The National City Bank of New York

National City Bank of New York, The
1812 Established City Bank of New York
1865 Convert Federal National City Bank of New York
05/01/1897 Acquire By Merger Third National Bank of the City of New York
06/01/1921 Acquire By Merger Commercial Exchange National Bank of New York
12/01/1921 Acquire By Merger Second National Bank of the City of New York
06/01/1926 Acquire By Merger Peoples Trust Company of Bklyn N.A. of New York
06/01/1929 Acquire By Merger Farmers' Loan State Bank
1931 Acquire By Merger Long Island National Bank of New York
11/01/1931 Acquire By Merger Bank of America National Association
03/01/1955 Name Change To First National City Bank of New York
01/01/1962 Name Change To First National City Bank
01/01/1963 Acquire By Merger First National City Trust Company
1976 Name Change To Citibank, N.A.
01/01/1976 Acquire By Merger Citibank (Suffolk), N.A.
01/01/1976 Acquire By Merger Citibank (Mid-Hudson), N.A.
07/17/2001 Acquire By Merger European American Bank
08/30/2003 Acquire By Merger Citibank (New York State)
New York Bank History N / Scripophily.com

The first president of the bank was Samuel Osgood, and G.B. Vroom was its first cashier. Moses Taylor had been a director since 1837, and was elected President of the bank about 1856, which he remained until his death in 1882. His son-in-law, Percy R. Pyne, succeeded him. When Pyne died, James Stillman succeeded him. (The Custom House Sold For $3,265,000. New York Times, Jul. 4, 1899.)

The National City Bank of New York, 1870

President, Moses Taylor; Cashier, Benjamin Cartwright; Notary Public, Pierre Wildey. Directors: Moses Taylor, John J. Cisco, Tarrant Putnam, George Greer, L.A. Von Hoffman, Henry Parish, Samuel Sloan, William Walter Phelps, Percy R. Pyne. (The National Banks of New York. Bankers' Magazine and Statistical Register, Apr. 1870.)

Henry Parish

Henry Parish was president and chairman of the New York Life Insurance and Trust Company. He was famous for not allowing a telephone in the institution, and typewriters had to be placed where he couldn't hear them. "The New York Life Insurance and Trust Company was chartered in 1830 and stands on the old site of the first bank of the United States at 52 Wall Street. Mr. Parish became President in 1871, succeeding William Bard. The deposits of the company then amounted to $6,000,000, but today total more than six times this amount." (Henry Parish, Banker, Dies in His 88th Year. New York Times, Sep. 19, 1917.) His estate was said to be more than $5 million. His daughter Grace was Mrs. Cleveland H. Dodge. (File Henry Parish Will. New York Times, Oct. 5, 1917.) He was on the board of managers of St. Luke's Hospital. (The Year at St. Luke's. New York Times, Oct. 20, 1885; St. Luke's Hospital Affairs. New York Times, Dec. 24, 1892.) "The New York Life Insurance and Trust Company was the first financial institution in this country to start business with 'trust company' as a part of its title, it having been organized under a special charter granted by the State Legislature in 1830. It has always made a specialty of personal trusts." In 1922 it merged with the Bank of New York, the oldest bank in New York City, organized in 1784 by Alexander Hamilton, first Secretary of the U.S. Treasury. (Bank of New York and Trust Co. Join. New York Times, Jun. 20, 1922.)

Henry Parish Jr. was vice president since 1900 and a trustee of the Bank of New York and Trust Company, where he began in 1877 after attending St. Paul's School in Concord, N.H. He married Susan Ludlow in 1884; she was a second cousin of Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt. The Roosevelts and Parishes were mutual visitors during FDR's administration. His mother was Elizabeth Wainwright. (Henry Parish Dies; Banker 65 Years. New York Times, Jun. 27, 1942.) Eleanor Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt were married in the house of Mrs. E. Livingston Ludlow, which opened directly into the house of her daughter, Mrs. Henry Parish Jr., by sliding doors. Eleanor Roosevelt's parents were Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Roosevelt, who died many years before. She lived with her grandmother, Mrs. Valentine G. Hall, until Mrs. Hall gave up her city home and moved to the country, and since then with Mrs. Parish. (President Roosevelt Gives the Bride Away. New York Times, Mar. 18, 1905.) His nephew, Henry Parish 2d, Harvard 1926, was a partner of Loeb Rhoades for 34 years, retiring in 1972. (Deaths. New York Times, Feb. 6, 1977.) Henry Parrish 2d married Dorothy May Kinnicutt, a granddaughter of Dr. Francis P. Kinnicutt. (Dorothy Kinnicutt Weds H. Parish 2d. New York Times, Feb. 15, 1931.) Henry Parish 3d, Harvard 1955, was married to Nancy Hellman, daughter of California banker Marco F. Hellman. (Nancy Hellman Engaged to Wed. New York Times, Dec. 23, 1957; The Social Circle. By Robin Orr. Oakland Tribune, Nov. 5, 1971.) William Elkins of Philadelphia was to be his best man. (Ann Ribbel to be Hostess In Piedmont for Nancy Hellman. Oakland Tribune, May 26, 1958.)

Edward H. Ludlow, who founded E.H. Ludlow & Company, was born in 1810 and received his medical degree in 1831. He went into real estate in 1836. His first partner was Gen. E.J. Mallett. Elliott Roosevelt was another of the partners. (Realty's Leading Lights. New York World, Jan. 8, 1888.) Dr. Edward H. Ludlow married Mary Livingston, daughter of Edward P. Livingston of Albany. (Married. New-York Spectator, Jan. 17, 1833.) The Livingstons are Royal descendants of Louis VI, King of France. (Americans of Royal Descent: A Collection of Genealogies of American Families. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 688.) Edward H. Ludlow died in 1884. (Died. New York Times, Nov. 28, 1884.) Edward Livingston Ludlow died in 1915. (Died. New York Times, Feb. 12, 1915.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 688 / Google Books

Henry Parish was a brother of Daniel Parish Jr., former President of the American Numismatic Society. (Daniel Parish Dies. New York Times, Dec. 18, 1914.) He was the nephew of Henry Parish, of Parish & Kernochan, a nephew of Thomas Powell, one of the wealthiest citizens of Newburg. He came to New York City about forty-five years before, and made at least $1 million in the dry goods business. During the panic of 1832, he bought up goods and shipped them to his agencies in New Orleans, Savannah and Charleston, to be sold at very large profits. He suffered a stroke that paralyzed him several years before his death. (Obituary. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, Mar. 15, 1856.) His uncle's will left him half his lot and store at No. 172 Pearl-street, at the corner of Pine, whose other half was owned by Joseph Kernochan. His brother, Daniel Parish, and friends Joseph Kernochan and Joseph Delafield were executors, and Henry and William Delafield were additional executors and trustees. A codicil removed his brother and left the residue to his wife, Susan Marie. (Will of the Late Henry Parish. New York Times, Apr. 2, 1856.) His uncle's will was still being contested when his aunt died and left everything to her brothers [who were the sons of John Delafield]. (Law Reports. New York Times, Aug. 7, 1861.)

Percy R. Pyne

Percy Rivington Pyne (1820-1895) was born in England and came to the U.S. in 1835. He joined Moses Taylor & Co. as a clerk, and became a partner from 1842 until 1887. He married Moses Taylor's oldest daughter, Albertina, in 1855, and succeeded Taylor as President of the National City Bank [1882-1891]. He was Vice President of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, and a director of the Farmers' Loan and Trust Company, the Central Trust Company of New York, the Chicago and Northwestern Railway Company, the Western Union Telegraph Company, and other companies. He was Vice President of St. Luke's Hospital, and a trustee of the Bellevue Medical School. (The Obituary Record. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1895.) He was on the board of managers of St. Luke's Hospital. Fellow managers included his son, Moses Taylor Pyne; Samuel D. Babcock, George M. Miller and his son, Hoffman Miller; J. Pierpont Morgan Jr.; and Gustav H. Schwab; also Chauncey M. Depew and Cornelius Vanderbilt. (St. Luke's Hospital Managers. New York Times, Oct. 20, 1894.) He was a trustee of the National City Bank from at least 1870 until his death.

The National City Bank of New York, 1892

James Stillman President; D. Palmer, Cashier. Directors: James Stillman, Percy R. Pyne, Samuel Sloan, George W. Campbell, Lawrence Turnure, Roswell G. Rolston, William Walter Phelps, Cleveland H. Dodge, Henry A.C. Taylor. (Display Ad 35. New York Times, Jan. 17, 1892 p. 14.)

Cleveland H. Dodge

Cleveland Hoadley Dodge was vice president of the Phelps-Dodge Company, formed to take over the assets of Phelps, Dodge & Co. (Phelps-Dodge Company Election. New York Times, Dec. 23, 1908), and Chairman of the Board of the Phelps Dodge Corporation. He was the son of William E. Dodge Jr. He graduated from Princeton in 1879, and was a classmate and lifelong friend and political supporter of Woodrow Wilson. He donated $1 million to the Red Cross in 1918. He was also a director of the Farmers Loan and Trust Company, the International Paper Company, and the Southern Pacific Railroad, President of the Board of Trustees of Robert College in Constantinople, and a trustee of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. His son, Cleveland E. Dodge, was vice president of Phelps Dodge. (Cleveland H. Dodge, Philanthropist, Dies. New York Times, Jun. 25, 1926.) He married Grace Parish, daughter of Henry Parish. Percy R. Pyne Jr. was best man, and his ushers were Elliott Roosevelt, her brother Henry Parish Jr., her cousin Daniel Kingsford, and Poultney Bigelow. (Four Weddings Yesterday. New York Times, Oct. 12, 1883.) Cleveland E. Dodge succeeded him as a director.

The National City Bank of New York, 1897

In 1897, the National City Bank absorbed the Third National Bank. Its president, A. Barton Hepburn, became a vice president of the National City Bank. President, James Stillman; Cashier, George S. Whitson; Notary, H.M. Kilborn. Principal directors: Samuel Sloan, Lawrence Turnure, Rosewell G. Rolston, Cleveland H. Dodge, William Rockefeller, H. Walter Webb, Francis M. Bacon, M. Taylor Pyne, and Robert Bacon. (National Banks Merge. New York Times, May 21, 1897.)

Francis M. Bacon

Francis McNeil Bacon of Bacon & Co., woolen goods manufacturers, was born in Boston. He was a director of the National City Bank and the Metropolitan Trust Company, and a trustee of the Atlantic Mutual Life Insurance Company and the Seaman's Bank for Savings. (Francis McNeil Bacon Dead. New York Times, Sep. 22, 1912; Francis M. Bacon. New-York Tribune, Sep. 24, 1912.) His first wife was Margaret R. Gray, daughter of Rev. F.T. Gray, of Boston. (Married. New York Times, Nov. 25, 1862.) Rev. Frederick Turell Gray was a close friend of Unitarian Rev. Ephraim Peabody. (Ephraim Peabody. Unitarian Universalist Association, accessed Sep. 13, 2010.) His second wife was Katherine Paris Storrow, daughter of Thomas W. Storrow Jr. (Married. New York Times, Oct. 18, 1879.)

Robert Bacon, Harvard 1880

Robert Bacon (1860-1919) was the son of William Benjamin Bacon. "After graduation from Harvard, he went to China as supercargo and later with his elder brother became a member of the firm of Daniel G. Bacon & Company. His second wife was Emily Crosby Low, a noted beauty. Robert Bacon, the second son of that marriage, was born at Jamaica Plain, Mass. He went to Hopkinson's School and Harvard, graduating in June 1880, the youngest man of a class which included Theodore Roosevelt, of whom he was always a devoted friend and follower." His closest friend at college was Dr. Henry Jackson. "After a trip around the world, he settled down to a business career with the firm of Lee, Higginson & Company, whom he left in 1883 to become a partner in the firm of E. Rollins Morse & Brother. On Oct. 10 of this same year he married Martha Waldron Cowdin of New England ancestry, but then living in New York. He remained with the Morse firm until 1894, when he accepted a partnership in J. P. Morgan & Company." He was involved in the formation of the United States Steel Corporation in 1901, and the negotiations resulting in the Northern Securities Company. He resigned from the firm in 1903. He was Assistant Secretary of State for Elihu Root in the Roosevelt administration from 1906 to 1909, and President William H. Taft appointed him ambassador to France in 1909. He resigned in 1912 to become a Fellow of Harvard, of which he had been an Overseer. (Robert Bacon. Dictionary of American Biography Base Set. American Council of Learned Societies, 1928-1936; Harvard College Class of 1880, 1920, p. 13.) Robert Bacon was an Overseer of Harvard University from 1889-1901 and 1902-1908. He gave $25,000 to the Harvard Medical School in 1902 (Money Gifts to Harvard. New York Times, Mar. 14, 1902), and participated in fundraisers for the American Society for the Control of Cancer in 1926. (Cancer Fund Gains $90,000 in Campaign. New York Times, Sep. 28, 1926.) William B. Bacon was an agent for Baring Bros. The family's friends included Nathaniel Thayer and Rev. Phillips Brooks. (Visitors. Barnstable Patriot, Jul. 18, 1876.) An uncle, Eben Bacon, was also member of Daniel G. Bacon & Co. (Funeral of Eben Bacon. Barnstable Patriot, Feb 29, 1904.)

Harvard College Class of 1880, 1920 / Internet Archive

"Mrs. Bacon was born in New York, a daughter of Elliot Christopher Cowdin and Sarah Katharine Waldron Cowdin of Boston," an importer of New York and Boston who died in New York City in 1880. Their children were Gaspar G. Bacon, former Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts; Mrs. George Whitney, whose husband was a member of the J.P. Morgan firm; and Elliot Cowdin Bacon, a partner in J.P. Morgan & Co. who died in 1924. (Mrs. Robert Bacon Dies At Age of 80. New York Times, Nov. 13, 1940.) Sarah Katherine Waldron was the sister of the wife of Dr. Edward W. Lambert, Skull & Bones 1854. Ironically, Robert Bacon died of blood poisoning after an operation for mastoiditis performed by Lambert's son, Dr. Adrian Van S. Lambert, Skull & Bones 1893; while another son, anti-smoker Dr. Alexander Lambert, Skull & Bones 1884, was in charge of the case. (Col. Robert Bacon Dies in Hospital. New York Times, May 30, 1919.) Gaspar Griswold Bacon was an Overseer of Harvard University from 1933 to at least 1936. Another son, Robert Low Bacon (1884-1938, Harvard 1907), ran for the U.S. Senate from New York in 1916 as an anti-isolationist. He was elected to Congress in 1922 and served until 1938.

William Avery Rockefeller Jr., Yale 1892

William Avery Rockefeller Jr. (1841-1922) was the younger brother of John D. Rockefeller and co-founder of the Standard Oil Company. He married Almira Geraldine Goodsell. His son, William Goodsell Rockefeller (1870-1922) married Elsie Stillman, daughter of National City Bank president James Stillman, and were the parents of William Avery Rockefeller (1896-1973), Godfrey Stillman Rockefeller (1899-1983), James Stillman Rockefeller (1902-2004), John Sterling Rockefeller (1904-1988), and Almira Geraldine Rockefeller (1907- ). (William Goodsell Rockefeller, B.A. 1892. Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1922-1923, pp. 173-174.) Another son, Percy Avery Rockefeller (1878-1934), was Skull & Bones 1900.

William Rockefeller / Wikipedia
Obituary Record 1922-1923 / Yale University Library (pdf, 385 pp)

The National City Bank of New York, 1898-99

Directors: Samuel Sloan, Lawrence Turnure, Rosewell G. Rolston, Cleveland H. Dodge, Henry A.C. Taylor, William Rockefeller, H. Walter Webb, Francis M. Bacon, M. Taylor Pyne, William Douglas Sloane, Robert Bacon, James Stillman, re-elected, and John A. McCall, William S. Bogert, and James A. Stillman. (Annual Bank Elections. New York Times, Jan. 12, 1898.) In 1899, its principal directors were Samuel Sloan, also First Vice President, Chairman of the Delaware Western and Lackawanna Railroad; William Rockefeller, President of the Standard Oil Company; Henry O. Havemeyer, President of the American Sugar Refining Company; Jacob H. Schiff of Kuhn, Loeb & Company; Robert Bacon, of J.P. Morgan & Co.; Charles S. Fairchild, ex-Secretary of the U.S. Treasury; William Douglas Sloane of W. & J. Sloane & Co., a brother-in-law of Cornelius and William K. Vanderbilt; Moses Taylor Pyne, of the Moses Taylor and Percy R. Pyne estates; John A. McCall, President of the New York Life Insurance Company; Cleveland H. Dodge of Phelps, Dodge & Co.;Stephen S. Palmer, President of the New Jersey Zinc Company; Henry A.C. Taylor, capitalist; Francis M. Bacon of Bacon & Co.; James H. Post of B.H. Howell, Son & Co.; John W. Sterling of Shearman & Sterling, lawyers; and H. Walter Webb, ex-Third Vice President of the New York Central Railroad. Vice President A.G. Loomis resigned from the Aetna National Bank in Hartford to replace A. Barton Hepburn. James A. Stillman, the son of James Stillman, became assistant cashier. (The Custom House Sold For $3,265,000. New York Times, Jul. 4, 1899.)

Henry O. Havemeyer

Henry Osborne Havemeyer Sr. was President of the American Sugar Refining Company. He was born in 1847, the son of F.C. Havemeyer Jr. and grandson of F.C. Havemeyer Sr. His grandfather and a cousin, William F. Havemeyer, immigrated from Germany and founded the Havemeyer Sugar Co. in Greenwich Village in 1802. The American Sugar Refining Co. was organized as a trust in 1887, ovethrown in the courts in 1891, and reincorporated in New Jersey with Henry O. Havemeyer's brother, Theodore, as President. William F. Havemeyer Jr. was Mayor of New York City. (H.O. Havemeyer Dies At L.I. Home. New York Times, Dec. 5, 1907.) He was one of the invited guests at the funeral of Prussian legislator Eduard Lasker. (The Funeral of Dr. Lasker. President White, Mr. Schurz, and Others Pay Tribute to His Memory. New York Times, Jan. 11, 1884.) His son, Horace, succeeded him as a director of the American Sugar Refining Co. (No More Secrecy in Sugar Trust. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1908.) His daughter, Electra, married James Watson Webb, son of W. Seward Webb. Ushers included his brother, Vanderbilt Webb, and George Whitney. (Miss Havemeyer Bride of J.W. Webb. New York Times, Feb. 9, 1910.)

Henry Osborne Havemeyer / Wikipedia

Frederick Christian Havemeyer (1879-1948), Scroll & Key 1900, was a member of Havemeyer & Elder, Inc., holding company, from its incorporation in 1917 until his death. He married Lillie Harriman, a daughter of Oliver Harriman. He was the son of Theodore Augustus Havemeyer, President of the Sugar Refineries Company, vice-president of the American Sugar Refining Co., and consul-general of the Emperor of Hungary and King of Hungary 1871-1896. His mother was the daughter of the Austrian Consul General in New York. Henry O. Havemeyer Jr., Yale 1900, was his brother. Frederick C. Havemeyer (Columbia 1825) was their grandfather. His nephew, Henry O. Havemeyer Jr., was a memer of the Yale Class of 1926. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1947-1948, p. 56.) His father, Theodore A. Havemeyer, was born in 1834, and joined the firm of Havemeyer, Townsend & Co., sugar refiners, in 1860. George Elder and Dwight Townsend were the non-Havemeyer members of the firm. He was President of the United States Golf Association since its organization in 1894. He had four sons and four daughters, including Mrs. William Butler Duncan. (Death of T.A. Havemeyer. New York Times, Apr. 27, 1897.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1947-1948 / Yale University Library (pdf, 254 pp)

The National City Bank of New York, 1900-02

Director Lawrence Turnure died. New directors were E.H. Harriman, President of the Chicago & Alton Railroad and involved with other railroad interests; Moses Taylor; A.G. Loomis; and W.S. Bogert, President Stillman's private secretary. Re-elected directors were F.N. Bacon, Robert Bacon, Cleveland H. Dodge, Charles S. Fairchild, Henry O. Havemeyer, John A. McCall, Stephen S. Palmer, James H. Post, M. Taylor Pyne, William Rockefeller, John W. Sterling, Jacob H. Schiff, James Stillman, William Douglas Sloane, Samuel Sloan, Henry A.C. Taylor, and H. Walter Webb. (Elections of the Banks. New York Times, Jan. 10, 1900.) They were all re-elected in 1901. (National and State Banks Elect Directors. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1901.) George W. Perkins was elected in 1902, replacing Bogert. (Bank Board Elections. New York Times, Jan. 15, 1902.)

Moses Taylor, Scroll & Key 1893

Moses Taylor was the son of Henry Augustus Coit Taylor, member of Moses Taylor & Company, sugar merchants, and trustee of the New York Life Insurance Company. He was the grandson of Moses Taylor, the president of the National City Bank. He was a vice president of the Lackawanna Iron & Steel Company, and a director of the Lackawanna Steel Company from 1902 until his death, and a director of a multitude of companies connected with it. He was a director of the National City Bank from 1900-1919; and a trustee of the New York Life Insurance and Trust Company (later Bank of New York & Trust Company) since 1913. He married Heber R. Bishop's daughter, Edith. Moses Taylor Jr. was killed in France in 1918, Francis Taylor graduated from Yale in 1921, and Reginald Bishop Taylor in 1923. (Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1927-1928, p. 136.) His sister, Harriet Taylor, married Count Giuseppe della Gherardesca of Florence, Italy. (Weddings of a Day, New York Times, May 21, 1903.)

Obituary Record of Yale Graduates 1927-1928 / Yale University Library (pdf, 366 pp)

The National City Bank of New York, 1904

Directors: Francis M. Bacon, Cleveland H. Dodge, Charles S. Fairchild, Henry C. Frick, Edward H. Harriman, Henry O. Havemeyer, Archibald G. Loomis, John A. McCall, Cyrus H. McCormick, Edwin S. Marston, Stephen S. Palmer, George W. Perkins, James H. Post, M. Taylor Pyne, William Rockefeller, John W. Sterling, Jacob H. Schiff, James Stillman, William D. Sloane, Samuel Sloan, Henry A.C. Taylor, Moses Taylor, and P.A. Valentine were elected, and James A. Stillman added. (Annual Bank Elections. New York Times, Jan. 13, 1904.)

Henry C. Frick

Henry Clay Frick born in Westmoreland County, Penn., in 1849. He began buying coke furnaces in 1871, and when the panic of 1873 hit, most of his partners and other coke operators were obliged to sell their shares, which Frick and "certain friends" bought up. [His personal counsel and one of the organizers of the H.C. Frick Coke Co. was Willis F. McCook, Scroll & Key 1873.] (Andrew Carnegie. New York Times, Jun. 4, 1899; Mr. Frick's Business Career. New York Times, Jul. 24, 1892.) He traded part of his holdings for a partnership with Andrew Carnegie. When he tried to buy out Carnegie, it caused a rupture between them, but he kept his holdings in the Carnegie enterprises, which later became U.S. Steel. He was also associated with Andrew J. Cassatt in the Pennsylvania Railroad, and Edward H. Harriman in the Union Pacific. His fortune was estimated at $75 to 100 million. His physician was Dr. Lewis A. Conner [founding president of the American Heart Association]. (Henry C. Frick Dies; Leaves Art to City. New York Times, Dec. 3, 1919.) Lewis Cass Ledyard, a longtime friend, was executor of his will and a trustee of the Frick Collection, for which Frick left $15 million in trust. He left a lump sum of $25 million to his family. (Frick Will Leaves $117,300,000 in Gifts For Public Benefit. New York Times, Dec. 7, 1919.) His holdings in U.S. Steel were appraised at only $214,605.95. Most of his stockholdings were in railroads and banks, including 100 shares of the National Bank of Commerce, 400 of National City Bank, 500 of First National Bank of New York, 15 of Mellon National Bank, and 280 shares of Franklin National Bank, Philadelphia. The personal property in his Fifth Avenue mansion were worth over $12 million. (Frick, 'Steel King,' Held Little Steel. New York Times, Jun. 19, 1920.) "His grasp on Pennsylvania politics was such that he was generally credited with forcing to the front Philander C. Knox," who had been his personal attorney. (Henry Clay Frick. The Historical Register, Edwin C. Hill, ed., 1920.) Henry C. Frick was one of the organizers of the Tobacco Products Corporation in 1912. He attended a 1916 dinner by tobacco financier Thomas F. Ryan which was a veritable summmit meeting of American Tobacco and the Guaranty Trust:. (Thomas F. Ryan Is Host. New York Times, Feb. 18, 1916.) His daughter, Helen C. Frick, was an activist of Memorial Hospital, N.Y.C., in 1934.

The Historical Register, 1920 / Google Books

The National City Bank of New York, 1905

Directors: Francis M. Bacon, Cleveland H. Dodge, Charles H. Fairchild, Henry C. Frick, Edward H. Harriman, Henry O. Havemeyer, Archibald G. Loomis, John A. McCall, Cyrus H. McCormick, Edwin S. Marston, Stephen S. Palmer, George W. Perkins, James H. Post, M. Taylor Pyne, William Rockefeller, John W. Sterling, Jacob H. Schiff, James Stillman, William D. Sloane, and Henry A.C. and Moses Taylor. (Boards of Directors Elected by City Banks. New York Times, Jan. 11, 1905.)

The National City Bank of New York, 1906

Directors: Francis M. Bacon, Cleveland H. Dodge, Charles S. Fairchild, Henry C. Frick, Edward H. Harriman, Henry O. Havemeyer, John A. McCall, Cyrus H. McCormick, Edwin S. Marston, Stephen S. Palmer, George W. Perkins, James H. Post, M. Taylor Pyne, William Rockefeller, John W. Sterling, Jacob H. Schiff, James Stillman, James A. Stillman, William Douglas Sloane, Samuel Sloan, Henry A.C. Taylor, Moses Taylor, P.A. Valentine, G.G. Whitson. (Many Bank Changes Result of Elections. New York Times, Jan. 10, 1906.) In 1908, W.A. De Wolf was elected a director, with one vacancy remaining. (Few Changes Made In Bank Directors. New York Times, Jan. 15, 1908.)

William S. Kies

William S. Kies (University of Wisconsin 1899) was a former trial attorney for the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. "After a term as State Treasurer of Illinois, he joined the National City Bank in 1913 to organize its foreign trade department, working on the organization of branches in South America. In 1915 he was named a vice president. Three years later he resigned to become Vice President of American International Corporation." He was a charter director of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation [1925] and a vice president of the University of Wisconsin Foundation. (William S. Kies, 72, Financier, Is Dead. New York Times, Feb. 3, 1950.) His name was actually Samuel William Kies, son of Christian L. Kies of Oshkosh, Wis. (Regents Vote to Award Honorary Degrees to Six. Oshkosh Daily Northwestern, May 5, 1937.) In 1916, the National City Bank announced that it would train about 100 undergraduates of U.S. colleges to represent the bank abroad, including Harvard, Yale, Princeton, New York University, Columbia, Cornell, and the University of Pennsylvania, and possibly including the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, and the Universities of Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota and Illinois. Vice presidents Samuel McRoberts, W.S. Kies and J.H. Perkins, and director of efficiency F.C. Schwedtman were involved. (Bank to Train 100 For Foreign Trade. New York Times, Mar. 1, 1916.) Dean William A. Scott of the UW School of Commerce and the other deans approved the plan. (Favor City Bank Plan. New York Times, Mar. 2, 1916.) In 1918, he "resigned in order to give his entire time to the affairs of the International Banking Corporation and the American International Corporation." (Few Changes in Bank Directorates. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1918.) His daughter Margaret married Dr. William Travis Gibb Jr., a Cornell graduate, and Virginia Vanderlip was one of her attendants. (Other Weddings. New York Times, Oct. 5, 1930.) His son, John H. Kies, was connected with Lord & Thomas in Chicago. (Margaret Hudson to be Bride Aug. 21. New York Times, Aug. 4, 1935.) In 1936, WARF sponsored the creation of the Women's Field Army of the American Society for the Control of Cancer in the state of Wisconsin.

The National City Bank of New York, 1909

Directors: James Stillman (Chairman), Francis M. Bacon, Cleveland H. Dodge, Charles S. Fairchild, Henry C. Frick, Joseph P. Grace, Edward H. Harriman, Cyrus H. McCormick, Edwin S. Marston, Stephen S. Palmer, George W. Perkins, James H. Post, M. Taylor Pyne, William Rockefeller, Jacob H. Schiff, Samuel Sloan, William Douglas Sloane, John W. Sterling, James A. Stillman, Henry A.C. Taylor, Moses Taylor, P.A. Valentine, Frank A. Vanderlip (President). Cashier: Arthur Kavanagh. (Trow's Directory, 1909.)

The National City Bank of New York, 1912

Geoge W. Perkins retired; E.P. Swenson of S.M. Swenson & Sons, bankers, replaced him. (Bank Changes Made At Annual Meetings. New York Times, Jan. 10, 1912.) Robert S. Lovett, chairman of the Harriman Lines, replaced the late Francis M. Bacon, and Frank Trumbull, Chairman of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas and the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroads, succeeded George Church. (Lovett in National City Bank. New York Times, Nov. 9, 1912.)

The National City Bank of New York, 1913

Largest stockholders of the National City Bank: James Stillman 47,498; William Rockefeller 10,000; J.P. Morgan & Co. 9,000; M. Taylor Pyne 8,267; Percy P. Pyne 8,267; Albertina T. Russell, 8,267; M. Taylor Pyne and Stephen S. Palmer, trustees for Kate W. Winthrop 7,699; M. Taylor Pyne and Stephen S. Palmer, trustees for Henry A.C. Taylor 7,699; Samuel Sloan estate 6,250; John W. Sterling 6,087; J. Pierpont Morgan 5,000; United States Trust Co. 4,500; Frederick E. Lewis, Fairfield N.J. 3,207; Percy P. Lewis, Bedford Village N.Y. 3,207; Catherine T. Moulton, South Orange N.J. 3,207; Henry A.C. Taylor 2,659; Cleveland H. Dodge 2,500; William Walter Phelps estate 2,337; James A. Stillman 2,250; Stephen S. Palmer 2,242; A. Iselin & Co. 2,165; Emily A. Watson 2,000; George Whittell 2,000; Kate W. Winthrop 1,924; John D. Rockefeller 1,750; William Woodward 1,710; Charles G. Thompson, New York 1,700; John Grenville Kane estate 1,512; Louisine W. Havermeyer 1,350; Edward S. Harkness 1,250; F.H. Prince & Co. 1,162; Charles S. Fairchild 1,125; Charles C. Stillman 1,100; J. Ogden Armour 1,000; Satah T. Gardiner 1,000; Benjamin Hart estate, Paris 1,000; Mary W. Harriman 1,000; Horace F. Howland 1,000; Kidder, Peabody & Co. 1,000; J.P. Morgan Jr. 1,000; Elizabeth Thompson, New York 1,000; and Mary G. Thompson, New York 1,000. Stockholders in Big Banks. New York Times, Jan. 23, 1913.)

The National City Bank of New York, 1915

Directors: J. Ogden Armour, Cleveland H. Dodge, Henry C. Frick, Joseph P. Grace, Robert S. Lovett, Cyrus H. McCormick, Edwin S. Marston, Gerrish H. Milliken, James H. Post, M. Taylor Pyne, William Rockefeller, Samuel Sloan, John W. Sterling, James Stillman (Chairman), James A. Stillman (Vice President), Eric P. Swenson, Henry A.C. Taylor, Moses Taylor, Frank Trumbull, P.A. Valentine, Frank A. Vanderlip (President), Beekman Winthrop. (Directory of Directors in the City of New York, 1915 Vol. 1939, p. 797.)

The National City Company Buys the International Banking Corporation, 1915

Directors of the National City Company: Cleveland H. Dodge, Samuel McRoberts (Chairman), C.V. Rich (President), John W. Sterling, James Stillman, Eric P. Swenson, Frank A. Vanderlip. James A. Stillman was Secretary and Treasurer. (Directory of Directors in the City of New York, 1915 Vol. 1939, p. 797.)

Jules S. Bache, as broker of the stock in the International Banking Corporation held by Thomas Hamlin Hubbard's estate, sold it to the National City Company, the investing company of the National City Bank. "When Mr. Vanderlip was asked if interests identified with his bank had not bought the Bache stock, he would only say: 'When you use that word 'interests' you open a wide range of possibilities.'" The National City Bank already had six branches in South America and Cuba, "and the addition of the International's foreign branches will bring the total up to twenty-two. The International under the administration of General Hubbard became strongly intrenched in China, Japan, India, and the Philippines." (Bache Sells Bank to National City Co. New York Times, Oct. 29, 1915.) The IBC was established by a special act of the Connecticut legislature in June 1901, which exempted it from state inspection and supervision.

The new directors of the International Banking Corporation were G.H. Church and R.L. Farnham of the National City Company, Arthur J. Kavanaugh and W.S. Kies, vice presidents of the National City Bank; E.W. Harden of Colgate & Co.; D.R. Iglehart of W.R. Grace & Co.; C.M. Muchnic, vice president of the American Locomotive Company; and Willard D. Straight, vice president of the American International Corporation. The old directors continuing were Jules S. Bache, Guy Cary, H.T.S. Green (president), Lionel Hagenaers, William T. Hincks, Minor C. Keith, George H. Macy, and Valentine P. Snyder. (Big Bank Is Reorganized. New York Times, Dec. 12, 1915.)

The National City Bank of New York, 1916

William C. Procter, President of the Procter & Gamble Company, was added to the board. (Schwab Gets Place in Chase National. New York Times, Jan. 12, 1916.)

The National City Bank of New York, 1918

All retiring directors were re-elected. William S. Kies "resigned in order to give his entire time to the affairs of the International Banking Corporation and the American International Corporation," and Robert Forgan of Chicago was appointed an assistant cashier. (Few Changes in Bank Directorates. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1918.)

The National City Bank of New York, 1921

Directors: William Rockefeller; Percy Rockefeller; M. Taylor Pyne; Henry A.C. Taylor; Nicholas F. Brady, President of the New York Edison Company; Cleveland H. Dodge of Phelps, Dodge Corp.; John A. Garver and Guy Cary of Shearman & Sterling, lawyers; Joseph P. Grace of W.R. Grace & Co.; James H. Post of B.H. Howell, Son & Co.; Eric P. Swenson of S.S. Swenson & Sons; Gerrish H. Milliken of Deering, Milliken & Co.; Philip A.S. Franklin, pres. International Mercantile Marine Co.; J. Ogden Armour of Armour & Co.; Earl D. Babst, Pres. American Sugar Refining Co.; Robert S. Lovett, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Union Pacific Railroad Co.; Cyrus H. McCormick, Chairman of International Harvester Co.; Edgar Palmer, Pres. New Jersey Zinc Co.; William Cooper Procter, Pres. of Procter & Gamble Co.; Horace S. Wilkinson, Chairman of the Crucible Steel Co. (Stillman Resigns; National City Bank Refuses to Accept. New York Times, Mar. 23, 1921.)

Cleveland E. Dodge

Cleveland E. Dodge was elected a director to succeed his late father, Cleveland H. Dodge; also John D. Ryan, Chairman of the Board of the Anaconda Copper Mining Company. "He was President of the Anaconda Copper Mining Company from 1903 to 1918, when he was made chairman of the board. During the war he was Second Assistant Secretary of War and was director of the Air Service in 1918. He was a member of the War Council of the American Red Cross in 1917 and 1918 and has been a member of the Central Committee of that organization since 1918. He is not only chairman of the Anaconda Company, but is also a director of the Chile Copper Company, the American Brass Company, the Brooklyn Edison Company and the Consolidated Gas Company of New York, a trustee of the Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank, President of the Montana Power Company and President of the United Metals Selling Company. Mr. Dodge is a Vice President of the Phelps-Dodge Corporation, a trustee of the Bank of New York and Trust Company and a director of the Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company, the North Star Mines Company, the Old Dominion Company, the Phelps-Dodge Mercantile Company and the Stag Canon Fuel Company." Buckley was President of the Crowell Publishing Company and publisher of The Chicago Herald Examiner. (J.D. Ryan on Board of National City. New York Times, Jun. 30, 1926.) Ryan helped form the Tobacco Products Corporation in 1912, and had been a director of the Guaranty Trust Company.

The National City Bank of New York, 1929-30; mergers with Farmers & Corn Exchange

In 1929, the National City Bank and its investment subsidiary, the National City Company, merged with the Farmers Loan and Trust Company. Farmers kept its state charter. Charles E. Mitchell, president of the National City Bank since 1921, became chairman of the bank, the investment company and the trust. Mitchell, the presidents of the three companies and five other men became the executive committee for the overall company. Gordon S. Rentschler became president of the National City Bank, and Hugh B. Baker, a vice president of the National City, became president of the investment company. ($2,000,000,000 Deal Links National City and Farmers' Loan. New York Times, Apr. 2, 1929.) Later that year, it merged with the Corn Exchange Bank. Charles E. Mitchell held a clerical position at Western Electric until he joined the Trust Company of America in 1906. He founded his own investment firm, C.E. Mitchell & Co., a few years later. He liquidated his firm to become a vice president of the National City Company. Directors of the Corn Exchange Bank: Clarence H. Kelsey, William R. Stewart, William H. Nichols, Charles W. McCutcheon, Andrew Mills, Philip Lehman, Robert A. Drysdale, Warren B. Nash, D. Schnakenberg, Dunham B. Sherer, A.R. Graustein, C.W. Nichols, Arthur A. Fowler, Robert Lehman, George Doubleday, Francis D. Bartow, Richard Whitney, Ethelbert Ide Low, Henry A. Patten, and Ralph Peters Jr. Directors of the National City Bank: Hugh B. Baker, Sosthenes Behn, Harry S. Black, Nicholas F. Brady, Guy Cary, Edward A. Deeds, Cleveland E. Dodge, Fred J. Fisher, Philip A.S. Franklin, John A. Garver, Joseph P. Grace, Cyrus H. McCormick, Gerrish H. Milliken, Charles E. Mitchell, Charles A. Peabody, James H. Perkins, James H. Post, Percy R. Pyne, Gordon S. Rentschler, Percy A. Rockefeller, John D. Ryan, William A. Simonson, Robert W. Stewart, James A. Stillman, Eric P. Swenson, and Beekman Winthrop. (National City Unites With Corn Exchange; Forms Largest Bank. New York Times, Sep. 20, 1929.) Retiring directors were all re-elected in 1930. (Annual Elections of Banks Are Held. New York Times, Jan. 19, 1930.)

"Looking at all the loans issued, it appears that only a handful of New York financial houses handled the German reparations financing. Three houses — Dillon, Read Co.; Harris, Forbes & Co.; and National City Company — issued almost three-quarters of the total face amount of the loans and reaped most of the profits... After the mid-1920s the two major German combines of I.G. Farben and Vereinigte Stahlwerke dominated the chemical and steel cartel system created by these loans. Although these firms. had a voting majority in the cartels for only two or three basic products, they were able — through control of these basics — to enforce their will throughout the cartel." (Wall Street and the Rise of Hitler. By Antony C. Sutton. Chapter 1, Wall Street Paves the Way for Hitler.)

Ch. 1, Wall Street and the Rise of Hitler / Reformed-Theology

Calvert Brewer, Harvard 1893

Calvert Brewer was secretary of the United States Mortgage and Trust Company. (Mortgage and Trust Election. New York Times, Mar. 27, 1903.) He was first vice president in 1910, when he was assaulted by suffragette Mrs. Ida M. von Claussen, "6 feet tall and heavy in proportion," for being slow to give her a small part of her one-eighth interest in a $1 million trust. "I lifted him out of his. I put my left elbow under his chin, and handed him one straight one with the knuckle - this one with the diamond ring on it - stuck out. That gashed his guarding hand slightly. I handed him another straight one, and he fell back against some curtains that were over an open door, and, of course, they couldn't hold him up." She said she has taken lessons in fencing, wrestling, boxing and jiu jitsu. (Smote the Bankers, Says Lady Caller. New York Times, Sep. 7, 1910.) He was elected a vice president of the Corn Exchange Bank and Trust Company in 1929. (Bamberger Elected to the Macy Board. New York Times, Jul 18, 1929.) He retired from banking in 1938. He was born in South Orange, N.J., and graduated from Harvard in 1893. (Calvert Brewer. New York Times, Dec. 25, 1949.) His first wife was Mary Mandeville Minott. (Married. New York Times, Feb. 11, 1902; Mrs. Calvert Brewer. New York Times, Oct. 6, 1931.) Calvert Brewer was an usher at the marriage of Robert G. Mead Jr. to Elizabeth M. Cleveland. (The Weddings of a Day. New York Times, Nov. 10, 1898.) Mrs. Mead was one of the founders of the American Society for the Control of Cancer, of which Brewer was elected a director in 1923. He also served as treasurer until at least 1937.

His grandfather, William Augustus Brewer, was a druggist in Boston. His father, William A. Brewer Jr., graduated from Harvard in 1854. He was in the actuary department of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York for three years until 1860, when he was chosen secretary and actuary of the Washington Life Insurance Company, of which he became president in 1879. (Biographical and Genealogical History of the City of Newark and Essex County. By Frederick William Ricord and Sophia B. Ricord, 1898, p. 123.) He was indicted for perjury for concealing the insolvency of the company by marking off policies anounting to $400,000. He pled guilty to filing false reports, a misdemeanor, and was let off with a $500 fine. The Times noted, "Thief Who Followed Him for Sentence Stole $60 Worth of Lead and Goes to the Penitentiary." (W.A. Brewer Gets A Light Sentence. New York Times, May 3, 1907.)

Biographical and Genealogical History of the City of Newark and Essex County, p. 123 / Google Books

Clarence H. Kelsey, Skull & Bones 1878

Clarence Hill Kelsey (1856-1930) helped organize the Title Guarantee & Trust Company in 1882, and was its president from 1892 to 1923, and its chairman until his death. In 1892, he helped organize the Bond & Mortgage Guarantee Company, where he was second vice president and general manager until 1925 and then chairman. He was vice president of City Real Estate since 1895; president and director of Yale Building Company and director of Westchester Title & Mortgage Guaranty Company since 1902; Lincoln Trust Company, Corn Exchange Bank & Trust Company (since 1892), Corn Products Refining Company (since 1909), Madison Safe Deposit Company, Realty Associates, Commercial Trust Company of Jersey City, Home Insurance Company (since 1910), United States Life Insurance Company (since 1895), Mechanics & Metals Bank, Thompson-Starrett Company (building construction, since 1903), Southern Pacific Railroad (until "recently"), and Consolidated Gas Company. He was a member of the council of New York University since 1903, and a trustee of the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute since 1909, where he suceeded his classmate, William H. Taft, as chairman in 1930. (Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1929-1930, pp. 64-66.) Kelsey and the Tafts had an interest in the Hotel McAlpin, owned by former tobacco man Edwin A. McAlpin.

Yale Obituary Record 1929-1930 / Yale University Library (pdf, 398 pp)

Ethelbert Ide Low, Wolf's Head 1902

Ethelbert Ide Low was the son of Ethelbert Mills Low (Harvard 1870), member of A.A. Low & Brother, China trade; and grandson of Josiah O. Low. His mother was Mary Louise Ide. He attended Columbia Law School and was associated with deForest Brothers from 1905 to 1909; then with his cousin, Benjamin R.C. Low (Yale 1902) and Charles D. Miller (Yale 1902) from 1909-1923. He was president of the Home Life Insurance Company from 1924 to 1929, and chairman of the board from 1929 to 1946. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1946-1947, p. 64.) His stepfather was Francis L. Hine.

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1946-1947 / Yale University Library (pdf, 241 pp)

Charles W. Nichols, Cornell 1899

Charles Walter Nichols was the son of William H. Nichols. He was a director of the Nichols Engineering and Research Co., the Corn Exchange Bank, the General Bond and Share Co., the Title Guarantee and Trust Co., Phelps-Dodge Corp. and the St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad. He attended Brooklyn Polytechnical Institute and graduated from Cornell in 1899, and became president of the Nichols Copper Co. in 1917, which later became the Allied Chemical Corp. He was a trustee of Choate School. (Walter Nichols, Financier, Dead. New York Times, Apr. 28, 1963.)

C. Walter Nichols Jr. was a director of the Allied Chemical Corporation and its successor, Allied-Signal Inc., for 31 years until retiring in 1987, and president of the Nichols Engineering and Research Corporation until it merged with Neptune International Corp. in 1973. (Charles W. Nichols Jr., Ex-Corporate Official. New York Times, Sep. 21, 1987.) He graduated from Williams College in 1933. His second wife was Dr. Marguerite Prince Sykes, a graduate of New York University College of Medicine and a trustee of the New York Infirmary. Her first husband was Walter P. Chrysler Jr. (Mrs. Sykes is Wed to C.W. Nichols Jr. New York Times, May 23, 1948.) She was a member of the committee for the annual luncheon for Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. (Sloan-Kettering Will Gain Feb. 4 At Waldorf Fete. New York Times, Jan. 19, 1965.)

William H. Nichols, NYU 1870

William H. Nichols was born in Brooklyn in 1852. He graduated from New York University in 1870 as Bachelor of Science, with an M.S. three years later. He founded his chemical business in 1870, calling it G.H. Nichols & Co. because he was under age. In 1899 he established the General Chemical Company, which took over the old firm, and was president until 1907 and chairman until 1920. He also operated the Nichols Copper Co. He was a director of the Corn Exchange Bank Trust Co., Semet-Solvay Co., Solvay Process Co. and the Title Guarantee and Trust Co. He was an incorporator and former president of the American Chemical Society, and for many years a trustee of New York University and member of its council. He donated the Nichols Chemistry Building and gave $250,000 for a new school of education building. (William H. Nichols Dies in Honolulu. New York Times, Feb. 23, 1950.) He left $250,000 to the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, of which he was vice chairman of the board; $100,000 to the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions; and $50,000 each to American Chemical Society and the American Society for the Control of Cancer. the Congregational Home Mission Society and the Y.M.C.A. also received bequests. (W.H. Nichols Left $1,000,000 to Public. New York Times, Mar. 15, 1930.) He gave $1,000 to the ASCC in 1927. ($50,000 to Cancer Society. New York Times, Feb. 20, 1927.) He left half his residuary estate to New York University. (W.H. Nichols Left $9,137,140 Estate. New York Times, Feb. 27, 1932.) His son, William H. Nichols Jr., was am officer of several of his companies.

The National City Bank of New York, 1933-34

Charles E. Mitchell and Hugh B. Baker resigned after a Congressional investigation of loans to its officers, and James H. Perkins became chairman and Gordon S. Rentschler chief operating executive of the bank. (Perkins New Head of National City. New York Times, Feb. 28, 1933.) The National City Company sold stock in Boeing Aircraft, the Pratt & Whitney Company, and Chance Vought that sold for $97 on the market to preferred investors for $30. They included H.B. Baker, Bernard M. Baruch, Gordon S. Rentschler, Charles E. Mitchell, Sosthenes Behn, Guy Cary, Percy Rockefeller, James A. Stillman and Col. R.W. Stewart. Rentschler's brother also profited. The companies were merged into United Aircraft. (Admits Big Profit in Aircraft Stock. New York Times, Feb. 2, 1934.)

W. Randolph Burgess

Warren Randolph Burgess was vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York since 1930, when he resiigned to become vice chairman of the National City Bank. Chairman James H. Perkins said he had been elected at the suggestion of Gordon S. Rentschler and himself. Burgess joined the statistics branch of the Fed in 1920. He was born in Newport, R.I. in 1889, and graduated from Brown University in 1912, and did post-graduate work at McGill and Columbia. He was president of the American Statistical Association in 1937, and a trustee of Robert College, Teachers College, and Brown University. (W.R. Burgess Quits Reserve Bank Post. New York Times, Sep. 14, 1938.) Burgess was on the merger committee of the Beekman Street Hospital, headed by Howard S. Cullman. (Hospital Merger Is Reported Near. New York Times, Oct. 1, 1938.) He was Vice Chairman of the National City Bank and a director of the Farmers Loan and Trust since at least 1940, when he was elected a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Company. (Elected By Mutual Life. New York Times, Nov. 28, 1940.) He was elected a member of the Corporation of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York. (Three in Hospital Corporation. New York Times, Jun. 12, 1945.) He was elected a director of IT&T in 1947. (7 New Directors Elected by I.T. & T. New York Times, Dec. 30, 1947.) He became Chairman of the Farmers in 1948. (Burgess Gets Bank Post. New York Times, Mar. 11, 1948.) He was a member of the fiscal advisory committee of the ECA, under Paul G. Hoffman. (Hoffman Picks Advisors. New York Times, May 22, 1948.) He was a trustee of the Health Insurance Plan of New York in 1948, of which Mrs. Albert D. Lasker was secretary. (Health Plan Pays $2,373,938 in Year. New York Times, May 19, 1948.) His first wife, May Ayres, was the sister of Leonard P. Ayres of the Cleveland Trust Company. She was in charge of a team of statisticians in the War Department from 1913 to 1920. In the late 1920s and early 30s, she was director of the commission that graded nursing schools in New York. (Mrs. W.R. Burgess, A Nursing Expert. New York Times, Jul. 16, 1953.) He was a director of International Telephone and Telegraph until 1953, when he resigned to become a special deputy of the Secretary of the Treasury. (City Bank Farmers Head Added to I.T. & T. Board. New York Times, Jan. 21, 1953.) Burgess was a member of President Eisenhower's Arden House group of policy makers. (Arden House Aids in Guiding Nation. By Charles Grutzner. New York Times, Sep. 7, 1953.) He was a trustee of the Carnegie Corporation, along with John W. Gardner, Devereux C. Josephs, Morris Hadley [S&B 1916], and Arthur W. Page. (Fund's Trustees Active in Policy. New York Times, Jul. 12, 1954.) He married Mrs. Arthur Woods, widow of the New York City Police Commissioner, the former Helen Morgan Hamilton. She was a great-great granddaughter of Alexander Hamilton and a niece of J. Pierpont Morgan. In 1949, she was director of public liaison of the Economic Cooperation Administration, and completed a survey for the Fund for Adult Education of the Ford Foundation. (W. Randolph Burgess, Treasury Officer, Will Marry Mrs. Arthur Woods March 5. New York Times, Feb. 22, 1955.) In 1965, he was a member of "Republicans for Progress," a "progressive" splinter group headed by Charles P. Taft, S&B 1918. (19 Republicans Join Party Progressives. New York Times, Apr. 15, 1965). A few years later, other members of this group were instrumental in creating the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and lobbying for it to proclaim that secondhand smoke causes cancer.

His brother, Robert W. Burgess, was director of the US Census Bureau during the Eisenhower administration. In 1955, the bureau surveyed 25,000 householders to find out "how many smoke and how often. It is understood that the results will be used in connection with research into lung diseases, particularly lung cancer."

Amory Houghton, Harvard 1921

His father, Alanson Bigelow Houghton, was the son of Amory Houghton Jr. and Ellen Bigelow Houghton. He was born in Cambridge, Mass. in 1863. "At Harvard he was class poet and editor of The Crimson. With the objective of becoming a writer on economics, he went to Europe after his graduation in 1886 and studied at Göttingen, Berlin and Paris." However, the family wanted him in the family business of glass-making, of which he became president in 1910. He was elected to Congress in 1918 for two terms, then Ambassador to Germany from 1922 to 1925, when he was appointed Ambassador to Great Britain. He resigned three years later. He was chairman of the Institute for Advanced Study, treasurer of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and a trustee of the Brookings Institution, Hobart College and St. Stephen's College, and president of the Board of Religious Education of Western New York. (A.B. Houghton Dies; Former Diplomat. New York Times, Sep. 17, 1941.) He was a witness to a codicil to the will of Bishop Charles Henry Brent of Buffalo (Bishop Brent Left $10,000 Estate. New York Times, May 9, 1929), a director of the International Acceptance Bank (Many Banks Change Directing Boards. New York Times, Jan. 14, 1931), and the Manhattan Company. (Manhattan Co. to Be a Bank Once More. New York Times, Oct. 20, 1932.)

Amory Houghton joined the Corning Glass Works in 1921, and had been its president since 1930. He was also a vice president of the Blue Ridge Glass Corporation, secretary of the Empire Machine Company, and a director of the Hartford-Empire Co., the American Blank Co., D'Electro Refractaire, the Corning Trust Co., and Steuben Glass Inc. He was elected a director of the National City Bank in 1937. (New Bank Director. New York Times, Sep. 8, 1937.) He was a trustee of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, of which his father, Alanson Bigelow Houghton, was a founding trustee and chairman of its board from 1930 until his death in 1941. (Princeton Institute Names Trustee. New York Times, Jun. 19, 1967.) In 1947, he was elected to a six-year term as an Overseer of Harvard University. Robert B. MacFadden of the National City Bank was chosen for the Harvard Fund Council. ($90,000,000 Called Need of Harvard. New York Times, Jun. 6, 1947.) Arthur Amory Houghton Jr., his cousin, donated the Houghton Library at Harvard.

He was president of Corning Glass Works from 1930 to 1941, chairman from 1945 to 1961 and ambassador to France from 1957 to 1961. He died in 1981 at age 81. He married Laura Richardson of Providence, R.I., in 1921. Their five children were Amory Houghton Jr., James R. Houghton, Rev. Alanson B. Houghton II, Elizabeth Weinberg, and Laura H. Beer. "Mrs. Houghton was a longtime supporter of Project Hope, the international medical education and training program, which operated a hospital ship, the Hope." (Laura Houghton, 102, Matriarch Of Corning Glassmaking Family. New York Times, Apr. 12, 2003.) Mr. and Mrs. Amory Houghton were members of the New York Committee for Project HOPE in 1964. (Project Hope Health Opportunities for People Everywhere. New York - 1964, p. 64.)

New York Committee for Project HOPE / UCSF

Amory Houghton was best man for Chandler Parsons Anderson Jr., who married his sister Matilda. "The ushers were nine Harvard undergraduates with the bridegroom and the Secretaries of the United States Embassy in London," A.A. Houghton Jr., Corning, N.Y.; Henry Faxon, George Lee, Robert Choate, Jo Stubbs, George Batchelder, and J.A. Lowell, Boston; Morris Phinney, Ray Atherton, and John Osborne, New York; and William Taylor, Philadelphia. (Royalty Attends Houghton Wedding. New York Times, Jul. 8, 1927.) His brother-in-law's father, Chandler Parsons Anderson, Scroll & Key 1887, represented the United States in numerous international legal issues, including the Bering Sea Claims Commission, Alaska Boundary Tribunal, North Atlantic Coast Fisheries Arbitration, and was legal advisor to U.S. embassies and legations and the State Department. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1936-1937, p. 38.) Chandler P. Anderson Sr.'s father, Henry H. Anderson, was Cornelius Vanderbilt II's legal advisor, and he and his brother, Henry B. Anderson, were witnessses to Vanderbilt's will. (Vanderbilt Will Changed By Heir. New York Times, Oct. 27, 1899.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1936-1937 / Yale University Library (pdf, 269 pp)

Their sister, Elisabeth Houghton of Washington, D.C., graduated from Lady Margaret's College, Oxford University. She was a member of the executive committee of the Washington Cathedral Foundation, and a former member of the board of governors of the American Red Cross. In 1971, President Nixon appointed her Joseph H. Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. (Elisabeth Houghton, Trustee. New York Times, Mar. 4, 1974.)

The National City Bank of New York, 1948-51

Directors: William Gage Brady Jr., Chairman; W. Randolph Burgess, Chairman, Executive Committee; Howard C. Sheperd, President; Sosthenes Behn, Chairman and President, International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation; Curtis E. Calder, Chairman, Electric Bond and Share Company; Guy Cary, Shearman & Sterling & Wright; Edward A. Deeds, Chairman, National Cash Register Company; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; A.P. Giannini, Founder-Chairman, Bank of America National Trust and Savings Association; Joseph P. Grace Jr., President, W.R. Grace & Co.; James R. Hobbins, President, Anaconda Copper Mining Company; Amory Houghton, Chairman, Corning Glass Works; Roger Milliken, President, Deering, Milliken & Co. Inc.; Gerard Swope, Honorary President, General Electric Company; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; and Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co. (Display Ad 29. New York Times, Apr. 5, 1948 p. 31.) In 1949, Frederick B. Rentschler, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation, joined the board, and A.P. Giannini was replaced by L.M. Giannini. (Display Ad 49. New York Times, Oct. 25, 1949 p. 47.) In 1951, Hobbins left and William H. Hoover, the new President of Anaconda, joined. (Display Ad 280. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1950 p. 84.) In 1951, Guy Cary left, and Boykin C. Wright, of Shearman & Sterling & Wright, joined. (Display Ad 330. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1951 p. 89.)

William Gage Brady Jr.

Brady was born in New York City around 1888, and graduated from Columbia University in 1908. He got his first business experience in the treasurer's office of the University, then went to the Bankers Trust Company. After six years there, in 1915 he joined the foreign department of the National City Bank. He was senior vice president of domestic operations in 1938, president in 1940, and chairman in 1948. He retired from the bank in 1952 but continued in business in Charlottesville, Va. as a director of the American Enka Corporation, Hugh W. Long & Co., Fundamental Investors, the Diversified Investment Fund, the Manhattan Bond Fund, and the Diversified Growth Fund until 1959. He had been a director of the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, Consolidated Edison, Sinclair Oil, United Aircraft, Western Union, the New York Hospital and the Memorial-Mission Hospital. (William G. Brady, Banker, 78, Dies. New York Times, Oct. 10, 1966.) John Hay Whitney was President of the Society of New York Hospital when he was elected to its board of governors. (National City's Chairman Joins N.Y. Hospital Board. New York Times, Jun. 21, 1950.) He was elected to the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States the next year. (Named to Church Post. New York Times, Dec. 6, 1951.) Mrs. William Gage Brady Jr. and Mrs. F. Huntington Babcock became the first women elected to the board of managers of St. Luke's Hospital. Eben W. Pyne was also elected; his great-grandfather, Percy R. Pyne, his great-uncle, Moses Taylor Pyne, and cousin Percy R. Pyne 2d, were all members of the board. (Tradition Broken At St. Luke's. New York Times, Jan. 13, 1951.) Fundamental Investors Inc. held 21,000 shares of of American Tobacco Co. (market value $1.3 million), 20,000 P. Lorillard Co. ($510,000), and 16,000 "B" shares of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. Fellow directors were Hugh W. Long, Thomas F. Chalker, William H. Lough, Julian K. Roosevelt, Solwin W. Smith, T. Kennedy Stevenson, and Roger Tuckerman. (Display Ad 144. New York Times, May 9, 1954.)

Roger Milliken, Wolf's Head 1937

Roger Milliken was the son of Gerrish H. Milliken [Yale 1898]. He took over the family’s textile business in 1947 when his father died. "He maintained close ties with a generation of conservative Republican senators who for decades dominated Southern politics, including Jesse Helms of North Carolina and South Carolina’s Strom Thurmond, whom Mr. Milliken is sometimes credited with helping to persuade to switch from the Democratic to the Republican Party in 1964." (Roger Milliken, Conservative Tycoon, Dies at 95. New York Times, Dec. 31, 2010.) He was a member of Wolf's Head. (Six Yale Societies Elect 90 Members. New York Times, May 8, 1936.)

The National City Bank of New York, 1952

Directors: William Gage Brady Jr., Chairman; W. Randolph Burgess, Chairman, Executive Committee; Howard C. Sheperd, President; Stanley C. Allyn, President, The National Cash Register Company; Sosthenes Behn, Chairman, International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation; Curtis E. Calder, Chairman, Electric Bond and Share Company; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; L.M. Giannini, President, Bank of America National Trust and Savings Association; Roy H. Glover, Vice President and General Counsel, Anaconda Copper Company; Joseph P. Grace Jr., President, W.R. Grace & Co.; Harry C. Hagerty, Financial Vice President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; Amory Houghton, Chairman, Corning Glass Works; Keith S. McHugh, President, New York Telephone Company; Roger Milliken, President, Deering, Milliken & Co. Inc.; Frederick B. Rentschler, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation; Gerard Swope, Honorary President, General Electric Company; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co.; and Boykin C. Wright, Shearman & Sterling & Wright. (Display Ad 39. New York Times, Jul. 3, 1952 p. 33.)

Harry C. Hagerty

Harry C. Hagerty was vice chairman and chief financial officer of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. "He joined Metropolitan Life in 1917 as a statistician, became assistant treasurer in 1931, treasurer in 1936, financial vice president in 1951, and vice chairman in 1960. He retired in 1964." He was on the board of W.R. Grace & Company, the First National City Bank, the Radio Corporation of America, the National Broadcasting Company, the Amerada-Hess Corporation, the Long Island Lighting Company, Brinks Inc., the East River Savings Bank, the Rochester Gas & Electric Corporation and the Commercial Solvents Corporation. He was a trustee of the University of Notre Dame, Fordham University, Holy Cross College and Manhattanville College. He was a board member of Catholic Charities, and a member of the Cardinal's Committee of the Laity. He was appointed a Papal Chamberlain in 1957 by Pope Pius XII, and was a Knight of the Order of Malta and a Knight of the Holy Sepulchre. (Harry C. Hagerty, Retired Executive. By George Dugan. New York Times, Sep. 25, 1977.) He resigned from the board of the Metropolitan Life in 1965. Fellow directors who also resigned that year included Jeremiah Milbank of Milbank & Co., a director since 1927, and Robert W. Woodruff, chairman of Coca-Cola. New directors included Albert L. Nickerson, Chairman of Socony Mobil Oil. (Five Directors Are Named to the Board of Metropolitan Life Insurance. New York Times, Apr. 16, 1965.) His son, married Harry Coleman Hagerty Jr., married the daughter of John A. Coleman, who was a director of Tobacco & Allied Stocks, and also a Knight of the Order of Malta. (Mary Ann Coleman Is Married Here. New York Times, Sep. 20, 1959.)

The National City Bank of New York, 1953-55

Directors: Howard C. Sheperd, chairman; James S. Rockefeller, president; Stanley C. Allyn, President, The National Cash Register Company; Sosthenes Behn, Chairman, International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation; Curtis E. Calder, Chairman of the Executive Committee, Electric Bond and Share Company; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; Ralph Gwin Follis, Chairman, Standard Oil Company of California; Roy H. Glover, Vice President and General Counsel, Anaconda Copper Company; Joseph P. Grace Jr., President, W.R. Grace & Co.; Harry C. Hagerty, Financial Vice President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; Amory Houghton, Chairman, Corning Glass Works; Keith S. McHugh, President, New York Telephone Company; Roger Milliken, President, Deering, Milliken & Co. Inc.; Richard S. Perkins, President, City Bank Farmers Trust Company; Frederick B. Rentschler, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co.; and Boykin C. Wright, Shearman & Sterling & Wright. (Display Ad 36. New York Times, Jan. 6, 1953 p. 35.). In 1954, Richard S. Perkins became vice-chairman of the board; and Nathan C. Lenfestey, executive vice president and cashier, joined the board of directors. (Display Ad 38. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1954 p. 35.) In 1955, De Witt A. Forward, senior vice president, replaced Lenfestey on the board, and Charles C. Parlin of Shearman & Sterling & Wright replaced Wright. (Display Ad 33. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1955 p. 31.) The National City Bank held the longest annual meeting in its 140-year history, at two hours and twenty minutes, when Lewis Gilbert and another minority stockholder offered three resolutions for stockholder review its proposed profit-sharing and pension plans. W. Randolph Burgess, who recently resigned to become Secretary of the Treasury, assured the meeting that "I'll still be working for you people." (National City Has a Lengthy Meeting. New York Times, Jan. 14, 1953.)

Stephen Van Rensselaer, Royal, Harvard 1928

Stephen Van Rensselaer (1905-1993) joined the First National Bank of the City of New York in 1928 as a clerk. He became manager of the credit department and then vice president from 1953 to 1955. When the First National merged with merged with the National City Bank in 1955, he continued as a vice president. He retired from the bank in 1970, but continued in business consulting and private investments. He graduated from Harvard in 1928. He lived in Locust Valley, Long Island. (S. Van Rensselaer, 88, Retired Bank Executive. New York Times, May 18, 1993.) He married Lillie Langstroth, daughter of Loraine Langstroth of Honolulu, Hawaii, and Oakland, California, and a niece of Dr. Lovell Langstroth. His brother, Charles A. Van Rensselaer, was best man. John M. Schiff and Douglas Robinson of New York and Clarence S. Postley of Burlingame were ushers. (S. Van Rensselaer to Wed Thursday. New York Times, Jul. 30, 1946; Floral Scene for Nuptials. Oakland Tribune, Aug. 2, 1946.) Dr. Langstroth claimed at AMA and CMA conventions that diet could cure heart disease, arthritis, and other illnesses. (Host of Ills Traced to Unbalanced Diet. Kingsport Times, Jun. 30, 1929; Doctor Outlines New Treatment For Arthritis. Salt Lake Tribune, May 1, 1934.) He was an instructor at the University of California and Stanford Medical Centers. (Langstroth Funeral Set For Sunday. Oakland Tribune, Jan. 21, 1966.) Dr. Lovell Langstroth Jr. was president of the Alameda County Heart Association, which promoted research on cholesterol by Dr. I.L. Chaikoff. (Heart Association Presents $17,000 in Research Grants. Oakland Tribune, Dec. 6, 1953), and was a delegate to the American Heart Association. (Officers Named By Heart Assn. Oakland Tribune, Jun. 7, 1954.) Chaikoff's publications date from 1934 to 1971.

Search: Langstroth L / PubMed
Search: Chaikoff IL / PubMed

Their father was Charles A. Van Rensselaer, of the importing firm of Charles A. Van Rensselaer & Co. (C.A. Van Rensselaer. New York Times, Jun. 24, 1950.) Charles Augustus Van Rensselaer married Caroline Elizabeth FitzGerald of Brookline, Mass. Her brothers, Harold and Stephen FitzGerald, were ushers. Philip Lydig was best man. (A Day's Weddings. New York Times, Dec. 13, 1899.) She was an aunt of Desmond FitzGerald of the C.I.A. Her niece, Eleanor FitzGerald, and her son, Charles A. Van Rensselaer Jr. and his wife, did fundraising for the American Society for the Control of Cancer. (Ball to Help Medical Work. New York Times, Feb. 27, 1927.) Charles A. Van Rensselaer Jr. married Maude Adele Brookfield, daughter of James H. Brookfield. (A Van Rensselaer in Quiet Wedding. New York Times, Feb. 23, 1925.)

Charles A. Van Rensselaer 3d attended the University of Florence, Italy. He married Yolande Domville Mascia, daughter of Luciano Mascia, the Italian Ambassador to Cuba. (Yolande D. Mascia Is Wed in Havana. New York Times, Feb. 24, 1952.) Mascia was second secretary of the Italian Embassy in Washington, D.C., whose marital troubles led Mussolini to prohibit diplomats from marrying foreign wives. (Italian Diplomat Quits Post Rather Than Give Up U.S. Girl. (Gettysburg Times, May 25, 1929.) From the 1930s and during World War II, he was an official of Mussolini's propaganda ministry. (King Finally Ends Fascist Travesty. By Seymour Berkson. Lowell Sun, Aug. 14, 1943.) In 1963, he took over the "Cholly Knickerbocker" society column from Igor Cassini, who had been indicted for serving as an unregistered foreign agent. (Police Probe Death of Columnist's Wife. AP. Racine Journal-Times, Apr. 10, 1963.) He lived in Palm Beach, Fla. since about 1969. He died in 1999 after a traffic accident. (Van Rensselaer, Charles A. III. New York Times, Jul. 16, 1999.) He co-wrote a gossip column in Palm Beach Society magazine with his boyfriend, Tom Cunneen. (The Season: The Secret Life of Palm Beach and America's Richest Society By Ronald Kessler, 2000, p. 121.)

The Season, p. 121 / Google Books

The First National City Bank of New York, 1956

Directors: Stanley C. Allyn, President, The National Cash Register Company; George F. Baker Jr., Trustee, George F. Baker Trust; Sosthenes Behn, Chairman, International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation; Percy Chubb 2d, Partner, Chubb & Son; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; Ralph Gwin Follis, Chairman, Standard Oil Company of California; De Witt A. Forward, Senior Vice President; Roy H. Glover, Chairman, Anaconda Copper Company; Joseph P. Grace Jr., President, W.R. Grace & Co.; George A. Guerdan, Vice President and Cashier; Harry C. Hagerty, Financial Vice President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; Amory Houghton, Chairman, Corning Glass Works; Keith S. McHugh, President, New York Telephone Company; Roger Milliken, President, Deering, Milliken & Co. Inc.; Edward S. Moore, Jr., Executive Vice President, National Biscuit Company; Charles G. Mortimer, Chairman, General Foods Corporation; Alexander C. Nagle, Chairman of the Executive Committee; Charles C. Parlin, Shearman & Sterling & Wright; Richard S. Perkins, Vice-Chairman of the Board; Frederick B. Rentschler, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation; James S. Rockefeller, President; Howard C. Sheperd, Chairman of the Board; William C. Stolk, President, American Can Company; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; and Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co. (Display Ad 136. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1956 p. 33.)

George F. Baker Jr.

George F. Baker Jr. (the third one, ~1915-1977) was a director of the City Bank Farmers Trust and the National City Bank from 1956 to at least 1971. Baker was found shot to death with a shotgun on his plantation near Tallahassee, Fla., an apparent suicide at age 62. His younger brother, Grenville, was accidentally shot to death there in 1949. He joined the First National Bank in 1939, a few months after graduating from Harvard. He was made a director in 1949, and continued as a director after the merger with the National City Bank. He was treasurer of the Fund for Medical Progress of the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. His first wife was Frances Drexel Munn and his second was the former Kim Kendall. (George F. Baker Jr., New York Socialite, Found Fatally Shot. New York Times, Dec. 12, 1977.) John Hay Whitney was big donor to the Fund for Medical Progress.

His father, George F. Baker Jr. (~1878-1937) was the son of George F. Baker, one of the founders of the First National Bank of New York in 1863. He married Edith Brevoort Kane, daughter of the Grenville Kanes. George Woolsey was best man. S. Walker, brother-in-law of the bride; William Goadby Loew, his brother-in-law; W. Prentice; and C.S. Lee were ushers. (Miss Edith Kane Bride at Tuxedo. New York Times, Oct. 15, 1911.) Mr. and Mrs. Baker raised funds for the American Society for the Control of Cancer. (Cancer Society's Benefit. New York Times, Dec. 14, 1926; Peacock Point Fete Attracts Throngs. New York Times, Sep. 13, 1927.) "The First National Bank leads in the percentage of representation on the A.T. & T. board. George F. Baker, chairman, and George F. Baker Jr., vice chairman of the First National, are directors of A.T. & T., while First National directors who are also on the A.T. & T. board include Myron C. Taylor and Walter S. Gifford. The Guaranty Trust may be said to be represented on the A.T. & T. board by James S. Alexander, John W. Davis, Charles P. Cooper and David F. Houston. Other directors of A.T. & T. who are connected with banking institutions include Thomas Nelson Perkins, a director of the State Street Trust Company of Boston; Edward E. Loomis, a trustee of the New York Trust Company; E.V.R. Thayer, chairman of the executive committee of the Central Trust Company of Illinois, and Daniel Willard, a director of the First National Bank of Chicago." Winthrop W. Aldrich, president of the Chase National Bank, was newly elected. (A.T. & T.'s Banking Directorate. New York Times, Aug. 24, 1930.) George F. Baker Sr. and Jr. contributed $2 million in 1920 to rebuild Lying-In Hospital. George F. Baker 3d is the fourth generation of the family to serve on the board of governors of New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. (Medical Center Gets $1.5 Million Whitney Gift. By Kathleen Teltsch. New York Times, Oct. 24, 1982.) George F. Baker Jr. was elected a governor of the Society of the New York Hospital after his father died. (G.F. Baker Jr. in Hospital Post. New York Times, June 3, 1931.) He was the chairman of the First National Bank, and died of peritonitis on his yacht in Honolulu Harbor. (George F. Baker, 59, Dies of Peritonitis on Yacht in Hawaii. New York Times, May 31, 1937.)

George F. Baker Jr.'s (~1915-1977) sister, Florence T. Baker, married T. Suffern Tailer Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Sidney S. Whelan were among the guests. (Florence T. Baker Weds T.S. Tailer Jr. New York Times, June 19, 1932.) His daughter, Edith B. Baker, married John M. Schiff, the grandson of Jacob H. Schiff of Kuhn, Loeb & Co. Paul F. Warburg was best man, and the bride's brother, George F. Baker, was an usher. (Edith Baker Wed to John M. Schiff. New York Times, May 4, 1934.) Georgette Whelan was a bridesmaid for both sisters. She was the daughter of Sidney Smith Whelan, an executive of the United Cigar Stores company and president of Philip Morris International Corporation in 1922. He was a stepson of George J. Whelan. He retired from the tobacco business in 1931, but remained a director of the Powhatan Brass and Iron Works of Ranson, W.V. (Sidney S. Whelan, 71, Tobacco Executive. New York Times, Nov. 6, 1959.) The Baker sisters were attendants for Georgette when she got married. Angier Biddle Duke was an usher. (Georgette Whelan Wed to G.G. Rutherfurd; Twelve Attendants in Bridal Procession. New York Times, Sep. 9, 1938.) George F. Baker Jr.'s (~1878-1937) granddaughter, Priscilla St. George, married Angier Biddle Duke Jr., the grandson of Benjamin N. Duke. Barbara Filed was a bridesmaid, and Marshall Field Jr. [4th] was an usher. (Priscilla St. George Is Married To Angier B. Duke in Tuxedo Park. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1937.) Mrs. T. Suffern Tailer and Mrs. George F. Baker Jr. were patronesses of fund raisers for Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. (May 18 Dinner At Plaza to Help Sloan-Kettering. New York Times, Apr. 7, 1966; Sloan-Kettering Center to Gain. New York Times, Aug. 30, 1967.)

The First National City Bank of New York, 1957-59

Directors: Stanley C. Allyn, President, The National Cash Register Company; George F. Baker Jr., Trustee, George F. Baker Trust; Percy Chubb 2d, Partner, Chubb & Son; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; Ralph Gwin Follis, Chairman, Standard Oil Company of California; De Witt A. Forward, Senior Vice President; Roy H. Glover, Chairman, The Anaconda Company; Joseph P. Grace Jr., President, W.R. Grace & Co.; Harry C. Hagerty, Financial Vice President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; H. Mansfield Horner, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation; Amory Houghton, Chairman, Corning Glass Works; Keith S. McHugh, President, New York Telephone Company; Roger Milliken, President, Deering, Milliken & Co. Inc.; Edward S. Moore, Jr., Executive Vice President, National Biscuit Company; Charles G. Mortimer, President, General Foods Corporation; Alexander C. Nagle, 20 Exchange Place; Charles C. Parlin, Shearman & Sterling & Wright; Richard S. Perkins, Vice-Chairman of the Board; James S. Rockefeller, President; Howard C. Sheperd, Chairman of the Board; William C. Stolk, President, American Can Company; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; Alan H. Temple, Executive Vice President; Leo D. Welch, Vice President, Standard Oil Company (New Jersey); and Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co. (Display Ad 212. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1957 p. 82.) In 1958, Houghton left, and Joseph A. Grazier, President, American Radiator & Standard Sanitary Corporation, joined the board. (Display Ad 36. New York Times, Jan. 3, 1958 p. 33.) Charles M. Brinckerhoff, President, the Anaconda Company, replaced Glover. (Display Ad 48. New York Times, Jan. 6, 1959 p. 45.)

The First National City Bank of New York, 1960

Directors: Stanley C. Allyn, Chairman, The National Cash Register Company; George F. Baker Jr., Trustee, George F. Baker Trust; Charles M. Brinckerhoff, President, The Anaconda Company; Percy Chubb 2d, President, Chubb & Son Inc.; Carl W. Desch, Cashier; Cleveland E. Dodge, Vice President, Phelps-Dodge Corporation; R. Gwin Follis, Chairman, Standard Oil Company of California; J. Peter Grace, President, W.R. Grace & Co.; Joseph A. Grazier, President, American Radiator & Standard Sanitary Corporation; George A. Guerdan, Vice President Operations; Harry C. Hagerty, Vice Chairman, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; H. Mansfield Horner, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation; Roger Milliken, President, Deering, Milliken & Co. Inc.; George S. Moore, President; Charles G. Mortimer, Chairman, General Foods Corporation; Alexander C. Nagle, 20 Exchange Place; Charles C. Parlin, Shearman & Sterling & Wright; Richard S. Perkins, Chairman of the Executive Committee; Clifton W. Phalen, President, New York Telephone Company; James S. Rockefeller, Chairman; William C. Stolk, President, American Can Company; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; Alan H. Temple, Vice Chairman; Leo D. Welch, Executive Vice President, Standard Oil Company (New Jersey); and Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co. (Display Ad 41. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1960 p. 41.)

First National City Bank of New York, 1961

Directors: Stanley C. Allyn, Chairman, The National Cash Register Company; George F. Baker Jr., Trustee, George F. Baker Trust; John E. Bierwirth, Chairman, National Distillers and Chemical Corporation; Charles M. Brinckerhoff, President, The Anaconda Company; Percy Chubb 2d, President, Chubb & Son Inc.; R. Gwin Follis, Chairman, Standard Oil Company of California; J. Peter Grace, President, W.R. Grace & Co.; Joseph A. Grazier, President, American Radiator & Standard Sanitary Corporation; George A. Guerdan, Vice President Operations; Harry C. Hagerty, Vice Chairman, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; H. Mansfield Horner, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation; John R. Kimberly, Chairman, Kimberly-Clark Corporation; Roger Milliken, President Deering-Milliken, Inc.; George S. Moore, President; Charles G. Mortimer, Chairman, General Foods Corporation; Alexander C. Nagle, 20 Exchange Place; Charles C. Parlin, Shearman & Sterling & Wright; Richard S. Perkins, Chairman of the Executive Committee; Clifton W. Phalen, President, New York Telephone Company; James S. Rockefeller, Chairman; William C. Stolk, Chairman of the Board, American Can Company; Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; Alan H. Temple, Vice-Chairman; Leo D. Welch, Chairman of the Board, Standard Oil Company (New Jersey); and Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co. (Display Ad 40. New York Times, Jan. 5, 1961 p. 41.)

First National City Bank, 1962

Directors and Trust Advisory Board: Stanley C. Allyn, Chairman, The National Cash Register Company; *George F. Baker Jr., Trustee, George F. Baker Trust; John E. Bierwirth, Chairman, National Distillers and Chemical Corporation; Charles M. Brinckerhoff, President, The Anaconda Company; Percy Chubb 2d, President, Chubb & Son Inc.; †William Rogers Coe, Trustee, The Coe Foundation; †Freeman J. Daniels, Perkins, Daniels, McCormack & Collins; †Hunt T. Dickinson, 405 Lexington Avenue; †Robert W. Dowling, President, City Investment Company; †Samuel Sloan Duryee, Parker, Duryee, Benjamin, Zunino & Malone; †Frederick M. Eaton, Shearman & Sterling; R. Gwin Follis, Chairman, Standard Oil Company of California; J. Peter Grace, President, W.R. Grace & Co.; Joseph A. Grazier, President, American Radiator & Standard Sanitary Corporation; George A. Guerdan, Senior Vice President; Harry C. Hagerty, Vice Chairman, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; H. Mansfield Horner, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation; Amory Houghton, Chairman of the Executive Committee, Corning Glass Works; John R. Kimberly, Chairman, Kimberly-Clark Corporation; Roger Milliken, President Deering-Milliken, Inc.; *George S. Moore, President; Charles G. Mortimer, Chairman, General Foods Corporation; Alexander C. Nagle, 399 Park Avenue; †William F. Oliver, President, The American Sugar Refining Company; Charles C. Parlin, Shearman & Sterling; *Richard S. Perkins, Chairman of the Executive Committee; Clifton W. Phalen, President, New York Telephone Company; †Eben W. Pyne, Senior Vice President; James S. Rockefeller, Chairman; †Howard C. Sheperd, 399 Park Avenue; William C. Stolk, Chairman of the Board, American Can Company; †Henry C. Taylor, Taylor, Pinkham & Co., Inc.; *Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; †Earle S. Thompson, Chairman, Allegheny Power System, Inc.; †J. Ed. Warren, President, Cities Service Company; Leo D. Welch, Chairman of the Board, Standard Oil Company (New Jersey); and *Robert Winthrop, Robert Winthrop & Co. (* Director and Member Trust Advisory Board; † Member Trust Advisory Board.) (Display Ad 174. New York Times, Jan. 4, 1962 p. 59.) Daniels was the counsel of the P. Lorillard Tobacco Company.

First National City Bank, 1963-65

Directors and Trust Board: *George F. Baker Jr., Trustee, George F. Baker Trust; †Dana T. Bartholomew, Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Aluminium Ltd.; William M. Batten, President, J.C. Penney Company Inc.; John E. Bierwirth, Chairman, National Distillers and Chemical Corporation; Charles M. Brinckerhoff, President, The Anaconda Company; Percy Chubb 2d, President, Chubb & Son Inc.; †William Rogers Coe, Trustee, The Coe Foundation; †Freeman J. Daniels, Perkins, Daniels, McCormack & Collins; †Hunt T. Dickinson, 405 Lexington Avenue; †Robert W. Dowling, President, City Investment Company; †Samuel Sloan Duryee, Parker, Duryee, Benjamin, Zunino & Malone; †Frederick M. Eaton, Shearman & Sterling; R. Gwin Follis, Chairman, Standard Oil Company of California; J. Peter Grace, President, W.R. Grace & Co.; Joseph A. Grazier, President, American Radiator & Standard Sanitary Corporation; Harry C. Hagerty, Director, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; Michael L. Haider, President, Standard Oil Company (New Jersey); H. Mansfield Horner, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation; Amory Houghton, Chairman of the Executive Committee, Corning Glass Works; †Amory Houghton Jr., President, Corning Glass Works; John R. Kimberly, Chairman, Kimberly-Clark Corporation; Roger Milliken, President Deering-Milliken, Inc.; George S. Moore, President; Charles G. Mortimer, Chairman, General Foods Corporation; †James M. Nicely, Vice President and Treasurer, The Ford Foundation; Robert S. Oelman, Chairman and President, The National Cash Register Company; †William F. Oliver, President, The American Sugar Refining Company; Charles C. Parlin, Shearman & Sterling; Richard S. Perkins, Chairman of the Executive Committee; Clifton W. Phalen, President, New York Telephone Company; James S. Rockefeller, Chairman; †Howard C. Sheperd, 399 Park Avenue; William C. Stolk, Chairman of the Board, American Can Company; †Henry C. Taylor, Taylor, Pinkham & Co., Inc.; *Reginald B. Taylor, Williamsville, N.Y.; †Earle S. Thompson, Chairman, Allegheny Power System, Inc.; †J. Ed. Warren, President, Cities Service Company; Leo D. Welch, Chairman, Communications Satellite Corporation; and *Robert Winthrop, Wood, Struthers & Winthrop. (* Director and Member Trust Advisory Board; † Member Trust Advisory Board.) (Display Ad 192. New York Times, Jul. 3, 1963 p. 37.) In 1963, Alan H. Temple, 399 Park Avenue, rejoined as a director and member of the Trust Advisory Board; and Hulbert W. Tripp, Financial Vice President of the University of Rochester, joined as a member of the Trust Advisory Board. (Display Ad 30. New York Times, Jan. 10, 1964 p. 33.) Coe, Nicely and Thompson left; Hagerty was replaced by George P. Jenkins, Financial Vice President of the Metropolitan Life; C. Sterling Bunnell, Chairman Credit Policy Committee, joined as a director, and Howard C. Harder, President Corn Products Company, joined as a director. (Display Ad 49. New York Times, Jul. 13, 1965 p. 47.)

Amory Houghton Jr., Harvard 1950

Amory Houghton Jr. is the son of Amory Houghton, Harvard 1921who was also a director of the National City Bank. Amory Houghton Jr. was elected a director of the New York Telephone Company in 1961. He was also a director of the B.F. Goodrich Co. (New York Telephone Selects New Director. New York Times, Jun. 29, 1961.) He was Chairman of the Board of Corning Glass Works, and Chairman of the board and Executive Officer of the Pittsburgh Corning Corporation, which was involved in asbestos litigation. Sidney J. Weinberg Jr. [his brother-in-law] of Goldman, Sachs & Co. was a director of Corning Glass Works. (Memorandum from Jeffrey Sherman to Francis K. Decker Jr., Dec. 10, 1981.) He was a founding member of The Fund for America's Future, formed by then-vice president George H.W. Bush. (Recruitment letter, by George Bush. Dec. 3, 1985.)

Pittsburgh Corning Corporation, Dec. 10, 1981 / UCSF
George Bush, Dec. 3, 1985 / UCSF

The Tobacco Institute Political Action Committee gave $500 to Friends of Houghton in 1992, and $500 to Friends for Amo Houghton in 1993. (Itemized Disbursements. The Tobacco Institute, Jul. 15, 1992, and Jul. 27, 1993.)

Itemized Disbursements, 1992 / UCSF
Itemized Disbursements, 1993 / UCSF

Amory Houghton Jr. married Ruth F. West, daughter of Robert Foster West, in 1950. His ushers were his brothers, Alanson B. Houghton and James R. Houghton; Edmund P. Dunstan Jr., James R. Lowell Jr., and Herbert P. Van Ingen, all of New York; Thomas Armstrong of Lancaster, Pa.; Andrew G.P. Hobbs of New Bedford, Mass.; Richard B. Kobusch of St. Louis; Robert Montgomery Jr. of Weatogue, Conn.; Charles M. Smith 4th of Providence, R.I.; Richard H. Soule of Brookline, Mass.; James B. Tailer of Marion, Mass.; Edwin S. Underhill 3d of Hammondsport, N.Y.; and James B. McCord, his brother-in-law. Chauncey Goodrich Parker 3d of Washington was best man. Her sister, Judith West, was maid of honor. Her other attendants included another sister and two sisters-in-law; Katherine KcKim Olyphant, Alice Taylor, and Katherine Talcott of N.Y., Louisa Noble of Groton, Mass., and Marley Marseilles of Waccabuc. (Nuptials Are Held for Ruth F. West. New York Times, Jun. 28, 1950.) Mrs. Amory (Ruth) Houghton Jr. of Corning, N.Y. was a delegate-at-large of the American Cancer Society's House of Delegates since 1971; also Past Secretary, Member of the Board and Executive Committee of the ACS New York State Division. (1975 House of Delegates and Board of Directors. American Cancer Society Inc., p. 21.)

ACS 1975 House of Delegates and Board of Directors / UCSF

His sister, Elizabeth Houghton, married James B. McCord Jr. (Nuptials Up-State for Miss Houghton. New York Times, Nov. 15, 1943.) Elizabeth Houghton's next husband was Sidney James Weinberg Jr., who was then with the Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation. (Mrs. M'Cord Affianced. New York Times, May 17, 1951.) His niece, Laura Richardson McCord, married George Gordon Guthrie. He was the son of Randolph H. Guthrie, senior partner of Mudge Rose Guthrie & Alexander and chairman of the executive committee of Studebaker-Worthington, Inc. He planned to join the corporate finance department of White, Weld & Co. Thomas Sibley [grandson of Harper Sibley] was one of his ushers. (George Guthrie Weds Laura McCord. New York Times, Feb. 13, 1972.) Laura R. McCord's next husband was Peter T. Grauer [crony of New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg]. Her daughter, Laura Richardson Guthrie married Frederick Wayne Lear Jr., regional vice president in the Dallas office of Neuberger Berman, an investment management unit of Lehman Brothers. (Laura Guthrie, Frederick Lear Jr. New York Times, Aug. 3, 2004.)

First National City Bank, 1967

Directors and Trust Board: *George F. Baker Jr., Trustee, George F. Baker Trust; *Dana T. Bartholomew, Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Alcan Aluminium Ltd.; William M. Batten, President, J.C. Penney Company Inc.; John E. Bierwirth, Chairman, National Distillers and Chemical Corporation; Charles M. Brinckerhoff, Chairman, The Anaconda Company; *William M. Chisholm, President, Oxford Paper Company; Percy Chubb 2d, Chairman, Chubb & Son Inc.; *Freeman J. Daniels, Perkins, Daniels & McCormack; *Hunt T. Dickinson, 405 Lexington Avenue; *Robert W. Dowling, President, City Investment Company; Frederick M. Eaton, Shearman & Sterling; R. Gwin Follis, Chairman, Standard Oil Company of California; J. Peter Grace, President, W.R. Grace & Co.; Gordon Grand, President, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation; Joseph A. Grazier, Chairman, American Radiator & Standard Sanitary Corporation; Michael L. Haider, Chairman, Standard Oil Company (New Jersey); *Howard C. Harder, President Corn Products Company; H. Mansfield Horner, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation; Amory Houghton, Honorary Chairman, Corning Glass Works; *Amory Houghton Jr., Chairman, Corning Glass Works; George P. Jenkins, Chairman Finance Committee, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; John R. Kimberly, President, Kimberly-Clark Corporation; *J. Howard Laeri, Vice Chairman; Roger Milliken, President Deering-Milliken, Inc.; George S. Moore, President; Charles G. Mortimer, Chairman of the Executive Committee, General Foods Corporation; Robert S. Oelman, Chairman The National Cash Register Company; *William F. Oliver, President, American Sugar Company; Richard S. Perkins, Chairman of the Executive Committee; Clifton W. Phalen, Chairman of the Executive Committee, New York Telephone Company; James S. Rockefeller, Chairman; Charles H. Sommer, President, Monsanto Company; William C. Stolk, Director, American Can Company; *Alan H. Temple, 399 Park Avenue; *Hulbert W. Tripp, Senior Vice President; *J. Ed. Warren, Consultant, 1271 Avenue of the Americas; Leo D. Welch, former Chairman of Standard Oil Company (New Jersey) and Communications Satellite Corporation; Albert L. Williams, Chairman of the Executive Committee, International Business Machines Corporation; Joseph C. Wilson, Chairman and CEO, Xerox Corporation; *Robert Winthrop, Wood, Struthers & Winthrop; and Howard C. Sheperd, Chairman Emeritus. (* Member Trust Board.) (Display Ad 326. New York Times, Jan. 12, 1967 p. 57.)

First National City Bank, 1968

Directors and Trust Board: *George F. Baker Jr., Trustee, George F. Baker Trust; *Frank S. Barnett, Chairman of the Executive Committee, Union Pacific Railroad Company; *Dana T. Bartholomew, Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Alcan Aluminium Ltd.; William M. Batten, Chairman, J.C. Penney Company Inc.; Charles M. Brinckerhoff, Chairman, The Anaconda Company; *William H. Chisholm, Executive Vice President, Ethyl Corporation; Percy Chubb 2d, Chairman, The Chubb Corporation; *Freeman J. Daniels, Perkins, Daniels & McCormack; John D. DeButts, Vice Chairman, American Telephone and Telegraph Company; Frederick M. Eaton, Shearman & Sterling; J. Peter Grace, President, W.R. Grace & Co.; Gordon Grand, President, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation; Joseph A. Grazier, Chairman, American Standard Inc.; Michael L. Haider, Chairman, Standard Oil Company (New Jersey); *Howard C. Harder, President Corn Products Company; *Robert L. Hoguet, Executive Vice President; H. Mansfield Horner, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation; Amory Houghton, Honorary Chairman, Corning Glass Works; *Amory Houghton Jr., Chairman, Corning Glass Works; George P. Jenkins, Chairman Finance Committee, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; John R. Kimberly, Chairman, Kimberly-Clark Corporation; *J. Howard Laeri, Vice Chairman; Gordon M. Metcalf, Chairman, Sears Roebuck & Co.; Roger Milliken, President Deering-Milliken, Inc.; George S. Moore, Chairman; Charles G. Mortimer, Chairman of the Executive Committee, General Foods Corporation; Robert S. Oelman, Chairman The National Cash Register Company; *William F. Oliver, President, American Sugar Company; Richard S. Perkins, Chairman of the Executive Committee; James S. Rockefeller, former Chairman; *Charles H. Sommer, President, Monsanto Company; William C. Stolk, Director, American Can Company; *Alan H. Temple, 399 Park Avenue; *Hulbert W. Tripp, Senior Vice President; *J. Ed. Warren, Consultant, 1271 Avenue of the Americas; Leo D. Welch, former Chairman of Standard Oil Company (New Jersey) and Communications Satellite Corporation; *Thomas R. Wilcox, Vice Chairman; Albert L. Williams, Chairman of the Executive Committee, International Business Machines Corporation; Joseph C. Wilson, Chairman and CEO, Xerox Corporation; *Robert Winthrop, Wood, Struthers & Winthrop; Walter B. Wriston, President. Howard C. Sheperd, Chairman Emeritus. (* Member Trust Board.) (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 12, 1968 p. 43.)

Thomas R. Wilcox

"THOMAS R. WILCOX New York City, ACS Director-at-Large (1959-60). Exec. Vice Pres., First National City Bank of New York, Trustee, Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York; East River Savings Bank. Chm.: Visiting Nurse Service of New York; Special Gifts Comm., Princeton Univ. campaign." (Know Your Board of Directors, 1961. American Cancer Society, p. 16.)

ACS Board of Directors, 1961 / UCSF
ACS Letterhead, 1963 / UCSF

Wilcox's parents were immigrants from Ireland. He began as a page at the First National City Bank in 1934. He received a degree in economics from Princeton in 1940, and served in the Navy during World War II. He was executive vice president from 1957 to 1967 and then vice chairman until resigning in 1971. In 1974, he became chairman and chief executive of the Crocker National Bank in San Francisco. The Midland Bank Ltd. of the U.K. acquired a majority share of Crocker in 1981, and Wilcox retired that year. Midland sold Crocker to Wells Fargo & Co. in 1986. His family said he died of cancer. One of his surviving brothers was George L. Wilcox of Ligonier, Penn. (Thomas R. Wilcox, 76, a Banker Who Rose From Page to Chairman. By Wolfgang Saxon. New York Times, Jul. 21, 1993.) In 1971, he was also a director of the Boeing Company, Colgate-Palmolive, National Cash Register, and National Distillers and Chemical Corporation, and a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York. He lived on Shelter Island and commuted by float plane. (Vice Chairman Leaving First National City Corp. By H. Erich Heinemann. New York Times, Aug. 3, 1971.) In 1967, he was a member of a special commission appointed by New York Mayor John V. Lindsay to recommend that the city's hospitals and health services be run by a public corporation appointed by the mayor. Gerard Piel, publisher of Scientific American, headed the commission, and the other members included Benjamin J. Buttenwieser and William T. Golden. (New Setup Urged for City Hospitals. By Martin Tolchin. New York Times, Dec. 16, 1967.) He joined Eastman Dillon as a vice chairman. (Loeb, Rhoades Promotes Two As It Drops Michel. By Terry Robards. New York Times, Nov. 23, 1971.) In 1975, when the U.S. Justice Department sued under the Clayton Act over interlocking directorships, Wilcox was also a director of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York, Colgate-Palmolive Company, Hilton Hotels Corporation, Schweppes (USA) Ltd., and United Merchants and Manufacturers, Inc. Fellow Crocker director Otto N. Miller was also a director of the Equitable and Weyerhaeuser; Crocker's executive committee chairman Emmett G. Solomon was also a director of the Metropolitan Life, Pacific Telephone and Telegraph, Pacific Gas and Electric, Clorox, and Union Sugar. (Banks and Insurers Sued Over Dual Directorships. New York Times, Oct. 7, 1975.)

His father-in-law, Maurice Collette, was vice president and a director of Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborne. He joined the George Batten Company in 1917. He handled the account of E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. since 1930. (Mary Jane Collette Married in Princeton to Lieut. Thomas Robert Wilcox of Navy. New York Times, Mar. 29, 1943; Maurice Collette, An Ad Executive, 70. New York Times, Apr. 4, 1956.) His brother, George L. Wilcox, was vice chairman of Westinghouse Electric. He graduated from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn with a Bachelor of Electrical Engineering in 1939. (Polytechnic Gives Degrees Tonight. New York Times, June 14, 1939.) He was elected vice president and a director of Westinghouse Electric International Company in 1953. (Vice President, Director of Westinghouse Unit. New York Times, Apr. 1, 1953.) He was elected an executive vice president of the Westinghouse Electric Corp. in 1963, responsible for the atomic, space, and defense group, the electric utility and marine group, electronic components and specialty products, and relations with Canadian Westinghouse Company Ltd., as well as Westinghouse Electric International. (Westinghouse Picks 2 Executive Vice Presidents. New York Times, Aug. 2, 1963.) He became a director two years later. (Westinghouse Elects Two Directors. New York Times, Oct. 29, 1965.)

First National City Bank, 1969-70

Directors and Trust Board: *George F. Baker Jr., Trustee, George F. Baker Trust; *Frank S. Barnett, Chairman of the Executive Committee, Union Pacific Railroad Company; *Dana T. Bartholomew, Executive Vice President, Finance, Alcan Aluminium Ltd.; William M. Batten, Chairman, J.C. Penney Company Inc.; Charles M. Brinckerhoff, Chairman Executive Committee, The Anaconda Company; *William H. Chisholm, Executive Vice President, Ethyl Corporation; Percy Chubb 2d, Chairman, The Chubb Corporation; *Freeman J. Daniels, Perkins, Daniels & McCormack; John D. DeButts, Vice Chairman, American Telephone and Telegraph Company; Frederick M. Eaton, Shearman & Sterling; *Richard M. Furlaud, President, Squibb-Beech-Nut Inc.; *Hon. Louis P. Gelinas, Consultant, Geoffrion, Robert & Gelinas, Inc.; J. Peter Grace, President, W.R. Grace & Co.; Gordon Grand, President, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation; Joseph A. Grazier, Chairman Executive and Finance Committee, American Standard Inc.; *William C. Greenough, Chairman & CEO, Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America and College Retirement Equities Fund; William P. Gwinn, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation; Michael L. Haider, Chairman, Standard Oil Company (New Jersey); *Howard C. Harder, President Corn Products Company; *Robert L. Hoguet, Executive Vice President; Amory Houghton, Honorary Chairman, Corning Glass Works; *Amory Houghton Jr., Chairman, Corning Glass Works; George P. Jenkins, Chairman Finance Committee, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; John R. Kimberly, Chairman, Kimberly-Clark Corporation; *J. Howard Laeri, Vice Chairman; Charles B. McCoy, President, E.I. duPont de Nemours & Co.; Gordon M. Metcalf, Chairman, Sears Roebuck & Co.; Roger Milliken, President Deering-Milliken, Inc.; †George S. Moore, Chairman; Charles G. Mortimer, Chairman of the Executive Committee, General Foods Corporation; Robert S. Oelman, Chairman The National Cash Register Company; *William F. Oliver, President, American Sugar Company; †Richard S. Perkins, Chairman of the Executive Committee; James S. Rockefeller, former Chairman; *Charles H. Sommer, Chairman, Monsanto Company; *Hulbert W. Tripp, Trustee and Chairman of the Investment Committee, The University of Rochester; *Thomas R. Wilcox, Vice Chairman; Albert L. Williams, Chairman of the Executive Committee, International Business Machines Corporation; Joseph C. Wilson, Chairman and CEO, Xerox Corporation; *Robert Winthrop, Wood, Struthers & Winthrop; †Walter B. Wriston, President. Howard C. Sheperd, Chairman Emeritus. (*Member Trust Board. †Director and Member Trust Board.) (Display Ad. New York Times, Jan. 14, 1969 p. 61.) In 1970, Harder and Hoguet left; Carl W. Desch, Senior Vice President and Cashier, and *M. Cabell Woodward Jr., President ITT Continental Baking Company, Inc. joined. (Display Ad 336. New York Times, Jan. 23, 1970 p. 43.)

First National City Bank, 1971

Directors: William M. Batten, Chairman, J.C. Penney Company Inc.; Milo M. Brisco, President, Standard Oil Company (New Jersey); Percy Chubb 2d, Chairman Executive Committee, The Chubb Corporation; John D. DeButts, Vice Chairman, American Telephone and Telegraph Company; Frederick M. Eaton, Shearman & Sterling; Dr. Louis K. Eilers, Chairman & CEO, Eastman Kodak Company; Dr. Lawrence E. Fouraker, Dean of the Faculty of Business Administration, Harvard Business School; J. Peter Grace, President, W.R. Grace & Co.; Gordon Grand, President, Olin Corporation; William P. Gwinn, Chairman, United Aircraft Corporation; John G. Hall, President, The Anaconda Company; Amory Houghton Jr., Chairman, Corning Glass Works; George P. Jenkins, Vice Chairman of the Board and Chairman of the Finance Committee, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; John R. Kimberly, Director, Kimberly-Clark Corporation; Charles B. McCoy, President, E.I. duPont de Nemours & Co.; Gordon M. Metcalf, Chairman, Sears Roebuck & Co.; Roger Milliken, President Deering-Milliken, Inc.; Charles G. Mortimer, Chairman of the Executive Committee, General Foods Corporation; Robert S. Oelman, Chairman The National Cash Register Company; *Edward L. Palmer, Chairman of the Executive Committee; *William I. Spencer, President; Franklin A. Thomas, President, Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation; Albert L. Williams, Chairman of the Executive Committee, International Business Machines Corporation; Joseph C. Wilson, Chairman, Xerox Corporation; Walter B. Wriston, Chairman. (* Also Member Trust Board.)

Trust Board: George F. Baker Jr., Trustee, George F. Baker Trust; Frank S. Barnett, Chairman of the Board and CEO, Union Pacific Corporation and Union Pacific Railroad Company; William H. Chisholm, Executive Vice President, Ethyl Corporation; Paul J. Collins, Senior Vice President; Freeman J. Daniels, Perkins, Daniels & McCormack; Richard M. Furlaud, President, Squibb-Beech-Nut Inc.; Hon. Louis P. Gélinas, Consultant, Geoffrion, Robert & Gélinas, Inc.; William C. Greenough, Chairman & CEO, Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America and College Retirement Equities Fund; Amory Houghton, Honorary Chairman, Corning Glass Works; J. Howard Laeri, Vice Chairman; William F. Oliver, President, Amstar Corporation; Richard S. Smith, Vice President-Administration, National Steel Corporation; Charles H. Sommer, Chairman, Monsanto Company; Thomas C. Theobald, Executive Vice President; Hulbert W. Tripp, Trustee and Chairman of the Investment Committee, The University of Rochester; Thomas R. Wilcox, Vice Chairman; Robert Winthrop, Honorary Chairman, Wood, Struthers & Winthrop Inc.; and M. Cabell Woodward Jr., President ITT Continental Baking Company, Inc. (Display Ad 30. New York Times, Jan. 22, 1971 p. 31.)

First National City had $1.75 billion, or 20 percent of its total equity, in just five companies: International Business Machines (the largest, with $700 million), Xerox, Avon Products, General Motors and Eastman Kodak. General Motors and Standard Oil of New Jersey were "probably" the bank's largest depositors. "The biggest and fastest growing portion of First National City's trust operation is its administration of pension and profit sharing plans, which totaled $5.9 billion at the end of last year, up from $5.4 billion a year earlier. Personal trusts came to $4.1 billion, down slightly from Dec. 31, 1969. Investments advisory accounts and estates made up the $1.7 billion balance." (City Bank Lists Its Stock Investments. By Erich Heinemann. New York Times, Apr. 15, 1971.)

First National City Corporation and First National City Bank, 1973

Directors of First National City Corporation and First National City Bank: *Lord Aldington, Chairman, National and Grindlays Bank Ltd.; *Frank S. Barnett, Chairman of the Board and CEO, Union Pacific Corporation and Union Pacific Railroad Company; William M. Batten, Chairman, J.C. Penney Company Inc.; John D. DeButts, Chairman, American Telephone and Telegraph Company; Frederick M. Eaton, Shearman & Sterling; Dr. Lawrence E. Fouraker, Dean of the Faculty of Business Administration, Harvard Business School; Clifton C. Garvin Jr., President, Exxon Corporation; J. Peter Grace, Chairman & CEO, W.R. Grace & Co.; Harry J. Gray, President & CEO, United Aircraft Corporation; H.J. Haynes, President, Standard Oil Company of California; Amory Houghton Jr., Chairman of the Board, Corning Glass Works; †George P. Jenkins, Vice Chairman of the Board, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; C. Peter McColough, Chairman & CEO, Xerox Corporation; Charles B. McCoy, Chairman and President, E.I. duPont de Nemours & Co.; †Gordon M. Metcalf, Chairman, Sears, Roebuck and Co.; Roger Milliken, President Deering-Milliken, Inc.; Robert S. Oelman, Chairman The National Cash Register Company; Edward L. Palmer, Chairman of the Executive Committee; †Charles M. Piggott, President, PACCAR Inc.; †William M. Rees, Chairman and President, The Chubb Corporation; *George C. Scott, Vice Chairman; William I. Spencer, President; Franklin A. Thomas, President, Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation; †Albert L. Williams, Chairman of the Finance Committee, International Business Machines Corporation; and Walter B. Wriston, Chairman. (* Director of First National City Corporation only; † Director of National City Bank only.) (Display Ad 100. New York Times, Jan. 24, 1973 p. 57.)

First National City Corporation and First National City Bank, 1974

Directors of First National City Corporation and First National City Bank: *Lord Aldington, Chairman, National and Grindlays Bank Ltd.; *Frank S. Barnett, Chairman of the Board and CEO, Union Pacific Corporation and Union Pacific Railroad Company; William M. Batten, Chairman, J.C. Penney Company Inc.; *Arthur G. Cohen, Chairman of the Board & CEO, Arlen Realty and Development Corporation; *G.A. Costanzo, Vice Chairman; John D. DeButts, Chairman, American Telephone and Telegraph Company; Frederick M. Eaton, Shearman & Sterling; Dr. Louis K. Eilers, Director, Eastman Kodak Company; Dr. Lawrence E. Fouraker, Dean of the Faculty of Business Administration, Harvard Business School; Clifton C. Garvin Jr., President, Exxon Corporation; J. Peter Grace, Chairman & CEO, W.R. Grace & Co.; Harry J. Gray, Chairman, President & CEO, United Aircraft Corporation; Robert S. Hatfield, Chairman of the Board and CEO, Continental Can Company Inc.; H.J. Haynes, President, Standard Oil Company of California; Amory Houghton Jr., Chairman of the Board, Corning Glass Works; †George P. Jenkins, Chairman of the Board, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; C. Peter McColough, Chairman & CEO, Xerox Corporation; Charles B. McCoy, Chairman Finance Committee, E.I. duPont de Nemours & Co.; Roger Milliken, President Deering-Milliken, Inc.; Robert S. Oelman, Chairman The National Cash Register Company; Edward L. Palmer, Chairman of the Executive Committee; †Charles M. Piggott, President, PACCAR Inc.; †William M. Rees, Chairman and President, The Chubb Corporation; Dr. Eleanor H.B. Sheldon, President, Social Science Research Council; Darwin E. Smith, Chairman of the Board and CEO, Kimberly-Clark Corporation; William I. Spencer, President; Franklin A. Thomas, President, Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation; Albert L. Williams, Chairman of the Executive Committee, International Business Machines Corporation; and Walter B. Wriston, Chairman. (* Director of First National City Corporation only; † Director of National City Bank only.) (Display Ad 88. New York Times, Jan. 25, 1974 p. 49.)

Citibank and anti-smoking

Irvine H. Dearnley and Christopher C. York, Vice Presidents of Citibank, participated in Work Group 4, "Smoking Control in the Workplace," of the National Conference on Smoking OR Health, Developing a Blueprint for Action, Nov. 18-20, 1981. Other participants included Group Leader Robert Beck, Director of Personnel Benefits and Services of IBM Corp.; Lloyd C. Arnold, director of the Johnson & Johnson Company's Live for Life; Gilbert H. Collings Jr. and Loring Wood of the New York Telephone Company; Willis Goldbeck, Ann Kiefhaber, and Leon J. Warshaw of the Washington Business Group on Health; Marvin M. Kristein of the American Health Foundation; Stanley M. Little of the Boeing Co.; Rebecca S. Parkinson of AT&T; and A. Judson Wells, Special Assistant of the American Lung Association and later ghost author (concealed behind illegal pass-through contracts) of the EPA ETS report.

Work Group 4, National Conference on Smoking OR Health, 1981 / UCSF

Christopher C. York

"After four years’ active duty as a Captain with the U.S. Air Force JAG 1970, Professor York served as Secretary of Citibank’s Board of Directors; Associate General Counsel of Citicorp; Vice President of Planning & Marketing of AmBase Corporation, and EVP—Management and COO of Project HOPE, the international medical education NGO. He earned an AB degree at Colgate University, an MA degree at the East-West Center at the University of Hawaii and a JD degree at Emory University Law School. His current research interests are ethical business practices and self regulating work teams. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and of the Bars of the U.S. Supreme Court; the 5th and 11th Federal District Courts, and the Supreme Court of the State of Georgia." (Christopher C. York, JD. Clinical Assistant Professor of Management, Institute on Contemporary Issues in Global Management, Sacred Heart.)

Christopher C. York, JD / Sacred Heart

In 1988, he was on the editorial board of "Business & Health" magazine, a publication of the Washington Business Group on Health.

Business & Health, April 1988 / UCSF
Business & Health, May 1988 / UCSF
Business & Health, June 1988 / UCSF
Business & Health, July 1988 / UCSF - with anti-smoking editorial by Willis B. Goldbeck
Business & Health, Aug. 1988 / UCSF
Business & Health, Sep. 1988 / UCSF
Business & Health, Nov. 1988 / UCSF

"...For the past decade he has operated his own international consultancy, specializing in strategic marketing planning. He served on the Board of Keyport Benefit Life Insurance Company and as a Trustee of NASA’s Center for Technology Commercialization, He has served on a number of academic, federal and state advisory councils regarding health policy and financial regulation, and has published articles in professional journals. He is a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, a member of The Pilgrims Society and the Phi Beta Kappa. He holds an AB from Colgate University, an MA from the East-West Center of the University of Hawaii, and a JD from the Emory University Law School. His academic specialties are Russian and Asian studies, Overseas Business and International Law. He served four years active duty as a Captain in the U.S. Air Force. He is a founding partner of Academica Associates." (Academic Leadership, Feb 22, 2007.)

Christopher C. York / Academic Leadership

In 1993, American Express under Sanford Weill acquired The Travelers, and Salomon Brothers, whose biggest shareholder was Warren Buffett, in 1997. In 1998, The Travelers acquired Citibank and became Citigroup [CIK 0000831001], and in 2000 Weill kicked Reed out.

Chronology of Sandy Weill's Career / Wall Street Journal Books

"In news on the muni front, Salomon Smith Barney was named the lead senior manager for the first two tobacco securitization plans (the transformation of revenue from the large tobacco settlement into bonds) in the summer of 1999" by New York City and Nassau County, NY.

Salomon Smith Barney / Iwon.com

Citicorp 1994

Directors: D. Wayne Calloway, Chairman & CEO, Pepsico Inc., director since 1988; Colby H. Chandler, former Chairman & CEO, Eastman Kodak Co., director since 1984; Pei-Yuan Chia, Vice Chairman, Citicorp and Citibank N.A., director since 1993; Paul J. Collins, Vice Chairman, Senior Corporate Officer for Europe and the Middle East, director since 1985; Kenneth T. Derr, Chairman & CEO, Chevron Corp., director since 1987; H.J. Haynes, Director & senior counselor, Bechtel Group Inc., director since 1972; John S. Reed, Chairman, Citicorp and Citibank N.A., director since 1982, also a director of Philip Morris Companies Inc.; William R. Rhodes, Vice Chairman, Citicorp and Citibank N.A., director since 1991, other activities - New York Hospital; Rozanne L. Ridgway, Co-Chair, The Atlantic Council of the U.S., director since 1990; H. Onno Ruding, Vice Chairman, Citicorp and Citibank N.A., director since 1990; Frank A. Shrontz, Chairman & CEO, The Boeing Company, director since 1986; Mario H. Simonsen, Vice Chairman, Brazilian Institute of Economics, The Getulio Vargas Foundation, director since 1979; Roger B. Smith, former Chairman & CEO, General Motors Corp. [conceived the General Motors Cancer Research Prizes in 1978], director since 1987, also a director of Johnson & Johnson; Christopher J. Steffen, Senior Executive Vice President, Citicorp and Citibank N.A., director since 1993, was an officer of Honeywell Inc. from 1989 to 1993; Franklin A. Thomas, President, The Ford Foundation, director since 1970, also a director of American Telephone & Telegraph Company, CBS Inc. and Cummins Engine Company, Inc.; Edgar S. Woolard Jr., Chairman & CEO, E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., director since 1987, also a director of International Business Machines Corp. Directors Lawrence E. Fouraker and Donald V. Seibert retired. The current directors and executive officers of Citicorp as a group beneficially owned approximately 1.98% of Citicorp's outstanding shares. Fidelity Management & Research Company, a subsidiary of FMR Corp. of Boston, owned approximately 7.22% of Citicorp's outstanding common stock. His Royal Highness Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Al Saud held shares of non-voting Convertible Preferred Stock, Series 12, which were convertible into common stock representing approximately 9.68% of Citicorp's common stock outstanding.

Citicorp 1994 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Citicorp 1995 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Citicorp 1996 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Citicorp 1997 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Citicorp 1998 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

Robert E. Rubin joined Goldman, Sachs & Co. in 1966, was a general partner in 1971, Vice Chairman and Co-COO 1987-1990, and Co-Senior Partner and Co-Chairman from 1990 to 1992. He left to become Assistant to the President (Clinton) for Economic Policy from 1993-1995, and Secretary of the Treasury 1995-1999. He was Secretary of the Executive Committee of Citigroup since 1999. He was also a trustee of NYU Health, and a member of the Harvard Corporation.

Citigroup Inc. 1999 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Citigroup Inc. 2000 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

"Bank commits millions in fight against cancer." Citibank press release, Nov 15, 2000. "Citibank USA has introduced two new credit cards that directly contribute to the fight against cancer [sic], America's number one personal health concern. Through a relationship with the American Cancer Society, the nation's leading voluntary health organization, Citibank has also committed to boost the organization's mission reach through Citibank's employees and customers..." It is expected to generate $15 million over a period of five years.

Nov. 15 2000 press release / Citigroup

Citigroup Inc. 2001 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Citigroup Inc. 2002 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Citigroup Inc. 2003 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Citigroup Inc. 2004 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Citigroup Inc. 2005 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Citigroup Inc. 2006 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

Directors of Citigroup in 2007 included Ann Dibble Jordan and Charles Prince (who were directors of Johnson & Johnson), Robert E. Rubin, and Franklin A. Thomas, who had been a director of Citigroup or its predecessors since 1970.

Citigroup Inc. 2007 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
Citigroup Inc. 2008 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

Citigroup 2009

C. Michael Armstrong, Chairman, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Health Systems and Hospital, July 2005 to present; Chairman, Comcast Corporation, 2002 to 2004; Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, AT&T Corp., 1997 to 2002; Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Hughes Electronic Corporation, 1992 to 1997. He was with International Business Machines Corporation, including member of the IBM Management Committee and Chairman of the IBM World Trade Corporation, from 1961 to 1992. He has been a director of Citigroup since 1989.

Alain J.P. Belda, Chairman and CEO of Alcoa, has been a senior executive of Alcoa, including its subsidiary in Brazil, since 1979. He is also a director of I.B.M. H has been a director of Citigroup since 1997.

John M. Deutch, Institute Professor at M.I.T. He was at the U.S. Department of Energy 1978-1980, the Defense Department 1993-1995, Director of Cenral Intelligence 1995-1996, and has been Dean of Science, Provost and professor of chemistry at M.I.T. between 1982 and the present. He was a director of Cummins Engine Company in 1997.

Jerry A. Grundhofer was Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Firstar Corporation and Star Banc Corporation (predecessors to U.S. Bancorp) from 1993 to 2007.

Andrew N. Liveris joined the Dow Chemical Company in 1976, and has been its President, COO, CEO, and presently Chairman. He is also a trustee of the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation and Tufts University. He has been a director of Citigroup since 2005.

Anne M. Mulcahy joined Xerox in 1976, has been a senior executive since 1999 and is currently Chairman. She is also a director of The Washington Post Company, and has been a director of Citigroup since 2004.

Michael E. O’Neill was Chief Financial Officer of Continental Bank from 1993 to 1995; Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer of Bank of America from 1995 to 1998; CEO of Barclay's PLC in 1999; and Chairman and CEO of Bank of Hawaii Corporation from 2000 to 2004.

Richard D. Parsons, director or officer of Time Warner Inc. or predecessors since 1991 to present. He was also Assistant Counsel to N.Y. Gov. Hugh Carey, and Deputy Counsel to Vice President Nelson Rockefeller, both in 1975; General Counsel and Associate Director of the White House Domestic Council, 1975-1977. He is also a Trustee of the Rockefeller Foundation. Director of Citigroup or predecessor since 1996. He is also a former director of Philip Morris.

Lawrence R. Ricciardi joined American Express in 1973, and was an Executive Vice President and General Counsel from 1983 to 1989. He was Executive Vice President, General Counsel, and President of RJR Nabisco during and after the takeover by KKR He has been a senior executor and advisor to the chairman of I.B.M. since 1997.

Dr. Judith Rodin has been President of the Rockefeller Foundation since 2005. She was Provost of Yale University 1992-1994, President of the University of Pennsylvania 1994-2004. She has been a director of Citigroup since 2004. She has a history of anti-smoking activism dating back to the 1970s.

Anthony M. Santomero, former President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, 2000-2006, and senior advisor of McKinsey & Co. 2006-2008, was professor of finance at the University of Pennsylvania. He is also a trustee of Drexel University and Drexel University College of Medicine.

William S. Thompson Jr., retired CEO (1993-2009) of Pacific Investment Management Company (PIMCO), was with Salomon Bros. from 1975-1993. He is also a director of Pacific Life Corporation. He is new on the board.

State Street Bank and Trust Company, Boston, Mass., owned 6.2% of common stock.

Citigroup Inc. 2009 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

Who Benefits From the Bailout?

"The particularly frustrating part about the bailouts is that if we're to believe much of the media coverage, the money is going toward keeping financial executives high on the hog and cushioning the fall of those who brought about calamity in the first place. There's certainly some truth to these claims, but most coverage has failed to call out one of the primary beneficiaries of the bailouts. Any guesses? If you said "bondholders," then you are smarter than a fifth-grader. So who are these shadowy figures known only as "the bondholders?" To put it broadly, these are the companies and investment funds that own the debt of companies like Citigroup, Bank of America, JPMorgan, and General Motors and are hoping that these same companies can -- maybe with a little help -- stave off bankruptcy. As for their exact identities, they're a bit harder to track down than equity holders, but I dug up the major bondholders for Citigroup and Bank of America. There's a good deal of overlap between the two, particularly at the top with PIMCO -- the bond fund behemoth -- and mutual fund giant Vanguard leading both lists. Other major holders include MetLife, AIG's life insurance arm, Fidelity, Prudential, Dodge & Cox, and TIAA-CREF... But even if the reasoning behind bailing out bondholders isn't anything new, the player is one that hasn't gotten much attention -- and that seems like a big oversight. After all, if there was a video "Banks Gone Wild," bondholders would be the cheering crowd feeding the banks drinks and encouraging them to go further." (Who's Really Getting Bailed Out? By Matt Koppenheffer. The Motley Fool, Apr. 6, 2009.)

Who's Really Getting Bailed Out? / The Motley Fool

PIMCO

The original directors of PIMCO included Guilford C. Babcock, Associate Professor of Finance at the University of Southern Califormia; William J. Popejoy, former chief exective officer of Orange County, California; Thomas P. Kemp, a former senior vice president of Beatrice Foods; Vern O. Curtis, director of 16 real estate trusts affiliated with Public Storage Inc., Charitable Work, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and chairman and CEO of Denny's Inc. (1980-1987); and Brent R. Harris, director of Harris Oil Company, Chairman of the Board of PIMCO. Executive officers included William S. Thompson, formerly Managing Director at Salomon Brothers Inc. It was the only closed-end fund that invested primarily in commercial mortgage-backed securities.

PIMCO 1996 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission
PIMCO N-30D Dec. 31, 1995 Annual Report / Securities and Exchange Commission

"On May 5, 2000, Allianz AG completed the acquisition of approximately 70% of the outstanding partnership interests in PIMCO Advisors L.P. ("PIMCO Advisors"), of which PIMCO is a subsidiary partnership. As a result of this transaction, PIMCO Advisors, and its subsidiaries, are now controlled by Allianz AG, a leading provider of financial services, particularly in Europe." (PIMCO Commercial Mortgage Securities Trust, Inc. June 30, 2000 Semi-Annual Report.)

PIMCO Form N-30D June 30, 2000 / Securities and Exchange Commission

The old directors of PIMCO continued in office until April 24, 2008, when the majority of shareholders voted to change the Fund’s investment management to Allianz Global Investors Fund Management (AGIFM), and new directors were elected. In May, Diane L. Taylor was appointed a director by the board of directors, not by election. (PCM Fund, Inc. Semi-Annual Report, June 30, 2008.) Diana L. Taylor is the mistress of anti-smoker New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

PCM Fund, Inc. Form N-CSRS June 30, 2008 / Securities and Exchange Commission
PCM Fund Inc. 2009 DEF-14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

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cast 11-12-14