Gilman was the head of Gilman, Sons & Co., founded in 1860 by his father, Winthrop S. Gilman, "who was originally a wholesale grocer in St. Louis and Illinois." It was a private banking firm and dealt in real estate mortgages, and was the New York correspondent of numerous banks in Iowa. (Old Banking Firm Suspends. New York Times, Oct. 17, 1902.) "In 1913, 1914, 1915 and 1918 he prepared and presented bills to Congress for the incorporation of clearing houses and issue by them to banks of currency secured by bank assets. It was the first bill ever introduced for the formation of a higher order of banks. The plan is now embodied in the Federal Reserve Act." He was also president and a manager of the New York Bible Society. He was born in Alton, Ill. in 1841, and graduated from Williams College. He married Elizabeth Drinker Paxson in 1863. (Theodore Gilman, Banker, Dies At 89. New York Times, Aug. 11, 1930.)

Prosper M. Wetmore

Prosper Montgomery Wetmore was born in Stratford, Conn., and came to New York City with his parents when he was nine years old. He joined the State Militia in 1819, and when his regiment was merged into the National Guard, he was placed in command with the rank of Major. He was appointed a Regent of the University of New York in 1833, and continued until his death. From 1845 to 1849, during the administration of President Polk, he held the office of Navy Agent, and was Secretary of the Chamber of Commerce during those years. "Although he held many positions of honor and trust, and accumulated a fortune, he lost his wealth from various causes, and died poor." He died at Great Neck, Long Island, aged seventy-seven. (Obituary. New York Times, Mar. 17, 1876.) He was a business partner of Benjamin T. Kissam in Kissam & Wetmore until Kissam died, then continued with Daniel Kissam. (Notice. Mercantile Advertiser, Aug. 29, 1818.) He was a son-in-law of Francis Ogsbury. (Died. New York Herald, Oct. 26, 1847.) His brothers-in-law, Charles A. and John J. Ogsbury, were among the pioneers of Texas, arriving just after the battle of San Jacinto. (Charles A. Ogsbury. Galveston Daily News, Dec. 26, 1891.) Wetmore was accused defalcation of the U.S. government of $558,000 while Navy Agent. He said it represented charges for disbursements during the Mexican War. (The Great Government Defalcation in This City. New York Weekly Herald, Dec. 29, 1849.) The accounting officers of the U.S. Treasury Department certified that the Navy Agent books were in arrears by $181,580.79, and instituted proceedings against him. (Daily National Intelligencer, Jan. 18, 1850.)

The Nautilus Mutual Life Insurance Company, 1847-49

Trustees: A.M. Merchant (President), O. Bushnell (Solicitor), Richard E. Purdy, R.A. Reading, James Harper, Loring Andrews, M.O. Roberts, C.F. Lindsley, Henry K. Bogert, Robert S. Coleman (Vice President), John M. Nixon, Henry A. Nelson, Samuel C. Paxson, Jonathan K. Herrick, William N. Seymour, Richard Irvin, John S. Bussing, Morris Franklin, and Spencer S. Benedict. Pliny Freeman, Actuary; George Wilkes M.D. and Cornelius Bogert M.D., Medical Examiners. (Cleveland Herald, Jun. 25, 1847; Jun. 26, 1848; Jun. 25, 1849.)

J.K. Herrick

Jonathan K. Herrick was a wealthy English importer of books and stationary, with a country home at Flushing. He was arrested for passing fraudulent invoices through Customs. He confessed to the charges, and his store with about $50,000 worth of goods was seized. (Fraud in the Revenue. Fayetteville Observer, Oct. 9, 1851.) His former partner, Isaac Ames, continued the business as before. (Copartnership. New York Times, Oct. 13, 1851.) It was formerly connected with Thomas Rhoads & Son, London. (Display Ad. Washington, D.C., Daily National Intelligencer, Jan. 28, 1837.) He subscribed a perpetual scholarship of $1500 to the University of the City of New York. (The University of the City of New York. New York Times, Feb. 28, 1853.) He died in 1861 at the age of 61 years. (Died. New York Herald, Jan. 24, 1861.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1850-51

The name of the company was changed from the Nautilus. Trustees: Morris Franklin, President; O. Bushnell; David A. Bokee; Alfred Freeman, M.D.; John M. Nixon; Henry A. Nelson; Henry I. Seaman; John C. Beach; Isaac C. Kendall; Pliny Freeman, Actuary; Samuel C. Paxson; J.K. Herrick; J.M. Wardwell; J.S. Bussing, Spencer S. Benedict, Vice President; Cyrus Curtis; Daniel S. Miller; William Barton; and William Coxe Dusenbury. George Wilkes M.D. and Cornelius R. Bogert M.D. were the medical examiners in New York. (Arkansas State Democrat, Jan. 25, 1850; Insurance. Cleveland Herald, Jun. 26, 1851.)

Daniel S. Miller

Daniel S. Miller was also a director of the Atlantic Insurance Company (Insurance. New York Times, Feb. 11, 1852, and Jan. 30, 1869), and a director and President pro tem of the Metropolitan Bank (Bank Notices. New York Times, Apr. 7, 1853), the U.S. Trust Company (Business Notices. New York Times, Jan. 30, 1854; Financial. New York Times, Feb. 2, 1857), and the Continental Insurance Company (The Galveston Daily News, Mar. 20, 1878.) He died in 1878. (Goulds Parties to Suit. New York Times, Jul. 15, 1909.) His wife was Anna Kip Bailey. (Died. New York Times, Jan. 11, 1890.) Her father was John H. Bailey. (The Kip/Kipp Family of New Amsterdam (New York). Rootsweb, accessed 11/17/09.)

The Kip/Kipp Family of New Amsterdam (New York) / Rootsweb

Their daughter, Helen D., married Jay Gould. (Marriages and Deaths. New York Herald, Jan. 23, 1863.) The brokerage firm of George P. Butler & Brother was deemed to be "the recognized Gould brokers." (Missouri Pacific. New York Times, Jan. 27, 1903.) Their daughter, Emily Miller, married McWalter B. Noyes shortly before he left to become the U.S. Consul at Venice, Italy. (Noyes-Miller. New York Times, Jul. 16, 1882; Died. New York Times, Sep. 30, 1910.) Noyes' family was from Rhode Island, but he was born on Cuba, where his father had estates, in 1835. He graduated from Harvard and became a Deacon at Trinity Church and other churches until 1881. (Obituary. New York Times, Dec. 7, 1885.) His Theta Delta Chi fraternity brother, John Hay, procured his appointment while he was Assistant Secretary of State. (In Memorium John Hay. By William L. Stone. The Shield, Vol. XXI, No. 3, 1905-1906, p. 321 [69]).

The Shield, 1905-1906 / Internet Archive (pdf, 318 pp)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1858

Trustees: Morris Franklin, President; Alfred Freeman, M.D.; John M. Nixon; John S. Buesing; Henry L. Seaman; Charles J. Martin; Loring Andrews; John Mairs; Russell Dart; Henry Suydam Jr.; Isaac C. Kendall; David Dows; William Barton; George Greer; John L. Rogers; Daniel S. Miller; William Coxe Dusenbury; William Patrick; William H. Appleton; Pliny Freeman, Actuary. Medical Examiners: Cornelius R. Bogert M.D. and George Wilkes M.D. (Financial. New York Herald, Feb. 7, 1858.)

William H. Appleton

William H. Appleton (1814-1899) was a son of the founder of the publisher D. Appleton & Co. On one of his visits to Europe, he "struck up a friendship with a Boston merchant of large business experience," and took his advice not to buy anything, which saved the firm from the crash of 1837. (Death of W.H. Appleton. New York Times, Oct. 20, 1899.) He was also a trustee of the Central Trust Company, and a manager of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad. (Lackawanna Elections. New York Times, Feb. 22, 1893.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1860-61

Trustees: Morris Franklin, President; Alfred Freeman, M.D.; John M. Nixon; John S. Buesing; Henry J. Seaman; David Dows; Daniel S. Miller; William Barton; William C. Dusenberry; John E. Williams; George Greer; Isaac C. Kendall; John L. Rogers; John Mairs; William Patrick; Loring Andrews; Russell Dart; William H. Appleton; Pliny Freeman, Actuary. Medical Examiners: Cornelius R. Bogert M.D. and George Wilkes M.D. (Financial. New York Herald, Feb. 4, 1860.) In 1861, Robert E. Collins joined the board. (Insurance. New York Herald, Feb. 26, 1861.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1863

Trustees: Trustees: Morris Franklin, President; John M. Nixon; John S. Buesing; David Dows; Daniel S. Miller; William Barton; William C. Dusenberry; John E. Williams; Henry K. Bogert; Isaac C. Kendall; John L. Rodgers; John Mairs; William Patrick; Loring Andrews; Russell Dart; William H. Appleton; Robert B. Collins; Pliny Freeman, Actuary. Medical Examiners: Cornelius R. Bogert M.D. and George Wilkes M.D. (Financial. New York Herald, Feb. 18, 1863.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1866-67

Office, 112-114 Broadway, New York. Trustees: Morris Franklin, President. John M. Nixon, of Doremus & Nixon, dry goods; David Dows, of David Dows & Co., flour merchants; Isaac C. Kendall, Vice President; Daniel S. Miller, late Dater, Miller & Co., grocers; John E. Williams, President, Metropolitan Bank; William C. Dusenbery, real estate; Henry K. Bogert, Bogert & Kneeland; John L Rogers, late Wyeth, Rogers & Co., importers; John Mairs, merchant; Dudley B. Fuller, iron; William H. Appleton, Appleton & Co., publishers; Robert B. Collins, Collins & Brother, stationers; William Barton, Wm. Barton & Son; William A. Booth, Booth & Edgar; Thomas Smull, Thos. Smull & Son; Sanford Cobb, President, Eagle Fire Insurance Co.; George A. Osgood, Van Schaick, Massett & Co., bankers; James G. King, banker; Charles L. Anthony, Anthony & Hall, dry goods. William H. Beers, Actuary; Theodore M. Banta, Cashier; Cornelius R. Bogert M.D. and George Wilkes M.D., Medical Examiners, Charles Wright M.D. Asst. Medical Examiner. (Financial. New York Times, Feb. 3, 1866.) Smull and King left. Henry Bowers, of Powers, Beeckman & Bradford, Jr. Dry Goods became a trustee. (Brooklyn Eagle, Feb. 9, 1867.)

Charles L. Anthony

Charles Lee Anthony was born in Brooklyn, Conn. and spent the early part of his life in Providence, R.I. He came to New York and engaged in the dry goods business of Anthony, Whittemore & Clark until 1862, when he went into the same business with George W. Hall. He died after breaking his leg while descending from a streetcar. (Obituary. New York Times, May 28, 1874; The Late Mr. Charles L. Anthony. New York Times, May 29, 1874.) His pall bearers included W.H. Vanderbilt. (Funeral of the late C.L. Anthony. New York Times, May 30, 1874.) He was one of the organizers of the Fourth National; Bank in 1864. (Fourth National Merged. New York Times, Jun. 19, 1914.) His widow, Catharine Holmes, died in 1882. (Died. New York Times, Feb. 25, 1882.) In 1864, his daughter, Rose de Wolf Anthony, married William Post Jr. (Married. New York Times, Nov. 16, 1864.) In 1880, his daughter, Louise Holmes Anthony, married Frederick W. Vanderbilt.

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1872

Trustees: Morris Franklin, President; David Dows, of David Dows & Co., flour merchants; Isaac C. Kendall, merchant; Daniel S. Miller, late Dater, Miller & Co., grocers; Henry K. Bogert, of Bogert & Kneeland; John Mairs, merchant; William H. Appleton, of Appleton & Co., publishers; Robert B. Collins, Collins & Brothers, stationers; William Barton, banker; William A. Booth, Booth & Edgar; George A. Osgood, banker; Charles L. Anthony, Anthony & Hall, dry goods; Sanford Cobb, President Eagle Fire Insurance Co.; Edward Martin, Cragin & Co., provisions; Edwin Hoyt, Hoyt, Spragues & Co., dry goods; H.B. Claflin, H.B. Claflin & Co., dry goods; J.F. Seymour, J.F. Seymour & Co.; Cornelius R. Bogert M.D.; William H. Beers, Vice President and Actuary. Theodore M. Banta, Cashier; D. Odell, Supt. of Agencies; Cornelius R. Bogert M.D. and George Wilkes M.D., Medical Examiners; Charles Wright M.D., Asst. Medical Examiner. (Cleveland Daily Herald, Feb. 28, 1872.)

Horace B. Claflin

Horace Brigham Claflin

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1874

Office, Nos. 346 & 348 Broadway. Trustees: Morris Franklin (President), David Dows, Isaac C. Kendall, Daniel S. Miller, Henry K. Bogert, John Mairs, William H. Appleton, Robert B. Collins, William Barton, William A. Booth, George A. Osgood, Henry Bowers, Charles L. Anthony, Sanford Cobb, Edward Martin, Edwin Hoyt, H.B. Claflin, William H. Beers (Vice President and Actuary), J.F. Seymour, Cornelius R. Bogert M.D. (New Advertisements. Boston Daily Advertiser, Mar. 17, 1874.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1875

Trustees: Morris Franklin (President), David Dows, Isaac C. Kendall, Henry K. Bogert, Daniel S. Miller, John Mairs, William H. Appleton, Robert B. Collins, William Barton, William A. Booth, George A. Osgood, Henry Bowers, Sanford Cobb, Edward Martin, H.B. Claflin, J.F. Seymour, C.R. Bogert M.D., William H. Beers (Vice President and Actuary). Theodore M. Banta, Cashier; D. O'Dell, Superintendent of Agencies; Cornelius R. Bogert M.D. and George Wilkes, Medical Examiners; Charles Wright M.D., Assistant Medical Examiner. (Display Ad. Inter Ocean, Mar. 27, 1875.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1876

Trustees: Morris Franklin (President), David Dows, Isaac C. Kendall, Daniel S. Miller, John Mairs, William H. Appleton, Robert B. Collins, William Barton, Loomis L. White, William A. Booth, H.B. Claflin, J.F. Seymour, C.R. Bogert M.D., George A. Osgood, Henry Bowers, Sandford Cobb, Edwin Martin, John M. Furman, William H. Beers (Vice President and Actuary). (The Congregationalist, Feb. 23, 1876.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1877-79

Trustees: Morris Franklin, President; Daniel S. Miller; Robert B. Collins; Charles Wright M.D.; J.F. Seymour; Henry Bowers; David Dows; John Mairs; William Barton; William A. Booth; Cornelius B. Bogert, M.D., Medical Examiner; Edward Martin; William H. Beers, Vice President and Actuary; Isaac C. Kendall; William H. Appleton; Loomis L. White; H.B. Claflin; George A. Osgood; and John M. Furman. Theodore M. Banta, Cashier; D. Odell, Superintendent of Agencies; Charles Wright M.D. Medical Examiner. (Thirty-Second Annual Report of the New York Life Insurance Company. St. Louis Globe-Democrat, Feb. 26, 1877.) In 1878, Bogert was replaced by Henry Tuck M.D., and Edward A. Whittemore replaced Miller. (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, Feb. 15, 1878.) In 1879, Kendall was replaced by S.S. Fisher. (The Congregationalist, Feb. 19, 1879.)

Henry Tuck, M.D., Harvard 1863

He was born in Barnstable, Mass. in 1842. He practiced medicine in Boston from 1868 to 1878, when he came to New York as Medical Director of the New York Life. He married Emma Roumelia Beers, daughter of the former president. He died in Seabright, N.J. in 1904. (Harvard College Class of 1863 50th Anniversary, 1913, p. 104.) He "kept up his associations with his class most earnestly," and left $1,250,000 in a contingency legacy to Harvard, Massachusetts General Hospital and several other Hospitals, and the American Unitarian Association. (Masonic Visitations. Barnstable Patriot, Sep. 19, 1904.)

Harvard College Class of 1863, p. 104 / Google Books

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1880-84

Trustees: Morris Franklin, President; William H. Appleton, William Barton, William A. Booth, H.B. Claflin, John M. Furman, David Dows, George A. Osgood, Henry Bowers, Loomis L. White, Robert B. Collins, S.S. Fisher, William H. Beers, Vice President & Actuary; Charles Wright M.D., Medical Examiner; Edward Martin, John Mairs, Edward A. Whittemore, Henry Tuck M.D., Medical Examiner; and Alexander Studwell. Theodore M. Banta, Cashier. (New-York Daily Tribune, Feb. 9, 1880.) In 1881, R. Suydam Grant replaced Beers as a trustee. (New-York Daily Tribune, Feb. 12, 1881.) In 1882, Whittemore left and Beers returned. (Milwaukee Daily Sentinel, Feb. 25, 1882.) In 1883, Osgood was replaced by Archibald H. Welch. (New York Daily Tribune, Feb. 10, 1883.) In 1884, Wright left the board of trustees and was replaced as Medical Examiner by A. Huntington M.D. (New York Sun, Feb. 15, 1884.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1885

Trustees: Morris Franklin (President), William H. Appleton, William A. Booth, H.B. Claflin, David Dows, Henry Bowers, Loomis L. White, Robert B. Collins, Edward Martin, John Mairs, Henry Tuck (2d Vice-President), Alex Studwell, R. Suydam Grant, Archibald H. Welch, George Potts, William L. Strong, and William H. Beers (Vice-Prest. and Actuary). Theodore M. Banta, Cashier; D. O'Dell, Superintendent of Agencies; Henry Tuck M.D. and A. Huntington M.D., Medical Examiners. (Council Bluffs Daily Bee, Mar. 11, 1885.)

Walter H. Lewis

Walter Herron Lewis was elected to the board on March 10, 1885. He was born in Roxbury, Mass. in 1829, and came to New York in 1865 as a partner of the wholesale dry goods firm of Lewis Brothers & Co., which became H. & W.H. Lewis in 1891. He was also a director of the Home Insurance Company.(Died. New York Times, Feb. 20, 1901.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1887

Trustees: William H. Appleton, William H. Beers (President), William A. Booth, Benjamin H. Bristow, Henry Bowers, John Claflin, Robert B. Collins, R. Suydam Grant, Elias S. Higgins, Walter H. Lewis, Edward Martin, Richard Muser, George H. Potts, C.C. Baldwin, John N. Stearns, William L. Strong, Alexander Studwell, Henry Tuck (Vice-President), A.H. Welch (2d Vice-President), and L.L. White. Theodore M. Banta, Cashier; D. O'Dell, Superintendent of Agencies; A. Huntington M.D., Medical Director; Rufus W. Weeks, Actuary. (Milwaukee Sentinel, Feb. 22, 1887.)

Elias S. Higgins

Elias S. Higgins was head of the New York carpet manufacturing firm of E.S. Higgins & Co. (Death-Roll of the Week. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, Aug. 31, 1889.) He was also a director of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad. (Railroad Progress. Philadelphia North American, Dec. 31, 1879; Railroad Matters. Boston Daily Advertiser, Mar. 22, 1884.) He married Emma Louisa Baldwin, daughter of Edwin Baldwin of New York. (Married. New York Weekly Herald, Dec. 23, 1848.) She left $200,000 each in trust for her grandson, Reginald Brooks, and two granddaughters. (The Will of Emma Louise Higgins. New York Times, Jul. 11, 1890.) He founded the company in 1837 with his brother, Alvin Higgins, who retired with over a million dollars but lost it in bad investments. They were among the twelve children of Amos Higgins, a shipbuilder in Portland, Maine. (Alvin Higgins. New York Times, Jun. 3, 1890.) He was an executor of the will of his brother, Nathaniel D. Higgins, also of the carpet firm, who left $1,500,000 in trust to his daughter, Nathalie Frances Reynal and her children. The will requested that her husband, Jules Reynal, be admitted to the firm. (A Millionaire's Will. New York Times, Jan. 22, 1882.) Jules Reynal, the actual executor, eventually obeyed under threat of punishment for contempt. (After Delinquent Executors. New York Times, Jul. 13, 1888.) Their son, Eugene S. Reynal, married a daughter of Gen. Louis Fitzgerald.

Elias S. Higgins's oldest daughter, Josephine, married Henry Mortimer Brooks. (Married. New York Times, Dec. 18, 1868.) She created a trust fund of $100,000 for each of her grandchildren, and a $250,000 trust fund for her daughter, Gladys Eugenie Livermore. It was administered by Frank L. Polk and the United States Trust Company. (Grandchildren Get Estate. New York Times, Sep. 14, 1920.) Their daughter, Gladys Baldwin Brooks, was the first wife of Eugene Van Rensselaer Thayer Jr.

Their only son, Eugene Higgins, left a $40 million trust fund for science education at Columbia, Yale, Harvard and Princeton Universities, with building projects specifically forbidden. The presidents of the four universities and of the United States Trust Company were to be administrators. He also left $10,000 and and a $5,000 life annuity to a secretary named Daniel Cousteau. Higgins was a classmate of Nicholas Murray Butler, and never married. ($40,000,000 Science Fund Willed to Four Universities. New York Times, Aug. 21, 1948.) Before Higgins, Daniel Cousteau had been a paid traveling companion of James Hazen Hyde, and was the father of Jacques Cousteau. (Jacques Cousteau: The Sea King. By Brad Matsen, 2010, p.15.) Eugene Higgins was one of the witnesses at the civil marriage of Gladys Deacon of Boston to the Duke of Marlborough, in Paris. (Table Gossip. Boston Globe, Jun. 26, 1901.)

Jacques Cousteau: The Sea King, p. 15 / Google Books

John N. Stearns

John Noble Stearns, an early silk manufacturer, was born in New York. He went to China several times for Munsel & Co., general merchants. In 1866, he founded J.N. Stearns & Co. He had four sons - Dr. Henry S., John N., Jr., Louis, and Walter C. Stearns. His daughter married William Travis Gibbs. (Death List of a Day. New York Times, Mar. 16, 1907.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1889

Trustees: William H. Appleton, William H. Beers (President), William A. Booth, Henry Bowers, John Claflin, Robert B. Collins, Alexander Studwell, Elias S. Higgins, Walter H. Lewis, Edward Martin, Richard Muser, C.C. Baldwin, John N. Stearns, William L. Strong, W.F. Buckley, Henry Tuck (Vice-President), A.H. Welch (2d Vice-President), and L.L. White. Rufus W. Weeks, Actuary; Theodore M. Banta, Cashier; and A. Huntington M.D., Medical Director. (The Congregationalist, Feb. 28, 1889.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1890

Trustees: William H. Appleton, William H. Beers (President), William A. Booth, Henry Bowers, John Claflin, Robert B. Collins, H.C. Mortimer, Alexander Studwell, Walter H. Lewis, Edward Martin, Richard Muser, C.C. Baldwin, E.N. Gibbs, John N. Stearns, William L. Strong, W.F. Buckley, Henry Tuck (Vice-President), A.H. Welch (2d Vice-President), and L.L. White. Rufus W. Weeks, Actuary; Theodore M. Banta, Cashier; and A. Huntington M.D., Medical Director. (New-York Daily Tribune, Feb. 23, 1890.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1891

The New York Times reported "rumors of all sorts flying about with reference to an attempt that is being made, or that will soon be made, to relieve the New-York Life Insurance Company of that incubus which weighs most heavily upon its management - namely, William H. Beers," and "his following of sons-in-law and brothers-in-law." Beers helped William A. Booth's Third National Bank out of a "serious entanglement" by purchasing $110,000 of its stock. Henry Tuck married Beer's daughter, "and was promptly made Vice President of the New-York Life, with a salary of $25,000 a year. Beers made Booth's son, William T. Booth, Henry Tuck, William H. Appleton, and A.H. Welch trustees of the Manhattan Safe Deposit and Storage Company. The trustees elected Buckley, a personal friend of Beers, even though none of them had ever heard of him before. One of its agents, named Dinkelspiel, was alleged to have swindled policyholders in Boston and other cities, but was not discharged. (It Is Beers's Own Board. New York Times, Jul. 16, 1891.) "One of the pet creations of President William H. Beers of the New-York Life Insurance Company is the Manhattan Safe Deposit and Storage Company in the basement of the New-York Life Building at 346 and 348 Broadway. But for the important fact that the stock of this truly remarkable safe deposit company figures for a very large sum among the sworn assets of the New-York Life no space would be devoted to it." The New York Life held about 99% of its stock, having bought out the worthless stock held by its trustees, who included NY Life trustees Appleton and Dows, plus Central Trust trustee Cornelius N. Bliss, who became Treasurer of the Republican National Committee in 1892. (A Very Poor Investment. New York Times, Nov. 27, 1891.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1892

John A. McCall, President; Henry Tuck, Vice President; Archibald H. Welch, 2d Vice President; George W. Perkins, 3d Vice President; Rufus W. Weeks, Actuary; A. Huntington M.D., Medical Director; Charles C. Whitney, Secretary; Horace C. Richardson, Ass't Actuary; Edmund C. Stanton, Cashier. Trustees: William H. Appleton, C.C. Baldwin, William H. Beers, William A. Booth, W.F. Buckley, John Claflin, Charles S. Fairchild, Edward N. Gibbs, W.B. Hornblower, Woodbury Langdon, Walter H. Lewis, H.C. Mortimer, Richard Muser, Edmund D. Randolph, John N. Stearns, William L. Strong, Henry Tuck, A.H. Welch, and William C. Whitney. Joseph Dinkelspiel was General Agent in New Orleans. (New Orleans Daily Picayune, Mar. 3, 1892.)

Woodbury Langdon, Royal

Woodbury Langdon was the son of Walter Langdon and Dorothea Astor, daughter of the first John Jacob Astor. He married Helen Colford Jones. (The Descendants of John Jacob Astor. New York Times, Mar. 6, 1898.) He was a Royal descendant of Henry I, King of France. (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 28.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 28 / Google Books

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1901-02

Members of the Executive Committee: Edmund D. Randolph, Darwin P. Kingsley, Augustus G. Paine, Thomas P. Fowler, Thomas B. Reed, William R. Plunkett, Alexander E. Orr. Minute on the death of Walter Herron Lewis. (Died. New York Times, Feb. 20, 1901.) Minute on the death of Thomas Brackett Reed: John A. McCall, President; Edmund D. Randolph, Chairman; Darwin P. Kingsley, Thomas P. Fowler, Augustus G. Paine, James Stillman, Alexander E. Orr. (Died. New York Times, Dec. 10, 1902.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1905-06

In 1906, 13 of the 24 were replaced. Old trustees included James A. Blair of Blair & Co., bankers; Thomas A. Buckner, vice president; Charles S. Fairchild, President of the New York Trust Company; and William B. Hornblower, "whom 'Judge' Hamilton called the 'Pecksniff' of the company." The 11 continuing trustees were President Alexander E. Orr, John Claflin, Thomas P. Fowler (of the self-investigating committee), Woodbury Langdon, Robert J. Lowry, Clarence H. Mackay, Henry C. Mortimer, George A. Morrison, William B. Plunkett, Augustus G. Paine, and Hiram R. Steel. The new trustees were James H. Eckels, former Controller of the Currency and now President of the Commercial National Bank of Chicago; David R. Francis, President of the Mississippi Trust Company of St. Louis; Julius Fleischmann of the Fleischmann yeast company and ex-mayor of Cincinnati; Ewald Fleitmann of Fleitmann & Co., commission merchants; Judge Horace H. Lurton of the U.S. Circuit Court, Nashville; Seth M. Milliken, wholesale dry goods; John G. Milburn of Carter, Ledyard & Milburn; Anton A. Raven, President of the Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company; John Reid, general manager of the Jordan L. Mott Iron Works; Fleming H. Revell, publisher; George F. Seward, President of the Fidelity and Casualty Company; Elbridge G. Snow, President of the Home Fire Insurance Co.; and Louis Wagner, President of the Third National Bank of Philadelphia. The company had about $75 million of insurance in France. (New York Life Ticket Includes 13 New Men. New York Times, Jul. 6, 1906.)

David R. Francis

David Rowland Francis (1850-1927) was born in Kentucky and graduated from Washington University in St. Louis in 1870. His uncle, David Pitt Rowland, helped him get into the university and gave him a job in the commission firm of Shryock & Rowland. He was elected president of the St. Louis Merchants Exchange in 1884, and Mayor of St. Louis in 1885. When his term ended, he was elected Governor of Missouri until 1893. In 1896, President Cleveland appointed him Secretary of the Interior. He was appointed Ambassador to Russia by President Wilson in 1916. "His service began under the old régime. After the Russian revolution, he supported the Kerensky provisional government; and under the Bolshevik régime he still stayed on, although given permission to return. He moved the embassy from place to place, lived on trains, appealed to the Russians to stand by the allies, warned against German intrigues, and refused to heed threats of personal violence until even his robust health gave way. On Nov. 6, 1918, he was carried on a stretcher to an American warship and taken to a London hospital for an operation, from which he never fully recovered. In 1876 he had married Jane Perry, daughter of John D. Perry, a pioneer railroad-builder. Six sons were born to them, three of whom followed their father's business career." (David Rowland Francis. Dictionary of American Biography Base Set. American Council of Learned Societies, 1928-1936.) H was one of the incorporators and directors of the American Central Committee for Russian Relief. (Organize Russian Relief. New York Times, Nov. 14, 1919.)

His father-in-law, John Dietz Perry, was one of the founding directors of the Mississippi Valley Trust Co. (A New Trust Company. New York Times, Sep. 19, 1890; D.R. Francis Dead; Ex-Ambassador. New York Times, Jan. 16, 1927.) J. Sheppard Smith, the vice president of the Mississippi Valley Trust Co. from 1915 and its president since 1925, was the brother-in-law of Perry's grandson, J.D. Perry Francis. (J. Sheppard Smith, St. Louis Banker, Dies. New York Times, Oct. 10, 1931.) In the 1915 Mexican Revolution, the Guaranty Trust Company transferred money from Germany to the Mississippi Valley Trust Company for forwarding to Pancho Villa.

His sons, David R. Francis Jr., Scroll & Key 1900, J.D. Perry Francis, Berzelius 1897, and Talton T. Francis, Yale 1907, were business partners in Francis, Bro & Company. David R. Francis was a director of the Mississippi Valley Trust Company. Brothers Charles B. Francis graduated from Yale in 1902, Sidney R. Francis was in the class of 1912, and Thomas Francis was a sixth brother. (Obituary Reconrd of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1938-1939, pp. 111; Obituary Record of Graduates of the Undergraduate Schools Deceased during the Year 1949-1950, p. 148.)

Obituary Reconrd of Graduates of Yale, 1938-1939 / Yale University Library (pdf, 329 pp)
Obituary Reconrd of Graduates of Yale, 1949-1950 / Yale University Library (pdf, 221 pp)

Seth M. Milliken

Seth Mellen Miliken was born in Poland, Maine, in 1836. In 1865, he established the dry goods firm of Deering, Milliken & Co. in Portland, Maine, then another of the same name in New York City. He was a director or president of more than two dozen textile amd other mills, in Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, South Carolina, Georgia and Alabama. He was a director of the Mercantile National Bank in New York City for more than 30 years. (Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine, Volume 4, 1909. By George Thomas Little, Henry Sweetser Burrage, and Albert Roscoe Stubbs, p. 2244.) He and his cousin, U.S. Rep. Seth L. Milliken of Maine, discussed the annexation of Canada with [Secretary of State James G.] Blaine. (Blaine Says Yet. Titusville Herald, Feb. 13, 1889.) He retired from Deering, Milliken & Co. in 1915, and died on March 5, 1920. His estate included nearly $6 million in stocks, most in the mills, but also $882,000 worth in the Irving National Bank and $191,000 in the National City Bank. Two fifths of the estate went to each of his two sons, Dr. Seth M. Milliken and Gerrish H. Milliken, and a fifth to his daughter, Mrs. Margaret M. Hatch. (Seth Milliken Left $10,260,308 Estate. New York Times, Feb. 20, 1924.)

Genealogical and family history of the state of Maine, Volume 4, p. 2244 / Google Books

His father-in-law, Dr. Levi Gerrish Hill of Dover, N.H., was treasurer and president of the New Hampshire Medical Society (New Hampshire State Medical Society. Dover Gazette, Jun. 26, 1863; New Hampshire Statesman, Jun. 12, 1868), and a vice president of the American Medical Association (American Medical Association. Galveston Daily News, Jun. 4, 1880.) Mrs. Seth M. Milliken's sister, Adelaide Shackford Hill, was the wife of Rev. James M. Buckley, editor of The Christian Advocate. (Mrs. Adelaide S.H. Buckley. In the 1880s, Buckley called for the establishment of a Methodist Episcopal hospital, for which George I. Seney contributed $410,000. (James Monroe Buckley. By George Preston Mains, 1917, p. 197.) Their son, Monroe Buckley, was a lawyer in Philadelphia. He married a daughter of John C. Dawson, a former member of Brown Brothers & Co. (Miss Cantlin Weds Monroe Buckley. New York Times, Jan. 26, 1912.) Rev. Buckley's nephew, John M. Buckley of Philadelphia, was editor of The Tobacco World. (John M. Buckley. New York Times, Jan. 28, 1907.)

James Monroe Buckley, p. 197 / Google Books

Dr. Seth Minot Milliken graduated from Yale in 1898, and the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1902. He was on the staff of French and Roosevelt Hospitals, and was a trustee of Roosevelt Hospital. He and his wife, the former Alida King Leese, founded the Blue Hill Troupe, an amateur musical organization. They had five children and eighteen grandchildren. (Seth M. Milliken, Surgeon, 82, Dead. New York Times, Nov. 19, 1957.) Their troupe did Gilbert and Sullivan at benefits for the New York Skin and Cancer Hospital and the New York City Cancer Committee (Blue Hill Troupe Aids Cancer Fund. New York Times, Apr. 1, 1945). Mrs. Milliken opened the first Smith College club in the country. (Smith College to Open First Club House in Gotham. Coshocton Tribune, Mar. 28, 1921.) She was a member of the executive committee of America First (The Washington Merry-Go-Round. By Drew Pearson. Panama City News, 1943), and was a member of the committee of endorsers of the John Birch Society. (Alida Milliken, 95, Aided Social Units. New York Times, Feb. 14, 1975.) She participated in the benefit for the Memorial Cancer Center thrift shop. (Aiding Benefit for Social Service Unit. New York Times, Feb. 22, 1953.) Dr. Seth M. Milliken's son, Minot Milliken, married a granddaughter of J. William Clark. (Edith Clark Bride of Minot Milliken. New York Times, Apr. 25, 1942.)

John Reid, Yale 1899

John Reid was born in Scotland and came to america about 1860. He was treasurer and general manager of the J.L. Mott Iron Works of Brooklyn. John Reid Jr. graduated from Yale in 1899, and was a member of Wolf's Head. He was a vice president of the Mott Company Ltd. of Montreal, president of the Belle City Manufacturing Company of Racine, Wis., and a director of the First National Bank of Racine, and Employers Mutual Liability Insurance Company of Wausau, Wis. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1924-1925, p. 146.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1924-1925 / Yale University Library (pdf, 317 pp)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1909

Trustees: John E. Andrus, Charles H. Beckett, John Claflin, Louis F. Dommerich, Thomas P. Fowler, David R. Francis, Rowland G. Hazard, A. Barton Hepburn, Granger A. Hollister, William R. Innis, Darwin P. Kingsley (President), Woodbury Langdon, Robert J. Lowry, John G. Milburn, Seth M. Milliken, George Austin Morrison, Henry C. Mortimer, Augustus G. Paine, William B. Plunkett, Anton A. Raven, John Reid, Fleming H. Revell, Elbridge G. Snow, Hiram R. Steele, Louis Wagner. Secretaries: John C. McCall, Seymour W. Ballard. Treasurer: Edmund D. Randolph. (Trow's Directory, 1909.)

William R. Innis, Scroll & Key 1880

William Reynolds Innis was an executive and a director of the Studebaker Corporation. He graduated from Yale in 1880, and in 1884 married Dora Luetta Studebaker, a daughter of company founder Peter Everst and Dora A. Studebaker, who died in 1909. In 1911 he married again to Edith Hunter Donaldson Clark, daughter of William Francis Donaldson and widow of George H. Clark, Yale 1880. He was also a vice president and director of the Chicago & South Bend Railroad, and a director of the New York Life Insurance Company and the O'Rourke Engineering Co., and a trustee of the Union Dime Savings Bank. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1920-1921, p. 114; William R. Innis Dies on Ardsley Links. New York Times, Oct. 22, 1920.) He belonged to Scroll & Key. (Yale Secret Society Elections. New York Times, May 23, 1879.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1920-1921 / Yale University Library (pdf, 304 pp)

His daughter, Janet Innis, married William Wurts White Jr., Yale 1905, in 1908. He founded W.W. White & Co. in 1914, but died of Spanish flu in 1918. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1918-1919, p. 173.) He belonged to Wolf's Head. ('Tap Day' on Yale Campus. Chicago Tribune, May 27, 1904.) In 1921, she remarried to Richard Steere Aldrich, Yale 1906, a son of Sen. Nelson W. Aldrich and brother-in-law of John D. Rockefeller Jr. He was a U.S. Representative from Rhode Island from 1923-33, and was on the foreign affairs and ways and means committees. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University 1941-1942, p. 111.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1918-1919 / Yale University Library (pdf, 493 pp)
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale 1941-1942 / Yale University Library (pdf, 320 pp)

His son, William Studebaker Innis, Wolf's Head 1914, was was a bond salesman at W.W. White & Co.; an aide to Maj. Murphey of the Red Cross War Council from 1917-18; and since 1920, an executive of the Rhode Island Hospital Trust Company and Rhode Island Hospital National Bank. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University, 1943-1944, p. 154.) His son William Reynolds Innis, was tapped for Elihu 1938. (90 Juniors Tapped by Yale Societies. New York Times, May 14, 1937.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1943-1944 / Yale University Library (pdf, 393 pp)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1915

Directors: John E. Andrus, Charles H. Beckett, Cornelius N. Bliss Jr., George B. Cortelyou, John H. Finley, David R. Francis, Rowland G. Hazard, A. Barton Hepburn, Granger A. Hollister, William R. Innis, Alba B. Johnson, Willard V. King, Darwin P. Kingsley (President), Robert J. Lowry, John G. Milburn, Seth M. Milliken, George Austin Morrison, William B. Plunkett, J.J. Pulleyn, John Reid, Fleming H. Revel, George M. Reynolds, Elbridge G. Snow, Hiram R. Steele, Oscar B. Straus. Vice Presidents: Thomas A. Buckner and Rufus W. Weeks. Secretary: S.M. Ballard. Treasurer: Edmund D. Randolph. (Directory of Directors in the City of New York, 1915 Vol. 1939, p. 819.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1921

346 and 348 Broadway, New York. Board of Directors: Lawrence F. Abbott, Alfred L. Aiken, John E. Andrus, Cornelius N. Bliss Jr., Nicholas Murray Butler, George B. Cortelyou, John H. Finley, David R. Francis, A. Barton Hepburn, Myron T. Herrick, Granger A. Hollister, Alba B. Johnson, Willard V. King, Darwin P. Kingsley (President), Richard I. Manning, John G. Milburn, Gerrish H. Milliken, Frank Presbrey, John J. Pulleyn, Fleming H. Revell, George M. Reynolds, Elbridge G. Snow, Hiram R. Steele, Oscar S. Straus, and S. Davies Warfield. (Cheyenne, Wyoming Tribune, Feb. 22, 1921.)

Lawrence F. Abbott

Lawrence Fraser Abbott was president and publisher of The Outlook from 1891 until the death of his father, Rev. Lyman Abbott, who edited The Outlook with Rev. Henry Ward Beecher after the Civil War, in 1922. "Besides the association of his own family and his family, Dr. Abbott most chersihed his friendship with Theodore Roosevelt. He was often referred to as the Roosevelt Boswell. He edited Roosevelt's speeches in 1910, wrote the article on Roosevelt in the Encyclopaedia Britannica in 1911, edited the letters of Roosevelt's aide, Archie Butt, in 1924, and brought out his own 'Impressions of Roosevelt' in 1919." He was born in Brooklyn in 1859, and graduated from Amherst in 1881. He was a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle before joining The Outlook. His brother, Dr. Theodore Abbott, was Professor of Clinical Medicine at New York University. (L.F. Abbott Dies in His 74th Year. New York Times, Feb. 8, 1933.)

Gerrish H. Milliken, Yale 1898

Gerrish Hill Milliken was the son of Seth Mellen Milliken. He joined his father's firm in 1898 and was its president from its incorporation in 1922 until 1947; and was president and a director of his father's many mills. He was also a director of the National City Bank and the Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company. Two sons graduated from Yale, Roger Milliken in 1937 and Gerrish Hill Milliken Jr. in 1940. His daughter, Anne, married Baron Mario Franchetti, and his daughter, Joan, married William Boulton Dixon Stroud (Princeton 1939). His brother, Seth M. Milliken, and brother-in-law, Harold A. Hatch, both graduated from Yale in 1898. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1946-1947, p. 135.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1946-1947 / Yale University Library (pdf, 241 pp)

"The Franchetti dynasty traces its roots back 700 years, to what was then a wealthy Jewish Italian family with a knack for trade, banking and eventually transport (they ran a courier service). It was always an influential clan, but it reached its “apogee,” as Mr. [Cody] Franchetti calls it, during the 19th century, when the family acquired both a title and a Rothschild (namely, Mr. Franchetti’s great-great-great-grandmother). Since then, the heirs have busied themselves mostly with spending money and then renewing it through marriages that have linked them to everyone from Henry Fonda (in the case of socialite Afdera Fonda) to Cy Twombly (in the case of Mr. Franchetti’s great-aunt, Tatiana)." Cody Franchetti's stepmother is Fiora Pirri, "a Sicilian princess who is now a professor of artificial intelligence but spent several years in prison after joining a radical guerrilla group in the 1970's. (The stepson still refers to her as 'the terrorist.')" (Baron Franchetti Gets Ready. By Lizzy Ratner. New York Observer, Jan. 29, 2006.)

Baron Franchetti Gets Ready / Bookrags

Gerrish H. Milliken's brother, Dr. Seth Minot Milliken, Yale 1898, graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1902. He was on the staff and was a trustee of Roosevelt Hospital, and had been treasurer of the New York Academy of Medicine. He and his wife, the former Alida King Leese, were aficionados of Gilbert & Sullivan who founded an amateur troupe which played at charity fundraisers. (Seth M. Milliken, Surgeon, 82, Dead. New York Times, Nov. 19, 1957.) Mrs. Milliken graduated from Smith College in 1900. She was a member of the committee of endorsers of the John Birch Society. (Alida Milliken, 95, Aided Social Units. New York Times, Feb. 14, 1975.)

Frank Presbrey, Princeton 1879

Frank Presbrey was the founder of the Frank Presbrey Company, advertising. He was born in Buffalo, N.Y. and moved with his family to Washington, D.C. when he was 14. He graduated from Princeton in 1879. From 1881 to 1885, he was editor and publisher of the Youngstown News-Register, and became a close friend of then-Congressman William McKinley. In 1885, he moved back to Washington and published Public Opinion, then left in 1894 to join Walter Hines Page at the Forum. He was a director of the New York Life since 1916, a trustee of the Bowery Savings Bank, and a member of the advisory committee of the Forty-Sixth Street branch of the Chase National Bank. (Frank Presbrey Dies in Greenwich. New York Times, Oct. 11, 1936.) He was chairman of the Publicity Committee of the Second Red Cross War Fund campaign. (How City Raised Red Cross Millions. By W.C. Breed. New York Times, Jun. 9, 1918.) He handled the Tuxedo pipe tobacco playing card giveaway for the American Tobacco Company in 1915 (ad, p. 36.)

Frank Presbrey Company, 1915 / UCSF

His son, Charles Spaulding Presbrey, graduated from Princeton in 1906, and became president and board chairman of the company [which became Cecil & Presbrey]. He lived at the Union League Club, of which he had been secretary, and was a trustee of Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospitals and Vice Chairman of Boys Life magazine. The company was dissolved in 1955. (Charles Presbrey, Had Led Ad Agency. New York Times, May 10, 1958.) David G. Lyon was senior vice president in charge of the Philip Morris account; he was the son of Alfred E. Lyon, president of Philip Morris. (David Lyon, Ad Executive, 83; Helped Create 'Marlboro Man'. By Wolfgang Saxon. New York Times, Aug. 17, 1994.) Archibald McG. Foster, Harvard 1938, was vice president at A.W. Lewin Company in 1950 when he left to join Cecil & Presbrey Inc., as a vice president and member of the executive committee. In 1954, he joined Ted Bates & Company and a year later was named vice president and supervisor on the Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation account. (Archibald McG. Foster, 73, Dies; An Advertising Industry Leader. By Alfonso A. Narvaez. New York Times, Apr. 7, 1989.)

"The Marlboro agency was Cecil & Presbrey, a small company whose main distinction seems to have been that the account supervisor on Marlboro was the son of the chairman of the board of Philip Morris (the agency folded upon losing the account to Burnett. In 1953 Philip Morris had hired Elmo Roper to do research on cigarette buying habits, in order to find out whether filters were really here .to stay. Marlboro was to be the test subject, as it had the least to lose if the test should flop. Thousands of people were questioned about their emotional reactions to various brands, package colors, and filters. By May, 1954, while the account was still at Cecil & Presbrey, the new Marlboro, with a more aromatic blend of tobaccos, in its new red-white- and-black flip-top package, and its new filter, was put on sale as a test, in Dallas and Fort Worth. The package looked essentially as it does today, except that the top, which is now all red, was red-and-white striped. Unfortunately the advertising was the same hollow sloganeering, and, although sales in Dallas went up, Cecil & Presbrey's stock at Philip Morris went down, and the company began looking for a new agency. Milton Blow, who had popularized the famous 'Call for Philip Morris,' and who was just then being finessed out of his agency by his own partners, put in a good word for Burnett, and in November, 1954, the account was officially transferred." (The New Advertising. By Robert Glatzer. The Citadel Press, 1970. Ch. 4, The Campaign of the Century, p. 123.)

The New Advertising, 1970 / UCSF

Also in 1954, James M. Cecil, the president since 1939 and board chairman of Cecil & Presbrey, died. He was chairman of the Red Cross Fund Campaign of Greater New York, a trustee of New York University-Bellevue Medical Center, and a member of the executive committee of the Arthritis and Rheumatism Foundation. He was a native of Richmond, Va., and moved his company to New York in the 1920s. (James Cecil Dies. New York Times, Sep. 19, 1954.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1926

346 Broadway, New York. Directors: Lawrence F. Abbott, John E. Andrus, Cornelius N. Bliss, Mortimer N. Buckner, Thomas A. Buckner, Nicholas M. Butler, George B. Cortelyou, Myron T. Herrick, Charles D. Hilles, Alba B. Johnson, Percy H. Johnston, Willard V. King, Darwin P. Kingsley, Richard I. Manning, John G. Milburn, Gerrish H. Milliken, Frank Presbrey, John J. Pulleyn, Fleming H. Revell, George M. Reynolds, Hiram R. Steele, Oscar S. Straus, S. Davies Warfield, and Ridley Watts. (Waterloo Evening Courier, Feb. 4, 1926.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1931

51 Madison Avenue, New York. Directors: Lawrence F. Abbott, John E. Andrus, Nathaniel F. Ayer, Cornelius N. Bliss, Mortimer N. Buckner, Thomas A. Buckner, Nicholas Murray Butler, Calvin Coolidge, George B. Cortelyou, Walter W. Head, Charles D. Hilles, Hale Holden, Charles Evans Hughes Jr., Alba B. Johnson, Percy H. Johnston, Willard V. King, Darwin P. Kingsley (President), Richard I. Manning, Gerrish H. Milliken, Frank Presbrey, John J. Pulleyn, Fleming H. Revell, George M. Reynolds, Jesse Isidor Straus, and Ridley Watts. (Display Ad, New York Times, Feb. 5, 1931.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1932-34

Directors: John E. Andrus, The Arlington Chemical Co.; Nathaniel F. Ayer, Treasurer, Cabot Manufacturing Co., textiles; Cornelius N. Bliss, Bliss, Fabyan & Co., commission cotton goods; Mortimer N. Buckner, Chairman, New York Trust Co.; Thomas A. Buckner, President, New York Life; Nicholas Murray Butler, President, Columbia University; Charles A. Cannon, President, Cannon Mills Co.; Calvin Coolidge, former President of the United States; George B. Cortelyou, President, Consolidated Gas Company of New York, ex-Secretary of the Treasury; William H. Danforth, Chairman, Ralston-Purina Co.; James G. Harboard, Chairman, Radio Corporation of America; Charles D. Hilles, Resident Manager, New York State Employers' Liability Assurance Corp.; Hale Holden, Chairman of the Executive Committee, Southern Pacific Co.; Charles Evans Hughes Jr., of Hughes, Schurman & Dwight; Alba B. Johnson, former President, Baldwin Locomotive Works; Percy H. Johnston, President, Chemical Bank & Trust Co.; Willard V. King, retired banker, trustee of Columbia University; Darwin P. Kingsley, Chairman, New York Life; Gerrish H. Milliken, Deering, Milliken & Co., dry goods Commission house; Frank Presbrey, Frank Presbrey Co., advertising; John J. Pulleyn, Chairman, Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank; George M. Reynolds, Chairman, Continental Illinois Bank & Trust Co.; J. Barstow Smull, Vice-Pres. J.H. Winchester & Co.; Jesse Isidor Straus, President, R.H. Macy & Co., Inc.; and Ridley Watts, retired merchant, director Chemical Bank & Trust Co. (Display Ad, New York Times, Jan. 28, 1932.) In 1933, Coolidge died, and Robert E. Dowling, President of City Investing Co., was elected; Pulleyn was replaced by Henry Bruère, President, Bowery Savings Bank. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 3, 1933.) In 1934, Reynolds was replaced by James Rowland Angell, President of Yale University; and Percy S. Straus, President, R.H. Macy, replaced Jesse Isidor Straus. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 15, 1934.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1935-36

Board of Directors: James Rowland Angell, President of Yale University; Nathaniel F. Ayer, Treasurer, Cabot Manufacturing Co., textiles; Arthur A. Ballantine, lawyer, Root, Clark, Buckner & Ballantine; Cornelius N. Bliss, Chairman, Bliss, Fabyan & Co.; Henry Bruère, President, Bowery Savings Bank; Mortimer N. Buckner, Chairman, New York Trust Co.; Thomas A. Buckner, President, New York Life; Nicholas Murray Butler, President, Columbia University; Charles A. Cannon, Chairman, Cannon Mills Co.; George B. Cortelyou, President, Consolidated Gas Co.; William H. Danforth, Chairman, Ralston-Purina Co.; Robert E. Dowling, President of City Investing Co.; James G. Harboard, Chairman, Radio Corporation of America; Charles D. Hilles, Resident Manager, New York State Employers' Liability Assurance Corp.; Hale Holden, Chairman, Southern Pacific Co.; Alba B. Johnson died Jan. 8, 1935, and Herbert Hoover, former President of the United States, was elected Jan. 9, 1935; Percy H. Johnston, Chairman, Chemical Bank & Trust Co.; Willard V. King, retired banker; Gerrish H. Milliken, President, Deering, Milliken & Co.; Frank Presbrey, Frank Presbrey Co., advertising; Alfred E. Smith, former Governor of New York; J. Barstow Smull, Vice-Pres. J.H. Winchester & Co.; Percy S. Straus, President, R.H. Macy & Co.; and Ridley Watts, director, Chemical Bank & Trust Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 21, 1935.) In 1936, Edward L. Ryerson Jr., Vice-Chairman of Inland Steel Co., was added to the board. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 23, 1936.)

Arthur A. Ballantine, Harvard 1904

Arthur Atwood Ballantine was a member of the New York law firm of Dewey, Ballantine, Bushby, Palmer & Wood; its original name was Root, Clark, Buckner & Howland. He was an authority on tax and corporate law. He was born in Oberlin, Ohio, where his father, Rev. Dr. William Gay Ballantine, was president of Oberlin College. He graduated from Harvard in 1904, and was editor of The Crimson when President Franklin D. Roosevelt was on the staff. He began his career with Gaston, Snow & Saltonstall in Boston, and went to New York in 1912. He was Solicitor of Internal Revenue in 1918, and was appointed Assistant Secretary of the Treasury by President Herbert Hoover in 1931, and remained until 1933 under Roosevelt. He was also a director of General American Investors; former president of the United Hospital Fund, and a trustee of Springfield College in Massachusetts. His widow was Helen Bailey Graves of Springfield, Mass. (Arthur Ballantine, Lawyer, Dies; Member of Dewey Firm Was 77. New York Times, Oct. 12, 1960.) His son, Arthur A. Ballantine Jr., was a member of The Minneapolis Tribune staff. He married Mrs. Morley Cowles Gale, daughter of John Cowles [president of The Minneapolis Star and Tribune Company]. (Mrs. M.C. Gale Bride of A.A. Ballantine Jr. New York Times, Jul. 27, 1947.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1938-40

Alfred L. Aiken, President; James Rowland Angell, Educational Counsellor of National Broadcasting Co.; Nathaniel F. Ayer, Treasurer, Cabot Manufacturing Co., textiles; Arthur A. Ballantine, lawyer, Root, Clark, Buckner & Ballantine; Cornelius N. Bliss, retired; Henry Bruère, President, Bowery Savings Bank; Mortimer N. Buckner, Chairman, New York Trust Co.; Thomas A. Buckner, President, New York Life; Nicholas Murray Butler, President, Columbia University; Charles A. Cannon, President, Cannon Mills Co.; George B. Cortelyou, ex-Secretary of the Treasury; William H. Danforth, Chairman, Ralston-Purina Co.; Robert E. Dowling, President of City Investing Co.; James G. Harboard, Chairman, Radio Corporation of America; Charles D. Hilles, Resident Manager, New York State Employers' Liability Assurance Corp.; Hale Holden, Chairman, Southern Pacific Co.; Herbert Hoover, former President of the United States; Percy H. Johnston, Chairman, Chemical Bank & Trust Co.; Willard V. King, retired banker; Gerrish H. Milliken, President, Deering, Milliken & Co.; Edward L. Ryerson Jr., Vice-Chairman of Inland Steel Co.; Alfred E. Smith, President, Empire State Inc.; J. Barstow Smull, Vice-Pres. J.H. Winchester & Co.; and Percy S. Straus, President, R.H. Macy & Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 10, 1938.) In 1939, Harper Sibley, banking and agriculture. joined the board. (Display Ad. New York Times, Feb. 27, 1939; Charleston Daily Mail, Mar. 19, 1940.) George L. Harrison, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, was offered the Presidency of the New York Life, which he deferred assuming until Jan. 1, 1941. (Harrison to Stay as Bank Head to '41. New York Times, Jun. 25, 1940.)

George Leslie Harrison, Skull & Bones 1910

"His association with the Reserve System dated from its organization in November, 1914. He was appointed general counsel in 1919 and early in 1928 he was designated deputy governor of the New York bank. In November of that year he was made chief executive officer with the title of governor, a name which was changed to president when all titles of the bank were revised in March, 1936." He was secretary to Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes after graduating from Harvard Law School. He joined the New York Life as President in 1941, and became chairman in 1948. (N.Y. Life Officers to Be Elevated. New York Times, Jun. 19, 1953.) He was born in San Francisco. (George L. Harrison Dead at 71; Headed Federal Reserve Here. New York Times, Mar. 6, 1958), but graduated from Western High School, in Washington, D.C. (High School Pupils to be Graduated. Washington Post, Jun. 12, 1906.)

"The President and Mrs. Taft were the guests of honor at a small dinner given last night by Miss Mabel Boardman. Mr. Robert Taft, Mr. George Harrison, and Mr. Stanhope Bayne-Jones, who came to Washington from Harvard to spend the week-end at the White House, departed yesterday for the university... Miss Frances Lippitt, daughter of Senator Lippitt, of Rhode Island, entertained at a luncheon yesterday at the Chevy Chase Club in honor of Miss Helen Taft and Mr. Robert Taft. The other guests were Mr. George Harrison and Mr. Stanhope Bayne-Jones, Miss Catherine Anderson, Miss Southerland, Miss Marion Wise, Miss Elsie Aldrich, Miss Wadsworth, Miss Ruth Wales, Paymaster Little, Mr. Samuel Elliot, Mr. Burrell Little, Mr. Henry Lippitt [S&B 1909]." (Mr. and Mrs. Taft Dine With Miss M. Boardman. Washington Post, Mar. 4, 1912.) George Leslie Harrison was best man at the wedding of Charles C. Glover Jr. to Marion Wise, niece of U.S. Sen. and Mrs. Francis G. Newland of Nevada. "Among the attendees were members of the president's household, members of the cabinet, the supreme court, the diplomatic corps, the senate, house, and a large number from resident society and other branches of official society." Robert Taft of Cincinnati, Thomas Wilson Bowers and Franklin K. Ellis of Washington, David J. Ely and Adrian Van Swinderen of New York, Kent S. Clow of Chicago, John Heron of Pittsburgh, and Charles Baird Price of Louisville were the ushers. Sophy Johnston, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Marion Johnston, was the only attendant. (Society. Nevada State Journal, May 18, 1913.) Mr. George Leslie Harrison was a guest of Prof. and Mrs. William Howard Taft at New Haven. "Mr. Harrison, Mr. Robert Taft, and Mr. Thomas Bowers will sail for Europe the last of this month to spend four months in travel. They will visit Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Noyes and the Misses Noyes at their villa on Lake Como before returning to this country." (Leave for Seashore Today. Washington Post, Jun. 18, 1913.) George Harrison was best man at the wedding of former President William H. Taft's son, Robert A. Taft (S&B 1910), to Martha Bowers. The ushers were Charles Taft; Stanhope Bayne-Jones [S&B 1910, who later headed the 1964 Surgeon General Report on smoking]; Stephen Philbin [S&B 1910] of Houston, Tex.; John Herron [S&B 1910] of Pittsburgh; Carl Lohman [S&B 1910] of Akron, Ohio; and Walter Logan [S&B 1910], Adrian Van Sinderen, and Harry Bingham of New York. (Taft-Bowers Wedding. New York Times, Sep. 30, 1914; Robert A. Taft Weds Miss Bowers. New York Times, Oct. 18, 1914.)

In 1940, he was married to Gertrude Gordon Grayson, widow of Rear Admiral Cary T. Grayson, physician and friend of President Wilson and former national chairman of the American Red Cross, to whose board of incorporators Harrison was elected in 1936. He was the son of Col. George Francis Edward Harrison. Alice Gertrude Gordon was the daughter of Major James J. Gordon. She was a close friend of the second Mrs. Wilson. Her sons, James Gordon Grayson and Cary T. Grayson [S&B 1942] were students at Yale, and William C. Grayson was at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn. (Mrs. Cary Grayson Engaged to Banker. New York Times, Feb. 28, 1940.) Their wedding breakfast was at the Georgetown home of Mrs. William Corcoran Eustis. (Mrs. Grayson Wed in Capital. New York Times, Mar. 3, 1940.) Mrs. Eustis was the daughter of former Vice President Levi P. Morton. (Mrs. Levi P. Morton Dies at Rhinecliff. New York Times, Aug. 15, 1918.)

Harrison was elected a life trustee of Columbia University in 1942. (Harrison Becomes Columbia Trustee. New York Times, Jan. 6, 1942.) He was head of the fiscal advisory committee of the ECA, under Paul G. Hoffman (Hoffman Picks Advisors. New York Times, May 22, 1948), and a director of RCA and its subsidiaries, the National Broadcasting Company and RCA Communications Inc. (Succeeds to Directorship of Radio Corp. of America. New York Times, Aug. 7, 1948.) Mrs. Harrison was was a member of the new women's advisory board of Lenox Hill Hospital, (Named to Hospital Board. New York Times, Jan. 13, 1947; Dance on April 15 to Assist Hospital. New York Times, Apr. 3, 1953), and a fundraiser for the New York Chapter of the Arthritis and Rheumatism Foundation. (Home Tours Here to Aid Foundation. New York Times, Mar. 29, 1953.)

His brother, William C. Harrison, USMA 1912, was vice president of Oxweld Acetylene Co. and eastern manager of Linde Air Products, units of Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation. He was a Lieutenant Colonel in the field artillery. (W.C. Harrison Dead; World War Officer. New York Times, Mar. 31, 1932.) His brother, Ross Ray Harrison, Cornell 1908, was president of the former New England Small Arms Company, which manufactured the Browning machine gun during World War II. His sister, Leila, was the wife of Lt. Gen. Geoffrey Keyes, former United States High Commissioner in Austria. (Ross R. Harrison, Industrialist, 67. New York Times, Dec. 3, 1951.) His brother, Ray Harrison, USMA 1917, was a field artillery officer in World War I, and ROTC instructor at Yale from 1920 to 1922, when he joined the staff of the National Bank of Commerce of New York. In 1929, he went to the Mellon National Bank, and was a vice president at his death. (Ray Harrison. New York Times, Jul. 17, 1957.)

Harper Sibley, Harvard 1907

Harper Sibley was born in New York, and graduated from Harvard in 1907, with an LL.B. from New York Law School. "Although classing himself as an agriculturist because of his extensive land interests in several states in this country and in Canada, Mr. Sibley pursued a business career that reached its climax in his terms as president of the Chamber of Commerce of the United States in 1935 and 1937. He remained a member of its senior council." He was chairman of the International Young Men's Christian Association, president of Church World Service for thirteen years and treasurer of the Federal Council of Churches. He was also a director of the Security Trust Company of Rochester, the Western Union Telegraph Company, the Hollister Lumber Company and the Leckie Smokeless Coal Company. (Harper Sibley, 74, of Chamber Dies. AP. New York Times, Apr. 26, 1959.) Mrs. Harper Sibley was the former Georgianna Farr of New York City. She was one of four women on the national council of the Episcopal Church. His parents were Hiram W. Sibley, son of Hiram W. Sibley, who "played a prominent part in extending Western Union lines across the nation and was associated with Cyrus Field in the transoceanic cable laying;" and Margaret (Harper). (Harper Sibley Dies; Grandson of Noted North Adams Native. North Adams Transcript, Apr. 27, 1959.) His daughter, Jane Harper Sibley, married Gordon Auchincloss 2d. (Mis Jane Sibley Wed to Gordon Auchincloss 2d. New York Times, Jun. 12, 1938.)

Mrs. Harper Sibley was one of the participants at the Flamingo Ball benefitting the American Cancer Society, which was co-chaired by Mrs. Daniel R. Topping. (The top 400 had a ball! By Suzy [Knickerbocker]. Lowell Sun, Mar. 8, 1970.) Harper Sibley Jr., was a director of the Western Union Company also (Stockholders Sue WUC Over False Claims. UPI. Connellsville Daily Courier, Dec. 23, 1974), and a business partner of Joe Robbie in the Miami Dolphins.

Hiram Watson Sibley (1845-1932) graduated from the private schools of Rochester and the Universities of Berlin and Heidelberg, then Columbia Law School in 1871. He inherited a large fortune from the Western Union Telegraph Company, and expanded into real estate, banking, lumber, railroads, finance and coal mining, and was president of the Security Trust Company and the Lincoln Alliance Bank of Rochester. He was a close friend of George Eastman. He retired from business in 1926. He married Margaret Durbin Harper in 1873. Besides his son, he had two daughters, Mrs. John A. Gade and Mrs. O'Donnell Iselin. (H.W. Sibley Dead. New York Times, Jun. 29, 1932.) He gave $3000 to the American Society for the Control of Cancer in 1926. (Cancer Fund Gains $90,000 in Campaign. New York Times, Sep. 28, 1926.) His granddaughter, Margaret Durbin Gade, married Richard Delafield, son of Brig. Gen. John Ross Delafield and a great-grandson of Maj. Joseph Delafield. "The Gade family for generations have held prominent places in Norway. The bride's grandfather, Gerhard Gade of Oslo, was in the diplomatic service of Norway." Her father was in the U.S. diplomatic service as Commissioner to the Baltic provinces, naval attaché of the legation in Copenhagen, and assistant to Herbert Hoover when he headed the Commission for Relief in Belgium. (Miss Gade Weds Richard Delafield. New York Times, Dec. 30, 1930.) The Delafield family are royal desendants of Edward III, King of England, and their ancestor, John Delafield, was made a Count of the Holy Roman Empire in 1697, "with remainder of the title to his descendants, male and female, of his name." (Americans of Royal Descent. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p.65.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 65 / Google Books

Harper Sibley's son, Hiram Sibley, was executive director of the Hospital Planning Council of Metropolitan Chicago. His grandson, Thomas Sibley, Harvard class of 1962, also attended Northwestern University and the University of Illinois. He was president of T.S. Unlimited, "a farming, real estate and insurance concern in Sibley, Ill. (Jean Eagleson, Thomas Sibley Marry in South. New York Times, Jul. 14, 1968.) Thomas Sibley was an usher at the wedding of George Gordon Guthrie to Laura McCord, a granddaughter of Amory Houghton. (George Guthrie Weds Laura McCord. New York Times, Feb. 13, 1972.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1940s

In 1944, Paul G. Hoffman, President of the Studebaker Corp. and chairman of the Committee for Economic Development, was elected a director. (Joins New York Life Board. New York Times, Aug. 18, 1944.) John S. Burke, President of B. Altman & Co., and Roger W. Straus, President of the American Smelting and Refining Company were elected directors. (Elected to Directorate Of N.Y. Life Insurance. New York Times, Dec. 14, 1944.) The nominees for the 1946 election were Aiken, Angell, Burke, Cannon, Hilles, Johnston, and Sibley, plus John B. Hollister, a Cincinnati Lawyer. (Display Ad. New York Times, Oct. 3, 1945.) The nominees for the 1947 election were: Bliss, Bruère, Butler, Harbord, Harrison, Ryerson, Smull, and Charles D. Dickey, Vice-President and Director of J.P. Morgan & Co., Inc. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 25, 1946.) Nominees for the 1949 election were: Angell, Burke, Cannon, Hilles, Hollister, Johnston, Sibley, and Devereux C. Josephs, President of the New York Life. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 30, 1948.) Robert A. Lovett, partner of Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. and former Assistant Secretary of War for Air and Under-Secretary of State, was elected a director. (Former U.S. High Official On N.Y. Life Directorate. New York Times, May 12, 1949.) Fredrick M. Eaton, partner of Shearman & Sterling & Wright, and former general counsel for the War Production Board, was elected a director. (Attorney Made Director of N.Y. Life Insurance Co. New York Times, Jun. 16, 1949.) Henry Ford 2d, president of Ford Motor Co., and Mark R. Sullivan, president of Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Co., were elected directors. (Elected Directors of New York Life. New York Times, Nov. 17, 1949.) John D. Rockefeller 3d was elected a director. (Chosen to Fill Vacancy On New York Life Board. New York Times, Dec. 22, 1949.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1950s

Elliott V. Bell, chairman of the executive committee of McGraw-Hill Publishing Co., was elected a director. (Bell on N.Y. Life Board. New York Times, Jan. 19, 1950.) Nominees for the 1950 election were Dickey, Harrison, Ryerson, Smull and Stevens, and Fredrick M. Eaton, of Shearman & Sterling & Wright; Robert A. Lovett of Brown Brothers Harriman & Co., and Raymond Rubicam, retired advertsing executive. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 29, 1949.) Nominees for the 1952 election were Burke, Cannon, Hollister, Johnston, Josephs, and Sibley, plus Elliott V. Bell, Chairman of the Executive Committee, McGraw-Hill Publishing Co.; and John D. Rockefeller 3d. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 28, 1951.) Richard S. Perkins, executive vice president of the City Bank Farmers Trust Co., was elected a director. (Trust Company Executive Named to N.Y. Life Board. New York Times, Oct. 18, 1951.) George L. Harrison announced his retirement as chairman at the end of the year, with Devereux C. Josephs, current president, to succeed him, and Clarence J. Myers to become president. Dudley Dowell, vice president in charge of agencies, and Richard K. Paynter, financial vice president, became executive vice presidents. (N.Y. Life Officers to Be Elevated. New York Times, Jun. 19, 1953.) Nominees for the 1958 election were Bell, Burke, Cannon, Hollister, Josephs, Rockefeller and Sibley, plus Kenneth H. Hannan, Executive Vice President, Union Carbide Corp. (Display Ad. New York Times, Oct. 1, 1957.) Executive Vice Presidents Dudley Dowell and Richard K. Paynter were elected directors of the New York Life. (New York Life Adds Two to Board. New York Times, May 22, 1958.)

Arthur Amory Houghton Jr., Harvard 1929

Arthur Amory Houghton Jr. was a great grandson of Amory Houghton, who founded the Corning Glass Works in 1851. He joined the company in 1929 and became president of its subsidiary, Steuben Glass, in 1933. He was a director of the USX Corporation, the New York Life Insurance Company, and a trustee of the United States Trust Company of New York. He was on the Board of the Metropolitan Museum of Art from 1952 to 1974; a former vice president of the Pierpont Morgan Library, former president of the English-Speaking Union of the United States, a trustee and past chairman of the Cooper Union in New York City, honorary trustee and former chairman of the Parsons School of Design, former vice chairman of the Fund for the Advancement of Education, and former chairman of the Institute of International Education. He was a cousin of Amory Houghton, former Ambassador to France. (Arthur Houghton Jr., 83, Dies; Led Steuben Glass. New York Times, Apr. 4, 1990.) Arthur Amory Houghton Jr. donated the Houghton Library at Harvard University, which opened in 1942. (Rare Manuscripts Given to Harvard. New York Times, Mar. 1, 1942.)

Arthur Amory Houghton Jr. married Elizabeth McCall in 1944. They were divorced in 1972. She died of liver cancer. (Elizabeth McCall Cain, Socialite, 76. New York Times, Feb. 17, 1996.) Mrs. Arthur A. Houghton [Jr.] and Mr. and Mrs. Alan G. Rinehart [her sister-in-law] were members of the benefit committee of the New York City chapter of the Jackson Laboratory Association. Mrs. Robert J. Campbell [her niece] was the chairman. The Roscoe B. Jackson Memorial Laboratory was founded by Dr. C.C. Little. (Art Show to Help Cancer Research. New York Times, Aug. 8, 1954.) Arthur Amory Houghton Jr. and Little were elected to six-year terms on the board of overseers of Harvard University the next year. (Named to Harvard Unit. New York Times, Jun. 17, 1955.)

Arthur Amory Houghton Jr. was appointed a member-at-large to the United States National Commission for the United Nations Economic, Scientific and Cultural Organization. (U.S. Names UNESCO Aides. New York Times, Nov. 19, 1952.) He was elected to the board of trustees of the Rockefeller Foundation in 1958, along with a fellow Harvard graduate, Barry Bingham of the Louisville Courier-Journal and the Times, and WHAS Inc. (Two Join Rockefeller Fund Board. New York Times, Apr. 3, 1958.) He was elected a director of the New York Life in 1959. (N.Y. Life Insurance Elects a New Director. New York Times, Jun. 2, 1959.) In 1960, he was chairman of the United Republican Finance Committee. (G.O.P. Solicits Fees Of Board Directors. New York Times, Oct. 13, 1960.) In 1961, he was a member of the group which bought WNTA Channel 13. (Education Group to Get WNTA-TV. By Jack Gould. New York Times, June 30, 1961.)

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur A. Houghton Jr. were members of the benefit committee for the New York City Cancer Committee of the American Cancer Society, of which Mrs. Albert D. Lasker was an honorary chairman in 1963 (A Dinner Cruise On Rotterdam Planned June 5. New York Times, May 5, 1963; Cancer Unit Gala To Be Supported By Eisenhowers. New York Times, Jul. 31, 1964; Cancer Society and Boys Club Are Planning Benefits. New York Times, Apr. 24, 1966; Liner Cruise on Sep. 24 Will Benefit Cancer Society. New York Times, Aug. 11, 1968); and of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (Fashions Lunch Feb. 3 to Assist Sloan-Kettering. New York Times, Jan. 16, 1966; May 18 Dinner At Plaza to Help Sloan-Kettering. New York Times, Apr. 7, 1966; Fashions Lunch Feb. 2 to Benefit Cancer Patients. New York Times, Jan. 22, 1967; Dinner Dance at Plaza Will Assist Cancer Center. New York Times, May 4, 1968.)

In 1973, he married Mrs. Nina Rodale Horstmann. (Wedding of Mrs. Horstmann To Arthur Houghton Jr. Held. New York Times, Jun. 8, 1973.) She was the sister of Robert Rodale, publisher of magazines on organic gardening and health cultism. (Robert Rodale, 60, Dies in Crash; Publisher Backed Organic Farms. By Glenn Fowler. New York Times, Sep. 21, 1990.) Rodale was a member of the US Department of Health and Human Services Secretary's Council on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in 1989, along with anti-smoking warhorses former Assistant Secretary for Health Philip R. Lee and former Surgeon General Julius B. Richmond; Alan W. Cross, Skull & Bones 1966, and Dr. Theodore Cooper.

Secretary's Council on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, 1989 / UCSF

Arthur A. Houghton Sr. was the president of Corning Glass Company and the Ephraim Creek Coal and Coke Company, and a director of the Corning Trust Company, the Metropolitan Trust Company of New York, the Chatham and Phenix National Bank and Trust Company, the Macbeth Daylighting Company of Pittsburgh, and the Hartford Empire Company. He had residences in Corning, N.Y., Washington D.C., and Salters Point, Mass., as well as in New York. (Arthur Houghton Dies at Age of 61. New York Times, Apr. 20, 1928.) He married Mabel Hollister, daughter of George Hollister. His brother, Alanson B. Houghton, was best man. Frederick Houghton of Cambridge, Mass., Dr. Charles Hayght, Lowell W. Farr, and William J. Tully of Corning, N.Y., George Buell Hollister, and Henry H. Hollister were ushers. (What Is Doing in Society. New York Times, Apr. 23, 1899.) Mrs. Houghton's brother, George Buell Hollister, Scroll & Key 1892, was affiliated with Corning Glass Works from 1904 to 1945, including as vice president and director of sales. (Obituary Record of Graduates of the Undergraduate Schools Deceased during the Year 1951-1952, p. 12.) Mabel Hollister Houghton died in 1938. Their children were Arthur A. Houghton Jr. and Mrs. Alan G. Rinehart. (Mrs. Arthur A. Houghton. New York Times, Feb. 14, 1938.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1951-1952 / Yale University Library (pdf, 215 pp)

Henry Hutchinson Hollister, Wolf's Head 1899, was Mrs. Arthur Houghton Sr.'s cousin. He was assistant to the president of the Delaware Lackawanna & Western Railroad 1899-1904; junior partner of Hollister & Babcock 1904-1909; member of Hollister, Fish & Co. (NYSE) 1909-1913; then purchasing agent for Corning Glass Works from 1913 until retiring in 1917. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1926-1927, p. 177.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1926-1927 / Yale University Library (pdf, 346 pp)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1960-62

Nominees for the 1960 election were: Arthur A. Ballantine, of Dewey, Ballantine, Bushby, Palmer & Wood; John M. Budd, President, Great Northern Railway Co.; Charles A. Coolidge, of Ropes, Gray, Best, Coolidge & Rugg; Dudley Dowell, Chairman of the Executive Committee, New York Life; Paul G. Hoffman, Managing Director, United Nations Special Fund; Katharine E. McBride, President of Bryn Mawr College; Richard S. Perkins, Vice Chairman, The First National City Bank of New York; and Frank Stanton, President, Columbia Broadcasting System Inc. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 21, 1959.) Nominees for the 1961 election were: Bell, Burke, Cannon, Hannan, Hollister, and Josephs; plus Gen. Alfred M. Gruenther, President, American National Red Cross; and Arthur A. Houghton Jr., President, Steuben Glass. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 21, 1960.) Nominees for the 1963 election were: Budd, Coolidge, Dowell, Hoffman, McBride, Perkins, Stanton, and J. Harris Ward, Chairman and President, Commonwealth Edison Co., Lake Forest, Ill. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 19, 1962.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1963-66

Board of Directors: Elliott V. Bell, Chairman of the Executive Committee, McGraw-Hill Publishing Company; John M. Budd, President, Great Northern Railway Co.; Charles A. Cannon, President and Chairman, Cannon Mills Co.; Charles A. Coolidge, of Ropes & Gray; Charles D. Dickey, Director and Member of the Executive Committee, Morgan Guaranty Trust Company; Dudley Dowell, President, New York Life; Frederick M. Eaton, of Shearman & Sterling; Alfred M. Gruenther, President, American Red Cross; Kenneth H. Hannan, Executive Vice President, Union Carbide Corp.; Paul G. Hoffman, Managing Director, United Nations Special Fund; John B. Hollister, of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister; Arthur A. Houghton Jr., President, Steuben Glass; Devereux C. Josephs, Trustee and Corporate Director; Robert A. Lovett, of Brown Brothers Harriman; Stanley Marcus, President, Neiman-Marcus Co.; Katharine E. McBride, President, Bryn Mawr College; Clarence J. Myers, Trustee and Corporate Director; Richard K. Paynter, Jr., Chairman, New York Life; Richard S. Perkins, Chairman of the Executive Committee, First National City Bank; H.I. Romnes, President, Western Electric Co. Inc.; Frank Stanton, President, Columbia Broadcasting System; John P. Stevens Jr., Director, J.P. Stevens & Co.; Mark R. Sullivan, director and former president of Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co.; J. Harris Ward, Chairman and President, Commonwealth Edison Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Apr. 1, 1963; and Mar. 9, 1964.) In 1965, Romnes was replaced by William S. Renchard, President, Chemical Bank New York Trust Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Mar. 8, 1965; and Mar. 7, 1966.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1968-69

Board of Directors: Elliott V. Bell, trustee and corporate director; R. Manning Brown Jr., Executive Vice President; John M. Budd, President, Great Northern Railway Co.; Charles A. Cannon, Chairman, Cannon Mills Co.; Charles A. Coolidge, of Ropes & Gray; Charles D. Dickey, Chairman Directors Advisory Council, Morgan Guaranty Trust Company; James C. Donnell II, President, Marathon Oil Co.; Dudley Dowell, President, New York Life; Frederick M. Eaton, of Shearman & Sterling; Gen. Alfred M. Gruenther (Ret.), former President, American Red Cross; Kenneth H. Hannan, Executive Vice President, Union Carbide Corp.; Paul G. Hoffman, Administrator, United Nations Development Program; Arthur A. Houghton Jr., President, Steuben Glass; Jerome W. Hull, Executive Vice President, Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co.; Carlisle H. Humelsine, President, Colonial Williamsburg; Robert A. Lovett, of Brown Brothers Harriman; Stanley Marcus, President, Neiman-Marcus Co.; Katharine E. McBride, President, Bryn Mawr College; Charles W.V. Meares, Executive Vice President; Clarence J. Myers, Trustee and Corporate Director; Richard K. Paynter, Jr., Chairman, New York Life; Richard S. Perkins, Chairman of the Executive Committee, First National City Bank; William S. Renchard, President, Chemical Bank New York Trust Co.; Frank Stanton, President, Columbia Broadcasting System; John P. Stevens Jr., Director, J.P. Stevens & Co.; Mark R. Sullivan, former president of Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co.; and J. Harris Ward, Chairman, Commonwealth Edison Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Mar. 11, 1968.) In 1969, Dickey, Lovett, Stevens, and Sullivan left. Gabriel Hauge, President of Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company, and Raymond C. Johnson, Executive Vice President of the New York Life, joined. (Display Ad. New York Times, Mar. 10, 1969.)

R. Manning Brown Jr., Princeton 1936

Ralph Manning Brown was born in Elizabeth, N.J., and graduated from Princeton in 1936. He joined the New York Life in 1951 as an assistant vice president, and was elected to the board of directors in 1967. He was chairman of the board and chief executive officer from 1972 to 1981, and continued as a director until his death. He was a director of the Associated Dry Goods Corporation, the Union Camp Corp. and Union Carbide, and a retired director of the Morgan Guaranty Trust. He was a former chairman of the board of trustees of Princeton, a former trustee of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and a director of the Union Theological Seminary. (R.M. Brown Jr., 70; Insurance Executive Led Princeton Board. New York Times, Oct. 22, 1985.) He was elected chairman of the executive committee of Princeton's board of trustees in 1970 (Princeton Unit Elects Chief. New York Times, Oct. 19, 1970), and a trustee of the Alfred P. Loan Foundation in 1971. (Sloan Fund Names Trustee. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1971.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1970-71

Board of Directors: Elliott V. Bell, trustee and corporate director; R. Manning Brown Jr., President; John M. Budd, President, Great Northern Railway Co.; Charles A. Cannon, Chairman, Cannon Mills Co.; James C. Donnell II, President, Marathon Oil Co.; Dudley Dowell, President, New York Life; Frederick M. Eaton, of Shearman & Sterling; Gen. Alfred M. Gruenther (Ret.); Kenneth H. Hannan, Vice Chairman, Union Carbide Corp.; Gabriel Hauge, President, Manufacturers Hanover Trust; Paul G. Hoffman, Administrator, United Nations Development Programme; Arthur A. Houghton Jr., President, Steuben Glass; Jerome W. Hull, President, Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co.; Carlisle H. Humelsine, President, Colonial Williamsburg; Raymond C. Johnson, Vice Chairman of the Board; Stanley Marcus, President, Neiman-Marcus Co.; Katharine E. McBride, President, Bryn Mawr College; Charles W.V. Meares, Chairman; Clarence J. Myers, Trustee and Corporate Director; Richard K. Paynter, Jr., Trustee and Corporate Director; Richard S. Perkins, Chairman of the Executive Committee, First National City Bank; William S. Renchard, Chairman, Chemical Bank; Frank Stanton, President, Columbia Broadcasting System; and J. Harris Ward, Chairman, Commonwealth Edison Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Mar. 16, 1970.) In 1971, George B. Munroe, President and CEO of Phelps Dodge Corp., joined the board. (Display Ad. New York Times, Mar. 9, 1971.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1972-73

Board of Directors: Elliott V. Bell, trustee and corporate director; Marshall P. Bissell, Executive Vice President; R. Manning Brown Jr., President; John M. Budd, Chairman of Finance Committee, Great Northern Railway Co.; James C. Donnell II, President, Marathon Oil Co.; Dudley Dowell, Retired President, New York Life; Frederick M. Eaton, of Shearman & Sterling; Gen. Alfred M. Gruenther (Ret.), former President, American Red Cross; Kenneth H. Hannan, Retired Vice Chairman, Union Carbide Corp.; Gabriel Hauge, Chairman, Manufacturers Hanover Trust; Paul G. Hoffman, Former Administrator, United Nations Development Programme; Arthur A. Houghton Jr., President, Steuben Glass; Jerome W. Hull, President, Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co.; Carlisle H. Humelsine, President, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation; Raymond C. Johnson, Vice Chairman of the Board; Stanley Marcus, President, Neiman-Marcus Co.; Katharine E. McBride, President Emeritus, Bryn Mawr College; Charles W.V. Meares, Chairman; George B. Munroe, President and CEO, Phelps Dodge Corp.; Richard K. Paynter, Retired Chairman, New York Life; Richard S. Perkins, Former Chairman of the Executive Committee, First National City Bank; William S. Renchard, Chairman, Chemical Bank; Frank Stanton, Vice Chairman, Columbia Broadcasting System; and J. Harris Ward, Chairman, Commonwealth Edison Co. (Display Ad. New York Times, Mar. 8, 1972.) Franklin A. Thomas, President, Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corp., became a director in 1973. (Display Ad. New York Times, Mar. 13, 1973.)

Nominees for the 1975 election were: John M. Budd, Former Chairman and CEO, Burlington Northern Inc.; Dudley Dowell, Retired President, New York Life; Gabriel Hauge, Chairman, Manufacturers Hanover Trust; Katharine E. McBride, President Emeritus, Bryn Mawr College; Richard S. Perkins, Former Chairman of the Executive Committee, First National City Bank; Richard R. Pivirotto, President, Associated Dry Goods Co.; and Frank Stanton, Chairman, American National Red Cross. (Display Ad. New York Times, Aug. 19, 1974.)

Nominees for the 1976 election were: Marshall P. Bissell, President, New York Life; R. Manning Brown Jr., Chairman, New York Life; James D. Finley, Chairman, J.P. Stevens & Co.; Kenneth H. Hannan, Retired Vice Chairman, Union Carbide Corp.; Charles W.V. Meares, Retired Chairman, New York Life; William S. Renchard, Chairman of Executive Committee, Chemical Bank; Franklin A. Thomas, President, Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corp.; and William Osborn Twaits, Former Chairman, Imperial Oil Ltd. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 8, 1975.)

The New York Life Insurance Company, 1980s

Nominees for the 1981 election were: Patricia T. Carbine, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, Ms. Magazine; Walter J.P. Curley, Venture Capital Investor; Andrew J. Goodpaster, Former Supreme Allied Commander, Europe; Gabriel Hauge, Former Chairman, Manufacturers Hanover Trust; Robert A. Mosbacher, Chairman, Mosbacher Production Co.; Richard S. Perkins, Retired Chairman Executive Committee, Citicorp and Citibank; Richard R. Pivirotto, Chairman, Associated Dry Goods Co.; and Donald K. Ross, President, New York Life. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 16, 1980.)

Robert A. Mosbacher

Robert A. Mosbacher "was the son of a Wall Street runner who later made a fortune as a specialist and trader on the Curb Exchange, the predecessor of the American Stock Exchange." He graduated from Washington and Lee University in 1947 and worked a year with his father, who had oil investments in Texas. His family contributed $500,000 for his start as an oil wildcatter in Texas and Louisiana. In the 1970s, he was finance chairman for President Gerald R. Ford, and was a fundraiser in two of George H.W. Bush's senate races and his presidential runs in 1980 and 1988. President Bush appointed him to head the Commerce Department. His brother, Emil Mosbacher Jr., was chief of protocol in the State Department during the Nixon administration. (Robert A. Mosbacher, 82, Ex-Commerce Chief, Dies. By Robert D. Hershey Jr. New York Times, Jan. 25, 2010.) He was a donor to Nixon's Committee to Re-Elect the Preident (CREEP). (Bush's Ruling Class - A 1992 Common Cause Magazine Investigation Reveals A Pattern of Special Favors For Former President Bush's Inner Circle of $100,000 Donors.)

Nominees for the 1982 election were: R. Manning Brown Jr., Retired Chairman, New York Life; Richard L. Gelb, Chairman, Bristol-Myers Co.; Kenneth H. Hannan, Retired Vice Chairman, Union Carbide Corp.; William A. Marquand, Chairman, President and CEO, American Standard Inc.; William W. Scranton, Former Governor of Pennsylvania and Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations; Franklin A. Thomas, President, The Ford Foundation; and William Osborn Twaits, Former Chairman, Imperial Oil Ltd. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 22, 1981.)

Nominees for the 1985 election were: R. Manning Brown Jr., Retired Chairman, New York Life; Richard L. Gelb, Chairman, Bristol-Myers Co.; William A. Marquand, Chairman, President and CEO, American Standard Inc.; George L. Shinn, Chairman & CEO Emeritus, The First Boston Corp.; and Franklin A. Thomas, President, The Ford Foundation. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 18, 1984.)

Nominees for the 1988 election were: William G. Burns, Vice Chairman, NYNEX Corp.; Richard L. Gelb, Chairman & CEO, Bristol-Myers Co.; William R. Grant, Chairman, New York Life International Investment Inc.; Harry G. Hohn, Vice Chairman, New York Life; William A. Marquand, Chairman of Executive Committee, American Standard Inc.; George L. Shinn, Retired Chairman & CEO, The First Boston Corp.; and Franklin A. Thomas, President, The Ford Foundation. (Display Ad. New York Times, Sep. 24, 1987.)

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cast 01-04-15