The Perkins Family

Samuel Gardiner Perkins (1767-1847)

Samuel G. Perkins was the younger brother of James and Thomas Handasyd Perkins, the founders of the China trading firm of J. & T. Perkins & Co. In the 1780s, Samuel G. Perkins handled their business in Santo Domingo. In 1794, he was a partner in S. Higginson & Co., one of whose captains, James Magee, had made a voyage to China. (Thomas Handasyd Perkins. The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, July 1856.) He married Stephen Higginson's daughter, Barbara Cooper Higginson, in 1795. They had four daughters and two sons, including Rev. James Handasyd Perkins (1810-1849). Mrs. Perkins' brother, Stephen Higginson (1770-1834), married Louisa Storrow, sister of Thomas Wentworth Storrow. (Descendants of the Reverend Francis Higginson. By Thomas Wentworth Higginson, 1910, p. 29.)

Descendants of the Reverend Francis Higginson / Internet Archive

Rev. James Handasyd Perkins (1810-1849) - a Cincinnati friend of Skull & Bones founder Alphonso Taft

James H. Perkins was the youngest child of Samuel G. Perkins and Barbara Higginson of Boston. He went to Cincinnati in 1832, where he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1834. He met Sarah H. Elliott, who was visiting her sister, Mrs. Samuel E. Foote, and married her the same year. In 1835, he purchased the Saturday Evening Chronicle and merged it with the Cincinnati Mirror. In 1841, he became pastor of the Unitarian Society of' Cincinnati. He was also Vice-President and Recording Secretary of the united Ohio and Cincinnati Historical Societies. In 1849, believing that his two sons, ages seven and nine, were dead, Perkins apparently jumped into a river from a ferry-boat and drowned. (James H. Perkins (1810-1849). William Turner Coggeshall, The Poets and Poetry of the West: With Biographical and Critical Notices 167-169. Columbus, Ohio: Follett, Foster and Company, 1860; James Handasyd Perkins. In: Cincinnati, the Queen City, 1788-1912. By S.J. Clarke Publishing, p. 587-589?).

James H. Perkins (1810-1949) / ~Jelkins/wvnet.edu
James Handasyd Perkins - Cincinnati, the Queen City, 1788-1912 / Google Books

The Elliotts are descendants of Rev. Joseph Eliot, son of Rev. Joseph Eliot, the Apostle, who married Mary Wyllis, a Royal descendant of Edward III, King of England. (Genealogy of the Descendants of John Eliot, 1598-1905. By Wilimena H. (Eliot) Emerson, 1905, p. 120; Americans of Royal Descent: A collection of genealogies of American families. By Charles Henry Browning, 1891, p. 406.)

Americans of Royal Descent, p. 406 / Google Books
Genealogy of the Descendants of John Eliot, p. 120 / Google Books

The two sons were Charles Elliott Perkins and Edward Cranch Perkins. Another son was James Handasyd Perkins (1848-1889), who married Mary Longworth Stettinius, the daughter of John L. Stettinius of Cincinnati (In: The Making of Nicholas Longworth: Annals of an American Family. By Clara Longworth de Chambrun. Ayer Publishing, 1971, p. 101.) He graduated from Exeter and Harvard in 1870, and the law school of Cincinnati College in 1872. (James Handasyd Perkins Jr. In: Cincinnati, the Queen City, 1788-1912. By S.J. Clarke Publishing, p. 604.) John Longworth Stettinius [Jr.] (1832-) was the grandson of Nicholas Longworth. He was a 33d degree Mason and a Royal Arch Mason. (John Longworth Stettinius. In: Cincinnati, the Queen City, 1788-1912. By S.J. Clarke Publishing, 1912, p. 612.)

The Making of Nicholas Longworth / Google Books
James Handasyd Perkins Jr. - Cincinnati, the Queen City, 1788-1912 / Google Books
John Longworth Stettinius - Cincinnati, the Queen City, 1788-1912 / Google Books

"Mr. Perkins was born in Boston in 1810 and was educated at Exeter. He was for a time a clerk in the counting room of his uncle, the well known philanthropist Thomas H. Perkins. After a tour of England and the West Indies, he settled in Cincinnati in 1832." His cousin, Rev. W.H. Channing, was pastor of the Unitarian Church, originally called the First Congregational Society, and Perkins took his place when he died in 1847 (p. 775). James H. Perkins was one of the "prominent citizens who took an active interest" in the First Congregational Church in Cincinnati; its second pastor was Ephraim Peabody, "who also joined Mr. Perkins and others in the publication of the Western Messenger, a monthly magazine." (p. 624). Perkins was one of the founders of the Semi-Colon Club, a social club whose members included Harriet Beecher (Stowe), E.P. Cranch, historian Charles W. Elliott, and Joseph Longworth. Samuel E. Foote's house was its usual meeting place until the financial panic of 1837. (Centennial History of Cincinnati and Representative Citizens. By Charles Theodore Greve. Biographical Pub. Co., 1904, p. 648). Joseph Longworth was the son of Nicholas Longworth (-1863) (p. 579). Joseph Longworth attended Yale only for his senior year, and graduated in 1832, the year before Alphonso Taft. He inherited an estate of $5 million. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1880-1890, p. 175.) Ephraim Peabody was the father of Harvard President Charles W. Eliot's first wife.

The Unitarian Church - Centennial History of Cincinnati / Google Books
The Semi-Colon Club - Centennial History of Cincinnati / Google Books
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1880-1890, p. 175 / Google Books

[Harriet Beecher (1811-) had a romantic attraction to Perkins. (Harriet Beecher Stowe: A Life. By Joan D. Hedrick. Oxford University Press, 1994.) She was in Cincinnati from 1832 to 1836 with her father, Rev. Lyman Beecher, and after her marriage to Prof. Stowe. Her mother was Roxanna Foote, his first wife, and Samuel E. Foote was her uncle. (The Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe. By Charles Edward Stowe. Project Gutenberg.) In 1852, according to the Boston Taveler, she received a copyright premium of $10,300 from Jewett & Co. for three months sales of her book, "Uncle Tom's Cabin." It was reputed to be "the largest sum of money ever received by an author, either American or European, from the actual sales of a single work in so short a period of time." Cleveland Herold, July 12, 1852.)]

Harriet Beecher Stowe: A Life / Google Books
The Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe / Infomotions

"Efforts to define and control delinquency in Ohio originated in the late 1830s among a local elite in Cincinnati, by far the state's largest city. This group may be usefully described as white males in their forties, Protestant moralists, Yankee migrants, Whigs (later Republicans), and businessmen or professionals (law, journalism, or education, often pursued simultaneously). Notable among them were Alphonso Taft, Samuel Lewis, and James Handasyd Perkins3. They opposed slavery and enthusiastically supported a variety of good works, including popular education and the systematic organization of poor relief and penal institutions... 3. Alphonso Taft, Secretary of War in the Grant administration and father of the President, was born in Vermont. He received his law degree from Yale (1833) and migrated from Connecticut in 1840 to become one of Cincinnati's most successful lawyers. Samuel Lewis, in 1814 an impoverished migrant from Massachusetts, gained affluence through marriage and as a legal adviser to local businessmen. In 1838 he was appointed the first State Superintendent of Common Schools. Militantly antislavery, he helped Salmon P. Chase, another Yankee-born Cincinnati lawyer, organize the Liberty Party. Later, Lewis was an unsuccessful Free Soil candidate for Congress and the governorship. James Handasyd Perkins left a comfortable family import business in Boston to become a lawyer-journalist in Cincinnati in 1832. He subsequently accepted a call from the First Congregational Society, but the relationship was strained as Perkins goaded the pious membership to get involved in practical work such as the Cincinnati Relief Union which he helped to establish. See Henry F. Pringle, The Life and Times of William Howard Taft, I (New York, 1939), 7-19; W. G. W. Lewis, Biography of Samuel Lewis (Cincinnati, 1857); William H. Channing, ed., Memoirs and Writings of James Handasyd Perkins, 2 vols. (Cincinnati, 1851)." ("The Family System of Common Farmers": The Origins of Ohio's Reform Farm, 1840-1858. By Robert M. Mennell. Ohio History, Spring 1980, Vol. 89 No. 2, pp 125-126.)

Ohio History / Ohio Historical Society

Mrs. James H. Perkins' Sister's Family, the Samuel Edmund Footes

Sarah Hart Elliott's sister, Elizabeth Betts Elliott, married Samuel Edmund Foote. They moved to New Haven, Conn., where their son, Henry Ward Foote, graduated from Yale in 1866. He died young, and left $25,000 to Yale. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1870-1880, p. 150.) Their daughter, Frances Elizabeth Foote, married Edwin Lawrence Godkin, who founded the "Nation" in 1865, and was later an editor of the New York Evening Post. (Genealogy of the Descendants of John Eliot, 1598-1905. By Wilimena H. (Eliot) Emerson, 1905, pp. 119-120; re Joseph Eliot and Mary Wyllys, p. 32.)

Genealogy of the Descendants of John Eliot, p. 119 / Google Books
Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1870-1880, p. 150 / Google Books

Their daughter, Katherine Virgina Foote, married Alfred Perkins Rockwell (1834-1903), Yale 1855, son of John Arnold and Mary Watkinson (Perkins) Rockwell. He was Professor of Mining in the Sheffield Scientific School 1865-1868, and at M.I.T. from 1868-1873. He was chairman of the Board of Fire Commissioners in Boston from 1873-76, President of the Eastern Railroad Co. 1876-79, and Treasurer of the Great Falls (N.H.) Manufacturing Co. until retiring in 1886. In 1901 he was the official representative of Yale University at the Millenary Celebration of King Alfred the Great in England. (Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 333.) He died while visiting his daughter, the wife of Prof. Edward H. Jenkins, in New Haven. (Gen. Alfred Rockwell Dead. New York Times, Dec. 25, 1903; Death List of a Day. New York Times, Mar. 25, 1902.)

Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale, 1900-1910, p. 333 / Google Books

The Elliotts

Her brother, Charles Wyllys Elliot, married Mary Green White, daughter of Abijah and Ann Maria (Howard) White, and a sister of Mrs. James Russell Lowell and Mrs. Dr. Estes Howe. He had cattle and sheep interests in Nebraska and Kansas. He died in 1883. (Genealogy of the Descendants of John Eliot. By Ellsworth Eliot, George Edwin Eliot, William Horace Eliot. Revised. The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Press, 1905, p. 159.) [James Russell Lowell (1819-1891) was appointed minister to Spain by President Rutherford B. Hayes, who was part of the Cincinnati clique. Lowell High School in San Francisco was named after him in 1894.]

Charles Wyllys Elliot, Genealogy of the Descendants of John Eliot / Google Books

Her nephew, Howard Elliott, graduated from Harvard in 1881. He worked for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railroad while attending school, and after graduating, for its branch lines in Keokuk, Iowa. In 1902, he was elected a second vice president of the CBQ, and in 1903, president and a director of the Northern Pacific Railroad. He was also a director of the St. Louis Union Trust Company. Genealogy of the Descendants of John Eliot. By Ellsworth Eliot et al., 1905, p. 191.) He was elected president of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad in 1913, and resigned in 1917, but continued as a director and member of the executive committee He also became chairman of the Northern Pacific. He was a member of the Railroads' War Board from 1917 to 1927. He was alected an Overseer of Harvard three times, the last time in 1924., and was a life member of the Corporation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (Howard Elliott Dies at Age of 67. New York Times, Jul. 9, 1928.) He was president of the Harvard Alumni Association in 1916. He was a director of over a dozen railroads, and the Guaranty Trust [1924-28] and the Fulton Trust. (Officers of Harvard Alumni Association. Lowell Sun, Oct. 27, 1916.) His son, Howard Elliot Jr., and daughter, Mrs. Frederick R. Wulsin, inherited a third each, and his grandsons, Edmund Pendleton Rogers Jr. and Howard Elliott Rogers, each recieved a sixth of his estate of over $2.5 million. The Fulton Trust Company was trustee. (Elliott Will Gives Estate to Family. New York Times, Jul. 18, 1928.) His son-in-law, Edmund Pendleton Rogers, Skull & Bones 1905, was president of the Fulton Trust.

Charles Elliott Perkins (1840-1907)

"Charles Elliott Perkins was born in Cincinnati Nov. 24, 1840. When 19 years old he went to Burlington, Iowa, and became a clerk in the office of the Assistant Treasurer of the Burlington & Missouri River Railroad. In 1862 he was appointed Assistant Treasurer of the road, and three years later was made Superintendent. In 1875 he was appointed a Director of new Chicago, Burlington & Quincy system. The following year he was elected Vice President, and in 1881 was advanced to the office of President." He resigned in 1901, when New York interests took control of the road. (Charles E. Perkins Dead. New York Times, Nov. 9, 1907.) He began work as a clerk at 16. He joined the Burlington & Missouri Railroad as a clerk in the office of Charles R. Lowell, the assistant treasurer (with whom he also boarded), and he was promoted when Lowell left the next year. As superintendent, he extended the line into Nebraska. (From "Progressive Men of Iowa," 1899. In: Genealogy of the Descendants of John Eliot. By Ellsworth Eliot, George Edwin Eliot, William Horace Eliot. Revised. The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Press, 1905, pp. 121-123.) Charles Russell Lowell (1835-1864) was the valedictorian at Harvard in 1854. He was killed in action in the Civil War. He was a nephew of James Russell Lowell. Mrs. Charles Russell Lowell (Josephine Shaw) co-founded the Charity Organization Society of New York in 1882. (Wikipedia accessed 3/2/08.)

Charles Elliott Perkins - Genealogy of the Descendants of John Eliot / Google Books

Directors of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad in 1876 were John M. Forbes, Sidney Bartlett, John W. Brooks, Charles J. Paine, and T. Jefferson Coolidge, all of Boston; John N.A. Griswold, Newport, R.I.; William J. Rotch, New Bedford, Mass. Peter Geddes, J.M. Walker, and Robert Harris of Chicago; and Charles E. Perkins of Burlington, Iowa. (Railroads. Daily Inte-Ocean, Feb. 24, 1876.) In 1883, the certificates of the 5 per cent bonds of the CBQ were exchanged for the common stock of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad, and the latter's Gould directors resigned. The new directors were John A. Griswold, Peter Geddes, Elihu Root, W.J. Ladd, Charles E. Perkins, and C.J. Paine. (Notes of Various Interests. New York Times, May 17, 1883.) Directors of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy in 1885 were John M. Forbes, Charles J. Paine, Edward Bangs, Francis W. Hunnewell, Peter Geddes, Sidney Bartlett, John L. Gardiner, T. Jefferson Coolidge, John N.A. Griswold, Wirt Dexter, and Charles E. Perkins. (Notes of Various Interests. New York Times, May 20, 1886.) In 1897: John M. Forbes, Charles J. Paine, William Endicott Jr., Frances W. Hunnewill, Richard Olney, and George P. Gardner of Boston; John N.A. Griswold and James H. Smith of New York; T. Jefferson Coolidge of Manchester, Mass., Edward W. Hooper, of Cambridge, Mass.; and Charles E. Perkins of Burlington, Iowa. (Burlington & Quincy Election. New York Times, May 9, 1895.) In 1897, Endicott left. (Burlington's Good Report. New York Times, May 13, 1897.) Charles E. Perkins continued as a director after resigning as president. His former assistant, Second Vice President George B. Harris, took his place as president. (Burlington's New President. New York Times, Feb. 21, 1901.) Peter Geddes and James Henry Smith were business agents for George Smith of London, England. George B. Harris was the older brother of John F. Harris of Harris, Upham & Co.

Charles Elliott Perkins was a director of the Bell Telephone Company as well, starting with its second election in 1885, when he replaced Charles S. Bradlee of Providence. William R. Driver was elected Treasurer, and George Eustis Hubbard, Clerk. (The Bell Telephone Company. New York Times, Apr. 1, 1885.) Clerk - Charles Eustis Hubbard; Treasurer - William R. Driver, Directors - Francis Blake, Charles P. Bowditch, George L. Bradley, Channing Clapp, Alexander Cochrane, William H. Forbes, Charles Eustis Hubbard, Gardiner G. Hubbard, John E. Hudson, Robert B. Minturn, Charles E. Perkins, and Thomas Sanders. "The above-named gentlemen were elected by a practically unanimous vote, and the meeting adjourned." (The Bell Telephone. New York Times, Mar. 30, 1887.) The Hubbards were brothers-in-law of Richard A. McCurdy of the Mutual Life Insurance Company.

Mrs. Charles E. Perkins was Edith Forbes, a daughter of R.B. Forbes of Milton, sister of J. Murray Forbes, and cousin of J. Malcolm Forbes. She was killed in an earthquake while visiting her daughter in California. Their children were Mrs. Robert F. Herrick and Robert Forbes Perkins of Framingham, Mrs. Edith Cunningham of Santa Barbara, Mrs. William Hooper of Manchester, and Charles E. Perkins (Jr.) of Burlington, Iowa. They were married in 1864. (Victim Was From Boston. New York Times, Jun. 30, 1925.) Robert Bennet Forbes (1804-1889) was the son of Ralph Bennet and Margaret Perkins Forbes. He sailed for China at age 13 for his uncles, the Perkins brothers, and was a captain at 20. He was on the sea until 1832, then returned to China for several years in 1838. He was the head or a partner of Russell & Co. until 1857. He married Rose Greene Smith in 1870. (Robert Bennet Forbes. Memorial Biographies of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1907, p. 416.)

James Murray Forbes Papers / Massachusetts Historical Society
Robert Bennet Forbes - Memorial Biographies of the NEHGS, 1907, p. 416 / Google Books

"Ralph Bennet Forbes's third son, John Murray Forbes [1813-1898], like his two older brothers, went to China at an early age and soon acquired a great fortune. Unlike them, he then transferred his business interests to projects within the United States, especially railroads. He was the driving force behind the construction of the Michigan Central and the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroads, serving as president of the latter in the 1880s. During the Civil War, he aided the Northern cause in many ways: he acted as consultant to the Navy, traveled to England to prevent the Laird "rams" from falling into Confederate hands, and urged Lincoln to allow the enlistment of more Negro troops. John Murray Forbes and his wife Sarah Hathaway Forbes had a daughter named Mary Hathaway Forbes. Their son William Hathaway Forbes (1840-1897) married Edith Emerson in 1865 and became the first president of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company." (Biographical Sketch. Forbes Family Papers 1732-1931. Massachusetts Historical Society.)

Forbes Family Papers / Massachusetts Historical Society

Robert Forbes Perkins, Harvard 1889

Robert Forbes Perkins was the head of the Boston brokerage Bond & Goodwin. He was born in Milton in 1865, and graduated from Harvard in 1889. He was with Lee, Higginson & Co. until 1897, when he joined Bond & Goodwin. He was survived by two sons, four daughters, four sisters, and one brother. (Robert F. Perkins, Retired Broker, 72. New York Times, Feb. 21, 1938.) He married Anna R. Bowditch, daughter of the late E. Francis Bowditch, in 1891. They were divorced, and she married Bronson Rumsey, of Cody, Wyoming. (Boston Banker Asks Divorce. New-York Tribune, Feb. 15, 1910; Divorce Suit Just a Favor. New York Times, Feb. 14, 1910; The William Bowditch Tree. RonUlrich.com.) E. Francis Bowditch was a trustee of the Massachusetts General Hospital Corporation in 1885 and 1887. (Local Matters. Fitchburg Sentinel, Feb. 6, 1885; Massachusetts General Hospital. Boston Daily Globe, Feb. 3, 1887.)

The William Bowditch Tree / RonUlrich.com

Charles Elliott Perkins Jr.

Charles Elliott Perkins Jr. was born in Burlington in 1881, and was a classmate of President Franklin [Roosevelt] and a member of the Board of Overseers of Harvard University. He was President of the C.B. & Q. from 1918 to 1921, and a director until 1929; and a member of the executive board of the Southern Pacific Railroad. (Charles E. Perkins, Rail Official, Dies. New York Times, Jun. 20, 1943.) He was a trustee of FDR's National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis in 1937. Charles Elliott Perkins (3d) died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at his large ranch in Santa Ynez, Calif. (Charles Elliott Perkins, 47, Was Rancher in California. New York Times, Mar. 23, 1965.) He was an usher at the marriage of Eugene Van Rensselaer Thayer Jr. to Gladys Brooks. (Thayer-Brooks Wedding. New York Times, Sep. 4, 1903.)

Edward Cranch Perkins

"Jane Sedgwick Watson, 4th child of Robert Sedgwick Watson (B43,4) and Mary Taber (Hathaway) Watson, was born May 16, 1838, at New Bedford, Mass. She had a twin sister, Louisa, who died at the age of one year. She married June 10, 1869, Edward Cranch Perkins of Boston, who grew up in Connecticut. He was son of James Handasyd Perkins, Unitarian minister of that city and of Sarah H. (Elliott) Perkins. He attended Exeter Academy, was on the Harvard crew against Yale at Lake Quinisgamond, Worcester, and graduated at Harvard College and at the Harvard Law School. He was a prominent Boston lawyer and cotton buyer for New England mills, developed mining properties and was counsel for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad of which his brother, Charles E. Perkins, was president. His Harvard classmate, William Jones Ladd, married his wife's sister, Anna Russell Watson." (A Sedgwick Genealogy: Descendants of Deacon Benjamin Sedgwick, p. 182. Sedgwick.org.) Edward Cranch Perkins graduated from Harvard University in 1866. After graduating from Harvard, Edward C. Perkins was associated with the Galveston cotton brokerage firm of Ladd & Amory during the winter, and studied law with John M. Forbes in Boston during the summer. He died in 1914. He was the father of Thomas Nelson Perkins (1870-1937) HC1891, Elliott Perkins (1873-), James Handasyd Perkins (1876-1940) HC1898, and John Forbes Perkins (1878-) HC1899. (The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. LXXV, 1921, p. xliii.)

A Sedgwick Genealogy: Descendants of Deacon Benjamin Sedgwick, p. 182 / Sedgwick.org
Edward Cranch PERKINS / Jane Sedgwick WATSON / Sedgwick.org
The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. LXXV, 1921 / Google Books

Thomas Nelson Perkins (1870-1937)

"Colonel Thomas Handasyd Perkins of Boston, a brother of Thomas Nelson Perkins's great-grandfather, became the first President of America's first railroad, when he was made head of the Granite Railway, a crude tramway two and three-fourths miles long, which was built at Quincy, Mass., in 1826, to convey to the waterfront the granite blocks with which the Bunker Hill monument was built. The Colonel also was one of the most noted merchant ship owners of his time, having maintained one of the country's largest fleets of clipper ships in the China trade. The present Mr. Perkins also has a connection with the railroad world in that John M. Forbes, a nephew of Colonel Perkins, had a prominent part in the building of the Chicago, Burlington, & Quincy, became its President and was succeeded in that office by his cousin, Charles E. Perkins. Thomas Nelson Perkins was born in Milton, Mass., in 1870. He was graduated from Harvard College in 1891 and from Harvard Law School three years later. He has been a member of the Massachusetts bar for thirty-five years. During the World War Mr. Perkins was made chief counsel to the War Industries Board, and later became Assistant to the Secretary of War for purchase and supply. When the Dawes plan was adopted at the London conference in 1924 Mr. Perkins was selected as an added member of the Reparations Commission with a vote on all matters pertaining to the Dawes plan. Through that post he was in the important position, during the period when the Dawes organization was getting started, of holding the vote which would have decided a tie among the other four nationals." He later resigned to become President of the Arbitral Tribunal of Interpretations, a post he held as of 1928, when he was elected Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Boston & Maine Railroad. He was also a Fellow of Harvard University, Chairman of the Commercial Radio International Committee, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Puget Sound Power and Light Company, Vice President and a director of the Railway and Light Securities Company, and a director of the Lee Higginson Trust Company, Merrimac Chemical Company, Flintkote Company and the Postum Company. (Perkins A Descendant of First Railway Head. New York Times, Mar. 11, 1928.) He was named an alternate to J.P. Morgan on the US Reparations Committee. (Perkins Sails For Paris. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1929.) He was acting president of the Boston & Maine when George Hannauer died. (T.N. Perkins Heads the Boston & Maine. New York Times, Nov. 6, 1929.) Perkins and W. Cameron Forbes [HC 1892], partner of J.M. Forbes & Co. and Governor General of the Philippines under President Taft, were elected directors of the Engineers Public Service Company. "Both men have been connected with the Puget Sound Power and Light Company, recently acquired by Engineers, for more than thirty years." (Utility Elects Two Directors. New York Times, Dec. 9, 1928.)

Thomas Nelson Perkins was an usher at the marriage of James Abercrombie Burden to William Douglas Sloane's daughter Adele. Frederick W. Winthrop was best man, and the other ushers were G. Richmond Fearing Jr., C.C. Baldwin, Louis Adams Frothingham, Rufus K. Thomas, and George Baty Bates, all Harvard friends and members of the Porcellian Club. (A notable Wedding at Lenox. New York Times, Jun. 2, 1895.)

Perkins was an usher at the wedding of Frederick Winthrop to Dorothy Amory, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Amory of Boston. Grenville Winthrop was best man. The other ushers were William Amory 2d and George G. Amory, the bride's brothers; Hugh Whitney, Ingersoll Amory [HC 1892], J.A. Burden Jr. and F.N. Watriss of New York; Francis R. Bangs and Rudolph L. Agassiz [HC 1892] of Boston; and Nicholas Longworth of Cincinnati. Mary Curtis and Marjorie Cochran were bridesmaids, and the pages were the two sons of Mr. and Mrs. T. Jefferson Coolidge [Jr.], née Clara Amory. (A Day's Weddings. New York Times, Jan. 21, 1903.)

Thomas Nelson Perkins was best man for Nicholas Longworth of Cincinnati, who married President Theodore Roosevelt's daughter, Alice. (The President A Guest At Longworth Dinner. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1906.) Perkins and Longworth had been candidates for the Varsity rowing team at Harvard (Harvard University. New York Times, Feb. 23, 1890); Perkins became the captain, and C.F. Adams was the coach. (Harvard's Unpromising Crew. New York Times, Jun. 2, 1892.) Alice was the oldest child of President Roosevelt, and the only child of his first marriage to Alice Hathaway Lee Roosevelt, who died a few days after she was born.

Thomas Nelson Perkins's second wife was Louisa J. Catherine Adams (b. 1871), the daughter of Charles Francis Adams Jr. (1835-1915) [who had been president of the Union Pacific Railroad 1884-90]. They were married in 1906. (Descendants of King Charlemagne. 36th Generation and 35th Generation.) The five Fellows and Treasurer of the Harvard Corporation who chose the new President of Harvard in 1908: Henry Pickering Walcott, Henry Lee Higginson, Francis Cabot Lowell, Arthur Tracy Cabot, and Thomas Nelson Perkins; Charles Francis Adams was Treasurer. Walcott was a physician and a member and later chairman of the Massachusetts Board of Health. Arthur Tracy Cabot was "one of Boston's leading Surgeons." (Abbott Lawrence Lowell, 1856-1943. By Henry Aaron Yeomans. Ayer Publishing, 1948, pp. 84-85.) In 1913, Thomas Nelson Perkins was trustee of the newly-formed Harvard Mutual Foundation, "a system that will ultimately mean, it is believed, millions of dollars to Harvard University." Fellow trustees were Charles Francis Adams 2d, Treasurer of Harvard University; Arthur Lyman, George Uriel Crocker, John Candler Cobb, Alexander H. Ladd, and Charles H.W. Foster. Adams said that "The trust is created to hold certain donations of funds and property from several men who desire to provide an income for their immediate heirs and have the property then go to Harvard, and is so arranged that other funds and properties can be added to the trust from time to time. I do not care to give the names and amounts of the donations, as I think the donors would prefer not to have their names published, but will say that a very substantial amount has already been received." (Millions in Harvard Trust. New York Times, Mar. 26, 1913.) Perkins resigned as a Fellow of the Harvard Corporation to serve on the Reparations Committee in Europe. He had been a Fellow since 1905 and was the youngest member ever elected. (T.N. Perkins Resigns Fellowship. New York Times, Oct. 30, 1924.) Clarence Cook Little, the future head of the American Society for the Control of Cancer, was secretary to the Harvard Corporation from 1910-12. And, in 1922, the Office of Cancer Investigations of the US Public Health Service at Harvard University (which was subsequently merged into the National Cancer Institute), was established at Harvard by Assistant Surgeon General Joseph W. Schereschewsky. Perkins was a member of the Harvard Corporation at during both times.

36th Generation / FamilyOrigins.com

Thomas N. Perkins accompanied Owen D. Young, Vice President of the General Electric Company, to Argentina in order to consolidate the radio operations of the Radio Corporation of America with those of the English Marconi Company, the French Compagnie de Telegraphie Sans Fil and the German Telefunken. (Big Radio Concerns to Use One Station. New York Times, Mar. 24, 1922.)

He was a member of the US Commission to the allied war talks, headed by Col. Edward Mandell House [a close friend of President Woodrow Wilson since his days as Governor of New Jersey in 1911]. Other members were Admiral W.S. Benson, Chief of Naval Operations; General Tasker H. Bliss, Chief of the General Staff; Assistant Secretary Oscar T. Crosby; Vance C. McCormick [Yale 1893], Chairman of the War Trade Board; Bainbridge Colby of the Shipping Board; and Dr. Alonzo E. Taylor of the Food Administration; and Gordon Auchincloss as Secretary. (House in Europe, Heads War Envoys. Nov. 8, 1917.) He was a member of the U.S. War Industries Board in 1918, with Bernard M. Baruch as chairman, Herbert Bayard Swope as his assistant, and Howard P. Ingels as secretary. The other original members were Alexander Legge, J. Leonard Replogle, Judge Edwin B. Parker; George N. Peek, Gerard Swope and Thomas Nelson Perkins representing the War Department; Robert S. Brookings, Admiral F.F. Fletcher, General George W. Goethals, Hugh Frayne, and Albert C. Ritchie [Governor of Maryland in 1930]. The War Board held biennial reunions until at least 1930. (War Board to Meet Again. New York Times, Nov. 10, 1930.)

Thomas Nelson Perkins was counsel for the Lee, Higginson Trust Company when it was chartered in 1927. Those who favored the plan included George C. Lee, Charles E. Cotting, David H. Howie and representatives of the Second National, Atlantic National, Merchants' National, Shawmut National and Old Colony Trust Company. (Trust Firm Gets Charter. New York Times, Aug. 31, 1927.) The Lee Higginson Trust Company was liquidated in 1932. "Announcement of the impending discontinuance of the trust company was made by its president, Francis C. Gray. Among its directors are former Governor Allen of Massachusetts, Thomas N. Perkins,... and L. Edmund Zacher, president of the Traveler Insurance Company. George C. Lee is chairman of the board. When the trust company was organized, in the Fall of 1927, it was announced that Ivar Kreuger, late Swedish financier, would be a member of its board of directors." (Lee, Higginson Trust Plans to Liquidate. New York Times, May 25, 1932.)

Directors of Stone & Webster in 1933: Henry G. Bradlee, W. Cameron Forbes, Joseph P. Grace, George O. Muhlfeld, Thomas N. Perkins, Herbert L. Pratt, Russell Robb, Charles A. Stone, Whitney Stone, Eliot Wadsworth, Walter B. Walker, Edwin S. Webster, Edwin S. Webster Jr., and Albert H. Wiggin, all except Walker returning. (Board of 22 Cut to 14 By Stone & Webster. New York Times, Mar. 24, 1933.)

Perkins was elected a director of A.T. & T., along with lawyer Owen J. Roberts of Phildelphia and Myron C. Taylor, Chairman U.S. Steel, to replace the late John I. Waterbury, and Secretary of the Navy Charles Francis Adams 2d [a nephew of his in-laws] and Edward Farnham Greene, who retired. (Vote $2,000,000 A.T. & T. Stock Total. New York Times, Mar. 27, 1929.) "The First National Bank leads in the percentage of representation on the A.T. & T. board. George F. Baker, chairman, and George F. Baker Jr., vice chairman of the First National, are directors of A.T. & T., while First National directors who are also on the A.T. & T. board include Myron C. Taylor and Walter S. Gifford. The Guaranty Trust may be said to be represented on the A.T. & T. board by James S. Alexander, John W. Davis, Charles P. Cooper and David F. Houston. Other directors of A.T. & T. who are connected with banking institutions include Thomas Nelson Perkins, a director of the State Street Trust Company of Boston; Edward E. Loomis, a trustee of the New York Trust Company; E.V.R. Thayer, chairman of the executive committee of the Central Trust Company of Illinois, and Daniel Willard, a director of the First National Bank of Chicago." Winthrop W. Aldrich, president of the Chase National Bank, was newly elected. (A.T. & T.'s Banking Directorate. New York Times, Aug. 24, 1930.) Elihu Root, of Root, Clark, Buckner & Ballantine, and David A. Crawford of Chicago will elected to fill vacancies caused by the deaths of Perkins and E.E. Loomis. (Elected to Fill Vacancies on Board of A.T. & T. New York Times, Dec. 16, 1937.) S. Clay Williams, Chairman of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company was elected to replace George S. Baker, deceased. (Investors Uphold Policies of A.T. & T. New York Times, Apr. 21, 1938.)

Perkins was elected a director of the Southern Pacific Railroad to fill a vacancy caused by the death of James N. Jarvie. (Southern Pacific Stock. New York Times, Apr. 10, 1930.) Thomas Nelson Perkins was elected a director of Loews Corporation to replace Harley L. Clark. Nicholas M. Schenck was the president of Loews, and Eugene W. Leake and David Warfield were other directors. Metro-Goldwyn-Pictures Corporation was a subsidiary of Loews. (Bonuses Cause Tilt at Loew's Meeting. New York Times. Dec. 16, 1932; Loew's Securities Tied Up By Court. New York Times, Dec. 16, 1933.)

Members of the Harvard Corporation 1936: Dr. James B. Conant, President of Harvard; Henry L. Shattuck of Boston, Treasurer; Thomas N. Perkins, Dr. Roger I. Lee and Charles A. Coolidge Jr. of Boston, Grenville Clark of New York; while Henry James, trustee of the Carnegie Corporation and the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, was newly elected to replace Charles P. Curtis Jr. of Boston. (On Harvard Corporation. New York Times, Feb. 25, 1936.)

"Mr. Perkins had practiced law in Boston since 1894. He was a member of the legal firm of Ropes, Gray, Boyden & Perkins. He was an attorney for many corporations." His widow and three sons, Elliot, James H. 2d, and Thomas N. Perkins Jr. survived him. (T.N. Perkins Dies; Young Plan Aide. New York Times, Oct. 8, 1937.)

Anne Bissell Perkins, daughter of Mrs. Thomas Nelson Perkins and the late Mr. Perkins, married William Wallace McDowell Jr. She was with the International Business Machines Corporation in New York; her father was president of the Bowen Company, a Boston investment firm. McDowell's father was a vice president of I.B.M., and he was with Philip Morris International in New York. (Anne B. Perkins, Alumna of Smith, Bay State Bride. New York Times, Jun. 4, 1967.) William W. McDowell Jr. was a vice president of Philip Morris Inc. in 1976. (Philip Morris, Federal Election Commission Report Form #3, alternative monthly report for September, 1976, p. 9.) W.W. McDowell approved the papers to be presented at the Tobacco Chemists' Research Conference. (W.W. McDowell to Dr. R.B. Seligman, May 23, 1977, p. 75.) In 1979, he was an Executive Vice President of Operations reporting to S.P. Pollock, President of P.M. USA. (Domestic Cigarette Industry Competitive Profile. RJR, 1979, p. 45.)

FEC Report Form #3, Sep. 1976 / UCSF
McDowell to Seligman, May 23, 1977 / UCSF
Domestic Cigarette Industry Profile, 1979 / UCSF

Ropes, Gray, Boyden & Perkins (now Ropes & Gray)

Edward C. Johnson 2d

Edward C. Johnson 2d "began his long association with the world of finance in 1935 when, as a practicing lawyer with the firm of Ropes, Gray, Boyden & Perkins (now Ropes & Gray), he began handling the legal affairs of Incorporated Investors, then one of Boston's largest investment companies. Four years later, he quit law and joined the investment firm as treasurer. In 1943, he became president and director of Fidelity Fund, a small ($3 million) Boston outfit." This became FMR Corporation, the financial services holding company that includes the Fidelity group. His son, Edward C. Johnson 3d, succeeded him as its head. "A Boston Brahmin, Mr. Johnson was born Edward Crosby Johnson 2d in a townhouse on Beacon street, Back Bay, on Jan. 19, 1898, the son of Samuel Johnson, a partner in a leading dry-goods firm [C.F. Hovey & Company], and Josephine (Forbush) Johnson. His ancestors came to this country in 1635 and were among the early settlers of Essex County. He was a graduate of Milton Academy, Harvard College, class of 1920, and Harvard Law School in 1924. During World War I, he served overseas with the Navy as an electrician's mate. Between college and law school he studied for a year at Harvard Business School. Following law school, he joined Ropes, Gray." (Edward Johnson 2d, Retired Board Chairman at Fidelity. Boston Globe, Apr. 4, 1984.) Edward Crosby Johnson 2d's father, Samuel Johnson, was the son of Dr. Amos Howe Johnson. Edward C. Johnson 2d married Elsie Livingston Johnson, whose father, Reginald Mansfield Johnson, was the son of Rev. Francis Howe Johnson. (Samuel Johnson. New York Times, Aug. 28, 1932; Miss Julia Edwards Weds R.M. Johnson. New York Times, Jul. 3, 1902; R.K. West's Master List.)

R.K. West's Master List / Rootsweb

The Johnsons' grandfathers, Dr. Amos and Rev. Francis Johnson, were brothers, whose sister, Mary Ann, married Prof. Austin Phelps of Andover Theological Seminary. Edward Johnson Phelps, Skull & Bones 1886, was their son. He was secretary, treasurer, and general manager of the Northern Trust Safe Deposit Company of Chicago from 1895 to 1929, president and a director from 1923 to 1929. He represented the Yale Club of Chicago on the Alumni Board from 1910 to 1916, and was a member of the Board of Education of New Trier Township High School from 1918-1923. (Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of the State of Massachusetts. By William Richard Cutter, William Frederick Adams. Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1910; Bulletin of Yale University. Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1938-1939, pp. 53-54.)

Genealogical and Personal Memoirs / Google Books
Yale Obituary Record, 1938-1939 / Yale University Library

"Fidelity manages $405 billion in assets. One manager alone, Jeffrey Vinik, who runs Fidelity's Magellan Fund, controls $54 billion. His enthusiasm for tech stocks helped fuel the sector for two years. Fidelity is so powerful that most traders and even many independent fund managers will talk about it only off the record." (In New York: Fidelity May Be Behind IBM Stock's Rapid Rise. By Robert McGough. Asian Wall Street Journal. New York, N.Y.: Feb 2, 1996.) "Fidelity oversees a far-flung domain of more than nine million customers and $497 billion in assets under management. Its 223 mutual funds, which have $340 billion in assets, include Fidelity Magellan Fund, which at $50 billion is the largest mutual fund in the U.S. Many stock traders say Fidelity is the most powerful trading force in the U.S. equity markets. Regulatory filings triggered by Fidelity's big stake in Chrysler Corp. disclose that the Johnson family has reduced its stake in the voting stock of Fidelity's parent to 49%. Fidelity says three long-time family associates are included in that figure. As recently as April, according to a Fidelity fund proxy statement, the family alone owned 80% of FMR." (Fidelity Gives Majority Stake To Managers. By Robert McGough. Asian Wall Street Journal. New York, N.Y.: Aug 17, 1995.) FMR Corporation held a large percentage of shares of both Philip Morris and R.J. Reynolds before and during the state lawsuits against the cigarette companies.

James T. Mountz

James T. Mountz of Ropes & Gray was a director of the American Cancer Society. "In 1959, the Board established the Committee on Tobacco and Cancer to succeed the Ad Hoc Committee which had guided the Board since 1957. Dr. Taylor was named chairman, a position he held until the fall of 1963. The Committee was composed of distinguished physicians and laymen, including: James M. Brittain, Director of the Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Co.; Dr. Frank W. Foote, Jr., of Memorial Hospital, New York City; Dr. [John R.] Heller; Dr. Leonard W. Larson, Bismark, N.D., pathologist and former president of the American Medical Association; Mr. [William B.] Lewis; Arthur L. Montgomery, President of the Atlanta, Ga., Coca-Cola Bottling Co., and Allied Plants; James T. Mountz, Boston, Mass., attorney; Dr. Ochsner; Dr. I. S. Ravdin of the University of Pennsylvania and in 1963 President of the American Cancer Society; Victor A. Scholis, Louisville, Ky., Vice President and Director of Stations WHAS and WHAS-TV; Dr. Wendell M. Stanley, Director of the Virus Laboratory, University of California, and 1946 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry; Dr. Stebbins; Waldo I. Stoddard, Grand Rapids, Mich., banker; and Dr. Ashbel C. Williams, Jacksonville, Fla. surgeon." (The Position of the American Cancer Society Regarding Tobacco and Lung Cancer. To the City Editor [form letter]. American Cancer Society News Service, Jan. 7, 1964, pp. 14-15.)

The Position of the American Cancer Society Regarding Tobacco and Lung Cancer, 1964 / UCSF

He attended the World Conference of Smoking & Health in 1967, p. 23.

Chapter VII, Proceedings of the World Conference on Smoking and Health / UCSF

Elliot L. Richardson

Elliot Lee Richardson was born in Boston in 1920 and graduated from Milton Academy. He was a philosophy major at Harvard. He served in the Arny during World War II, and graduated from Harvard Law School in 1947, where he was president and editor of the law review. "Mr. Richardson spent four years at the Boston law firm of Ropes & Gray, joined the Washington staff of US Senator Leverett Salstonstall (R-Mass.) for two years, returned to Ropes & Gray, then served as acting counsel to Governor Christian A. Herter." He was named assistant secretary for legislation of the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare in 1957. He was a US Attorney and Massachusetts Attorney General in the 1950s and 60s. In the Nixon Administration, he was undersecretary of state, secretary of health, education and welfare (1970), secretary of defense, and attorney general, where he and his deputy, William Ruckelshaus, refused to fire Watergate special prosecutor Archibald Cox. He was ambassador to Great Britain and secretary of commerce in the Ford administration, and ambassador at large in the Carter administration. In 1980, he joined the Washington office of Milbank, Tweed, Hadley, & McCloy as senior partner. "Mr. Richardson's great-grandfather, both grandfathers, a grandmother, three uncles, his father, and both his brothers were physicians." (Elliot Richardson is dead at 79; was key GOP stalwart. By Mark Feeney, Boston Globe, Jan. 1, 2000.)

James Handasyd Perkins (1876-1940)

James H. Perkins was elected president and a director of the Farmers Loan and Trust Company of New York in 1921. During the 1920s, Farmers Loan and Trust became a major stockholder in the American Tobacco Company, and James H. Perkins was on American's board of directors between 1926 and 1929.

John Forbes Perkins

John F. Perkins (b. 1878) was a judge of the Boston Juvenile Court. His son, Malcolm D. Perkins, graduated from Harvard in 1936 and Harvard Law School in 1939. He was with the firm of Parker & Duryee until 1941, when he took flight training and joined Pan American World Airways, then the Army Air Transport Command. He married Sheila D. Redmond, the daughter of Roland Redmond. (Sheila Redmond Becomes A Bride. New York Times, Feb. 3, 1944.) His son, Dr. John F. Perkins Jr. (1909-1966), was a professor of physiology at the University of Chicago School of Medicine. He received his MD in 1936 from Harvard Medical School. (John F. Perkins, 57; Physiology Teacher. New York Times, Aug. 10, 1966.)

Search: Perkins JF / PubMed

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