The Surgeon General Reports on Smoking, 1967-81

For the Lasker Syndicate, the true foundation of science is the lifestyle questionnaire. Because less wealthy people are more likely to be exposed to the infections that cause chronic diseases, these predictably reach the emotionally gratifying conclusion (at least to the wealthy) that the lifestyle preferences of the privileged are superior to those of the rabble. Science is employed in a superficial manner only to supply rationalizations which support their liefestyle prejudices, but not to explore mechanisms other than those which implicate tobacco. (Consider how they spent piles of money investigating every potential biochemical explanation for ulcers other than Helicobacter pylori infection.) Alternative explanations are anathema to the Lasker Syndicate! Only those flimsy objections which pandered to approved thinking in areas such as genes, personality and pollution were given some consideration.

Even though the National Cancer Institute was ostensibly searching for human cancer viruses during this period, these nominally annual reports concocted by Lasker Syndicate true believers demonstrate their complete absence of interest in the possibility that infections could be the cause of the diseases blamed on smoking.

The Cigarette Advertising and Labeling Act of 1965

After the 1964 Surgeon General report, Syndicate cronies passed Public Law 89-92, the Cigarette Advertising and Labeling Act of 1965, to require supplemental reports to Congress. Under this was written "The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Public Health Service Review, 1967; with supplements in 1968 and 1969. (Cigarette Labeling and Advertising, Hearings Before the Committee on Commerce, United States Senate, Eighty-Ninth Congress, First Session on S. 559 and 547, Bills to Regulate Labeling of Cigarettes and for Other Purposes, Part 1, March 22, 23, 24, 25, 29 , 30, April 1 and 2, 1965, Serial 89-5. 1035 pp.) Sen. Warren G. Magnuson (D-WA), the Chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, was an old friend of Mary W. Lasker.

Hearings of the Cigarette Advertising and Labeling Act of 1965 / tobacco document

Four US Senators - Gaylord Nelson (D-WI), Paul H. Douglas (D-IL), Joseph S. Clark (D-PA), and Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY) - and four Representatives - John A. Blatnik (D-MN), Richard Bolling (D-MO), John E. Moss (D-CA), and Morris K. Udall (D-AZ) - signed a letter urging President Johnson to veto the bill because of its provision postponing the Federal Trade Commission's rule requiring health hazard warning in cigarette advertising. "'This delay is inexcusable,' the letter ssays. 'This legislation, instead of protecting the health of the American people, protects only the cigarette industry,' UPI reports the letter says. 'We cannot emphasize too strongly our belief that there is no justification whatever for this bill.'" (Tobacco News Summary. Hill & Knowlton, Nos. 69-72, July 16, 1965.) [Sen. Douglas's son, Paul W. Douglas, became a director of Philip Morris from 1980-95; and his grandson married a niece of anti-smoker Gov. Thomas H. Kean of New Jersey.]

Tobacco News Summary, July 16, 1965 / tobacco document
Douglas, Paul Howard (1892-1976) / Congressional Bioguide

Review of events around the signing of the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act (P.L. 89-92). Tobacco Growers Information Committee, Raleigh, North Carolina, 1965 Oct;6(1).

Tobacco Growers Information Committee, 1965 / tobacco document

The Origins of the Office on Smoking and Health

SG William H. Stewart (Oct. 2, 1965 to Aug. 1, 1969)

Stewart was involved in anti-smoking since the 1955 National Health Survey, carried out by the U.S. Census Bureau. The National Opinion Research Center did opinion polls of physicians and other health personnel for the National Clearinghouse on Smoking and Health during his tenure.

"The Health Consequences of Smoking A Public Health Service Review: 1967," 58pp. (tobacco document)
"The Health Consequences of Smoking A Public Health Service Review, 1967," 213pp. (tobacco document)
The Health Consequences of Smoking, 1969 Supplement (130pp) / tobacco document

Stewart was the first to testify at the Federal Trade Commission hearing on "Proposed Rulemaking Requiring Health Warning in Cigarette Advertising," July 1, 1969. "As you know, our Department has urged this from the beginning. We supported this when it was included in the ruling which you proposed in 1964 and we have three times urged the Congress to achieve this and through legislation, in 1967, 1968, and now in 1969."

1969 FTC Cigarette Labeling Hearing / tobacco document

Later, he was a member of Work Group 5, "High Priority Federal Government Initiatives," of the 1981 National Conference on Smoking or Health.

Work Group 5, NCSH 1981 / tobacco document

The National Interagency Council on Smoking and Health

"On July 13, 1964, announcement came of the formation of the National Interagency Council on Smoking and Health, later to be headed by Emerson Foote. Heading the list of national agencies and organizations are the United States Public Health Service and the American Cancer Society. They are joined by sixteen other prominent groups in the fields of health and education, all with the avowed purpose 'develop and implement plans and programs aimed at combatting smoking as a health hazard.' Signficiantly, the American Medical Association, which has not officially adopted the Surgeon General's Report, refused to accept the Council's invitation to become a member. Serving as the principal communication medium for the Council is the National Clearinghouse on Smoking and Health, a unit of the U.S. Public Health Service, and recent recipient of a $2,000,000 appropriation from Congress." "Key staff members of the Division of Chronic Diseases [CDC] play important roles in the Clearinghouse's activities: Dr. Guthrie and Dr. Daniel Horn, formerly of the American Cancer Society (Hammond-Horn Report) and now Assistant Chief of the Division's Cancer Control Branch." (Where the Industry Now Stands. Dec., 1965.)

Where the Industry Now Stands, Dec. 1965, p1 / tobacco document
Where the Industry Now Stands, The National Interagency Council pp 22-24 / tobacco document

Emerson Foote of the American Cancer Society was chairman of the National Interagency Council on Smoking and Health, which included the American Heart Association, American Public Health Association, and National Tuberculosis Association (predecessor of the American Lung Association) as well as the American Cancer Society. (Smoking and Health Newsletter, 1965 Jul-Aug;1(1). National Interagency Council on Smoking and Health, 8600 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland [the address of the building built in 1962 to house the National Library of Medicine of the National Institutes of Health].)

Smoking and Health Newsletter, 1965 / tobacco document

The National Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health began in the "Regional Medical Programs"

The National Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health, which compiled the data for the Surgeon General reports, was established in 1965 in the "Regional Medical Programs." The legislation had been promoted by the President's Commission on Heart Disease, Cancer, and Stroke. "The president later indicated that he had created the commission 'at the insistence of the lovely lady, Mrs. Mary Lasker.'" The Commission was dominated by Mrs. Lasker's associates and friends. Dr. Michael DeBakey of Houston was the chairman. Other members included Emerson Foote, Mrs. Florence Mahoney, Dr. Sidney Farber, Dr. R. Lee Clark, Mrs. Harry Truman, whom Mary Lasker had known since the Truman White House days, and Dr. J. Willis Hurst of the Emory University Medical School, the president's personal heart specialist. Mr. Boisfeuillet Jones was a key consultant. Farber, Clark, and Dr. Frank Horsfall, of the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, were the principal members of the cancer subcommittee... Farber and Clark had been active in the late 1950s in organizing an association of cancer institutes. Four major cancer institutes existed then - Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Roswell Park Memorial Institute, and the National Cancer Institute's intramural laboratories and clinical research facilities." There were approximately ten other smaller centers around the country also engaged in these activities. "The legislation was introduced on January 19, 1965, and considered by Sen. Hill's subcommittee on health on February 9 and 10. The subcommittee made few changes in the proposed bill and the full committee reported the bill to the Senate on June 24. The bill was adopted by the Senate a few days later." Dr. Hugh Hussey, the American Medical Association's director of scientific activities, had resigned from the commission in 1964 "because of potential conflict between AMA policy and the commission's recommendations," and the AMA had been distracted with opposing Medicare legislation in 1965. (The Benevolent Plotters. In: Cancer Crusade: The Story of the National Cancer Act of 1971. By Richard Rettig, Joseph Henry Press 1977, pp. 35-41.)

President's Commission on Heart Disease, Cancer, and Stroke, 1964 / tobacco document
Progress Report with member affiliations, June 15, 1964 / tobacco document
President's Commission on Heart Disease, Cancer, and Stroke, Dec. 1964 / tobacco document

In 1964, anti-smoker Dr. George James was the chairman of the White House Task Force on Health, which worked in parallel with the President's Commission on Heart Disease, Cancer and Stroke. "This was not announced to the public; it worked in secret." The two groups were coordinated in the office of Boisfeuillet Jones.

From the National Library of Medicine website: "On December 6, 1991, NLM sponsored and hosted a conference titled Regional Medical Programs: Legislation and Activities in the U.S. (1965-1976). As background for the conference, print and photographic materials were assembled at NLM, and interviews of 24 individuals were videotaped. Subsequent to the conference, a website was mounted that provides transcripts of conference activities, photographs, transcripts and short clips of video interviews, digital images of selected archival materials, selections from a history of the Programs, and a bibliography." Numerous interviews refer to the activities of the Laskerites. However, there is virtually no menition of the Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health in the interviews. Like the Nazi persecution of Jews, it's something people don't talk about.

NLM Regional Medical Programs Website

Interview with Dr. William Kissick by Stephen P. Strickland: "The key player in the early days of RMP was -- like the voice, or its father -- was Wilbur Cohen. Wilbur Cohen was a key player in everything of the Great Society. There were two parallel activities in '64. The President's Commission on Heart Disease, Cancer and Stroke, was appointed, as I recall in March of 1964, and then in April, Johnson created a dozen task Forces to craft his agenda for the Great Society. There were people who were small on the commission, but they also had a lot of real heavyweights, some like John Gardner who chaired the education task force...

Strickland: This was 1964? Who was the Assistant Secretary?

Kissick: Beaufeuillet Jones. [sic - "Boisfeuillet" Jones, who was the father of the Washington Post publisher and CEO with the same name. He had been a Lasker crony since the Eisenhower administration, see Rettig p. 27: "Hill selected the members of the outside review committee with some assistance from Mary Lasker. The chairman was Boisfeullet [sic] Jones, then vice president for medical affairs at Emory University, and relatively unknown to Hill. The other members, however, included a number of stalwarts among the citizen witnesses for medical research..." [This committee reported in May 1960.]

Strickland: He never actually held the title.

Kissick: No, he had the title of Special assistant to the Secretary for Health and Medical Affairs. Beaufeuillet [sic] was the De Facto Assistant Secretary and his office consisted of three people: Bo, Bill Stewart, and myself. The White House task force on health had eight members and George James chaired it.

Strickland: He was the health official of New York?

Kissick: Yes, he, Bill Steward [sic] and I. Funny compared with Hillary's cast of 500. So there were eight members of the task force and three of us on the staff. And the link between the task force and the Commission was through Bo's office because Bo had been a member of the last two task forces.

Strickland: A close friend of Florence Mahoney.

Kissick: Yes, on good terms with Mary Lasker, very good terms with Senator Hill and a comfortable associate of Mike DeBakey and all of the key Lasker people. And Bo stayed as the de facto assistant secretary through the work of the commission, through the elevation and he was there when we presented the report to Johnson. Then he left to take a foundation presidency.

Bill Stewart was really the lynch pin.

Strickland: At that point, was he also the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service?

Kissick: No, he was Surgeon General in October of '65, after the legislation had passed, Bill and Karl Yordie were together in the Heart Institute and they had been trying to implement the Regional Medical Programs and Bill was in the process of being recruited out to the Heart Institute when he was made assistant deputy. At that point I was in Phil Lee's office. Phil was one of the key players because as the new official assistant secretary he designed the commission...

Kissick interview by Strickland / NLM

Boisfeuillet Jones was a correspondent of Florence Mahoney from 1961-1984.

Florence Mahoney papers collection / NIH

Interview with Dr. Stanley W Olson, Director of the Division of Regional Medical Programs 1968-70, by John Parascandola (presently a PHS historian): "...What can you tell us about how and why RMPs got started?"

Olson: I guess the chief source of information that I had prior to becoming involved myself was in my capacity as Dean of Baylor University College of Medicine, of which Michael DeBakey was professor of surgery. As you probably know, Dr. DeBakey was the chairman of the commission that developed the report on heart disease, cancer, and stroke.

But even prior to that time, there is some background information that might be useful. The New Yorker magazine had an interesting article called "The Noble Conspiracy." It described how Senator Lister Hill, who had oversight of both the authorization and the appropriations committee for the Senate, and Congressman John Fogerty had similar responsibility in the House, how those two worked with Dr. Jim Shannon, who was Director of NIH [National Institutes of Health], Mike DeBakey in heart disease, Sidney Farber from the Boston Children's Hospital, in cancer, Mike Gorman, who was with the Mental Health Association, and, very notably, Mary Lasker, who was very much interested in health generally. They frequently got together to talk about both legislation and appropriations, and it was often said that the budget of NIH was set by that group rather than the Congress.

Olson interview by Parascandola / NLM

Interview with Dr. Paul Sanazaro by Diane Rehm (Rehm is presently a talk show host with NPR station WAMU in Washington DC): "Talk a little about what the RMPs were. What was the thinking behind them? How did they come into being?"

Sanazaro: That's a tangled tale. It goes back to the late fifties. Mary Lasker at that time was a strong advocate of clinical research. She had a great deal to do with the funding of the National Institutes of Health. Late in the fifties, she became particularly focused on heart disease and cancer as very important conditions. She happened to be a close friend of the Kennedys, and she suggested to President Kennedy at that time that he look into this, but he was occupied by things like the Bay of Pigs and so forth, and nothing much came of that.

But after Kennedy's assassination, President Johnson was also interested in these issues, and he took up this theme and appointed Michael DeBakey, who is also from Texas and Houston, as chairman of this [President's] Commission on Heart Disease, Cancer, and Stroke (now), because the senior Kennedy had had a stroke. That commission completed its work in a very short time, less than a year,...

Sanazaro interview by Diane Rehm / NLM

In 1970, five of the nine original chronic disease programs were phased out: cancer, diabetes and arthritis, chronic respiratory disease, heart disease and stroke, neurological and sensory disease. This left only the RMPs, the kidney disease program, and the National Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health. However, these were peak years of funding for the program.

Chronology of RMPs / NLM

National Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health Cancer Control Project Grants Active As of October 1, 1967:

NCSH Grants, 1967 / tobacco document

The Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act of 1969

In 1970, the Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act of 1969 amended the 1965 law. The reports, "The Health Consequences of Smoking, A Report of the Surgeon General" of 1971 through 1980 followed.

Criticism by Rep. David E. Satterfield, from Rep. Harley Staggers Report from committee of the Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act of 1969: "There is criticism that the Surgeon General and others have concentrated upon the single hypothesis that cigarette smoking is the cause of lung cancer, coronary heart disease, emphysema and other diseases whereas there are other hypotheses, compatible with existing data, which, it is felt, should receive equal consideration.

"For example, there is the constitutional hypothesis based upon heredity, genetics, and emotional makeup of the individual. Some suspect that there may be a connection between these features and susceptibility to certain diseases; that an individual, for example, might inherit weaknesses in certain organs that makes them susceptible to a given disease. This hypothesis is receiving particular attention today in connection with studies relating to coronary heart disease being conducted with identical twins by Dr. R___ Cederlof and others.

"A second hypothesis holds that cancer may be caused by a virus. A third related hypothesis deals with the suspicion that cancer may be caused by an antecedent virus, and still another that emphysema may be caused by polluted air. There are many other such hypotheses. Each of these hypotheses is the subject of active research today. Certainly they deserve the same attention generated by the Surgeon General's acceptance of the cigarette hypothesis and ought not to be summarily discarded.

"Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act of 1969; Report Together With Additional and Minority Views (To Accompany HR 6543)." Rep. Harley Staggers, House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce / tobacco document Dead link http://www.tobaccodocuments.org/ctr/894.html

Congressional Record, Jun 17 1969, House. 66pp / tobacco document
Congressional Record, Jun 18, 1969, House. 27pp / tobacco document
Sen. Magnuson report, Nov 1969, 66pp / tobacco document
Sen. Magnuson report, undated. 29pp / tobacco document

The Surgeon General Reports 1971-1981

SG Jesse Steinfeld (Dec. 18, 1969 to Jan. 20, 1973)

"The Health Consequences of Smoking A Report of the Surgeon General: 1971" 233pp / tobacco document
Press conference of SG Steinfeld and NCSH Director Daniel Horn, Jan 10, 1972 / tobacco document
Remarks by SG Steinfeld at the National Interagency Council on Smoking and Health re 1972 SG Report / tobacco document
"The Health Consequences of Smoking," 1973. Pt 2/3, 102pp. / tobacco document

(No Surgeon General)

"The Health Consequences of Smoking," 1974. Pt 2/2, 57pp. / tobacco document
"The Health Consequences of Smoking," 1975. 247pp / tobacco document
Cross Reference to 1975 SG Report / tobacco document

The Clearinghouse moves to the new Bureau of Health Education

The National Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health was moved to the new Bureau of Health Education in the Centers for Disease Control in 1976. The Bureau was "created as an offshoot... of the President's Committee on Health Education" [in the Nixon administration, which was chaired by R. Heath Larry, with Victor Weingarten in charge of the staff]. At the Bureau, "The second part of the action has been to incorporate and continue as best we can the ongoing activities of the National Clearinghouse on Smoking and Health... The Clearinghouse, in effect, the old Clearinghouse, constitutes two of the three divisions of the new Bureau. One division is still called the National Clearinghouse on Smoking and Health, and it is carrying on the scientific and technical information and also public response services that the Clearinghouse initiated. This group is responsible for the production of the annual report to the Congress on the health consequences of smoking. It is responsible for running the Technical Inforation Center and bibliographic and library services to the world at large, both to professional and to private citizen kinds of audiences. The second piece is called the Community Program Development Division, which indeed is what it was called when it was within the Clearinghouse framework." The Bureau of Health Education allocated about $1.5 to 2 million for the Clearinghouse. (Testimony of Horace Ogden, Director of the Bureau of Health Education. Hearings Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, 94th Congress. Feb. 20, 1976.)

House Committee on Appropriations, Feb. 20, 1976 / tobacco document

Department of Health, Education and Welfare Secretary Joseph Califano crowed about new appropriations for the Office on Smoking and Health: "Much of the authority for the activities of this new Office comes from the landmark legislation, 'The National Consumer Health Information and Health Promotion Act of 1976', which was sponsored by House Health Subcommittee Chairman Paul Rogers." The old National Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health became the nucleus of the new Office, and it got a $23 million boost in funding. (Address by Joseph A. Califano, Secreatary of HEW, Before the National Interagency Council on Smoking and Health, Jan. 11, 1978.)

Califano to Interagency Council on Smoking and Health, 1978 / tobacco document

John Mercer Pinney, Skull & Bones 1965

He was the first director of the Office on Smoking and Health in 1978, supervised the Surgeon General Reports of 1977-81, and continues as Bones controller

"DIRECT EXAMINATION BY MR. DON DAVIS: Q, State your name, please. A. John M. Pinney. Q. Where do you reside? A, Washington, D.C. Q. Would you give us your educational background, please. A. I have a Bachelor's degree in history from Yale University. Q. Following your receipt of your Bachelor's degree, what did you do for a living? A. I served in the U.S. Navy for five years. For six years, excuse me.Q. How many Surgeon General reports did you personally manage? A. I was responsible for the 1977 and '78 report, which was a combined report, the 1979, the 1980 and the 1981 reports. Q. After your discharge from the Navy, what employment did you obtain? A. In 1971 I went to work for the Department of Health, Education and Welfare in Washington as a management analyst. Q. What were your duties and responsibilities as a management analyst? A. I was responsible for analyzing all the health issues that came before the Department at that time, including the implementation of legislation, the reorganization of internal offices and the general policy process within the department. Q. For what period of time were you with the Department? A. For three years. Q. After that where were you employed? A. I was employed by the National Council on Alcoholism in Washington. Q. In what capacity? A. I was the managing director of the Washington office of the National Institute. Q. What were your duties and responsibilities as the director? A. I was overall federal liaison for the National Council. I was responsible for staffing public policy and management issues and I ran several large grants that dealt with public information and public education. Q. Did you study in that capacity the effect that misinformation has on the public's perception of risks involved with using a product? A. Yes, I did. Q. Following your work with the National on Alcoholism, what was your next assignment? A. In 1978 I became the director of the Office on Smoking and Health in the Department of Education and Welfare. Q. What is the Office of Smoking and Health? A. It's the office within the Department that's responsible for coordinating and developing all of the Department's policies and programs on tobacco and health. Q. Who did you answer to in that capacity? A. I reported directly to both the Surgeon General and the Secretary. Q. What is the relationship between the Office of Smoking and Health and the Surgeon General of the United States? A. Other than being a staff office to the Surgeon General, the office is responsible for preparing the annual report to Congress on smoking and health which is called the Surgeon General's report. Q. How many Surgeon General reports did you personally manage? A. I was responsible for the 1977 and '78 report, which was a combined report, the 1979, the 1980 and the 1981 reports. Q. What other duties did you have besides being the executive editor of the Surgeon General reports? A. I was the official spokesperson for the Department on smoking to the media, civic organizations, voluntary groups, and the general public. Q. In that capacity, were you required to learn the strategy of the tobacco industry concerning issues of smoking and health? A. Yes, I was. I was continuously requested by the media and others to comment on statements by the tobacco industry. Q. Were you in receipt of press releases on a weekly basis from the Tobacco Institute? A. Regularly, and depending upon the event, often weekly. Q. Were you in receipt of specific publications that were put out by the Tobacco Institute concerning smoking and health? A. Yes, I was. Q. Let me show you five documents. Will you simply hold those up and identify them to the Court and explain to the Court what they represent. A. This is Smoking and Health, 1964-1979. This is a publication of the Tobacco Institute. Q. What is it called? A. It's called "The Continuing Contoversy" published in 1979, the day before the Surgeon General's report of that year. Q. The day before what? A. The Surgeon General's report of that year was released on January 11. This was published on January 10." (In the Circuit Court of Lafayette County, Mississippi, Ella Mae Howard Horton, and Nathan Randall Horton, Widow and Son of Nathan Henry Horton, Deceased, Individually and on Behalf of All Wrongful Death Beneficiaries and the Estate of the Deceased, Plaintiffs, Against the American Tobacco Company and New Deal Tobacco and Candy Company, Inc., Defendants, No. 12325. Sep. 24, 1990).

John M. Pinney Testimony in Horton, 1990 / tobacco document

Testimony of William H. Foege to the Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research of the U.S. Senate Committee on Human Resources, May 25, 1978, advocating for the National Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Act, S. 3115, aka the Smoking Deterrence Act of 1978. Foege was accompanied by Pinney and Dr. Norman Kretchmer, director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Foege / Smoking Deterence Act of 1978 / tobacco document
Smoking Deterrence Act of 1978 / tobacco document

Pinney and HEW Secretary Califano were both heavy smokers who flopped on their bellies and surrendered to the anti-smoking vermin. This article is classic anti-smoker disinformation, gibbering about "the well-financed opposition of the Tobacco Institute," which consisted of the occasional limp and flaccid whimper that more (unspecificed) research is needed; versus the phony "grass roots" heros of the anti-smoking movement, comprised of rotten little local social-climbers who leaped at the chance curry favor with the powerful Wall Street banksters who headed the American Cancer Society, whose corrupt pseudo-science was funded with public tax dollars, and who had the exclusive, unquestioning, and free services of the media at their beck and call. (Critics Surround Califano in his War Against Tobacco. Greensboro Daily News, Jan. 16, 1979.)

Critics Surround Califano, 1979 / tobacco document

Smoking and Health a report of the Surgeon General The Health Consequences of Smoking. The Behavioral Aspects of Smoking; Education and Prevention. DHEW Publication No (PHS) 79-50066 U.S Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office on Smoking and Health, 1979.

1979 Surgeon General Report / tobacco document

Cigarette Smoking as a Dependence Process. NIDA Research Monograph, Number 23. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, January 1979. Florence Mahoney's crony, Avram Goldstein, was on the seven-member Editorial Advisory Board.

NIDA Monograph 23, 1979 download page / Drugabuse.gov
NIDA Monograph 23, 1979 (203pp) / tobacco document

Memo from Fred Panzer of the Tobacco Instititute to The File, June 4, 1979: "Spoke to Gio Gori on 8:30 Saturday night, June 2. He met with Arthur Upton last Wednesday. Upton wants him to take orders and suggestions from John Pinney. Gori's suggested names for advisory group of smoking & health program are to be cleared with Pinney. Upton feels that he would not be averse to using NCI Smoking & Health funds for educational purposes [sic], approved by Pinney. In effect, Upton would be funding Office of Smoking & Health programs through the back door, if the Appropriations Committee has in fact cut them off the budget."

Panzer File, 1979 / tobacco document

Pinney and DHEW Secretary Joseph Califano Jr. bilked taxpayers of at least $22,750 to send HEW employees to quit-smoking classes at SmokEnders, before a public outcry was raised. SmokEnders was the company the two worms used to quit smoking. Its founder, Jacquelin Rogers, said that she intended to turn it into a multi-million-dollar business. (Taxpayers Condemn HEW "Quit" Plans. The Tobacco Observer, June 1979;4(3).)

Taxpayers Condemn HEW "Quit" Plans, June 1979 / tobacco document

Pinney was the featured star of National Public Radio phony debate on secondhand smoke on WETA's phony "Town Meeting" program, hosted by Rich Firestone, Aug. 23, 1979; along with anti-smoker John Banzhaf, and William.Dwyer of the Tobacco Institute.

NPR "Town Meeting," Aug. 23, 1979 / tobacco document

The Health Consequences of Smoking for Women. A Report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office on Smoking and Health, 1980. Prepared by agencies of the U.S. Department of Health Education and Welfare under the general editorship of the Office on Smoking and Health, John M. Pinney, Director.

Introduction, The Health Consequences of Smoking for Women / National Library of Medicine
The Health Consequences of Smoking for Women (435 pp) / tobacco document

Warning Citizens about the Hazards of Smoking: Where We Are in 1981. By John M. Pinney. In: The Tobacco Industry In Transition. William R. Finger, editor. Lexington Books, D.C. Heath and Co., Lexington Mass. Quoth Pinney: "At the present time, the Public Health Service has this advice to give to the smoker: 1. Switching from high-yield to low-yield cigarettes is a good thing. The Public Health Service's formal position is that, 'the preponderance of scientific evidence continues to suggest that cigarettes with lower 'tar' and nicotine are less hazardous.'" Note that the anti-smokers have sued the tobacco companies for supposedly "lying" to the public that low-yield cigarettes are safer. And this exactly what we have come to expect of the bloodsucking anti-smoker filth, that they blame the tobacco companies for the very things that they are themselves guilty of, in order to loot smokers -with their bloodsucker-controlled media cheering them on all the way!

Pinney, Warning Citizens About the Hazards of Smoking, 1981 / tobacco document

Pinney was a member of the steering Committee of the 1981 National Conference on Smoking or Health, and also a leader of Work Group 10, on "Future Strategies for the Changing Cigarette."

Fred Panzer memo to Alex Spears and Arthur Stevens, June 19, 1981 / tobacco document
Conference Leadership, National Conference on Smoking or Health, 1981 / tobacco document
Work Group 10, National Conference on Smoking or Health, 1981 / tobacco documents

1981 Surgeon General Report, The Changing Cigarette.

Intro, The Changing Cigarette, 1981 / Centers for Disease Control (pdf)

"BURNED UP, HHS' CHIEF SMOKING FOE QUITS. Med World News 22(18):25, 1981. Dr. John M. Pinney suffered in near silence as the budget for the Health and Human Services' Office on Smoking and Health (OSH) was cut from $5 million this year to $2.1 million (by rescision) and to the $1.1 million slated for next year. Then department higher-ups derailed plans for an antismoking ad campaign starring Brooke Shields which cost HHS $68,000 before it was dropped. Pinney believes that the Reagan people are waging an inept fight against the cigarette habit and tobacco interests and the Shields project was the best thing OSH had done to try to reach teenagers. Dr. Joanne Luoto became acting director of OSH upon Pinney's resignation. Due to tight money, no one will be recruited to become permanent chief unless a staffer is fired." (Tobacco Current Awareness Bulletin, Oct. 30, 1981;1(4). Literature Selected and Abstracted by Peters Technology Transfer.)

Tobacco Current Awareness Bulletin, Oct. 30, 1981 / tobacco document

Pinney's friends made a job for him: "Until now, most of the efforts being made to change the nation's smoking habits have been undertaken by federal, state and local governments. But recently, Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government has received a sizeable grant to establish an Institute for the Study of Smoking Behavior and Policy. The $658,000 grant was awarded by the Carnegie Corp., a New York-based foundation whose president, David A. Hamburg, has long maintained a strong interest in reducing tobacco use. The new institute will be directed by Thomas C. Schelling, an economist at Harvard... John M. Pinney, who served as a special assistant to former Health, Education and Welfare Secretary Joseph A. Califano and as director of the department's Office on Smoking and Health during the Carter Administration, will serve as executive director of the new institute..." (A Study That's Up in Smoke. By John K. Iglehart. National Journal 1984 June 9, p. 1141.)

National Journal, 1984 / tobacco document

Pinney was funded to produce a book on smoking, asbestos for the Consumer Union Insurance Company. The book was intended to be used in litigation by insurance companies against the tobacco industry. It was published but never put on sale. (Deposition of Richard A. Bordow, M.D. Elayne D. Galbraith V. R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. Oct. 3, 1985.)

Bordow Deposition, Oct. 3, 1985 / tobacco document

Bordow also said he believed that the 1981 Surgeon General report on non-neoplastic lung disease must have been written by a "contract writer" who lacked a background in the field, "because much of the terminology wasn't even appropriate to lung diseases."

Bordow Deposition, pp. 66-68 / tobacco document

Institute for the Study of Smoking Behavior and Policy, Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government

"INSTITUTE STAFF - Thomas C. Schelling, Director, is Lucius N. Littauer Professor of Political Economy. John M. Pinney, Executive Director, is former director of the Office on Smoking and Health in the Public Health Service. Jan L. Hitchcock, Associate Director, is a psychologist studying the natural history of smoking. Nancy A. Rigotti, M,D., Associate Director, is an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School and an internist at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is examining smoking intervention in health care settings. Michael A. Stoto, Associate Director, is associate professor of public policy conducting demographic research on. smoking. Laura J. Flinchbaugh, Research Assistant, supports the work of the Natural History and Intervention projects. Andrea M. Berman, Research Assistant, manages the research database and the Institute library. Helen Chayefsky, Administrative Assistant, is responsible for the administrative management of the Institute. ADVISORY BOARD Graham T. Allison, Dean, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. John Bunker, M.D. Professor of Anesthesia Stanford Medical Center. Joseph A. Califano Partner Dewey, Ballantine, Bushby, Palmer & Wood. Beatrlx A. Hamburg, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics Mr. Sinai School of Medicine. Howard Hiatt, M.D. Professor of Medicine Harvard Medical School. Newton N. Minow, Partner Sidley and Austin. James L. Moorefield, President Health Insurance Association of America. Frederick Mosteller, Roger I. Lee Professor, School of Public Health Harvard University. Joseph P. Newhouse, Head, Economics Department, The Rand Corporation. Julius B. Richmond, M.D., Director, Division of Health Policy Research and Education Harvard University. Arthur C. Upton, M.D., Chairman, Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University Medical Center. RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE - David M. Burns, M.D. Associate Professor of Medicine, University of California San Diego School of Medicine. Ellen R. Gritz, Director, Division of Cancer Control, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California Los Angeles. Jeffrey E. Harris, M.D., Associate Professor Department of Econonics Massachusetts Institute of Technology. C. Anderson Johnson, Director, Health Behavior Research Institute, University of'Southern California. Edward Lichtenstein, Professor, Department of Psychology University of Oregon. Mark H. Moore, Daniel and Florence Guggcnhcim Professor, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. Judith K. Ockene, Director, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School. Terry Pechacek, Associate Professor, Division of Epidemiology, University of Minnesota. Michael Pertschuk, Co-Director, The Advocacy Institute. Saul Shiffman, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh. Kenneth E. Warner, Chairman, Departmcnt of Health Planning and Administration, School of Public Health, University of Michigan. Institute for the Study of Smoking Behavior and Policy John F. Kennedy School of Govcrnmcnt Harvard University 79 John F. Kennedy Street Cambridgc, MA 02138." Former Surgeon General Richmond submitted the proposal for the Institute. Beatrix Hamburg's husband, David A. Hamburg, president of the Carnegie Corporation, gave them a $658,000 grant. (A Study That's Up in Smoke. By John K. Iglehart. National Journal 1984 June 9, p. 1141.)

Staff, Institute for the Study of Smoking Behavior and Policy / tobacco document
National Journal, 1984 / tobacco document

Smoking Behavior and Policy Conference Series The Cigarette Excise Tax. Institute for the Study of Smoking Behavior and Policy, Harvard University John E Kennedy School of Government, April 17, 1985. The Cabot Family Charitable Trust gave the Institute $25,000 in 1984. (Memo from Carol Hrycaj of the Tobacco Institute, Jan. 14, 1988.) The Cabot Family Charitable Trust supported the overall series, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation funded the initial conference. Karl Kronebusch, the front man of the fraudulent 1985 OTA report on supposed smoking costs, attended. Pinney was also a member of the Study Staff of the 1985 OTA report.

The Cigarette Excise Tax, 1985 (63pp) / tobacco document
Hrycaj Memo, Jan. 14, 1988 / tobacco document

Smoking Behavior and Policy Conference Series. The Pharmacologic Treatment of Tobacco Dependence. Proceedings of the World Congress November 4-5, 1985. Institute for the Study of Smoking Behavior and Policy Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government. "This volume contains papers and discussions presented at the World Congress on the Pharmacologic Treatment of Tobacco Dependence, held in New York City, November 4-5, 1985. The World Congress brought together researchers and scientists from all over the world to review the latest findings relating to pharmacologic measures for smoking cessation. The Institute for the Study of Smoking Behavior and Policy jointly sponsored the event with Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals Inc., and Aktiebolaget Leo, respectively the distributor and manufacturer of Nicorette chewing gum. Ted Klein and Company of New York coordinated the World Congress. These proceedings, produced by the Institute for the Study of Smoking Behavior and Policy, would have been impossible without the support and assistance of Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals. Likewise, the work of the Institute, which housed this publication project, is made possible through grants from the Carnegie Corporation, the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the Cabot Family Charitable Trust, the Conrad Hilton and Alfred P. Sloan Foundations and the National Cancer Institute."

The Pharmacologic Treatment of Tobacco Dependence, 1986 / tobacco document

Smoking Behavior and Policy Discussion Paper Series. Adolescent Smoking: Research and Health Policy. By Pinney and several others. Institute for the Study of Smoking Behavior and Policy, Harvard University John E Kennedy School of Government, September 1986.

Smoking Behavior and Policy Discussion Paper Series, 1986 / tobacco document

"This year, the surgeon general is expected to produce a report on the harmful effects of secondhand smoke, Pinney said. However, that the report is in danger of being downplayed or even buried 'by a pro-business (Reagan) administration,' he said. 'Secondhand smoke is harmful. There are 4,000 or 5,000 chemicals in the smoke itself,' Pinney said. 'Several thousand chemicals are cancer causing - arsenic, cyanide, carbon monoxide.' Pinney said employers are obligated to regulate smoking in the work place by 'every piece of common law' that calls for a safe work place. 'Most ventilation systems can't remove the (harmful) particulates (of cigarette and cigar smoke) from the work space,' he said." (Seminar Tackles Smoking At Work. By Joanna Zikos. Worcester, Mass. Evening Gazette, Feb. 5, 1986.) THE ANTI-SMOKERS SEIZED UPON THE PRETENSE THAT SECONDHAND SMOKE IS DANGEROUS, AS A CYNICAL PRETEXT TO BAN SMOKING. They controlled the research money, and it went to their obliging whores to manufacture phony evidence to serve them. And, for six decades, the bloodsucking Lasker Lobby has been systematically brainwashing the public to be ignorant, hysterical, fanatical morons, obsessing about chemicals and particulates while ignoring and denying the role of infection, and rabidly attacking anyone who dares to disagree - of which this baboon with a Yale history degree and Skull & Bones connections to ensure his employment is a perfect example.

Evening Gazette, Feb. 5, 1986 / tobacco document

The Health Consequences of Using Smokeless Tobacco. A report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General. NIH Publication No. 862874, April 1986.

The Health Consequences of Using Smokeless Tobacco, 1986 / National Library of Medicine (pdf)
The Health Consequences of Using Smokeless Tobacco, 1986 (225 pp) / tobacco document

The Smoking Tobacco and Cancer Program of the National Cancer Institute, which included the "Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation" (COMIT): One of the objectives of the Attorney Antitobacco Development Program: was "To stimulate the professional involvement of attorneys in the application of such scientific information to antitobacco activities, including advocacy, policy development, litigation, legislation, and legal interpretation." (Program Presentation to the Board of Scientific Counselors Division of Prevention and Control National Cancer Institute September 22, 1987.) SEE HOW THE U.S. GOVERNMENT INCITES AND NURTURES ANTI-SMOKERS - AND HAS NEVER PROTECTED SMOKERS' LEGITIMATE RIGHTS! "Democracy and the rule of law" are nothing but a lie here!

NCI Smoking Tobacco and Cancer Program, 1987 / tobacco document

Pinney was involved in the "Nicotine Addiction" defamation (Health Consequences of Smoking, Nicotine Addiction, A Report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, Center for Health Promotion and Education, Office on Smoking and Health, May 1988.

Nicotine Addiction, 1988 (617pp) / tobacco document

Pinney was involved in the 1989 Surgeon General report, Reducing the Health Consequences of Smoking. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health.

Intro, Reducing the Health Consequences of Smoking, 1989 / Centers for Disease Control (pdf)
Reducing the Health Consequences of Smoking, 1989 / tobacco document

Final Report. Tobacco Use in America Conference, January 27-28, 1989. McConnell Blakeman, Editor; Alan L. Engleberg, M.D., M.P.H., Scientific Editor. Initiated by Congressman Michael A. Andrews of Texas and funded by the American Medical Association. Charles A. LeMaistre, the president of M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and director of that famous campaign contributor, Enron Corporation, was prominently involved. Rep. Richard Durbin's legislative assistant Susan A .Lightfoot and Pinney were co-authors of "Protecting Nonsmokers."

"Protecting Nonsmokers," Tobacco Use in America, 1989 / tobacco document

The Surgeon Generals Report on the Health Benefits of Smoking Cessation, 1990.

The Health Benefits of Smoking Cessation, 1990 (623 pp) / tobacco document

Pinney's consultant firm, Corporate Health Policies Group, March 1990.

Pinney bio, CPHG 1991 / tobacco document

Smoking and Health in the Amencas. A 1992 Report of the Surgeon General, in collaboration with the Pan American Health Organization. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. March 12, 1992.

Smoking and Health in the Americas, 1992 (213 pp)/ tobacco document

Preventing Tobacco Use Among Young People. A Report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 1994.

Preventing Tobacco Use Among Young People, 1994 / National Library of Medicine (pdf, 22pp)
Preventing Tobacco Use Among Young People, 1994 (322 pp) / tobacco document

Pinney has been a trustee of the Center for the Advancement of Health since at least 1996, when The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation gave them $36,750 in 1996 to whine that employers didn't reimburse quit-smoking programs. His old crony Thomas C. Schelling, and John R. Seffrin of the American Cancer Society are also trustees (2005). Besides health establishment figures, members of the Working Group on Tobacco Dependence Treatment Policy included Susan Blair of Pacific Bell, Beth Hadley of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, and Sonia Muchnick-Baku of the Washington Business Group on Health. RWJF gave Pinney Associates $64,478 in 1996, and $35,500 for 1996-98, to propagandize on behalf of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) Smoking Cessation Clinical Practice Guideline.

Board and Staff Bios / Center for the Advancement of Health
Grants, 1996 / Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Smoking Cessation Guideline Grants / Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Monograph 7, Smoking and Tobacco Control. The FTC Cigarette Test Method for Determining Tar, Nicotine, and Carbon Monoxide Yields of U.S. Cigarettes Report of the NCI Expert Committee U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service National Institutes of Health, 1996. "Special recognition is due John M. Pinney and Joseph G. Gitchell, Pinney Associates, Bethesda, MD, for their help with overall conference organization and planning. Mr. Pinney also served as facilitator for all consensus deliberations by the expert panel." [Facilitator, meaning Skull & Bones controller!]

Monograph 7, Smoking and Tobacco Control, 1996 / tobacco document

"Center To Study Health Plans' Support for Healthier Behaviors." Center for the Advancement of Health news release, Jan 19, 1998. "Supported by a $391,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Center's project is guided by a steering committee led by J. Michael McGinnis, MD, Scholar in Residence at the National Academy of Sciences, and John Pinney of Pinney Associates, a Washington, DC, health studies and policy firm." (dead link http://www.cfah.org/website2/Newsrelease/980119.htm.)

Pinney was also involved in Monograph 13: Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Tar Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Oct. 2001.

Monograph 13 / Cancercontrol.gov (pdf)

Pinney founded Pinney Associates in 1990. Anti-smoking warhorse Jack E. Henningfield is a vice president, and principals Saul Shiffman and Mitchell Zeller are also anti-smokers.

John M. Pinney bio / Pinney Associates

SG Julius Richmond (July 13, 1977 to Jan. 20, 1981)

"Smoking and Health, a report of the Surgeon General," 1979, 1236pp / tobacco document
"The Health Consequences of Smoking for Women," 1980. 442pp / tobacco document
The Julius Richmond Page

In 1986, "The Office of Air and Radiation of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Office on Smoking and Health of the Department of Health and Human Services asked the National Research Council to evaluate methods for assessing exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and to review the literature on the health consequences from such exposures. The National Research Council responded to this request by appointing 11 scientists to serve on the Committee on Passive Smoking, in the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, under the Commission on Life Sciences." It was funded by the EPA and the Department of Health and Human Services. (Environmental Tobacco Smoke: Measuring Exposures and Assessing Health Effects. National Academy Press, 1986).

Environmental Tobacco Smoke, 1986 / tobacco document

The National Council for Clean Indoor Air lobbied for the EPA to proclaim that passive smoking kills non-smokers. "John C. Topping, Jr., an attorney and former staff director of EPA's Office of Air and Radiation, was instrumental in creating the council, and served as the group's general counsel, according to Bond." (Public Policy Group Formed on Indoor Air to Push for More Research on Radon, Smoking. Environment Reporter, Bureau of National Affairs, Aug. 22, 1986.)

In 1988, the Office on Smoking and Health was placed in the Center for Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in the Centers for Disease Control, with Jeffrey P. Koplan as the head of this agency.

SG C. Everett Koop (Nov. 16, 1981 to Oct. 1, 1989)

C. Everett Koop Was A Pawn

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cast 05-02-14