Cummins Engine Company Inc.

Company history: Founded in 1919 by William Glanton Irwin and Clessie Lyle Cummins, manufactures diesel engines. In the early days they were marketed to farmers through Sears catalogs. The company's original financier, William Glanton Irwin, was the Indiana banker who introduced Albert Lasker to Will Hays, which eventually led to Lasker's appointment to the Shipping Board.

History / Cummins Engines

Irwin Union Bank and Trust. By Bill Beck and Kathleen Curley. Indiana Business Magazine, Sep. 2002. Irwin-Union Trust dodged the stock market crash by a timely conversion of investments to cash.

Beck & Curley / Indiana Business 2002
Irwin mss. / Indiana University

In 1957, SG Warburg merged with Seligman Brothers. Geoffrey Seligman's American clients included Cummins Engine Company. (The Warburgs, by Ron Chernow. Random House, 1993, p. 647.)

1994: The Ford Motor Co. owned 7.70%; Tenneco Inc. General Employee Benefit Trust owned 7.70%; Cummins Engine Co. Inc. and Affiliates Employee Stock Ownership Trust c/o The Northern Trust Co. owned 5.57%; and The Capital Group Inc. owned 5.04%.

Cummins Engine Company 1994 DEF 14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

1998 ownership was: Miller Anderson & Sherrerd 12.18%; Cummins Employee Benefits Trust c/o Vanguard 8.92%; FMR Corp. 8.10%; The Capital Group 5.95%; and Cummins and Affiliates Employee Stock Trust c/o Vanguard 5.15%.

Cummins Engine Company 1998 DEF 14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

2002: Cummins Inc. Employee Benefits Trust c/o The Vanguard Fiduciary Trust Company owned 7.62%, and Capital Research and Management Co. owns 6.30% of Cummins.

Cummins Engine Company 2002 DEF 14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

Cummins' PC Social Activism

Early involvement in anti-smoking

Harold Wayne Richmond, MD, Corporate Medical Director of Cummins Engine Company Inc., attended the Third World Conference on Smoking and Health in NYC in 1975.

3rd World Conference on Smoking and Health, 1975 / UCSF (pdf, 33 pp)

Cummins became involved in the anti-smoking persecution in 1976. Other large companies involved before 1985 included Bell Laboratories (1978), IBM, Ford (1980), Johnson & Johnson (1982), AT&T (1980), General Foods, Campbell Soup (1980), DuPont, Eastman Kodak, and Boeing (1980). Kimberly Clark, Mattell, Tosco Corporation, Cannon Mills, Dow Chemical Texas Division, Johns-Manville, Blue Cross/Blue Shield, State Farm Insurance, Metropolitan Life Insurance, The Travelers, and Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance were also active. (Review and evaluation of smoking cessation methods - the United States and Canada, 1978-1985. By Jerome L. Schwartz of the National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. US DHHS, April 1987.) Interestingly, the name of the author of the Cummins Engine study was GH Miller - possibly a relative of the company founder's heir J. Irwin Miller.

Schwartz 1987 / UCSF (pdf, 208 pp)

"Cummins Maintains its Support of Domestic Partner Benefits." Hundreds of locals and employees demonstrated against it. News, Human Rights Campaign Foundation.

Cummins / Human Rights Campaign

Cummins and AT&T, 1995

AT&T's 15-member board of directors in 1995 included no less than four who were also directors of Cummins Engine Company: Henry B. Schacht, director since 1981; Franklin A. Thomas, director since 1988; Walter Y. Elisha, director since 1987; and Donald S. Perkins, director since 1979. Thomas H. Wyman, director since 1981, was chairman of SG Warburg & Co. and had been a director of CBS with Schacht and Thomas. Two more had ties to Warner-Lambert, Elmer Bobst's old company: its retired chairman and CEO, Joseph D. Williams, director since 1984, who was also a director of Rockefeller Financial Services and Rockefeller & Co.; and Michael I. Sovern, director since 1984, the former president of Columbia University who established Joseph Califano's CASA at Columbia. Philip M. Hawley, director since 1982, was also a director of Johnson & Johnson; and Carla A. Hills, director since 1993, was a former RAND trustee who later joined J&J.

AT&T 1995 DEF 14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

Rebecca S. Parkinson, Staff Manager - Employee Health Education of AT&T, participated in Work Group 4, "Smoking Control in the Workplace," of the National Conference on Smoking OR Health, Developing a Blueprint for Action, Nov. 18-20, 1981. Other participants included Group Leader Robert Beck, Director of Personnel Benefits and Services of IBM Corp.; Lloyd C. Arnold, director of the Johnson & Johnson Company's Live for Life; Gilbert H. Collings Jr. and Loring Wood of the New York Telephone Company (NYNEX); Irvine H. Dearnley and Christopher C. York, Vice Presidents of Citibank; Willis Goldbeck, Ann Kiefhaber, and Leon J. Warshaw of the Washington Business Group on Health; Marvin M. Kristein of the American Health Foundation; Stanley M. Little of the Boeing Co.; and A. Judson Wells, Special Assistant of the American Lung Association and later ghost author (concealed behind illegal pass-through contracts) of the EPA ETS report.

Work Group 4, National Conference on Smoking OR Health, 1981 / UCSF (pdf, 3 pp)

Cummins and CBS

Cummins directors Harold Brown, Henry B. Schacht, and Franklin Thomas were all also directors of CBS since the 1980s. The Board of Directors of CBS in 1986 included Marietta Tree, a member of the American Cancer Society's National Commission on Smoking and Public Policy; newscaster Walter Cronkite; anti-smoking activist Newton Minow; Henry Schacht; Michael Bergerac, the former chairman of Revlon; James Houghton; Franklin Thomas; Edson Spencer; James Wolfensohn; Roswell Gilpatric; and Harold Brown. Thomas Wyman was the CEO. Mary Lasker's crony, Benno C. Schmidt was also a director of CBS during the 1980s; his business partner, Jock Whitney, was the brother-in-law of CBS Chairman William S. Paley. (In All His Glory. The Life of William S. Paley. By Sally Bedell Smith. Simon and Schuster, 1990.)

1998: EPA - Cummins Engine Company Diesel Engine Settlement

Looting consumers to fund health fascists

"On October 22, 1998, the Department of Justice and the Environmental Protection Agency an $83.4 million total penalty against diesel manufacturers, the largest civil penalty ever for violation of environmental law. Under this settlement, seven major manufacturers of diesel engines will spend more than one billion dollars to resolve claims that they installed computer devices in heavy duty diesel engines which resulted in illegal amounts of air pollution emissions..." It also involved Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel, Mack, Navistar, Renault, and Volvo. The Consent Decree signed by Cummins required expenditures for environmental projects of $18,750,000, and $6,250,000 planned later (see the Consent Decree, pages 155-158).

Cummins Settlement / Environmental Protection Agency
Consent Decree / Environmental Protection Agency (pdf, 161pp)

Cummins Directors

J. Irwin Miller, director from 1934 to 1996

Grand-nephew of founder William Glanton "WG" Irwin; former CEO and chairman, became general manager in 1934. He is a director of Irwin Financial Corp. and the Irwin Management Co. and a member of The Business Council. He is the father of director William I. Miller. He graduated from Yale University and had an M.A. from Oxford.

J. Irwin Miller, Chairman of Cummins Engine Company, was a member of the Committee on Economic Development's Commission on Money and Credit, which was established in 1957. The CED was founded by Paul G. Hoffman in 1942, who was its Chairman from 1942 to 1948. Other founding members included William Benton; Marion B. Folsom, Chairman from 1950 to 1953 and later Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare in the Eisenhower administration; and Eric A. Johnston, a member of the ASCC takeover group. James D. Zellerbach was Chairman from 1955 to 1957, and Donald K. David, Dean of Harvard University, Trustee of the Ford Foudation and Carnegie Institute, was Chairman from 1957 to 1959. "The Research and Policy Committee of the Committee for Economic Development is the select inner-group which actually runs the CED." In 1957, these included Frank Altschul, William Benton, Donald K. David, and Philip L. Graham. (The Invisible Government, by Dan Smoot, 1962.)

The Invisible Government / Raymond W. Jensen website (pdf, 124pp)

In 1960, Joseph Irwin Miller was elected president of the National Council of Churches of Christ, which represented 26 Protestant and 7 Eastern Orthodox denominations. He was a leading layman of the Disciples of Christ. He was a director of American Telephone & Telegraph Co., Purity Stores, a California supermarket chain; and the Indiana National Bank, and board chairman of Cummins and the Irwin Bank and Trust Company. He was a trustee of the Taft School and a fellow of the Yale Corporation. (Biblicist of Many Parts. New York Times, Dec. 9, 1960.) He was elected a trustee of the Ford Foundation in 1961. He was president of the National Council of Churches of Christ in the U.S.A. and Chairman of Cummins Engine Co., the Irwin Union Bank and Trust Co., and the Union Starch Co., all of Columbus, Indiana. Also elected was Bethuel M. Webster, senior partner of Webster, Sheffield, Fleischmann, Hitchcock and Chrystie, a counsel to Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company, whose ex-partners Francis H Horan and Frederick P. Haas directors of the company. (Ford Fund Elects 2. New York Times, Jun. 27, 1961.) He was a director of the Chemical Bank New York Trust Company of New York, along with Maurice T. Moore of Time Inc. and H.I. Romnes of A.T.&T. and the American Cancer Society, and James Bruce, a director of Loew's, on the advisory board (Display Ad 155. New York Times, Jan. 6, 1964 p. 117; Display Ad 253. New York Times, Jan. 14, 1966); and G. Keith Funston, who was amember of the National Panel on the Conquest of Cancer the next year. (Display Ad 321. New York Times, Jan. 27, 1970; Display Ad 43. New York Times, Jul. 23, 1971.)

In 1968, Irwin was head of the Nelson Rockefeller for President Committee, and James A. Henderson was an assistant campaign manager. John Hay Whitney and Walter N. Thayer were leading fund raisers. (Review of Presidential Candidates Organizations. Congressional Quarterly, Inc., 1968.)

Review of Presidential Candidates Organizations, 1968 / UCSF (pdf, 7 pp)

Cummins Engine Foundation got 5% of Cummins' pretax profit, about 1 to 3 million dollars, which was funneled to Marxist-Leninist organizations in the US. (Appendix G: Confidential Government Report on Cummins Engine Company (J. Irwin Miller) and Financing of Marxist Revolutionary Activities Within the United States. From: The Best Enemy Money Can Buy, by Antony C. Sutton.)

Sutton / Reformed Theology

Miller was chairman of the National Advisory Commission on Health Manpower during the Johnson Administration. Dr. Peter S. Bing was executive director. The Commission was established by Executive Order 11279 of May 7, 1966. (Remarks to the Press on Making Public the Report of the National Advisory Commission on Health Manpower, Nov. 20, 1967.)

Johnson Remarks, Nov. 20, 1967 / The American Presidency Project, U. Calif. - Santa Barbara

Miller is an Emeritus Public Trustee of the Mayo Clinic Foundation, along with former Cummins director Hanna H. Gray; former Assistant Secretary for Health Philip R. Lee; J. Willard Marriott Jr., who spun off Caterair to Fred Malek who seated George Bush on its board in return for the domestic airline smoking ban; anti-smoker arch-conspirator Newton N. Minow; former Scientific American publisher Gerard Piel; and former Honeywell CEO Edson W. Spencer.

Board of Trustees / Mayo Foundation

Miller is a Life Trustee of the Urban Institute. Other Life Trustees include Warren E. Buffett, James E. Burke of Johnson & Johnson, Joseph A. Califano, William T. Coleman of the RAND Corporation, former US Trade Representative Carla A. Hills, Vernon E. Jordan Jr., former EPA Administrator William Ruckelshaus, and Cyrus R. Vance. Trustees in 2000 included Katharine Graham of The Washington Post, and Philip Morris director Lucio Noto.

2000 Annual Report / Urban Institute (pdf)

Harold Brown, director from 1985 to 1999

Brown taught and held research positions at Columbia, the Stevens Institute of Technology and the University of California at Berkeley from 1947 to 1952, then joined the Livermore Laboratory at the University of California and became its director in 1960. He was Director of Defense Research and Engineering from 1961 until 1965; Secretary of the Air Force from 1965 to 1969; President of the California Institute of Technology from 1969 to 1977; US Secretary of Defense from 1977 to 1981. Since 1981, he has been at the Johns Hopkins University's Foreign Policy Institute and then the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). He is a partner of EM Warburg, Pincus & Co. In 1994, he was a director of Alumax, CBS, IBM, Mattell, and Philip Morris; chairman of the Beckman Foundation and a trustee of the California Institute of Technology and the Rand Corporation. In 1998, he was a director of Alumax, Evergreen Holdings, IBM, Mattell and Philip Morris, and a trustee of the California Institute of Technology and the Rand Corp.

Robert J. Darnall, director since1989

Darnall joined Inland Steel in 1962 and became its Chairman, President and CEO in the 1980s. In 1994 he was a director of Inland Steel and Household International; and a trustee of DePauw University and the University of Chicago. In 1998, he was a director of Household International, Ryerson Tull, and the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, and a Trustee of the University of Chicago. In 2002, he was also a director of Household International, Pactiv Corp., Sunoco, US Steel, and Chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, and a Trustee of Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center.

Kenneth R. Dabrowski, director from 1994 until 1995

Vice President of the Ford Motor Co. Commercial Truck Vehicle Center. He served through the Ford Investment Agreement.

John M. Deutch, director since 1997

Dean of Science (1982), Provost (1985) and Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since 1990. Former US Undersecretary (1993) and Deputy Secretary of Defense (1994-95) and CIA Director (1995-96). He was Director of Energy Research and Undersecretary of the US Dept. of Energy during the Carter Administration. During 1998-2002, he was a director of Ariad, Citicorp, CMS Energy, Raytheon Corp., and Schlumberger, and a member of the CFR; and a trustee of Resources for the Future and the Urban Institute.

Deutch was a director of Citigroup or predecessors 1987-1993, and since 1996. Fellow Cummins director Franklin A. Thomas was on the 2001 Board of Directors of Citigroup, along with Ann Dibble Jordan, a director of Johnson & Johnson since 1981 and Capital Cities/ABC.

2001 Annual Report / Citigroup (pdf, 36pp)

James J. Donaldson, director from 1993 until 1994

Vice president of Ford Motor Co. and general manager of Ford Truck Operations; former COO of Autolina until 1964, joined Ford of Britain until 1967, and Ford of Europe until 1976. He served through the Ford Investment Agreement.

Walter Y. Elisha, director since 1991

Retired chairman and CEO of Springs Industries Inc. (1981-1998). Director of Springs Industries since 1980. In 1994, also a director of AT&T, and a trustee of the Brookings Institution and the Committee for Economic Development;.and during 1998-2002, a director of AT&T Wireless.

Elisha and former Cummins CEO Henry Schacht are Honorary Trustees of the Brookings Institution. Trustees include Elizabeth E. Bailey, director of Philip since 1991; Ann Dibble Jordan, director of Capital Cities/ABC and Johnson & Johnson; and former Rep. John Edward Porter. Other Honorary Trustees include D. Ronald Daniel, former trustee of the American Health Foundation, and Robert D. Haas, Chairman of the Board of Levi Strauss & Co.

Board of Trustees / Brookings Institution

Hanna Holborn Gray, director from 1977 to 2001

Gray was one of two women appointed to the Yale Corporation in 1971. The other was civil rights lawyer Marian Wright Edelman, who received a law degree from Yale in 1963. William S. Beinecke, chairmain of Sperry & Hutchinson, and Lance M. Liebman, associate professor of law at Harvard, were also chosen. John Hay Whitney and Right Rev. Paul Moore Jr. were among the continuing trustees. (Yale Names Two Women, One A Black Lawyer, to Board of Trustees. New York Times, Jun. 20, 1971.) Gray was provost of Yale University from 1974 to 1977, and acting president from 1977-78; then president of the University of Chicago from 1978 to 1993, where William Blair & Co. partners are a large proportion of trustees. Her father was the German historian Hajo Holborn, who served in the OSS ("The Historian and the Public Realm," by William E. Leuchtenberg, president of the American Historical Association. American Historical Review 1992 Feb;97(1):1-18). Her husband of 42 years is Charles M. Gray, professor of history at the University of Chicago. During 1994-1998, she was a director of JP Morgan and Company and Morgan Guaranty Trust Company, Atlantic Richfield Co., and American Information Technologies / Ameritech. She was a director of the Morgan Guaranty Trust in 1977.

Gray is an Emeritus Public Trustee of the Mayo Clinic Foundation, along with former Cummins director J. Irwin Miller; former Assistant Secretary for Health Philip R. Lee; J. Willard Marriott Jr., who spun off Caterair to Fred Malek who seated George Bush on its board in return for the domestic airline smoking ban; anti-smoker arch-conspirator Newton N. Minow; former Scientific American publisher Gerard Piel; and former Honeywell CEO Edson W. Spencer.

Board of Trustees / Mayo Foundation

Gray was a director of Atlantic Richfield Co. from 1982 to 1998. Johnson & Johnson director Philip M. Hawley was a fellow director who served from 1975 to 1997.

Atlantic Richfield 1997 DEF 14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

She was appointed the Harvard Board of Overseers in 1988, and to the Harvard Corporation in 1997. A fellow member of the Corporation is D. Ronald Daniel, who was a trustee of the Naylor-Dana Institute for Preventive Medicine of the American Health Foundation from 1975 to 1981. (Gray Appointed to Harvard Corporation. Harvard Gazette, June 6, 1996).

Gray Appointed to Harvard Corporation / Harvard University Gazette
The Harvard Corporation / Elitewatch.com

Gray retired in April 2003 after 23 years as a trustee of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The Foundation made a $3 million grant to the University of Chicago and a $1.5 million grant to Bryn Mawr College, to support research in the humanities. Her bio notes that she was a fellow of the Ford Foundation-founded Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. (Mellon Foundation to establish the Hanna Holborn Gray Advanced Graduate Fellowships in the Humanities. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Press release, April 2, 2003.) William O. Baker, a founding director of the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation and the Health Effects Institute, is a fellow trustee.

Hanna Holborn Gray fellowships, 2003 / University of Chicago
Trustees / The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Gray is a Trustee of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, where Lasker Foundation Director Purnell W. Choppin was President from 1987 until the end of 1999.

Board of Trustees / Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Her father was the German historian Hajo Holborn, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University, who served in the OSS and was "a dominant figure in the training of postwar Germanists." ("The Historian and the Public Realm," by William E. Leuchtenberg, president of the American Historical Association. American Historical Review 1992 Feb;97(1):1-18); and "A short list of scholars who worked for the Office of Strategic Services," by Robin W. Winks; from Cloak & Gown: Scholars in the Secret Service, by Robin W. Winks. William Morrow & Co., 1987.)

Leuchtenberg / American Historical Association 1992
Winks / CIA On Campus

James A. Henderson, director from 1974 to 1999.

Henderson joined Cummins in 1964, and became its CEO in 1975 and president in 1977. During 1994-98, he was a director of Inland Steel, American Information Technologies / Ameritech, Landmark Communications, and Rohm and Haas, and President of the Board of Trustees of the Culver Educational Foundation; and in 1998, a director of Ryerson Tull (to which part of Inland Steel was merged).

Alexis M. Herman, director since 2001

Chairman and CEO of New Ventures Inc. (independent consulting firm); US Secretary of Labor from 1997 to 2001. Chairwoman of Coca-Cola's Diversity Task Force, and Toyota's Diversity Advisory Board, and online columnist for Monster.com. Also a director of MGM/Mirage Inc., and the Prudential Life Insurance Co.

Dana G. Mead, director from 1993 to 1996

President, CEO and a director of Tenneco since 1992, and chairman and CEO of Case Corp., then a Tenneco subsidiary. He got his director's seat through the Tenneco Investment Agreement with Cummins. Retired US Army Colonel (1978); various executive positions at International Paper Co. from 1978 to 1992.

William I. Miller, director since 1989

Chairman and director of Irwin Management Co. and Irwin Financial Corp. Also a director of Tennant Co. and the New Perspective Fund; also a trustee of EuroPacific Gowth Fund; and a former trustee of Public Radio International, Minneapolis, MN. He is a trustee of Taft School, as is Thomas S. Murphy Jr., possibly the son of the head of Capital Cities/ABC. William I. Miller is the son of former director J. Irwin Miller.

Board of Trustees / Taft School

Donald S. Perkins, director from 1974 to 1998

Former president and chairman of the Jewel Companies. In 1994, he was also a director of AT&T; Aon; K-Mart; Inland Steel; Springs Industries; and Time Warner; and vice chairman of Northwestern University. In 1998, he was a director of Aon, Current Assets, LaSalle Street Fund, Lucent Technologies, Nanophase Technologies, The Putnam Funds, Ryerson Tull, Springs Industries, and Time Warner, and Vice Chairman and Trustee of Northwestern University. He is also a member of the original board of RoundTable Healthcare Partners, with Edgar Jannotta of Wm. Blair & Co.; Silas Cathcart, former chairman and CEO of Illinois Toolworks; Lester Crown, President of Henry Crown & Co.; and Charles F. Knight of Emerson Electric.

William Ruckelshaus, director from 1974 to 1983, and since 1985

From 1969 to 1973 Ruckelshaus was an Assistant Attorney General in the Justice Department, an Administrator of the EPA, Acting Director of the FBI and Deputy Attorney General. He joined Weyerhauser as Senior Vice President in 1976. He became EPA Administrator again from 1983 to 1985. In 1994, he was Chairman of the Board and CEO of Browning-Ferris Industries; and a director of Monsanto, Nordstrom, Texas Commerce Bankshares, and Weyerhaeuser. In 1998, he was a director of Monsanto, Nordstrom, Weyerhaeuser, Coinstar, Solutia, and Gargoyles Inc. In 2002, he was a director of Pharmacia, Nordstrom, Weyerhaeuser, Coinstar, and Solutia Inc.

Henry B. Schacht

Director from 1969 to 1995

Henry Brewer Schacht is the son of a commercial fisherman; he graduated from high school in Erie, Penn., and graduated from Yale University with a BS in industrial administration in 1956. Just before graduation, he was recruited by the American Brake Shoe Company, which had sponsored his scholarship, but stayed with them less than a year before joining the Navy. He left the Navy and went to Harvard Business School, where he was recruited by the Irwin Management Co., "a small investment management company that in addition to handling the Irwin and Miller family investments manages several trusts and funds for a number of seminaries." (Cummins Chief Looks for New Roads. By Robert E. Bedingfield. New York Times, Oct. 12, 1969.) He was with Irwin Management Company before joining Cummins in 1964 as vice president of finance. He was elected to the board in 1969. He was president, CEO, and chairman before retiring in 1995, when he joined Lucent Technologies. In 1980, Schacht was a founder of the Health Effects Institute, which uses defective studies to falsely blame air pollution for diseases caused by infection. Our arch-enemy Jonathan M. Samet is on the Research Committee of this institute. The automotive industry is funding its own enemies, just as the tobacco industry did. In 1994, Schacht was a director of CBS, AT&T, and The Chase Manhattan Corp.; a Trustee of the Yale Corporation, the Committee for Economic Development, and the Ford Foundation, and a member of the Business Roundtable, the CFR, and The Business Council. In 1997, Schacht was elected to the Board of Directors of the Johnson & Johnson Co., which is the source of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's funds to spread health fascism; and was also a director of Lucent Technologies, Aluminum Company of America, and The Chase Manhattan Corp; and a Trustee of The Yale corporation, Committee for Economic Development and The Ford Foundation, and a member of The Business Council and the CFR.

Schacht bio / Lucent Technologies

Schacht was a director of CBS Inc. from 1971 until it was bought by Westinghouse in 1997. Fellow directors in 1995 included Franklin A. Thomas, also a director since 1971; Laurence A. Tisch, co-chairman and co-CEO of Loews Corp., which owned Lorillard Tobacco, director since 1986, and Preston Robert Tisch, director since 1988; Harold Brown, trustee of the RAND Corporation and director of Philip Morris, a CBS director since 1981; Edson W. Spencer, former CEO of Honeywell and chairman of the Humphrey Institute at the University of Minnesota, director since 1985; and Daniel Yankelovich, President of Public Agenda, director since 1994.

CBS 1995 DEF 14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

Mary Lasker's ally, Benno Schmidt, was a director of CBS during the 1980s. Betsey Cushing, a sister of CBS Chairman William S. Paley's second wife, Barbara (Babe), was married to Jock Whitney. Franklin Thomas, President of the Ford Foundation and a director of CBS and Cummins Engine Company, was close to Jock Whitney as well, and Schmidt and Paley had invested in Thomas's Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation in the 1960s. CBS director Henry Schacht was another of Thomas's cronies. (In All His Glory. The Life of William S. Paley. By Sally Bedell Smith. Simon and Schuster, 1990.)

Schacht was Vice Chairman of The Conference Board in 1983. Katharine Graham of The Washington Post was a fellow Vice Chairman. And a third Vice Chairman was Philip M. Hawley of Carter, Hawley Hale Stores, Inc., who preceded Schacht to the Board of Directors of the Johnson & Johnson Co. in 1988. Paul F. Oreffice, President of The Dow Chemical Co.; James L. Ferguson, Chairman of General Foods; and Frank T. Cary, Chairman of the Board of IBM, were among the Trustees.

Officers and Trustees of The Conference Board, 1983 / UCSF (pdf, 1 p)

"Power and Accountability," by Bob Monks and Nell Minow (HarperCollins 1992), Chapter 4, describes how Schacht has turned Cummins into a little dictatorship. (Nell Minow is the daughter of Newton Minow.)

Power and Accountability / Corporations.org

Schacht and Cummins director Walter Elisha are Honorary Trustees of the Brookings Institution. Trustees include Elizabeth E. Bailey, director of Philip since 1991; Ann Dibble Jordan, director of Capital Cities/ABC and Johnson & Johnson; and former Rep. John Edward Porter. Other Honorary Trustees include D. Ronald Daniel, former trustee of the American Health Foundation, and Robert D. Haas, Chairman of the Board of Levi Strauss & Co.

Board of Trustees / Brookings Institution

Theodore M. Solso, director since 1994

President and CEO of Cummins Engine Company since 1995. Also a director of Amoco, Cyprus Armax Minerals Co., and Irwin Financial Corp. and a Trustee of DePauw University.

Franklin A. Thomas, director since 1973

Thomas was President and CEO of the Ford Foundation from 1979 to 1996. He was an attorney for the Federal Housing Finance Agency from 1963 to 1964, Assistant US Attorney for the Southern District of New York in 1964, and a Deputy Police Commissioner in New York City from 1965 to 1967; then President and CEO of the Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corp. from 1967 to 1977. In 1994, he was a director of AT&T, CBS, Citicorp/Citibank, and Aluminum Company of America, and a Trustee of the Ford Foundation. In 1998, he was a director of Citicorp/Citibank, Alcoa, Lucent Technologies, and PepsiCo. In 2002, he was a director of Avaya, Citigroup, Conoco, ALCOA, Lucent Technologies, and PepsiCo.

Thomas was a director of CBS Inc. from 1971 until it was bought by Westinghouse in 1997. Fellow directors in 1995 included Henry B. Schacht, also a director since 1971; Laurence A. Tisch, co-chairman and co-CEO of Loews Corp., which owned Lorillard Tobacco, director since 1986, and Preston Robert Tisch, director since 1988; Harold Brown, trustee of the RAND Corporation and director of Philip Morris, a CBS director since 1981; Edson W. Spencer, former CEO of Honeywell and chairman of the Humphrey Institute at the University of Minnesota, director since 1985; and Daniel Yankelovich, President of Public Agenda, director since 1994.

CBS 1995 DEF 14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

In 1980, Mary Lasker's longtime crony Benno Schmidt presided at the board of directors meeting that installed Thomas Wyman as the President and CEO of CBS. Fellow directors included Thomas and his fellow Cummins director, Henry Schacht. (In All His Glory, The Life of William S. Paley, by Sally Bedell Smith. Simon and Schuster, 1990.) Betsey Cushing, a sister of CBS Chairman William S. Paley's second wife, Barbara (Babe), was married to Jock Whitney. Franklin Thomas, President of the Ford Foundation and a director of CBS and Cummins Engine Company, was close to Jock Whitney as well, and Schmidt and Paley had invested in Thomas's Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation in the 1960s. CBS director Henry Schacht was another of Thomas's cronies. (In All His Glory. The Life of William S. Paley. By Sally Bedell Smith. Simon and Schuster, 1990.)

Thomas was a member of the 2001 Board of Directors of Citigroup, along with fellow Cummins director John M. Deutch; and Ann Dibble Jordan, director of Johnson & Johnson and Capital Cities/ABC.

2001 Annual Report / Citigroup (pdf, 36pp)

In 1978, Ernst L. Wynder's American Health Foundation began listing an address in the Ford Foundation building, at 320 East 43rd Street in New York City.

Thomas and former EPA Administrator William K. Reilly have been directors of Conoco Inc. (which is controlled by DuPont) since 1998.

Conoco 2002 DEF 14A / Securities and Exchange Commission

J. Lawrence Wilson, director since 1990

Wilson joined Rohm and Haas in 1965 and has been variously its director, chairman and CEO from 1977 to 1999. In 1994, he was a member of the boards of Vanderbilt University, the Vanguard Group of Investment Companies, and the Culver Educational Foundation. In 1998, he was a member of the boards of Vanderbilt University, the Vanguard Group, and the Mead Corporation. In 2002, he was member of the board of Vanderbilt University, the Vanguard Group, MeadWestvaco Corp. and AmeriSourceBergen Corp.

Former Executives of Cummins

Charles W. Powers

In the late 70s, Powers was chief environmental officer and Vice President for Public Policy at Cummins Engine Co. He was the first executive director of the Health Effects Institute. Currently, he is on the Management Board of CRESP (Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation), which was co-founded by Drs. Bernard D. Goldstein, John A. Moore, Gilbert Omenn, Charles W. Powers, and Arthur C. Upton in 1995. Two former members of the Science Advisory Board of the EPA ETS report are there: Paul Lioy is a Principal Investigator, and Morton Lippmann is on the Peer Review Committee

Powers bio / CRESP

Powers was named the first Acting Executive Director of the Institute for Evaluating Health Risks, which was set up in 1989 in the law offices of Cooley Godward Castro Huddleston & Tatum to contract with the California Department of Health Services for risk assessments.

Laurance R. Hoagland

Laurance R. Hoagland Jr. was a vice president and treasurer of Cummins and a portfolio manager and vice president of the Irwin Management Company. He left in 1980 to co-found Anderson, Hoagland & Co., a money-management firm. Since 1981, he was a director and member of the investment committee of the Presbyterian Church's pension board and in 1991 was chairman of its $2.5 billion in assets. In 1991, he was named chief executive of the Stanford Management Company, which was founded in October to manage Stanford University's $3.5 billion portfolio.

cast 04-11-09